Search results for 'conscience' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Donovan Miyasaki (2010). Nietzsche Contra Freud on Bad Conscience. Nietzsche-Studien 39 (1).score: 18.0
    While much has been made of the similarities between the work of Nietzsche and Freud, insufficient attention has been paid to their differences. Even where they have been noted, the degree of these differences, which sometimes approaches direct opposition, has often been underestimated. In the following essay, I will suggest that on the topic of conscience Nietzsche and Freud have radically opposed views, with profoundly different moral consequences. Despite superficial similarities, Nietzsche’s conception of conscience is opposed to that (...)
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  2. Jeffrey White, Conscience: The Mechanism of Morality.score: 18.0
    Conscience is oft-referred to yet not understood. This text develops a theory of cognition around a model of conscience, the ACTWith model. It represents a synthesis of results from contemporary neuroscience with traditional philosophy, building from Jamesian insights into the emergence of the self to narrative identity, all the while motivated by a single mechanism as represented in the ACTWith model. Emphasis is placed on clarifying historical expressions and demonstrations of conscience - Socrates, Heidegger, Kant, M.L. King (...)
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  3. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2008). What is Conscience and Why is Respect for It so Important? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):135-149.score: 18.0
    The literature on conscience in medicine has paid little attention to what is meant by the word ‘conscience.’ This article distinguishes between retrospective and prospective conscience, distinguishes synderesis from conscience, and argues against intuitionist views of conscience. Conscience is defined as having two interrelated parts: (1) a commitment to morality itself; to acting and choosing morally according to the best of one’s ability, and (2) the activity of judging that an act one has done (...)
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  4. Y. Michael Barilan & Margherita Brusa (2011). Triangular Reflective Equilibrium: A Conscience-Based Method for Bioethical Deliberation. Bioethics 25 (6):304-319.score: 18.0
    Following a discussion of some historical roots of conscience, we offer a systematized version of reflective equilibrium. Aiming at a comprehensive methodology for bioethical deliberation, we develop an expanded variant of reflective equilibrium, which we call ‘triangular reflective equilibrium’ and which incorporates insights from hermeneutics, critical theory and narrative ethics.We focus on a few distinctions, mainly between methods of justification in ethics and the social practice of bioethical deliberation, between coherence in ethical reasoning, personal integrity and consensus formation, and (...)
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  5. Eva LaFollette & Hugh LaFollette (2007). Private Conscience, Public Acts. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (5):249-254.score: 18.0
    A growing number of medical professionals claim a right of conscience, a right to refuse to perform any professional duty they deem immoral—and to do so with impunity. We argue that professionals do not have the unqualified right of conscience. At most they have a highly qualified right. We focus on the claims of pharmacists, since they are the professionals most commonly claiming this right.
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  6. Lori Kantymir & Carolyn McLeod (2013). Justification for Conscience Exemptions in Health Care. Bioethics 27 (8):16-23.score: 18.0
    Some bioethicists argue that conscientious objectors in health care should have to justify themselves, just as objectors in the military do. They should have to provide reasons that explain why they should be exempt from offering the services that they find offensive. There are two versions of this view in the literature, each giving different standards of justification. We show these views are each either too permissive (i.e. would result in problematic exemptions based on conscience) or too restrictive (i.e. (...)
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  7. Brian Besong (forthcoming). The Prudent Conscience View. International Philosophical Quarterly.score: 18.0
    Moral intuitionism, which claims that some moral seemings are justification-conferring, has become an increasingly popular account in moral epistemology. Defenses of the position have largely focused on the standard account, according to which the justification-conferring power of a moral seeming is determined by its phenomenal credentials alone. Unfortunately, the standard account is a less plausible version of moral intuitionism because it does not take etiology seriously. In this paper, I provide an outline and defense of a non-standard account of moral (...)
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  8. Kenneth E. Goodpaster (2007). Conscience and Corporate Culture. Blackwell Pub..score: 18.0
    Conscience and Corporate Culture advances the constructive dialogue on a moral conscience for corporations. Written for educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives, the book serves as a platform on a subject profoundly difficult and timely. Written from the unique vantage point of an author who is a philosopher, professor of business administration, and a corporate consultant A vital resource for both educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives Forwards the (...)
