Search results for 'consequentializing' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Paul Hurley (2013). Consequentializing and Deontologizing: Clogging the Consequentialist Vacuum&Quot;. Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics 3:123-153.score: 24.0
    That many values can be consequentialized – incorporated into a ranking of states of affairs – is often taken to support the view that apparent alternatives to consequentialism are in fact forms of consequentialism. Such consequentializing arguments take two very different forms. The first is concerned with the relationship between morally right action and states of affairs evaluated evaluator-neutrally, the second with the relationship between what agents ought to do and outcomes evaluated evaluator-relatively. I challenge the consequentializing arguments (...)
     
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  2. James Dreier (2011). In Defense of Consequentializing. In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, Volume 1. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
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  3. Douglas W. Portmore (2009). Consequentializing. Philosophy Compass 4 (2):329-347.score: 18.0
    A growing trend of thought has it that any plausible nonconsequentialist theory can be consequentialized, which is to say that it can be given a consequentialist representation. In this essay, I explore both whether this claim is true and what its implications are. I also explain the procedure for consequentializing a nonconsequentialist theory and give an account of the motivation for doing so.
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  4. Douglas W. Portmore, Consequentializing Commonsense Morality.score: 16.0
    This is Chapter 4 of my Commonsense Consequentialism: Wherein Morality Meets Rationality. In this chapter, I argue that that any plausible nonconsequentialist theory can be consequentialized, which is to say that, for any plausible nonconsequentialist theory, we can construct a consequentialist theory that yields the exact same set of deontic verdicts that it yields.
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  5. Douglas W. Portmore (2007). Consequentializing Moral Theories. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (1):39–73.score: 15.0
  6. Sergio Tenenbaum (2014). The Perils of Earnest Consequentializing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1):233-240.score: 15.0
  7. Friderik Klampfer (2014). Consequentializing Moral Responsibility. Croatian Journal of Philosophy (40):121-150.score: 15.0
    In the paper, I try to cast some doubt on traditional attempts to define, or explicate, moral responsibility in terms of deserved praise and blame. Desert-based accounts of moral responsibility, though no doubt more faithful to our ordinary notion of moral responsibility, tend to run into trouble in the face of challenges posed by a deterministic picture of the world on the one hand and the impact of moral luck on human action on the other. Besides, grounding responsibility in desert (...)
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  8. Douglas W. Portmore (2011). Commonsense Consequentialism: Wherein Morality Meets Rationality. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    This is a book on morality, rationality, and the interconnections between the two. In it, I defend a version of consequentialism that both comports with our commonsense moral intuitions and shares with other consequentialist theories the same compelling teleological conception of practical reasons.
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  9. Graham Oddie & Peter Milne (1991). Act and Value: Expectation and the Representability of Moral Theories. Theoria 57 (1-2):42-76.score: 6.0
    According to the axiologist the value concepts are basic and the deontic concepts are derivative. This paper addresses two fundamental problems that arise for the axiologist. Firstly, what ought the axiologist o understand by the value of an act? Second, what are the prospects in principle for an axiological representation of moral theories. Can the deontic concepts of any coherent moral theory be represented by an agent-netural axiology: (1) whatever structure those concepts have and (2) whatever the causal structure of (...)
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  10. C. Pizzi & T. Williamson (2005). Conditional Excluded Middle in Systems of Consequential Implication. Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (4):333 - 362.score: 6.0
    It is natural to ask under what conditions negating a conditional is equivalent to negating its consequent. Given a bivalent background logic, this is equivalent to asking about the conjunction of Conditional Excluded Middle (CEM, opposite conditionals are not both false) and Weak Boethius' Thesis (WBT, opposite conditionals are not both true). In the system CI.0 of consequential implication, which is intertranslatable with the modal logic KT, WBT is a theorem, so it is natural to ask which instances of CEM (...)
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  11. Christopher Callaway (2011). Keeping Score: The Consequential Critique of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (3):231-246.score: 6.0
    This essay attempts to specify just what one would need to show in order to draw any substantive conclusion about religion’s consequential value. It is focused on three central questions: (1) What exactly is being evaluated? (2) What benefits and harms are relevant? (3) How are the relevant benefits and harms to be assessed? Each of these questions gives rise to a range of thorny philosophical and empirical issues, and any thesis about religion’s ultimate consequential value will therefore be contingent (...)
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  12. Claudio Pizzi & Timothy Williamson (1997). Strong Boethius' Thesis and Consequential Implication. Journal of Philosophical Logic 26 (5):569-588.score: 6.0
    The paper studies the relation between systems of modal logic and systems of consequential implication, a non-material form of implication satisfying "Aristotle's Thesis" (p does not imply not p) and "Weak Boethius' Thesis" (if p implies q, then p does not imply not q). Definitions are given of consequential implication in terms of modal operators and of modal operators in terms of consequential implication. The modal equivalent of "Strong Boethius' Thesis" (that p implies q implies that p does not imply (...)
