Search results for 'consistency objection' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. P. Garavaso (2013). Hilary Putnam's Consistency Objection Against Wittgenstein's Conventionalism in Mathematics. Philosophia Mathematica 21 (3):279-296.score: 120.0
    Hilary Putnam first published the consistency objection against Ludwig Wittgenstein’s account of mathematics in 1979. In 1983, Putnam and Benacerraf raised this objection against all conventionalist accounts of mathematics. I discuss the 1979 version and the scenario argument, which supports the key premise of the objection. The wide applicability of this objection is not apparent; I thus raise it against an imaginary axiomatic theory T similar to Peano arithmetic in all relevant aspects. I argue that (...)
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  2. John A. Humphrey (1993). Some Objections to Putnam's “Consistency Objection”. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:127-141.score: 120.0
    This paper is a critical analysis of Putnam’s “consistency objection,” an objection made against a particular reading of Wittgenstein’s philosophy of mathematics (“up-to-us-ism”). I show that Putnam’s objection presupposes a rather unlikely version of Wittgenstein’s “up-to-us-ism” and is unable to undermine a more likely anti-Platonist version. I also show that a companion argument, (the “something more” argument) is unable to overturn this more sophisticated anti-Platonist version of Wittgenstein’s up-to-us-ism. Along the way I try to clarify Wittgenstein’s (...)
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  3. Pieranna Garavaso (1988). Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Mathematics: A Reply to Two Objections. Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):179-191.score: 92.0
    This paper has two main purposes: first to compare Wittgenstein's views to the more traditional views in the philosophy of mathematics; second, to provide a general outline for a Wittgensteinian reply to two objections against Wittgenstein's account of mathematics: the objectivity objection and the consistency objections, respectively. Two fundamental thesmes of Wittgenstein's account of mathematics title the first two sections: mathematical propositions are rules and not descritpions and mathematics is employed within a form of life. Under each heading, (...)
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  4. Joseph W. E. Schmitt (1992). Gewirth and the Egoist: A New Objection to the Principle of Generic Consistency. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (1):105-116.score: 72.0
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  5. Matthias Schirn (2010). Consistency, Models, and Soundness. Axiomathes 20 (2-3):153-207.score: 54.0
    This essay consists of two parts. In the first part, I focus my attention on the remarks that Frege makes on consistency when he sets about criticizing the method of creating new numbers through definition or abstraction. This gives me the opportunity to comment also a little on H. Hankel, J. Thomae—Frege’s main targets when he comes to criticize “formal theories of arithmetic” in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (1884) and the second volume of Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (1903)—G. Cantor, L. (...)
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  6. Richard Heck (1992). On the Consistency of Second-Order Contextual Definitions. Noûs 26 (4):491-494.score: 42.0
    One of the earliest discussions of the so-called 'bad company' objection to Neo-Fregeanism, I show that the consistency of an arbitrary second-order 'contextual definition' (nowadays known as an 'abstraction principle' is recursively undecidable. I go on to suggest that an acceptable such principle should satisfy a condition nowadays known as 'stablity'.
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  7. Marius V. Peelen Jaap Munneke, Valentina Brentari (2013). The Influence of Scene Context on Object Recognition is Independent of Attentional Focus. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 36.0
    Humans can quickly and accurately recognize objects within briefly presented natural scenes. Previous work has provided evidence that scene context contributes to this process, demonstrating improved naming of objects that were presented in semantically consistent scenes (e.g., a sandcastle on a beach) relative to semantically inconsistent scenes (e.g., a sandcastle on a football field). The current study was aimed at investigating which processes underlie the scene consistency effect. Specifically, we tested: 1) whether the effect is due to increased visual (...)
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  8. Kai F. Wehmeier (1999). Consistent Fragments of Grundgesetze and the Existence of Non-Logical Objects. Synthese 121 (3):309-328.score: 32.0
    In this paper, I consider two curious subsystems ofFrege's Grundgesetze der Arithmetik: Richard Heck's predicative fragment H, consisting of schema V together with predicative second-order comprehension (in a language containing a syntactical abstraction operator), and a theory T in monadic second-order logic, consisting of axiom V and 1 1-comprehension (in a language containing anabstraction function). I provide a consistency proof for the latter theory, thereby refuting a version of a conjecture by Heck. It is shown that both Heck and (...)