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  9. Linda Hogan (2000). Confronting the Truth: Conscience in the Catholic Tradition. Paulist Press.score: 18.0
    In "Confronting the Truth", Hogan gives readers a balanced, clearly written examination of conscience in the Catholic tradition.
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  10. Wenyu Xie (2009). The Enlightenment: Conscience and Authority in Judgment. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):264-281.score: 18.0
    There were two prevailing sentiments in Europe after the Reformation: One opposing papal authority and one advocating individual freedom. This paper analyzes these two sentiments and finds that the concept of conscience is crucial in understanding them. The issue of conscience is about judging truth and good, and in initiating the Reformation, Martin Luther heavily appealed to his conscience while countering Catholic attacks. With the wide dispersal of the Reformation, Luther’s notion of conscience was well received (...)
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  11. Carolyn McLeod (2011). Taking a Feminist Relational Perspective on Conscience. In Jocelyn Downie & Jennifer Lewellyn (eds.), Being Relational: Reflections on Relational Theory and Health Law and Policy. University of British Columbia Press.score: 18.0
    One understanding of conscience dominates bioethical discussion about conscience. On this view, to have a conscience is to be compelled to act in accordance with one’s own moral values for the sake of one’s “integrity,” where integrity is understood as inner or psychological unity. Conscience is deemed valuable because it promotes this quality. In this paper, I describe the dominant view, attempt to show that it is flawed, and sketch a positive alternative to it. In my (...)
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  12. Dominique Weber (2010). Thomas Hobbes's Doctrine of Conscience and Theories of Synderesis in Renaissance England. Hobbes Studies 23 (1):54-71.score: 18.0
    Is there a specifically "Hobbesian moment" in the extremely complex history of the idea of conscience? In order to answer this question and to understand why Hobbes's conception of conscience was so innovative, one needs to look at the materials he used to build his system, including the medieval doctrine of synderesis. The article examines the way this doctrine was both perpetuated and altered in Renaissance England.
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  13. Kimberley Brownlee (2012). Conscience and Conviction: The Case for Civil Disobedience. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This book shows that civil disobedience is generally more defensible than private conscientious objection. -/- Part I explores the morality of conviction and conscience. Each of these concepts informs a distinct argument for civil disobedience. The conviction argument begins with the communicative principle of conscientiousness. According to this principle, having a conscientious moral conviction means not just acting consistently with our beliefs and judging ourselves and others by a common moral standard. It also means not seeking to evade the (...)
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  14. Benedict (2006). On Conscience: Two Essays. Natl Catholic Bioethics Center.score: 18.0
    Foreword This small volume contains two essays on conscience by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, written while he was Prefect of the ...
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  15. Edmund Leites (ed.) (1988). Conscience and Casuistry in Early Modern Europe. Editions De La Maison des Sciences De L'Homme.score: 18.0
    This examination of a fundamental but often neglected aspect of the intellectual history of early modern Europe brings together philosophers, historians and political theorists from Great Britain, Canada, the United States, Australia, France and Germany. Despite the diversity of disciplines and national traditions represented, the individual contributions show a remarkable convergence around three themes: changes in the modes of moral education in early modern Europe, the emergence of new relations between conscience and law (particularly the law of the state), (...)
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  16. Timothy C. Potts (ed.) (1980). Conscience in Medieval Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This book presents in translation writings by six medieval philosophers which bear on the subject of conscience. Conscience, which can be considered both as a topic in the philosophy of mind and a topic in ethics, has been unduly neglected in modern philosophy, where a prevailing belief in the autonomy of ethics leaves it no natural place. It was, however, a standard subject for a treatise in medieval philosophy. Three introductory translations here, from Jerome, Augustine and Peter Lombard, (...)
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  17. John J. Hardt (2008). The Conscience Debate: Resources for Rapprochement From the Problem's Perceived Source. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):151-160.score: 18.0
    This article critically evaluates the conception of conscience underlying the debate about the proper place and role of conscience in the clinical encounter. It suggests that recovering a conception of conscience rooted in the Catholic moral tradition could offer resources for moving the debate past an unproductive assertion of conflicting rights, namely, physicians’ rights to conscience versus patients’ rights to socially and legally sanctioned medical interventions. It proposes that conscience is a necessary component of the (...)