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  13. Loy D. Watley & Douglas R. May (2004). Enhancing Moral Intensity: The Roles of Personal and Consequential Information in Ethical Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (2):105-126.score: 6.0
    This research explored how (a) information regarding consequences and (b) personal information regarding the potential victim influences perceptions of moral intensity and ethical behavioral intent. An experimental vignette research design was used and 314 professional managers participated. The results of the study indicated that personal information impacted ethical behavioral intent through its influence on perceptions of proximity. In contrast, consequential information''s impact depended on the presence of personal information or prior knowledge. Implications for management and future ethical research are discussed.
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  14. Claudio Pizzi (2008). Aristotle's Cubes and Consequential Implication. Logica Universalis 2 (1):143-153.score: 6.0
    . It is shown that the properties of so-called consequential implication allow to construct more than one aristotelian square relating implicative sentences of the consequential kind. As a result, if an aristotelian cube is an object consisting of two distinct aristotelian squares and four distinct “semiaristotelian” squares sharing corner edges, it is shown that there is a plurality of such cubes, which may also result from the composition of cubes of lower complexity.
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  15. Kirk K. Durston (2005). The Failure of Type-4 Arguments From Evil, in the Face of the Consequential Complexity of History. Philo 8 (2):109-122.score: 6.0
    Bruce Russell has classified evidential arguments from evil into four types, one of which is the type-4 argument. Rather than begin with observations of evils that appear to be gratuitous, type-4 arguments simply begin with observations of evils. The next step, and the heart of a type-4 argument, is an abductive inference (inference to the best explanation) from those observations, to the conclusion that there is gratuitous evil. Reflection upon the consequential complexity of history, however, reveals that we have no (...)
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  16. Jean-François Bonnefon (2012). Utility Conditionals as Consequential Arguments: A Random Sampling Experiment. Thinking and Reasoning 18 (3):379 - 393.score: 6.0
    Research on reasoning about consequential arguments has been an active but piecemeal enterprise. Previous research considered in depth some subclasses ofconsequential arguments, but further understanding of consequential arguments requires that we address their greater variety, avoiding the risk of over-generalisation from specific examples. Ideally we ought to be able to systematically generate the set of consequential arguments, and then engage in random sampling of stimuli within that set. The current article aims at making steps in that direction, using the theory (...)
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  17. Ishtiyaque Haji (1994). Consequential Omnibenevolence. Grazer Philosophische Studien 47:207-222.score: 6.0
    It is argued that a theorist like Leibniz who believes that a consequentially omnibenevolent God created the actual world must presuppose that there is a best possible world. If so, then if God did create this world, there is no best, and He has as essential properties each of His perfections, God's omnibenevolence must be understood in terms of some alternative concept of omnibenevolence. Such an alternative is offered, one consistent with there being no best world, and one that does (...)
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  18. Niels Skovgaard Olsen, Logical Omniscience and Acknowledged Vs. Consequential Commitments. Questions, Discourse and Dialogue: 20 Years After Making It Explicit, Proceedings of AISB50.score: 6.0
    The purpose of this paper is to consider the explanatory resources that Robert Brandom‟s distinction between acknowledged and consequential commitments affords in relation to the problem of logical omniscience. With this distinction the importance of the doxastic perspective under consideration for the relationship between logic and norms of reasoning is emphasized, and it becomes possible to handle a number of problematic cases discussed in the literature without thereby incurring a commitment to revisionism about logic. 12.
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  19. Amartya Sen (2000). Consequential Evaluation and Practical Reason. Journal of Philosophy 97 (9):477-502.score: 5.0
  20. Campbell Brown (2011). Consequentialize This. Ethics 121 (4):749-771.score: 5.0
    To 'consequentialise' is to take a putatively non-consequentialist moral theory and show that it is actually just another form of consequentialism. Some have speculated that every moral theory can be consequentialised. If this were so, then consequentialism would be empty; it would have no substantive content. As I argue here, however, this is not so. Beginning with the core consequentialist commitment to 'maximising the good', I formulate a precise definition of consequentialism and demonstrate that, given this definition, several sorts of (...)