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  9. Matthew H. Kramer (2008). Is Law's Conventionality Consistent with Law's Objectivity? Res Publica 14 (4):241-252.score: 30.0
    Legal positivism’s multi-faceted insistence on the separability of law and morality includes an insistence on the thoroughly conventional status of legal norms as legal norms. Yet the positivist affirmation of the conventionality of law may initially seem at odds with the mind-independence of the existence and contents and implications of legal norms. Mind-independence, a central aspect of legal objectivity, has been seen by some theorists as incompatible with the mind-dependence of conventions. Such a perception of incompatibility has led some anti-positivist (...)
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  10. David J. Stump (2007). The Independence of the Parallel Postulate and Development of Rigorous Consistency Proofs. History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (1):19-30.score: 30.0
    I trace the development of arguments for the consistency of non-Euclidean geometries and for the independence of the parallel postulate, showing how the arguments become more rigorous as a formal conception of geometry is introduced. I analyze the kinds of arguments offered by Jules Hoüel in 1860-1870 for the unprovability of the parallel postulate and for the existence of non-Euclidean geometries, especially his reaction to the publication of Beltrami’s seminal papers, showing that Beltrami was much more concerned with the (...)
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  11. Stefan Artmann (2004). Four Principles of Evolutionary Pragmatics in Jacob's Philosophy of Modern Biology. Axiomathes 14 (4):381-395.score: 30.0
    The French molecular biologist François Jacob outlined a theory of evolution as tinkering. From a methodological point of view, his approach can be seen as a biologic specification of the relation between laws, describing coherently the dynamics of a system, and contingent boundary conditions on this dynamics. From a semiotic perspective, tinkering is a pragmatic concept well-known from the information-theoretic anthropology of Claude Lévi-Strauss. In idealized contrast to an engineer, the tinkerer has to accept the concrete restrictions on his material (...)
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  12. Alberto Giubilini (2014). The Paradox of Conscientious Objection and the Anemic Concept of 'Conscience': Downplaying the Role of Moral Integrity in Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):159-185.score: 30.0
    Conscientious objection in health care is a form of compromise whereby health care practitioners can refuse to take part in safe, legal, and beneficial medical procedures to which they have a moral opposition (for instance abortion). Arguments in defense of conscientious objection in medicine are usually based on the value of respect for the moral integrity of practitioners. I will show that philosophical arguments in defense of conscientious objection based on respect for such moral integrity are extremely (...)
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  13. Evandro Agazzi (2011). Consistency, Truth and Ontology. Studia Logica 97 (1):7 - 29.score: 30.0
    After a brief survey of the different meanings of consistency, the study is restricted to consistency understood as non-contradiction of sets of sentences. The philosophical reasons for this requirement are discussed, both in relation to the problem of sense and the problem of truth (also with historical references). The issue of mathematical truth is then addressed, and the different conceptions of it are put in relation with consistency. The formal treatment of consistency and truth in mathematical (...)
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  14. Vincenzo Marra (forthcoming). The Problem of Artificial Precision in Theories of Vagueness: A Note on the Rôle of Maximal Consistency. Erkenntnis:1-12.score: 30.0
    The problem of artificial precision is a major objection to any theory of vagueness based on real numbers as degrees of truth. Suppose you are willing to admit that, under sufficiently specified circumstances, a predication of “is red” receives a unique, exact number from the real unit interval [0, 1]. You should then be committed to explain what is it that determines that value, settling for instance that my coat is red to degree 0.322 rather than 0.321. In this (...)
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  15. Hans-jörg Rheinberger (2011). Consistency From the Perspective Ofan Experimental Systems Approach Tothe Sciences and Their Epistemic Objects. Manuscrito 34 (1):307-321.score: 30.0
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  16. Mark R. Wicclair (forthcoming). Managing Conscientious Objection in Health Care Institutions. HEC Forum:1-17.score: 28.0
    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient’s/surrogate’s timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based (...)
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  17. David L. Dowe (2008). Minimum Message Length and Statistically Consistent Invariant (Objective?) Bayesian Probabilistic Inference—From (Medical) “Evidence”. Social Epistemology 22 (4):433 – 460.score: 26.0
    “Evidence” in the form of data collected and analysis thereof is fundamental to medicine, health and science. In this paper, we discuss the “evidence-based” aspect of evidence-based medicine in terms of statistical inference, acknowledging that this latter field of statistical inference often also goes by various near-synonymous names—such as inductive inference (amongst philosophers), econometrics (amongst economists), machine learning (amongst computer scientists) and, in more recent times, data mining (in some circles). Three central issues to this discussion of “evidence-based” are (i) (...)
