Search results for 'conflicts' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew Reisner (forthcoming). Normative Conflicts and the Structure of Normativity. In Iwao Hirose & Andrew Reisner (eds.), Weighing and Reasoning: A Festschrift for John Broome.score: 24.0
    This paper considers the relation between the sources of normativity, reasons, and normative conflicts. It argues that common views about how normative reasons relate to their sources have important consequences for how we can understand putative normative conflicts.
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  2. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (2011). Climate Change, Nuclear Economics, and Conflicts of Interest. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (1):75-107.score: 24.0
    Merck suppressed data on harmful effects of its drug Vioxx, and Guidant suppressed data on electrical flaws in one of its heart-defibrillator models. Both cases reveal how financial conflicts of interest can skew biomedical research. Such conflicts also occur in electric-utility-related research. Attempting to show that increased atomic energy can help address climate change, some industry advocates claim nuclear power is an inexpensive way to generate low-carbon electricity. Surveying 30 recent nuclear analyses, this paper shows that industry-funded studies (...)
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  3. Giovanni Sartor (1992). Normative Conflicts in Legal Reasoning. Artificial Intelligence and Law 1 (2-3):209-235.score: 24.0
    This article proposes a formal analysis of a fundamental aspect of legal reasoning: dealing with normative conflicts. Firstly, examples are illustrated concerning the dynamics of legal systems, the application of rules and exceptions, and the semantic indeterminacy of legal sources. Then two approaches to cope with conflicting information are presented: the preferred theories of Brewka, and the belief change functions of Alchourrón, Gärdenfors, and Makinson. The relations between those approaches are closely examined, and some aspects of a model of (...)
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  4. Barteld Kooi & Allard Tamminga (2008). Moral Conflicts Between Groups of Agents. Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (1):1-21.score: 24.0
    Two groups of agents, G1 and G2, face a *moral conflict* if G1 has a moral obligation and G2 has a moral obligation, such that these obligations cannot both be fulfilled. We study moral conflicts using a multi-agent deontic logic devised to represent reasoning about sentences like "In the interest of group F of agents, group G of agents ought to see to it that phi". We provide a formal language and a consequentialist semantics. An illustration of our semantics (...)
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  5. Massimo Durante (2013). Dealing with Legal Conflicts in the Information Society. An Informational Understanding of Balancing Competing Interests. Philosophy and Technology 26 (4):437-457.score: 24.0
    The present paper aims at addressing a crucial legal conflict in the information society: i.e., the conflict between security and civil rights, which calls for a “fine and ethical balance”. Our purpose is to understand, from the legal theory viewpoint, how a fine ethical balance can be conceived and what the conditions for this balance to be possible are. This requires us to enter in a four-stage examination, by asking: (1) What types of conflict may be dealt with by means (...)
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  6. Claudia Welz (2010). Identity as Self-Transformation: Emotional Conflicts and Their Metamorphosis in Memory. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):267-285.score: 24.0
    This paper develops the thesis that personal identity is neither to be taken in terms of an unchanging self-sufficient ‘substance’ nor in terms of selfhood ‘without substance,’ i.e. as fluctuating processes of pure relationality and subject-less activity. Instead, identity is taken as self-transformation that is bound to particular embodied individuals and surpasses them as individuated entities. The paper is structured in three parts. Part I describes the experiential givenness of conflicts that support our sense of self-transformation. While the first (...)
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  7. Mathieu Beirlaen, Christian Straßer & Joke Meheus (2013). An Inconsistency-Adaptive Deontic Logic for Normative Conflicts. Journal of Philosophical Logic 42 (2):285-315.score: 24.0
    We present the inconsistency-adaptive deontic logic DP r , a nonmonotonic logic for dealing with conflicts between normative statements. On the one hand, this logic does not lead to explosion in view of normative conflicts such as O A ∧ O ∼A, O A ∧ P ∼A or even O A ∧ ∼O A. On the other hand, DP r still verifies all intuitively reliable inferences valid in Standard Deontic Logic (SDL). DP r interprets a given premise set (...)