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  21. Edward Royzman & Rahul Kumar (2004). Is Consequential Luck Morally Inconsequential? Empirical Psychology and the Reassessment of Moral Luck. Ratio 17 (3):329–344.score: 5.0
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  22. Amartya Sen (1983). Evaluator Relativity and Consequential Evaluation. Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (2):113-132.score: 5.0
  23. Ruth Burnice McKay (2000). Consequential Utilitarianism: Addressing Ethical Deficiencies in the Municipal Landfill Siting Process. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 26 (4):289 - 306.score: 5.0
    This paper examines ethical concerns of the utilitarian paradigm, the greatest good for the greatest number, advocated by many proponents and consultants in siting landfills. The implications of the consequentialist utilitarian approach are considered through the examination of a landfill-site-search case study in Ontario, Canada. Limitations to such an approach, in terms of differing values, equal consideration, equitable participation, distributive justice and the emphasis on non-quantifiable factors are discussed. Recommendations to improve the process are made based on the ethical analysis (...)
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  24. Kirk Durston (2000). The Consequential Complexity of History and Gratuitous Evil. Religious Studies 36 (1):65-80.score: 5.0
    History is composed of a web of innumerable interacting causal chains, many of which are composed of millions of discrete events. The complexity of history puts us in a position of having knowledge of only a minuscule portion of the consequences of any event, actual or proposed. Our almost complete lack of knowledge of the data necessary to know if an event is gratuitous makes it very likely that we would be mistaken about a very large number of events. The (...)
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  25. Thomas Nickles (1988). Truth or Consequences? Generative Versus Consequential Justification in Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:393 - 405.score: 5.0
    Pure consequentialists hold that all theoretical justification derives from testing the consequences of hypotheses, while generativists maintain that reasoning (some feature of) the hypothesis from we already know is an important form of justification. The strongest form of justification (they claim) is an idealized discovery argument. In the guise of H-D methodology, consequentialism is widely supposed to have defeated generativism during the 19th century. I argue that novel prediction fails to overcome the logical weakness of consequentialism or to render generative (...)
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  26. Claudio Pizzi (1993). Consequential Implication. A Correction To: ``Decision Procedures for Logics of Consequential Implication''. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 34 (4):621-624.score: 5.0
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  27. Michael Hamilton (2007). Freedom of Assembly, Consequential Harms and the Rule of Law: Liberty-Limiting Principles in the Context of Transition. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (1):75-100.score: 5.0
    The consequences of restricting or not restricting the right to freedom of assembly are potentially magnified in transitional societies. Yet determining whether such consequences are indeed ‘harmful’, and whether their cost should be borne despite the harms caused, requires the elaboration of criteria which define what are valid and relevant harms. While a human rights framework can perform this task, open-textured rights standards prescribe neither the threshold of legal intervention nor the goals of transition. By extension, the rule of law—underpinned (...)
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  28. Robert W. Murungi (1977). Necessitas Consequentis in a Singleton Possible World. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 18 (4):637-638.score: 5.0
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  29. Cartesian Selves & E. D. McCANN (1986). Body and Soul in Philoponus, HJ BLUMENTHAL Philoponus Like Other Platonists Had to Reconcile His Dualism with the Need to Give an Account of Human Activity. The Article Explores How He Formulated and Attempted to Resolve Some of the Consequential Problems. It is Based on the Assumption That Philoponus' Neoplatonism Was Crucial. [REVIEW] New Scholasticism 60 (3).score: 5.0
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  30. E. Bone (1993). [God for Consequential Thought, Vol 1, the Role and Nature of Evil-French-Gesche, A]. Revue Théologique de Louvain 24 (3):378-380.score: 5.0
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  31. Claudio Pizzi (1991). Decision Procedures for Logics of Consequential Implication. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 32 (4):618-636.score: 5.0
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  32. Arif Hossain (2012). Consequential Approach of Islamic Bioethics. Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics 3 (1).score: 5.0
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  33. Dirk Luyten (1998). Grote en kleine ondernemers tijdens de repressie van de economische collaboratie: kanttekeningen bij de discriminerende werking van de Galopin-doctrine, de strafwet en de consequenties voor het vervolgingsbeleid. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D'Histoire 76 (2):501-526.score: 5.0
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  34. H. Philipse (1985). Leidt consequentie altijd naar de duivel? Een analyse van de argumentatie voor Berkeleys immaterialisme. Wijsgerig Perspectief 26:45-57.score: 5.0
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  35. Abraham P. Bos (2008). Een herinterpretatie van Aristoteles' psychologie, en haar consequenties. Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 100 (3):228-243.score: 5.0
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  36. K. Deschouwer (2001). Politieke Instituties, Strategieën En Beleid: De Consequenties van Multi-Level Governance. Res Publica 1.score: 5.0