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  18. Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (2012). Reasoning, Normativity, and Experimental Philosophy. American Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2):151 - 163.score: 24.0
    The development of modern science, as everybody knows, has come largely through naturalizing domains of inquiry that were historically parts of philosophy. Theories based on mere speculation about matters empirical, such as Aristotle‟s view about teleology in nature, were replaced with law-based, predictive explanatory theories that invoked empirical data as supporting evidence. Although philosophers have, by and large, applauded such developments, inquiry into normative domains presents a different set of problems, and there is no consensus about whether such an inquiry (...)
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  19. Brigitte Falkenburg (2010). Language and Reality. Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1171-1188.score: 24.0
    The article investigates the way in which Peter Mittelstaedt has been contributing to the philosophy of physics for half a century. It is shown that he pursues a path between rationalism and empiricism in the sense of Erhard Scheibe’s philosophy of the physicists. Starting from Kant’s a priori he gives a rational reconstruction of the conceptual revolutions of 20th century physics. The central topic of his philosophy of physics is the quest for semantic self-consistency, which for quantum mechanics is (...)
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  20. Arjan Markus (2004). Divine Timelessness: A Coherent but Unfruitful Doctrine? Sophia 43 (2):29-48.score: 24.0
    The author argues in this article that it is possible to have a consistent and coherent version of the doctrine of divine timelessness. Towards the objection that a timeless God cannot act it is defended that a timeless God can certainly act in the world and can love human people. In spite of the consistency and coherence of the doctrine of divine timelessness, however, the author has serious problems with the fruitfulness of this doctrine when it comes to (...)
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  21. R. F. Card (2011). Conscientious Objection, Emergency Contraception, and Public Policy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (1):53-68.score: 24.0
    Defenders of medical professionals’ rights to conscientious objection (CO) regarding emergency contraception (EC) draw an analogy to CO in the military. Such professionals object to EC since it has the possibility of harming zygotic life, yet if we accept this analogy and utilize jurisprudence to frame the associated public policy, those who refuse to dispense EC would not have their objection honored. Legal precedent holds that one must consistently object to all forms of the relevant activity. In the (...)
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  22. M. Cathleen Kaveny (2002). Conjoined Twins and Catholic Moral Analysis: Extraordinary Means and Casuistical Consistency. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (2):115-140.score: 24.0
    : This article draws upon the Roman Catholic distinction between "ordinary" and "extraordinary" means of medical treatment to analyze the case of "Jodie" and "Mary," the Maltese conjoined twins whose surgical separation was ordered by the English courts over the objection of their Roman Catholic parents and Cormac Murphy-O'Connor, the Roman Catholic Cardinal Archbishop of Westminster. It attempts to shed light on the use of that distinction by surrogate decision makers with respect to incompetent patients. In addition, it critically (...)
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  23. Jason A. Beyer (2004). A Physicalist Rejoinder to Some Problems with Omniscience; or, How God Could Know What We Know. Sophia 43 (2):5-13.score: 24.0
    A certain objection to belief in God is based on the intrinsic incoherence of the concept of Divine Being or God. In particular, it questions the major traditional characteristic, notably omniscience, and its relation to omnipotence, moral unassailability, and absence of embodiment on the part of the Divine Being. In this paper, an attempt is made to counter this objection by an appeal, not to natural theology, but rather to physicalism in its application to human beings, and by (...)
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  24. Derek K. Heyman (1997). Dual and Non-Dual Ontology in Satre and MahāyāNa Buddhism. Man and World 30 (4):431-443.score: 24.0
    This paper examines Sartre's dualistic ontology in the light of the non-duality asserted by Mahayana Buddhism. In the first section, I show, against the objection of Hazel E. Barnes, that Sartre and Buddhism have comparable theories of consciousness. The second section discusses Steven W. Laycock's use of Zen philosophy to solve the Sartrean metaphysical problem regarding the origin of being for-itself. This solution involves rejecting the ontological priority of being in-itself in favor of the Buddhist understanding of interdependent origination (...)
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  25. Aaron Holland (2001). Consistency in Presuming Agnosticism. Philo 4 (1):82-89.score: 24.0
    According to the presumption of atheism, we are to presume disbelief unless agnosticism or theism can be adequately defended. In this paper I will defend the presumption of atheism against a popular objection made by Thomas Morris and elucidate an insuperable difficulty for any attempt to argue for a presumption of agnosticism.