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  8. Delon Human (2002). Conflicts of Interest in Science and Medicine: The Physician's Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):273-276.score: 24.0
    The various statements and declarations of the World Medical Association that address conflicts of interest on the part of physicians as (1) researchers, and (2) practitioners, are examined, with particular reference to the October 2000 revision of the Declaration of Helsinki. Recent contributions to the literature, notably on conflicts of interest in medical research, are noted. Finally, key provisions of the American Medical Association’s Code of Medical Ethics (2000–2001 Edition) that address the various forms of conflict of interest (...)
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  9. Jason Borenstein & Yvette E. Pearson (2008). Taking Conflicts of Interest Seriously Without Overdoing It: Promises and Perils of Academic-Industry Partnerships. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):229-243.score: 24.0
    Academic-industry collaborations and the conflicts of interest (COI) arising out of them are not new. However, as industry funding for research in the life and health sciences has increased and scandals involving financial COI are brought to the public’s attention, demands for disclosure have grown. In a March 2008 American Council on Science and Health report by Ronald Bailey, he argues that the focus on COI—especially financial COI—is obsessive and likely to be more detrimental to scientific progress and public (...)
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  10. Andrew J. Felo (2001). Ethics Programs, Board Involvement, and Potential Conflicts of Interest in Corporate Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):205 - 218.score: 24.0
    Board composition, insider participation on compensation committees, and director compensation practices can potentially cause conflicts of interest between directors and shareholders. If these corporate governance structures result in situations where actions beneficial to directors do not also benefit shareholders, then shareholders may suffer.Corporate ethics programs usually address conflicts of interest that may arise in the firm''s activities. Some boards of directors take active roles in their firms'' ethics programs by actively overseeing the programs. This paper empirically examines the (...)
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  11. Julie Bolette Bindslev, Jeppe Schroll, Peter Gøtzsche & Andreas Lundh (2013). Underreporting of Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Practice Guidelines: Cross Sectional Study. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):19.score: 24.0
    Conflicts of interest affect recommendations in clinical guidelines and disclosure of such conflicts is important. However, not all conflicts of interest are disclosed. Using a public available disclosure list we determined the prevalence and underreporting of conflicts of interest among authors of clinical guidelines on drug treatments.
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  12. Anne Ingeborg Myhr & Terje Traavik (2003). Genetically Modified (GM) Crops: Precautionary Science and Conflicts of Interests. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (3):227-247.score: 24.0
    Risk governance of GM plants and GMfood products is presently subject to heatedscientific and public controversies. Scientistsand representatives of the biotechnologyindustry have dominated debates concerningsafety issues. The public is suspicious withregard to the motives of scientists, companies,and political institutions involved. Thedilemmas posed are nested, embracing valuequestions, scientific uncertainty, andcontextual issues. The obvious lack of data andinsufficient information concerning ecologicaleffects call for application of thePrecautionary Principle (PP). There are,however, divergent opinions among scientistsabout the relevance of putative hazards,definition of potential ``adverse effects,'' (...)
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  13. Christopher Mayes (2012). On the Importance of the Institution and Social Self in a Sociology of Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry (Browse Results) 9 (2):217-218.score: 24.0
    On the Importance of the Institution and Social Self in a Sociology of Conflicts of Interest Content Type Journal Article Category Case Studies Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11673-012-9355-1 Authors Christopher Mayes, Rock Ethics Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 201 Willard Building, University Park, PA 16802-1601, USA Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529.
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  14. Katherine McComas (2012). Researcher Views About Funding Sources and Conflicts of Interest in Nanotechnology. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (4):699-717.score: 24.0
    Dependence in nanotechnology on external funding and academic-industry relationships has led to questions concerning its influence on research directions, as well as the potential for conflicts of interest to arise and impact scientific integrity and public trust. This study uses a survey of 193 nanotechnology industry and academic researchers to explore whether they share similar concerns. Although these concerns are not unique to nanotechnology, its emerging nature and the prominence of industry funding lend credence to understanding its researchers’ views, (...)
