Search results for 'consistency objection' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. P. Garavaso (2013). Hilary Putnam's Consistency Objection Against Wittgenstein's Conventionalism in Mathematics. Philosophia Mathematica 21 (3):279-296.score: 60.0
    Hilary Putnam first published the consistency objection against Ludwig Wittgenstein’s account of mathematics in 1979. In 1983, Putnam and Benacerraf raised this objection against all conventionalist accounts of mathematics. I discuss the 1979 version and the scenario argument, which supports the key premise of the objection. The wide applicability of this objection is not apparent; I thus raise it against an imaginary axiomatic theory T similar to Peano arithmetic in all relevant aspects. I argue that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. John A. Humphrey (1993). Some Objections to Putnam's “Consistency Objection”. Journal of Philosophical Research 18:127-141.score: 60.0
    This paper is a critical analysis of Putnam’s “consistency objection,” an objection made against a particular reading of Wittgenstein’s philosophy of mathematics (“up-to-us-ism”). I show that Putnam’s objection presupposes a rather unlikely version of Wittgenstein’s “up-to-us-ism” and is unable to undermine a more likely anti-Platonist version. I also show that a companion argument, (the “something more” argument) is unable to overturn this more sophisticated anti-Platonist version of Wittgenstein’s up-to-us-ism. Along the way I try to clarify Wittgenstein’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Pieranna Garavaso (1988). Wittgenstein's Philosophy of Mathematics: A Reply to Two Objections. Southern Journal of Philosophy 26 (2):179-191.score: 46.0
    This paper has two main purposes: first to compare Wittgenstein's views to the more traditional views in the philosophy of mathematics; second, to provide a general outline for a Wittgensteinian reply to two objections against Wittgenstein's account of mathematics: the objectivity objection and the consistency objections, respectively. Two fundamental thesmes of Wittgenstein's account of mathematics title the first two sections: mathematical propositions are rules and not descritpions and mathematics is employed within a form of life. Under each heading, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Joseph W. E. Schmitt (1992). Gewirth and the Egoist: A New Objection to the Principle of Generic Consistency. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (1):105-116.score: 36.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Matthias Schirn (2010). Consistency, Models, and Soundness. Axiomathes 20 (2-3):153-207.score: 27.0
    This essay consists of two parts. In the first part, I focus my attention on the remarks that Frege makes on consistency when he sets about criticizing the method of creating new numbers through definition or abstraction. This gives me the opportunity to comment also a little on H. Hankel, J. Thomae—Frege’s main targets when he comes to criticize “formal theories of arithmetic” in Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik (1884) and the second volume of Grundgesetze der Arithmetik (1903)—G. Cantor, L. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David J. Stump (2007). The Independence of the Parallel Postulate and Development of Rigorous Consistency Proofs. History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (1):19-30.score: 21.0
    I trace the development of arguments for the consistency of non-Euclidean geometries and for the independence of the parallel postulate, showing how the arguments become more rigorous as a formal conception of geometry is introduced. I analyze the kinds of arguments offered by Jules Hoüel in 1860-1870 for the unprovability of the parallel postulate and for the existence of non-Euclidean geometries, especially his reaction to the publication of Beltrami’s seminal papers, showing that Beltrami was much more concerned with the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Richard Heck (1992). On the Consistency of Second-Order Contextual Definitions. Noûs 26 (4):491-494.score: 21.0
    One of the earliest discussions of the so-called 'bad company' objection to Neo-Fregeanism, I show that the consistency of an arbitrary second-order 'contextual definition' (nowadays known as an 'abstraction principle' is recursively undecidable. I go on to suggest that an acceptable such principle should satisfy a condition nowadays known as 'stablity'.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Evandro Agazzi (2011). Consistency, Truth and Ontology. Studia Logica 97 (1):7 - 29.score: 21.0
    After a brief survey of the different meanings of consistency, the study is restricted to consistency understood as non-contradiction of sets of sentences. The philosophical reasons for this requirement are discussed, both in relation to the problem of sense and the problem of truth (also with historical references). The issue of mathematical truth is then addressed, and the different conceptions of it are put in relation with consistency. The formal treatment of consistency and truth in mathematical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Marius V. Peelen Jaap Munneke, Valentina Brentari (2013). The Influence of Scene Context on Object Recognition is Independent of Attentional Focus. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