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  26. John McMurtry (2003). The Life-Blind Structure of the Neoclassical Paradigm: A Critique of Bernard Hodgson's "Economics as a Moral Science". [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (4):377 - 389.score: 24.0
    This paper achieves two general objectives. It first analyses Bernard Hodgson's "Economic As Moral Science" as a path-breaking internal critique of neo-classical economic theory, and it then demonstrates that the underlying neo-classical paradigm he presupposes suffers from a deeper-structural myopia than his standpoint recognizes. EMS mainly exposes the a priori moral prescriptions underlying orthodox consumer choice theory - namely, its classical utilitarian ground and four or, as argued here, five hidden universal categorical-ought prescriptions which the theory presupposes as instrumental (...)
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  27. Ira M. Schnall (2007). Hume on “Popular” and “Philosophical” Skeptical Arguments. Hume Studies 33 (1):41-66.score: 24.0
    In section 12 of the Enquiry concerning Human Understanding, Hume presents several skeptical arguments, including “popular” and “philosophical”objections to inductive reasoning. I point out a puzzling aspect of Hume’s treatment of these two kinds of objection, and I suggest a way to deal with the puzzle. I then examine the roles of both kinds of objection in leading to “mitigated” skepticism. In particular, Hume claims that the philosophical objection can lead to limiting investigation to matters of common (...)
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  28. A. J. Ravenscroft (2000). 'End-of-Life' Decision Making Within Intensive Care - Objective, Consistent, Defensible? Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (6):435-440.score: 24.0
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  29. Peter Carrier (2011). Anti-Totalitarian Rhetoric in Contemporary German Politics (its Ambivalent Objects and Consistent. Human Affairs 21 (1):27-34.score: 24.0
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  30. Sandra R. Waxman & Irena Braun (2005). Consistent (but Not Variable) Names as Invitations to Form Object Categories: New Evidence From 12-Month-Old Infants. Cognition 95 (3):B59-B68.score: 24.0
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  31. Ezio Di Nucci (2010). Refuting a Frankfurtian Objection to Frankfurt-Type Counterexamples. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (2):207-213.score: 22.0
    In this paper I refute an apparently obvious objection to Frankfurt-type counterexamples to the Principle of Alternate Possibilities according to which if in the counterfactual scenario the agent does not act, then the agent could have avoided acting in the actual scenario. And because what happens in the counterfactual scenario cannot count as the relevant agent’s actions given the sort of external control that agent is under, then we can ground responsibility on that agent having been able to avoid (...)
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  32. Walter Carnielli & Rodrigues Abilio, On the Philosophical Motivations for the Logics of Formal Consistency and Inconsistency.score: 22.0
    We present a philosophical motivation for the logics of formal inconsistency (LFIs), a family of paraconsistent logics whose distinctive feature is that of having resources for expressing the notion of consistency (and inconsistency as well) within the object language. We shall defend the view according to which logics of formal inconsistency are theories of logical consequence of normative and epistemic character. This approach not only allows us to make inferences in the presence of contradictions, but offers a philosophically acceptable (...)
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  33. Kristin Voigt (2007). The Harshness Objection: Is Luck Egalitarianism Too Harsh on the Victims of Option Luck? [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (4):389 - 407.score: 22.0
    According to luck egalitarianism, inequalities are justified if and only if they arise from choices for which it is reasonable to hold agents responsible. This position has been criticised for its purported harshness in responding to the plight of individuals who, through their own choices, end up destitute. This paper aims to assess the Harshness Objection. I put forward a version of the objection that has been qualified to take into account some of the more subtle elements of (...)
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  34. Douglas N. Kutach (2003). Time Travel and Consistency Constraints. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1098-1113.score: 22.0
    The possibility of time travel, as permitted in General Relativity, is responsible for constraining physical fields beyond what laws of nature would otherwise require. In the special case where time travel is limited to a single object returning to the past and interacting with itself, consistency constraints can be avoided if the dynamics is continuous and the object's state space satisfies a certain topological requirement: that all null-homotopic mappings from the state-space to itself have some fixed point. Where (...) constraints do exist, no new physics is needed to enforce them. One needs only to accept certain global topological constraints as laws, something that is reasonable in any case. (shrink)
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  35. Gopal Sreenivasan (2008). Character and Consistency: Still More Errors. Mind 117 (467):603-612.score: 22.0
    This paper continues a debate among philosophers concerning the implications of situationist experiments in social psychology for the theory of virtue. In a previous paper (2002), I argued among other things that the sort of character trait problematized by Hartshorne and May's (1928) famous study of honesty is not the right sort to trouble the theory of virtue. Webber (2006) criticizes my argument, alleging that it founders on an ambiguity in "cross-situational consistency" and that Milgram's (1974) obedience experiment is (...)