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  15. Fengkui Ju & Fenrong Liu (2011). Prioritized Imperatives and Normative Conflicts. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 7 (2):35-58.score: 24.0
    Imperatives occur ubiquitously in natural languages. They produce forces which change the addressee’s cognitive state and regulate her actions accordingly. In real life we often receive conflicting orders, typically, issued by various authorities with different ranks. A new update semantics is proposed in this paper to formalize this idea. The general properties of this semantics, as well as its background ideas are discussed extensively. In addition, we compare our framework with other approaches of deontic logics in the context of normative (...)
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  16. Wendy A. Rogers & Jane Johnson (2013). Addressing Within-Role Conflicts of Interest in Surgery. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):219-225.score: 24.0
    In this paper we argue that surgeons face a particular kind of within-role conflict of interests, related to innovation. Within-role conflicts occur when the conflicting interests are both legitimate goals of professional activity. Innovation is an integral part of surgical practice but can create within-role conflicts of interest when innovation compromises patient care in various ways, such as by extending indications for innovative procedures or by failures of informed consent. The standard remedies for conflicts of interest are (...)
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  17. Judge Christian Byk (2002). Conflicts of Interests and Access to Information Resulting From Biomedical Research: An International Legal Perspective. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):287-290.score: 24.0
    Recently adopted international texts have given a new focus on conflicts of interests and access to information resulting from biomedical research. They confirmed ethical review committees as a central point to guarantee individual rights and the effective application of ethical principles. Therefore specific attention should be paid in giving such committees all the facilities necessary to keep them independent and qualified.
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  18. Andrea Frolic & Paula Chidwick (2010). A Pilot Qualitative Study of “Conflicts of Interests and/or Conflicting Interests” Among Canadian Bioethicists. Part 2: Defining and Managing Conflicts. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):19-29.score: 24.0
    This paper examines one aspect of professional practice for bioethicists: managing conflicts of interest. Drawing from our qualitative study and descriptive analysis of the experiences of conflicts of interest and/or conflicting interests (COI) of 13 Canadian clinical bioethicists (Frolic and Chidwick 2010), this paper examines how bioethicists define their roles, the nature of COIs in their roles, how their COIs relate to conventional definitions of conflicts of interest, and how COIs can be most effectively managed.
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  19. Cynthia E. Clark & Harry J. Van Buren (2013). Compound Conflicts of Interest in the US Proxy System. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):355-371.score: 24.0
    The current proxy voting system in the United States has become the subject of considerable controversy. Because institutional investment managers have the authority to vote their clients’ proxies, they have a fiduciary obligation to those clients. Frequently, in an attempt to fulfill that obligation, these institutional investors employ proxy advisory services to manage the thousands of votes they must cast. However, many proxy advisory services have conflicts of interest that inhibit their utility to those seeking to discharge their fiduciary (...)
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  20. Sally Gunz & Sandra van der Laan (2011). Actuaries, Conflicts of Interest and Professional Independence: The Case of James Hardie Industries Limited. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):583-596.score: 24.0
    Drawing on calls by researchers to examine corporate scandals involving potential conflicts of interest or compromise to professional independence involving the actuarial profession, this article outlines one such case. The consulting actuaries – to a large Australian listed company, James Hardie Industries Limited – found themselves advising two parties in a corporate restructuring where the interests of each were sometimes competing and the interests of the public appeared to be ignored. The James Hardie case is instructive in a number (...)
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  21. Jordan J. Cohen (2002). Managing Financial Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Research. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):401-406.score: 24.0
    Upholding public trust in clinical research necessitates that human subjects be protected from avoidable harm and that the design, interpretation and reporting of research results be shielded from avoidable bias. On both counts, managing financial conflicts of interest is critically important, especially in the modern era when the opportunities for investigators to benefit personally from the commercialization of their intellectual property are overtly encouraged and rapidly expanding. Efforts are underway in the United States to provide more useful guidance to (...)
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  22. Jane Johnson & Wendy Rogers (2014). Joint Issues – Conflicts of Interest, the ASR Hip and Suggestions for Managing Surgical Conflicts of Interest. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):63.score: 24.0
    Financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest in medicine and surgery are troubling because they have the capacity to skew decision making in ways that might be detrimental to patient care and well-being. The recent case of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip provides a vivid illustration of the harmful effects of conflicts of interest in surgery.