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  18. David S. Pacini (2008). Through Narcissus' Glass Darkly: The Modern Religion of Conscience. Fordham University Press.score: 18.0
    Through Narcissus' Glass Darkly presents a genealogy and critique of the ideal of conscience in modern philosophical theology, particularly in the writings of ...
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  19. Lucas A. Swaine (2003). Institutions of Conscience: Politics and Principle in a World of Religious Pluralism. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 6 (1):93-118.score: 18.0
    This article considers the difficult question of whether there are any reasons for theocratic religious devotees to affirm liberalism and liberal institutions. Swaine argues not only that there are reasons for theocrats to affirm liberalism, but that theocrats are committed rationally to three normative principles of liberty of conscience, as well. Swaine subsequently discusses three institutional and strategic implications of his arguments. First, he outlines an option of semisovereignty for theocratic communities in liberal democracies, and explains why an appropriate (...)
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  20. Chloë Fitzgerald (2014). A Neglected Aspect of Conscience: Awareness of Implicit Attitudes. Bioethics 28 (1):24-32.score: 18.0
    The conception of conscience that dominates discussions in bioethics focuses narrowly on private regulation of behaviour resulting from explicit attitudes. It neglects to mention implicit attitudes and the role of social feedback in becoming aware of one's implicit attitudes. But if conscience is a way of ensuring that a person's behaviour is in line with her moral values, it must be responsive to all aspects of the mind that influence behaviour. There is a wealth of recent psychological work (...)
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  21. Daniel Regnier (2006). Consciousness and Conscience: Mamardašvili on the Common Point of Departure for Epistemological and Moral Reflection. [REVIEW] Studies in East European Thought 58 (3):141 - 160.score: 18.0
    Mamardašvili did not develop a systematic philosophy that treats separately the various traditional disciplines of philosophy such as epistemology, logic, ethics, aesthetics etc. On the contrary, isolated from the direct influences of other currents of thought that might otherwise have given his own a different direction, Mamardašvili concentrated his attention on the very act of thought, the vitality of which had been undermined in philosophical understandings, including both Hegelian-Marxist attempts to situate the subject in history and re-appropriations of the Cartesian (...)
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  22. Sean Murphy & Stephen J. Genuis (2013). Freedom of Conscience in Health Care: Distinctions and Limits. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):347-354.score: 18.0
    The widespread emergence of innumerable technologies within health care has complicated the choices facing caregivers and their patients. The escalation of knowledge and technical innovation has been accompanied by an erosion of moral and ethical consensus among health providers that is reflected in the abandonment of the Hippocratic Oath as the immutable bedrock of medical ethics. Ethical conflicts arise when the values of health professionals collide with the expressed wishes of patients or the dictates of regulatory bodies and administrators. Increasing (...)
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  23. Oddbjørn Leirvik (2006). Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations: Modern Egyptian Thinkers on Al-Ḍamīr. Routledge.score: 18.0
    "Human Conscience and Muslim-Christian Relations provides an insight into the notion of conscience and the impact of Christian-Muslim relations in Egypt on the ...
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  24. Pierre Cassou-Noguès (2004). Conscience et réflexivité dans la philosophie mathématique de Cavaillès. Methodos 1.score: 18.0
    L’épistémologie de Cavaillès est connue pour une critique abrupte des notions de conscience et de sujet. Cette critique ne vise pas à éliminer de la philosophie la notion de conscience mais seulement à la destituer de sa place de notion primitive. Dès lors, il s’agit de rendre compte de la conscience. Nous soutenons que la conscience est définie et constituée à partir de la réflexivité du devenir mathématique. Pour établir ce point, nous discutons de quelques textes. (...)
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  25. Mary Aloysius Adimonye (2002). My Conscience: My Guiding Light. Snaap Press.score: 18.0
    ch. 1. Conscience--the subjective norm of morality -- ch. 2. Conscience and law -- ch. 3. Relationship between conscience and law -- ch. 4. Holy Scipture on the nature of conscience -- ch. 5. Freedom and commitment of conscience -- ch. 6. The African and conscience with particular reference to the Igbos of Nigeria -- ch. 7. Igbo moral conscience in the light of cross-cultural education: Western civilisation and christianity.