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  36. Douglas Kutach (2003). Time Travel and Consistency Constraints. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1098-1113.score: 22.0
    The possibility of time travel, as permitted in General Relativity, is responsible for constraining physical fields beyond what the laws normally require. In the special case where time travel is limited to a single object returning to the past and interacting with itself, consistency constraints can be avoided if the dynamics is continuous and the object’s state space satisfies a certain topological requirement: that all null-homotopic mappings from the state-space to itself have some fixed point. Where consistency constraints (...)
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  37. Jonathan Webber (2006). Character, Consistency, and Classification. Mind 115 (459):651-658.score: 22.0
    John Doris has recently argued that since we do not possess character traits as traditionally conceived, virtue ethics is rooted in a false empirical presupposition. Gopal Sreenivasan has claimed, in a paper in Mind, that Doris has not provided suitable evidence for his empirical claim. But the experiment Sreenivasan focuses on is not one that Doris employs, and neither is it relevantly similar in structure. The confusion arises because both authors use the phrase ‘cross-situational consistency’ to describe the aspect (...)
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  38. J. Sonderholm (2013). World Poverty, Positive Duties, and the Overdemandingness Objection. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 12 (3):308-327.score: 22.0
    One objection that has been consistently raised for theorists who are committed to the idea that we have a positive duty to aid the global poor is the overdemandingness objection. This article is a critical discussion of this objection. First, the objection is laid out in some detail. A number of influential attempts to meet the overdemandingness objection are then discussed, and it is argued that they all fail in their intended purpose. The conclusion of (...)
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  39. Shane J. Ralston (2008). In Defense of Democracy as a Way of Life: A Reply to Talisse's Pluralist Objection. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (4):pp. 629-659.score: 22.0
    Robert Talisse objects that Deweyan democrats, or those who endorse John Dewey’s philosophy of democracy, cannot consistently hold that (i) “democracy is a way of life” and (ii) democracy as a way of life is compatible with pluralism, at least as contemporary political theorists define that term. What Talisse refers to as his “pluralist objection” states that Deweyan democracy resembles a thick theory of democracy, that is, a theory establishing a set of prior restraints on the values that can (...)
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  40. Sandra Shapshay (2011). Did Schopenhauer Neglect the 'Neglected Alternative' Objection? Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (3):321-348.score: 22.0
    For well over a hundred years, commentators have examined the importance of the famous ‘neglected alternative’ (NA) objection to transcendental idealism. By contrast, very little attention has been paid to what the NA objection means for a later philosophical system of the 19th century that was highly indebted to Kant, namely, that of Arthur Schopenhauer. I seek to redress this lacuna in Schopenhauer scholarship and argue first that Schopenhauer acknowledged NA ( avant la lettre ) and took it (...)
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  41. Brett Doran (2001). Reconsidering the Levelling-Down Objection Against Egalitarianism. Utilitas 13 (01):65-.score: 22.0
    The levelling-down objection rejects the egalitarian view that it is intrinsically good to eliminate the inequality of an outcome by lowering the relevant good of those better off to the level of those worse off. Larry Temkin suggests that the position underlying this objection is an exclusionary version of the person-affecting view, in which an outcome can be better or worse only if persons are affected for better or worse. Temkin then defends egalitarianism by rejecting this position. In (...)
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  42. Yong Huang (2010). The Self-Centeredness Objection to Virtue Ethics. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):651-692.score: 22.0
    As virtue ethics has developed into maturity, it has also met with a number of objections. This essay focuses on the self-centeredness objection: since virtue ethics recommends that we be concerned with our own virtues or virtuous characters, it is self-centered. In response, I first argue that, for Zhu Xi’s neo-Confucianism, the character that a virtuous person is concerned with consists largely in precisely those virtues that incline him or her to be concerned with the good of others. While (...)