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  23. Jensen T. Mecca, Carter Gibson, Vincent Giorgini, Kelsey E. Medeiros, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly (forthcoming). Researcher Perspectives on Conflicts of Interest: A Qualitative Analysis of Views From Academia. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-13.score: 24.0
    The increasing interconnectedness of academic research and external industry has left research vulnerable to conflicts of interest. These conflicts have the potential to undermine the integrity of scientific research as well as to threaten public trust in scientific findings. The present effort sought to identify themes in the perspectives of faculty researchers regarding conflicts of interest. Think-aloud interview responses were qualitatively analyzed in an effort to provide insights with regard to appropriate ways to address the threat of (...)
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  24. Carlos J. Sanchez-Runde, Luciara Nardon & Richard M. Steers (2013). The Cultural Roots of Ethical Conflicts in Global Business. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):689-701.score: 24.0
    This study examines the cultural roots of ethical conflicts in the global business environment. It begins with a brief look at worldviews on ethical behavior in general. Based on this, it is argued that an in-depth understanding of ethical conflicts has been hampered by an overreliance on Western models and viewpoints. Three common sources, or bases, of ethical conflicts are discussed as they relate to business practices, including conflicts over tastes and preferences, the relative importance of (...)
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  25. H. G. Callaway (1997). Values and Conflicts of Values in the Pragmatist Tradition. In Natale And Fenton (ed.), Business Education and Training: A Value-Laden Process. Volume I: Education and Value Conflict.score: 21.0
    This paper proceeds from an analysis (Callaway 1992, pp. 239-240) of a role of conflict in the origin of value commitments, a pervasive sociological pattern in the development of unifying group values which transforms personal conflicts, or differences, into large-scale collective conflicts. I have urged that these forces are capable of distorting even the cognitive processes of science and that they are a chief reason why value claims are regarded as incapable of objective evaluation. The thesis of the (...)
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  26. Rebecca Dresser (2006). Private-Sector Research Ethics: Marketing or Good Conflicts Management? The 2005 John J. Conley Lecture on Medical Ethics. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (2):115-139.score: 21.0
    Pharmaceutical companies are major sponsors of biomedical research. Most scholars and policymakers focus their attention on government and academic oversight activities, however. In this article, I consider the role of pharmaceutical companies’ internal ethics statements in guiding decisions about corporate research and development (R&D). I review materials from drug company websites and contributions from the business and medical ethics literature that address ethical responsibilities of businesses in general and pharmaceutical companies in particular. I discuss positive and negative uses of pharmaceutical (...)
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  27. Alfred R. Mele (2004). Outcomes of Internal Conflicts in the Sphere of Akrasia and Self-Control. In Peter Baumann & Monika Betzler (eds.), Practical Conflicts: New Philosophical Essays. Cambridge University Press. 262.score: 21.0
    Practical conflicts include conflicts in agents who judge, from the perspective of their own values, desires, beliefs, and the like, that one prospective course of action is superior to another but are tempted by what they judge to be the inferior course of action. A man who wants a late-night snack, even though he judges it best, from the identified perspective, to abide by his recent New Year's resolution against eating such snacks until he has lost ten pounds, (...)
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  28. Emanuela Ceva (2010). How Should a Theory of Justice Respond to Value Conflicts? Some Meta-Theoretical Reflections. Rivista di Filosofia 101 (1):81-98.score: 21.0
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  29. Clemens Löffler, Thomas Pfeiffer & Georg Schneider (2013). The Irreversibility Effect and Agency Conflicts. Theory and Decision 74 (2):219-239.score: 21.0
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  30. Armen K. Nersesyan (2002). Conflicts of Interest in Science in Armenia. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):291-293.score: 21.0
    The author describes problems facing Armenia in reorganization of the structure of science in the post-socialist era with the aim of utilizing limited state resources more efficiently by reducing the number of separate scientific institutes, concentrating on essential core subjects required by the nation and encouraging all other projects to compete in the international arena for grant sponsorship.