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  37. Abigail Baird & Fugelsang & Jonathan (2006). The Emergence of Consequential Thought: Evidence From Neuroscience. In Semir Zeki & Oliver Goodenough (eds.), Law and the Brain. Oup Oxford.score: 5.0
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  38. Jan Hellner (1981). Consequential Loss and Exemption Clauses. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 1 (1):13-49.score: 5.0
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  39. Jozef Keulartz & Earth Summit (2010). Voorbij de Ark? Consequenties voor de kernactiviteiten en het collectiebeleid van dierentuinen. Filosofie En Praktijk 31 (4):77.score: 5.0
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  40. J. M. Montgomery (2000). A Discussion of Social, Ethical, Practical and Consequential Effects of Sex-Selection. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 7 (2):52-54.score: 5.0
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  41. Wade L. Robison (1973). On the Consequential Claim That Hume Is a Pragmatist. Journal of Critical Analysis 4 (4):141-153.score: 5.0
  42. Marc Slors (2012). Belichaamde sociale cognitie: consequenties voor de status van'theory of mind'. Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 104 (3).score: 5.0
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  43. Jaume Mensa I. Valls (2003). La "Fallacia consequentis" en la polémica escatológica entre Arnau de Vilanova y los profesores de la universidad de París. Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 10:297-302.score: 5.0
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  44. Timothy D. Wilson (1991). Consciousness: Limited but Consequential. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):701.score: 5.0
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  45. Jussi Suikkanen (2009). Consequentialism, Constraints and The Good-Relative-To: A Reply to Mark Schroeder. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (March 2009):1-9.score: 3.0
    Recently, it has been a part of the so-called consequentializing project to attempt to construct versions of consequentialism that can support agent-relative moral constraints. Mark Schroeder has argued that such views are bound to fail because they cannot make sense of the agent relative value on which they need to rely. In this paper, I provide a fitting-attitude account of both agent-relative and agent-neutral values that can together be used to consequentialize agent-relative constraints.
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  46. George Gotsis & Zoi Kortezi (2008). Philosophical Foundations of Workplace Spirituality: A Critical Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):575 - 600.score: 3.0
    It is an undeniable reality that workplace spirituality has received growing attention during the last decade. This fact is attributable to many factors, socioeconomic, cultural and others [Hicks, D.A. 2003: Religion and the Workplace. Pluralism, Sprtituality, Leadership (Cambridge University press, Cambridge)]. However the field is full of obscurity and imprecision for the researcher, the practitioner, the organisational analyst and whoever attempts to systematically approach this relatively new inquiry field. This article attempts to provide a critical review of the literature on (...)
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  47. S. Andrew Schroeder (2011). You Don't Have to Do What's Best! (A Problem for Consequentialists and Other Teleologists). In Mark Timmons (ed.), Oxford Studies in Normative Ethics, vol. 1. Oxford University Press.score: 2.0
    Define teleology as the view that requirements hold in virtue of facts about value or goodness. Teleological views are quite popular, and in fact some philosophers (e.g. Dreier, Smith) argue that all (plausible) moral theories can be understood teleologically. I argue, however, that certain well-known cases show that the teleologist must at minimum assume that there are certain facts that an agent ought to know, and that this means that requirements can't, in general, hold in virtue of facts about value (...)
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  48. Robert Audi (2014). Normativity and Generality in Ethics and Aesthetics. Journal of Ethics 18 (4):373-390.score: 2.0
    Moral properties such as being wrong or being obligatory are not brute but based on other kinds of properties, such as being a lie or being promised. Aesthetic properties such as being graceful or being beautiful are similar to moral properties in being based on other kinds of properties, but in the aesthetic cases it may be impossible to specify just what these grounding properties are. Does any single property ground poetic beauty in the way promising grounds obligation to do (...)
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  49. Simona Selelionytė-Drukteinienė (2009). Pure Economic Loss as a Special Kind of Loss in Lithuanian Tort Law. Jurisprudence 118 (4):123-146.score: 2.0
    In tort law, including Lithuanian tort law, damage usually is divided into two types: pecuniary and non-pecuniary damage. The concept of non-pecuniary damage has recently become a focus of attention of Lithuanian legal researchers. However, it has to be noted that the issues related to the concept of pecuniary damage remain scarcely analysed. As a result, the unique type of pecuniary damage, i.e. the damage of purely economic character, has received no attention whatsoever in Lithuanian tort law. It is usually (...)
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  50. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2012). The Feasible Alternatives Thesis: Kicking Away the Livelihoods of the Global Poor. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 11 (1):97-119.score: 1.0
    Many assert that affluent countries have contributed in the past to poverty in developing countries through wars of aggression and conquest, colonialism and its legacies, the imposition of puppet leaders, and support for brutal dictators and venal elites. Thomas Pogge has recently argued that there is an additional and, arguably, even more consequential way in which the affluent continue to contribute to poverty in the developing world. He argues that when people cooperate in instituting and upholding institutional arrangements that foreseeably (...)
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