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  43. Frederik Herzberg (2013). The Consistency of Probabilistic Regresses: Some Implications for Epistemological Infinitism. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 78 (2):371-382.score: 22.0
    This note employs the recently established consistency theorem for infinite regresses of probabilistic justification (Herzberg in Stud Log 94(3):331–345, 2010) to address some of the better-known objections to epistemological infinitism. In addition, another proof for that consistency theorem is given; the new derivation no longer employs nonstandard analysis, but utilises the Daniell–Kolmogorov theorem.
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  44. Anders Kraal (2013). A Humean Objection to Plantinga's Quantitative Free Will Defense. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (3):221-233.score: 22.0
    Plantinga’s The Nature of Necessity (1974) contains a largely neglected argument for the claim that the proposition “God is omnipotent, omniscient, and wholly good” is logically consistent with “the vast amount and variety of evil the universe actually contains” (not to be confused with Plantinga’s famous “Free Will Defense,” which seeks to show that this same proposition is logically consistent with “some evil”). In this paper I explicate this argument, and argue that it assumes that there is more moral good (...)
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  45. Laurent Dubois (2013). Lambda Theory: Introduction of a Constant for" Nothing" Into Set Theory, a Model of Consistency and Most Noticeable Conclusions. Logique Et Analyse 222:165-181.score: 22.0
    The purpose of this article is to present several immediate consequences of the introduction of a new constant called Lambda in order to represent the object ``nothing" or ``void" into a standard set theory. The use of Lambda will appear natural thanks to its role of condition of possibility of sets. On a conceptual level, the use of Lambda leads to a legitimation of the empty set and to a redefinition of the notion of set. It lets also clearly appear (...)
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  46. Matej Sušnik (2009). The Amoralist Objection and the Method of Moral Reasoning. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):91-100.score: 22.0
    In his book Moralna spoznaja Baccarini argues that, with respect to the individual reasoning about morality, the method of reflective equilibrium is the appropriate method of moral reasoning. The starting point of my argument is Baccarini’s refutation of Hare’s view. As I see it, one of Baccarini’s central arguments against Hare consists in claiming that Hare’s approach to the amoralist objection weakens the deductive model of moral reasoning. I argue that the amoralist objection also posses a threat to (...)
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  47. Andrew Boucher, Consistency and Existence by V1.00 Last Updated: 1 Oct 2000 Please Send Your Comments to Abo.score: 22.0
    On the one hand, first-order theories are able to assert the existence of objects. For instance, ZF set theory asserts the existence of objects called the power set, while Peano Arithmetic asserts the existence of zero. On the other hand, a first-order theory may or not be consistent: it is if and only if no contradiction is a theorem. Let us ask, What is the connection between consistency and existence?
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  48. A. Minh Nguyen (2000). On a Searlean Objection to Rosenthal's Theory of State-Consciousness. Journal of Philosophical Research 25 (January):83-100.score: 22.0
    In a series of closely connected papers, Rosenthal has defended what has come to be known as “the higher-order thought theory of state-consciousness.” According to this theory, a mental state which one instantiates is conscious if and only if one is conscious of being in it in some relevant way, and one’s being conscious of being in the state which is conscious consists in one’s having a contemporaneous thought to the effect that one is in that state. The main aim (...)
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  49. Adriano Dodó & João Marcos (2014). Negative Modalities, Consistency and Determinedness. Electronic Notes in Theoretical Computer Science 300:21-45.score: 22.0
    We study a modal language for negative operators—an intuitionistic-like negation and its paraconsistent dual—added to (bounded) distributive lattices. For each non-classical negation an extra operator is hereby adjoined in order to allow for standard logical inferences to be opportunely restored. We present abstract characterizations and exhibit the main properties of each kind of negative modality, as well as of the associated connectives that express consistency and determinedness at the object-language level. Appropriate sequent-style proof systems and adequate kripke semantics are (...)
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  50. Thomas Müller (2013). Alternatives to Histories? Employing a Local Notion of Modal Consistency in Branching Theories. Erkenntnis:1-22.score: 22.0
    Branching theories are popular frameworks for modeling objective indeterminism in the form of a future of open possibilities. In such theories, the notion of a history plays a crucial role: it is both a basic ingredient in the axiomatic definition of the framework, and it is used as a parameter of truth in semantics for languages with a future tense. Furthermore, histories—complete possible courses of events—ground the notion of modal consistency: a set of events is modally consistent iff there (...)
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