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  31. Marc A. Rodwin (1993). Medicine, Money, and Morals: Physicians' Conflicts of Interest. Oxford University Press.score: 20.0
    Conflicts of interest are rampant in the American medical community. Today it is not uncommon for doctors to refer patients to clinics or labs in which they have a financial interest (40% of physicians in Florida invest in medical centers); for hospitals to offer incentives to physicians who refer patients (a practice that can lead to unnecessary hospitalization); or for drug companies to provide lucrative give-aways to entice doctors to use their "brand name" drugs (which are much more expensive (...)
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  32. Chris MacDonald, Michael McDonald & Wayne Norman (2002). Charitable Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 39 (1-2):67 - 74.score: 20.0
    This paper looks at conflicts of interest in the not-for-profit sector. It examines the nature of conflicts of interest and why they are of ethical concern, and then focuses on the way not-for-profit organisations are especially prone to and vulnerable to conflict-of-interest scandals. Conflicts of interest corrode trust; and stakeholder trust (particularly from donors) is the lifeblood of most charities. We focus on some specific challenges faced by charitable organisations providing funding for scientific (usually medical) research, and (...)
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  33. Samuel M. Natale, Sebastian A. Sora & Matthew Drumheller (2012). The Importance of the University in the 21st Century: Ethical Conflicts and Moral Choices. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (1):1-8.score: 20.0
    The Importance of the University in the 21st Century: Ethical Conflicts and Moral Choices Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-8 DOI 10.1007/s10805-012-9152-9 Authors Samuel M. Natale, Kellogg College, University of Oxford, England, UK Sebastian A. Sora, Adelphi University, Garden City, NY, USA Matthew Drumheller, Grand Canyon University, Phoenix, AZ, USA Journal Journal of Academic Ethics Online ISSN 1572-8544 Print ISSN 1570-1727.
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  34. Donald F. Sacco, Samuel V. Bruton, Alen Hajnal & Chris J. N. Lustgraaf (forthcoming). The Influence of Disclosure and Ethics Education on Perceptions of Financial Conflicts of Interest. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-20.score: 20.0
    This study explored how disclosure of financial conflicts of interest (FCOI) influences naïve or “lay” individuals’ perceptions of the ethicality of researcher conduct. On a between-subjects basis, participants read ten scenarios in which researchers disclosed or failed to disclose relevant financial conflicts of interest. Participants evaluated the extent to which each vignette represented a FCOI, its possible influence on researcher objectivity, and the ethics of the financial relationship. Participants were then asked if they had completed a college-level ethics (...)
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  35. Guido Palazzo & Lena Rethel (2008). Conflicts of Interest in Financial Intermediation. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):193 - 207.score: 20.0
    The last years have seen a surge of scandals in financial intermediation. This article argues that the agency structure inherent to most forms of financial intermediation gives rise to conflicts of interest. Though this does not excuse scandalous behavior it points out market imperfections. There are four types of conflicts of interest: personal-individual, personal-organizational, impersonal-individual, and finally, impersonal-organizational conflicts. Analyzing recent scandals we find that all four types of conflicts of interest prevail in financial intermediation.
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  36. Peter Baumann & Monika Betzler (eds.) (2004). Practical Conflicts: New Philosophical Essays. Cambridge.score: 20.0
    Practical conflicts pervade human life. Agents have many different desires, goals, and commitments, all of which can come into conflict with each other. How can practical reasoning help to resolve these practical conflicts? In this collection of new essays a distinguished roster of philosophers analyze the diverse forms of practical conflict. Their aim is to establish an understanding of the sources of these conflicts, to investigate the challenge they pose to an adequate conception of practical reasoning, and (...)
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  37. Bradley Partridge & Wayne Hall (2014). Conflicts of Interest in Recommendations to Use Computerized Neuropsychological Tests to Manage Concussion in Professional Football Codes. Neuroethics 7 (1):63-74.score: 20.0
    Neuroscience research has improved our understanding of the long term consequences of sports-related concussion, but ethical issues related to the prevention and management of concussion are an underdeveloped area of inquiry. This article exposes several examples of conflicts of interest that have arisen and been tolerated in the management of concussion in sport (particularly professional football codes) regarding the use of computerized neuropsychological (NP) tests for diagnosing concussion. Part 1 outlines how the recommendations of a series of global protocols (...)