    Humans can quickly and accurately recognize objects within briefly presented natural scenes. Previous work has provided evidence that scene context contributes to this process, demonstrating improved naming of objects that were presented in semantically consistent scenes (e.g., a sandcastle on a beach) relative to semantically inconsistent scenes (e.g., a sandcastle on a football field). The current study was aimed at investigating which processes underlie the scene consistency effect. Specifically, we tested: 1) whether the effect is due to increased visual (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David Sobel (2007). The Impotence of the Demandingness Objection. Philosophers' Imprint 7 (8):1-17.score: 18.0
    Consequentialism, many philosophers have claimed, asks too much of us to be a plausible ethical theory. Indeed, the theory's severe demandingness is often claimed to be its chief flaw. My thesis is that as we come to better understand this objection, we see that, even if it signals or tracks the existence of a real problem for Consequentialism, it cannot itself be a fundamental problem with the view. The objection cannot itself provide good reason to break with Consequentialism, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Thomas Porter (2011). Prioritarianism and the Levelling Down Objection. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):197-206.score: 18.0
    I discuss Ingmar Persson’s recent argument that the Levelling Down Objection could be worse for prioritarians than for egalitarians. Persson’s argument depends upon the claim that indifference to changes in the average prioritarian value of benefits implies indifference to changes in the overall prioritarian value of a state of affairs. As I show, however, sensible conceptions of prioritarianism have no such implication. Therefore prioritarians have nothing to fear from the Levelling Down Objection.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Michael McGlone, The Humphrey Objection and the Problem of De Re Modality.score: 18.0
    In this paper I consider Saul Kripke’s famous Humphrey objection to David Lewis’s views on de re modality and argue that responses to this objection currently on the market fail to mitigate its force in any significant way.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. William Lauinger (2013). The Missing-Desires Objection to Hybrid Theories of Well-Being. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (2):270-295.score: 18.0
    Many philosophers have claimed that we might do well to adopt a hybrid theory of well-being: a theory that incorporates both an objective-value constraint and a pro-attitude constraint. Hybrid theories are attractive for two main reasons. First, unlike desire theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about the problem of defective desires. This is so because, unlike desire theories, hybrid theories place an objective-value constraint on well-being. Second, unlike objectivist theories of well-being, hybrid theories need not worry about being (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Julia Tanner (2009). The Argument From Marginal Cases and the Slippery Slope Objection. Environmental Values 18 (1):51-66.score: 18.0
    Rationality (or something similar) is usually given as the relevant difference between all humans and animals; the reason humans do but animals do not deserve moral consideration. But according to the Argument from Marginal Cases not all humans are rational, yet if such (marginal) humans are morally considerable despite lacking rationality it would be arbitrary to deny animals with similar capacities a similar level of moral consideration. The slippery slope objection has it that although marginal humans are not strictly (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Derk Pereboom (2012). The Disappearing Agent Objection to Event-Causal Libertarianism. Philosophical Studies:1-11.score: 18.0
    The question I raise is whether Mark Balaguer’s event-causal libertarianism can withstand the disappearing agent objection. The concern is that with the causal role of the events antecedent to a decision already given, nothing settles whether the decision occurs, and so the agent does not settle whether the decision occurs. Thus it would seem that in this view the agent will not have the control in making decisions required for moral responsibility. I examine whether Balaguer’s position has the resources (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Gualtiero Piccinini (2003). Alan Turing and the Mathematical Objection. Minds and Machines 13 (1):23-48.score: 18.0
    This paper concerns Alan Turing’s ideas about machines, mathematical methods of proof, and intelligence. By the late 1930s, Kurt Gödel and other logicians, including Turing himself, had shown that no finite set of rules could be used to generate all true mathematical statements. Yet according to Turing, there was no upper bound to the number of mathematical truths provable by intelligent human beings, for they could invent new rules and methods of proof. So, the output of a human mathematician, for (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Mark R. Wicclair (2008). Is Conscientious Objection Incompatible with a Physician's Professional Obligations? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):171--185.score: 18.0