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  26. Alan M. S. J. Coffee (2008). Inclusivity and Equality: Freedom of Thought, Conscience and Religion in Republican Society. Politics in Central Europe 4 (2):26-40.score: 18.0
    Balancing citizens’ freedom thought, conscience and religion with the authority of the law which applies to all citizens alike presents an especial challenge for the governments of European nations with socially diverse and pluralistic populations. I address this problem from within the republican tradition represented by Machiavelli, Harrington and Madison. Republicans have historically focused on public debate as the means to identify a set of shared interests which the law should uphold in the interests of all. Within pluralistic societies, (...)
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  27. Peter Godman (2009). Paradoxes of Conscience in the High Middle Ages: Abelard, Heloise, and the Archpoet. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Moral moments -- The neurotic and the penitent -- True, false, and feigned penance -- Fame without conscience -- Cain and conscience -- Feminine paradoxes -- Sincere hypocrisy -- The poetical consience -- Envoi : spiritual sophistry.
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  28. James Edward Gough & Sue Matheson (2013). Nietzsche and Bad Conscience on Mosquito Coast. Film-Philosophy 17 (1):234-244.score: 18.0
    Conscience plays a crucial role in identifying, applying, and initiating actions chosen as right or wrong. In this paper, we pursue an answer to the question, Can bad conscience, as Nietzsche defines it, be overcome to form the ground for the creation of good conscience? Nietzsche identifies Christianity as the source of that which has to be overcome to help re-define human existence--overcoming self-destructive, bad conscience. To understand whether someone could (or even should) overcome and redefine (...)
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  29. James Calvin Davis (2005). William Ames's Calvinist Ambiguity Over Freedom of Conscience. Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):333 - 355.score: 18.0
    Reformed Christianity's qualified embrace of freedom of conscience is per- haps best represented by William Ames (1576-1633). This essay explores Ames's interpretation of conscience, his understanding of its relationship to natural law, Scripture, and civil authority, and his vacillation on the sub- ject of conscientious freedom. By rooting his interpretation of conscience in natural law, Ames provided a foundation for conscience as an authority whose convictions are binding and worthy of some civil respect and free- dom. (...)
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  30. Michael R. Kelly (2009). Quand l'esprit « dit » le temps : la conscience du temps chez Aristote, Augustin et Husserl. Methodos 9.score: 18.0
    Cet essai met en cause la comparaison historique courante qui relie le traitement husserlien de la conscience du temps à la tradition philosophique occidentale par le biais du livre IX des Confessions d’Augustin. Je soutiens notamment que cette comparaison n’est valable qu’à l’égard des leçons sur le temps de 1905 (qui expliquent l’appréhension du temps par le recours à l’étirement de la conscience opéré par la mémoire) et non pour la théorie husserlienne ultérieure, que l’on peut dater autour (...)
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  31. René Thun (2010). Ricoeur on Conscience: His Blind Spot and the Homecoming of Shame. Études Ricoeuriennes / Ricoeur Studies 1 (1):45-54.score: 18.0
    In his hermeneutic of the self, which he is working out in his Oneself as another , Ricœur writes about the constitutive conditions of conscience as a dimension of the experience of passivity. For the following considerations, I will argue that Ricœur is very right in maintaining the moral impact of the notion of conscience; but if we on the other hand remember older writings by Ricœur like Fallible Man we have to admit that something is missed in (...)
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  32. Edward Vallance & Harald Braun (eds.) (2004). Contexts of Conscience in Early Modern Europe, 1500-1700. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 18.0
    In an era of confessional conflict, the conscience served as a powerful mediator between God and man, directing and judging moral actions. This work aims to convey the breadth of the conscience's jurisdiction, analyzing its impact upon a variety of important aspects of early modern society: political allegiance the genre of "advice to princes" religious conformity slavery the regulation of sexual behavior gender roles and the intellectual methods of scientists.