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  38. Laurence J. Hirsch (2002). Conflicts of Interest in Drug Development: The Practices of Merck & Co., Inc. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (3):429-442.score: 20.0
    Conflicts of interest are common and exist in academia, government, and many industries, including pharmaceutical development. Medical journal editors and others have recently criticized “the pharmaceutical industry,” citing concerns over investigator access to data, approaches to analysis of clinical trial data, and publication practices. Merck & Co., Inc. is a global, research-driven pharmaceutical company that discovers, develops, manufactures, and markets a broad range of human and animal health products, directly and through its joint ventures. Although part of its mission (...)
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  39. Brad Partridge (2014). Dazed and Confused: Sports Medicine, Conflicts of Interest, and Concussion Management. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (1):65-74.score: 20.0
    Professional sports with high rates of concussion have become increasingly concerned about the long-term effects of multiple head injuries. In this context, return-to-play decisions about concussion generate considerable ethical tensions for sports physicians. Team doctors clearly have an obligation to the welfare of their patient (the injured athlete) but they also have an obligation to their employer (the team), whose primary interest is typically success through winning. At times, a team’s interest in winning may not accord with the welfare of (...)
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  40. Chris Provis (2008). "Guanxi" and Conflicts of Interest. Journal of Business Ethics 79 (1/2):57 - 68.score: 20.0
    "Guanxi" involves interpersonal obligations, which may conflict with other obligations people have that are based on general or abstract moral considerations. In the West, the latter have been widely accepted as the general source of obligations, which is perhaps tied to social changes associated with the rise of capitalism. Recently, Western ethicists have started to reconsider the extent to which personal relationships may form a distinct basis for obligation. In administration and management, salient bases for decision-Making include deontological, consequentialist and (...)
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  41. Ronald M. Davis, Anne Victoria Neale & Joseph C. Monsur (2003). Medical Journals' Conflicts of Interest in the Publication of Book Reviews. Science and Engineering Ethics 9 (4):471-483.score: 20.0
    The purpose of the study was to assess medical journals’ conflicts of interest in the publication of book reviews. We examined book reviews published in 1999, 2000, and 2001 (N=1,876) in five leading medical journals: Annals of Internal Medicine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine. The main outcome measure was journal publication of reviews of books that had been published by the journal’s own publisher, that had been (...)
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  42. Don A. Moore (ed.) (2005). Conflicts of Interest: Challenges and Solutions in Business, Law, Medicine, and Public Policy. Cambridge University Press.score: 20.0
    This collection explores the subject of conflicts of interest. It investigates how to manage conflicts of interest, how they can affect well-meaning professionals, and how they can limit the effectiveness of corporate boards, undermine professional ethics, and corrupt expert opinion. Legal and policy responses are considered, some of which (e.g., disclosure) are shown to backfire and even fail. The results offer a sobering prognosis for professional ethics and for anyone who relies on professionals who have conflicts of (...)
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  43. Marc A. Rodwin (2010). Conflicts of Interest and the Future of Medicine: The United States, France, and Japan. Oxford University Press.score: 20.0
    The heart of the matter -- The evolution of the French medicine -- Coping with physicians' conflicts of interest in France -- The rise of a protected medical market : the United States before 1950 -- The commercial transformation : the United States, 1950-1980 -- The logic of medical markets : the United States, 1980 to the present -- Coping with physicians' conflicts of interest in the United States -- The evolution of Japanese medicine -- Coping with physicians' (...)
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  44. Hidde de Jong, Nicolaas Mars & Paul van der Vet (1999). Computer-Supported Resolution of Measurement Conflicts: A Case-Study in Materials Science. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 4 (4):427-461.score: 20.0
    Resolving conflicts between different measurements ofa property of a physical system may be a key step in a discoveryprocess. With the emergence of large-scale databases and knowledgebases with property measurements, computer support for the task ofconflict resolution has become highly desirable. We will describe amethod for model-based conflict resolution and the accompanyingcomputer tool KIMA, which have been applied in a case-study inmaterials science. In order to be a useful aid to scientists, the toolneeds to be integrated with other tools (...)