    In response to physicians who refuse to provide medical services that are contrary to their ethical and/or religious beliefs, it is sometimes asserted that anyone who is not willing to provide legally and professionally permitted medical services should choose another profession. This article critically examines the underlying assumption that conscientious objection is incompatible with a physician’s professional obligations (the “incompatibility thesis”). Several accounts of the professional obligations of physicians are explored: general ethical theories (consequentialism, contractarianism, and rights-based theories), internal (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Mark R. Wicclair (2011). Conscientious Objection in Health Care: An Ethical Analysis. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Three approaches to conscientious objection in health care: conscience absolutism, the incompatibility thesis, and compromise; 3. Ethical limitations on the exercise of conscience; 4. Pharmacies, health care institutions, and conscientious objection; 5. Students, residents, and conscience-based exemptions; 6. Conscience clauses: too little and too much protection; References.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Elliott Louis Bedford (2012). Abortion: At the Still Point of the Turning Conscientious Objection Debate. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (2):63-82.score: 18.0
    Abortion is the central issue in the conscientious objection debate. In this article I demonstrate why this is so for two philosophical viewpoints prominent in American culture. One, represented by Patrick Lee and Robert P. George, holds that the fundamental moral value of being human can be found in bare life and the other, represented by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress, holds that this fundamental value is found in the life that can choose and determine itself. First, I articulate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lawrence B. Lombard (2006). Scope Fallacies and the “Decisive Objection” Against Endurance. Philosophia 34 (4):441-452.score: 18.0
    From time to time, the idea that enduring things can change has been challenged. The latest challenge has come in the form of what David Lewis has called a “decisive objection”, which claims to deduce a contradiction from the idea that enduring things change with respect to their temporary intrinsics, when that idea is combined with eternalism. It is my aim in this paper to explain why I think that no argument has yet appeared that deduces a contradiction from (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Matthew Braddock (2013). Defusing the Demandingness Objection: Unreliable Intuitions. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):169-191.score: 18.0
    Dogged resistance to demanding moral views frequently takes the form of The Demandingness Objection. Premise (1): Moral view V demands too much of us. Premise (2): If a moral view demands too much of us, then it is mistaken. Conclusion: Therefore, moral view V is mistaken. Objections of this form harass major theories in normative ethics as well as prominent moral views in applied ethics and political philosophy. The present paper does the following: (i) it clarifies and distinguishes between (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Annabelle Lever (2013). 'Taxation, Conscientious Objection and Religious Freedom'. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1):144-153.score: 18.0
    This is part of a symposium on conscientious objection and religious freedom inspired by the US Catholic Church's claim that being forced to pay for health insurance that covers abortions (the effect of 'Obamacare')is the equivalent of forcing pacifists to fight. This article takes issue with this claim, and shows that while it would be unjust on democratic principles to force pacifists to fight, given their willingness to serve their country in other ways, there is no democratic objection (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Q. Yu (1992). Consistency, Mechanicalness, and the Logic of the Mind. Synthese 90 (1):145-79.score: 18.0
    G. Priest's anti-consistency argument (Priest 1979, 1984, 1987) and J. R. Lucas's anti-mechanist argument (Lucas 1961, 1968, 1970, 1984) both appeal to Gödel incompleteness. By way of refuting them, this paper defends the thesis of quartet compatibility, viz., that the logic of the mind can simultaneously be Gödel incomplete, consistent, mechanical, and recursion complete (capable of all means of recursion). A representational approach is pursued, which owes its origin to works by, among others, J. Myhill (1964), P. Benacerraf (1967), (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Fernando Ferreira & Kai F. Wehmeier (2002). On the Consistency of the Δ11-CA Fragment of Frege's Grundgesetze. Journal of Philosophical Logic 31 (4):301-311.score: 18.0
    It is well known that Frege's system in the Grundgesetze der Arithmetik is formally inconsistent. Frege's instantiation rule for the second-order universal quantifier makes his system, except for minor differences, full (i.e., with unrestricted comprehension) second-order logic, augmented by an abstraction operator that abides to Frege's basic law V. A few years ago, Richard Heck proved the consistency of the fragment of Frege's theory obtained by restricting the comprehension schema to predicative formulae. He further conjectured that the more encompassing (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Lawrence Pasternack (2013). The Many Gods Objection to Pascal's Wager: A Decision Theoretic Response. Philo 15 (2):158-178.score: 18.0