     
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  33. Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.score: 18.0
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether or not (...)
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  34. Thomas D. Williams (2008). Knowing Right From Wrong: A Christian Guide to Conscience. Faith Words.score: 18.0
    Father Williams explains how the conscience is formed through our training and experiences and informed by the Holy Spirit, making it an essential tool for daily living. He uses familiar and surprising characters to illustrate the positive choices conscience can direct--and the disaster that results when a conscience is undeveloped or ignored. Questions he tackles include "Is it more important to be smart or good?""Is there a morally right thing to do in every situation?" and "Is the (...)
     
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  35. Hugh Chandler, Can There Be Conflict Between Conscience and Self-Love?score: 15.0
    Ethical dualists hold that we have good reason to pursue our own happiness and good reason to pursue moral goodness. It would seem that there is a potential conflict here. On the other hand there have been those who deny even the possibility of conflict, whether or not there is a God and an afterlife. Rawls seems to say, or hint, that this was Butlers’ view, and Kant, according to at least one person, argued that there cannot be conflict here. (...)
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  36. J. M. Dieterle (2008). Freedom of Conscience, Employee Prerogatives, and Consumer Choice: Veal, Birth Control, and Tanning Beds. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):191 - 203.score: 15.0
    Does a pharmacist have a right to refuse to fill certain prescriptions? In this paper, I examine cases in which an employee might refuse to do something that is part of his or her job description. I will argue that in some of these cases, an employee does have a right of refusal and in other cases an employee does not. In those cases where the employee does not have a right of refusal, I argue that the refusals (if repeated) (...)
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  37. Dean Moyar (2008). Unstable Autonomy: Conscience and Judgment in Kant's Moral Philosophy. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (3):327-360.score: 15.0
  38. Tadeusz Grzesik (2012). Faith and Conscience--The Surest of Arguments for the Existence of God. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 17 (2):245-268.score: 15.0
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  39. Harold M. Schulweis (2008). Conscience: The Duty to Obey and the Duty to Disobey. Jewish Lights Pub..score: 15.0
    From Abraham to Abu Ghraib, from the dissenting prophets to Darfur, he probes history, the Bible and the works of contemporary thinkers for ideas about both ...
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  40. Michelle Kosch (forthcoming). Practical Deliberationand the Voice of Conscience in Fichte's 1798 System of Ethics. Philosophers' Imprint.score: 15.0
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  41. Huaiyu Wang (2007). Conscience and the Aporia of Being and Time. Research in Phenomenology 37 (3):357-384.score: 15.0
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  42. Clea F. Rees (2006). Reclaiming the Conscience of Huckleberry Finn. In Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (eds.), The Experience of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    Huck Finn’s emotional responses constitute perfectly good moral reasons not to betray his friend, even though Huck is unable to recognise them as such.
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  43. Bob Tennant (2011). Conscience, Consciousness and Ethics in Joseph Butler's Philosophy and Ministry. Boydell Press.score: 15.0
    out a visitation and a thorough assessment of his diocese. His predecessor (or rather his friend Benson, the bishop of Gloucester, who during Edward Chandler's decline had managed Durham's affairs) had kept the deanery records in good ...
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  44. Xie Wenyu (2009). The Enlightenment: Conscience and Authority in Judgment. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (2):264 - 281.score: 15.0
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  45. Anand Amaladass (ed.) (1999). A Crosscultural Look at Conscience. Satya Nilayam Publications.score: 15.0
     
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  46. Piero Bargellini (1958). The Unquiet Conscience. Stamperia Del Santuccio].score: 15.0
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  47. Archibald Chisholm (1934). Conscience; its Nature and Authority. London, Nisbet & Co. Ltd..score: 15.0
     
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  48. Catherine Glyn Davies (1990). Conscience as Consciousness: The Idea of Self-Awareness in French Philosophical Writing From Descartes to Diderot. Voltaire Foundation.score: 15.0
  49. Ralph Glasser (ed.) (1978). Conscience and Individual Responsibility in Society. [Council of Christians and Jews].score: 15.0
     
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  50. John Haas (ed.) (1996). Crisis of Conscience. Crossroad Pub. Co..score: 15.0
     
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