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  45. Livia Scheller (2014). Activity Clinic and Affects in Workplace Conflicts: Transformation Through Transferential Activity. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 15 (2):74-92.score: 20.0
    This paper presents some reflections about an approach in work psychology: the Activity Clinic. After a brief introduction to the conceptual background of the “Activity Clinic”, it covers three deeply interconnected themes. The first concerns the meaning attributed to the development of the affects present in the work situation under analysis; the second discusses the reasons for the conflicts that are ultimately due to these affects; the third considers how a method of co-analysis of the activity can lead towards (...)
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  46. Miriam Kos, Theo G. Vosse, Danielle Van Den Brink & Peter Hagoort (2010). About Edible Restaurants: Conflicts Between Syntax and Semantics as Revealed by ERPs. Frontiers in Psychology 1.score: 20.0
    In order to investigate conflicts between semantics and syntax, we recorded ERPs, while participants read Dutch sentences. Sentences containing conflicts between syntax and semantics (Fred eats in a sandwich…/ Fred eats a restaurant…) elicited an N400. These results show that conflicts between syntax and semantics not necessarily lead to P600 effects and are in line with the processing competition account. According to this parallel account the syntactic and semantic processing streams are fully interactive and information from one (...)
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  47. Ghislaine Mathieu & Bryn Williams-Jones (2012). Managing Conflicts of Interest Should Begin with Dialogue and Education, Not Punitive Measures. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (2):221-222.score: 20.0
    Managing Conflicts of Interest Should Begin with Dialogue and Education, Not Punitive Measures Content Type Journal Article Category Case Studies Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11673-012-9358-y Authors Ghislaine Mathieu, Programmes de bioéthique, Département de médicine sociale et préventive, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada Bryn Williams-Jones, Programmes de bioéthique, Département de médicine sociale et préventive, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7, Canada Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print (...)
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  48. Leonildo Silveira Campos (2011). Pentecostalismo e Protestantismo “Histórico” no Brasil: um século de conflitos, assimilação e mudanças (Pentecostalism and “Historical” Protestantism in Brazil: one century of conflicts, assimilation and changes) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n22p504. [REVIEW] Horizonte 9 (22):504-533.score: 20.0
    Este artigo propõe analisar as relações entre o pentecostalismo e o protestantismo “histórico” nos últimos 100 anos. Desde o ano 2010 comemora-se o centenário da chegada do pentecostalismo no Brasil por meio das pregações do ítalo-americano Luis Francescon e dos suecos Daniel Berg e Gunner Vingren. Até os anos 1950, a Congregação Cristã no Brasil e a Assembléia de Deus, resultantes do trabalho dos três, eram os dois maiores exemplos de igrejas pentecostais consolidadas no Brasil. Uma nova explosão pentecostal ocorrida (...)
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  49. Andreas Walker & Christof Breitsameter (2013). Conflicts and Conflict Regulation in Hospices: Nurses' Perspectives. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):709-718.score: 20.0
    The present article considers conflicts and conflict regulation in hospices. The authors carried out a qualitative study in three hospices in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, to explore how conflicts arise and how conflict regulation proceeds. Hospice nurses should act according to a set of ethical codes, to mission statements of the institution and to professional standards of care. In practice the subjective interpretations of codes and/or models concerning questions of care are causes of conflicts among nurses, with doctors, (...)
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  50. Vance W. Berger (forthcoming). Conflicts of Interest, Selective Inertia, and Research Malpractice in Randomized Clinical Trials: An Unholy Trinity. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-18.score: 20.0
    Recently a great deal of attention has been paid to conflicts of interest in medical research, and the Institute of Medicine has called for more research into this important area. One research question that has not received sufficient attention concerns the mechanisms of action by which conflicts of interest can result in biased and/or flawed research. What discretion do conflicted researchers have to sway the results one way or the other? We address this issue from the perspective of (...)
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