    The Many Gods Objection (MGO) is widely viewed as a decisive criticism of Pascal’s Wager. By introducing a plurality of hypotheses with infinite expected utility into the decision matrix, the wagerer is left without adequate grounds to decide between them. However, some have attempted to rebut this objection by employing various criteria drawn from the theological tradition. Unfortunately, such defenses do little good for an argument that is supposed to be an apologetic aimed at atheists and agnostics. The (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Brian Ribeiro & Scott Aikin (2009). A Consistency Challenge for Moral and Religious Beliefs. Teaching Philosophy 32 (2):127-151.score: 18.0
    What should individuals do when their firmly held moral beliefs are prima facie inconsistent with their religious beliefs? In this article we outline several ways of posing such consistency challenges and offer a detailed taxonomy of the various responses available to someone facing a consistency challenge of this sort. Throughout the paper, our concerns are primarily pedagogical: how best to pose consistency challenges in the classroom, how to stimulate discussion of the various responses to them, and how (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Luciano Floridi (2014). Information Closure and the Sceptical Objection. Synthese 191 (6):1037-1050.score: 18.0
    In this article, I define and then defend the principle of information closure (pic) against a sceptical objection similar to the one discussed by Dretske in relation to the principle of epistemic closure. If I am successful, given that pic is equivalent to the axiom of distribution and that the latter is one of the conditions that discriminate between normal and non-normal modal logics, a main result of such a defence is that one potentially good reason to look for (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Jonah N. Schupbach (2013). Is the Bad Lot Objection Just Misguided? Erkenntnis (1):1-10.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I argue that van Fraassen’s “bad lot objection” against Inference to the Best Explanation [IBE] severely misses its mark. First, I show that the objection holds no special relevance to IBE; if the bad lot objection poses a serious problem for IBE, then it poses a serious problem for any inference form whatever. Second, I argue that, thankfully, it does not pose a serious threat to any inference form. Rather, the objection misguidedly blames (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Martin Kaså (2012). Experimental Logics, Mechanism and Knowable Consistency. Theoria 78 (3):213-224.score: 18.0
    In a paper published in 1975, Robert Jeroslow introduced the concept of an experimental logic as a generalization of ordinary formal systems such that theoremhood is a (or in practice ) rather than . These systems can be viewed as (rather crude) representations of axiomatic theories evolving stepwise over time. Similar ideas can be found in papers by Putnam (1965) and McCarthy and Shapiro (1987). The topic of the present article is a discussion of a suggestion by Allen Hazen, that (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Gemma Robles & José M. Méndez (2009). Strong Paraconsistency and the Basic Constructive Logic for an Even Weaker Sense of Consistency. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (3):357-402.score: 18.0
    In a standard sense, consistency and paraconsistency are understood as the absence of any contradiction and as the absence of the ECQ (‘E contradictione quodlibet’) rule, respectively. The concepts of weak consistency (in two different senses) as well as that of F -consistency have been defined by the authors. The aim of this paper is (a) to define alternative (to the standard one) concepts of paraconsistency in respect of the aforementioned notions of weak consistency and F (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stefan Artmann (2004). Four Principles of Evolutionary Pragmatics in Jacob's Philosophy of Modern Biology. Axiomathes 14 (4):381-395.score: 18.0
    The French molecular biologist François Jacob outlined a theory of evolution as tinkering. From a methodological point of view, his approach can be seen as a biologic specification of the relation between laws, describing coherently the dynamics of a system, and contingent boundary conditions on this dynamics. From a semiotic perspective, tinkering is a pragmatic concept well-known from the information-theoretic anthropology of Claude Lévi-Strauss. In idealized contrast to an engineer, the tinkerer has to accept the concrete restrictions on his material (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Liang Li, Tian Liu & Ke Xu (2013). Variable-Centered Consistency in Model RB. Minds and Machines 23 (1):95-103.score: 18.0
    Model RB is a model of random constraint satisfaction problems, which exhibits exact satisfiability phase transition and many hard instances, both experimentally and theoretically. Benchmarks based on Model RB have been successfully used by various international algorithm competitions and many research papers. In a previous work, Xu and Li defined two notions called i-constraint assignment tuple and flawed i-constraint assignment tuple to show an exponential resolution complexity of Model RB. These two notions are similar to some kind of consistency (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Deryck Beyleveld (2012). The Principle of Generic Consistency as the Supreme Principle of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (1):1-18.score: 18.0
    Alan Gewirth’s claim that agents contradict that they are agents if they do not accept that the principle of generic consistency (PGC) is the supreme principle of practical rationality has been greeted with widespread scepticism. The aim of this article is not to defend this claim but to show that if the first and least controversial of the three stages of Gewirth’s argument for the PGC is sound, then agents must interpret and give effect to human rights in ways (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Boccuni (2011). On the Consistency of a Plural Theory of Frege’s Grundgesetze. Studia Logica 97 (3):329-345.score: 18.0
    PG (Plural Grundgesetze) is a predicative monadic second-order system which is aimed to derive second-order Peano arithmetic. It exploits the notion of plural quantification and a few Fregean devices, among which the infamous Basic Law V. In this paper, a model-theoretical consistency proof for the system PG is provided.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Walter Carnielli (2011). The Single-Minded Pursuit of Consistency and its Weakness. Studia Logica 97 (1):81 - 100.score: 18.0
    I argue that a compulsive seeking for just one sense of consistency is hazardous to rationality, and that observing the subtle distinctions of reasonableness between individual and groups may suggest wider, structuralistic notions of consistency, even relevant to re-assessing Gödei's Second Incompleteness Theorem and to science as a whole.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Joseph G. Johnson & Jerome R. Busemeyer (2001). Multiple-Stage Decision-Making: The Effect of Planning Horizon Length on Dynamic Consistency. Theory and Decision 51 (2/4):217-246.score: 18.0
    Many decisions involve multiple stages of choices and events, and these decisions can be represented graphically as decision trees. Optimal decision strategies for decision trees are commonly determined by a backward induction analysis that demands adherence to three fundamental consistency principles: dynamic, consequential, and strategic. Previous research (Busemeyer et al. 2000, J. Exp. Psychol. Gen. 129, 530) found that decision-makers tend to exhibit violations of dynamic and strategic consistency at rates significantly higher than choice inconsistency across various levels (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Ronald Sandler (2004). An Aretaic Objection to Agricultural Biotechnology. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (3):301-317.score: 18.0
    Considerations of virtue and character appear from time to time in the agricultural biotechnology literature. Critics of the technologies often suggest that they are contrary to some virtue (usually humility) or do not fit with the image of ourselves and the human place in the world that we ought to embrace. In this article, I consider the aretaic or virtue-based objection that to engage in agricultural biotechnology is to exhibit arrogance, hubris, and disaffection. In section one, I discuss Gary (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. James M. Dickey, Morris L. Eaton & William D. Sudderth (2009). De Finetti Coherence and Logical Consistency. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 50 (2):133-139.score: 18.0
    The logical consistency of a collection of assertions about events can be viewed as a special case of coherent probability assessments in the sense of de Finetti.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Gilles Dowek & Olivier Hermant (2012). A Simple Proof That Super-Consistency Implies Cut Elimination. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 53 (4):439-456.score: 18.0
    We give a simple and direct proof that super-consistency implies the cut-elimination property in deduction modulo. This proof can be seen as a simplification of the proof that super-consistency implies proof normalization. It also takes ideas from the semantic proofs of cut elimination that proceed by proving the completeness of the cut-free calculus. As an application, we compare our work with the cut-elimination theorems in higher-order logic that involve V-complexes.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Takashi Hayashi (2011). Context Dependence and Consistency in Dynamic Choice Under Uncertainty: The Case of Anticipated Regret. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 70 (4):399-430.score: 18.0
    We examine if and to what extent choice dispositions can allow dependence on contexts and maintain consistency over time, in a dynamic environment under uncertainty. We focus on one of the context dependence properties, opportunity dependence because of being affected by anticipated regret, where the consequentialist choice framework is maintained. There are two sources of potential inconsistency: one is arrival of information, and the other is changing opportunities. First, we go over the general method of resolution of potential inconsistency, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Pavan Ramkumar Aapo Hyvärinen (2013). Testing Independent Component Patterns by Inter-Subject or Inter-Session Consistency. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Independent component analysis (ICA) is increasingly used to analyze patterns of spontanous activity in brain imaging. However, there are hardly any methods for answering the fundamental question: Are the obtained components statistically significant? Most methods considering the significance of components either consider group-differences or use arbitrary thresholds with weak statistical justification. In previous work, we proposed a statistically principled method for testing if the coefficients in the mixing matrix are similar in different subjects or sessions. In many applications of ICA, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Ayesha Ahmad (2014). Do Motives Matter in Male Circumcision? 'Conscientious Objection' Against the Circumcision of a Muslim Child with a Blood Disorder. Bioethics 28 (2):67-75.score: 18.0
    Whilst there have been serious attempts to locate the practice of male circumcision for religious motives in the context of the (respective) religion's narrative and community, the debate, when referring to a clinical context, is often more nuanced. This article will contribute further to the debate by contextualising the Islamic practice of male circumcision within the clinical setting typical of a contemporary hospital. It specifically develops an additional complication; namely, the child has a pre-existing blood disorder. As an approach to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Christopher Hughes Chatham (2013). The Consistency Fallacy and Failures of Theory Embellishment. Frontiers in Psychology 4:965.score: 18.0
    The consistency fallacy and failures of theory embellishment.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Joost J. Joosten (2010). Consistency Statements and Iterations of Computable Functions in IΣ1 and PRA. Archive for Mathematical Logic 49 (7-8):773-798.score: 18.0
    In this paper we will state and prove some comparative theorems concerning PRA and IΣ1. We shall provide a characterization of IΣ1 in terms of PRA and iterations of a class of functions. In particular, we prove that for this class of functions the difference between IΣ1 and PRA is exactly that, where PRA is closed under iterations of these functions, IΣ1 is moreover provably closed under iteration. We will formulate a sufficient condition for a model of PRA to be (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Anne Joosten, Marius van Dijke, Alain Van Hiel & David De Cremer (2013). Feel Good, Do-Good!? On Consistency and Compensation in Moral Self-Regulation. Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.score: 18.0
    Studies in the behavioral ethics and moral psychology traditions have begun to reveal the important roles of self-related processes that underlie moral behavior. Unfortunately, this research has resulted in two distinct and opposing streams of findings that are usually referred to as moral consistency and moral compensation. Moral consistency research shows that a salient self-concept as a moral person promotes moral behavior. Conversely, moral compensation research reveals that a salient self-concept as an immoral person promotes moral behavior. This (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Eva M. K. Nordberg, Helge Skirbekk & Morten Magelssen (2014). Conscientious Objection to Referrals for Abortion: Pragmatic Solution or Threat to Women's Rights? BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):15.score: 18.0
    Conscientious objection has spurred impassioned debate in many Western countries. Some Norwegian general practitioners (GPs) refuse to refer for abortion. Little is know about how the GPs carry out their refusals in practice, how they perceive their refusal to fit with their role as professionals, and how refusals impact patients. Empirical data can inform subsequent normative analysis.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Hans-jörg Rheinberger (2011). Consistency From the Perspective Ofan Experimental Systems Approach Tothe Sciences and Their Epistemic Objects. Manuscrito 34 (1):307-321.score: 18.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Gemma Robles (2008). Extensions of the Basic Constructive Logic for Weak Consistency BKc1 Defined with a Falsity Constant. Logic and Logical Philosophy 16 (4):311-322.score: 18.0
    The logic BKc1 is the basic constructive logic for weak consistency (i.e., absence of the negation of a theorem) in the ternary relational semantics without a set of designated points. In this paper, a number of extensions of B Kc1 defined with a propositional falsity constant are defined. It is also proved that weak consistency is not equivalent to negation-consistency or absolute consistency (i.e., non-triviality) in any logic included in positive contractionless intermediate logic LC plus the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Saeed Salehi (2013). Herbrand Consistency of Some Finite Fragments of Bounded Arithmetical Theories. Archive for Mathematical Logic 52 (3-4):317-333.score: 18.0
    We formalize the notion of Herbrand Consistency in an appropriate way for bounded arithmetics, and show the existence of a finite fragment of IΔ0 whose Herbrand Consistency is not provable in IΔ0. We also show the existence of an IΔ0-derivable Π 1-sentence such that IΔ0 cannot prove its Herbrand Consistency.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Jacquelyn Shaw & Jocelyn Downie (2014). Welcome to the Wild, Wild North: Conscientious Objection Policies Governing Canada's Medical, Nursing, Pharmacy, and Dental Professions. Bioethics 28 (1):33-46.score: 18.0
    In Canada, as in many developed countries, healthcare conscientious objection is growing in visibility, if not in incidence. Yet the country's health professional policies on conscientious objection are in disarray. The article reports the results of a comprehensive review of policies relevant to conscientious objection for four Canadian health professions: medicine, nursing, pharmacy and dentistry. Where relevant policies exist in many Canadian provinces, there is much controversy and potential for confusion, due to policy inconsistencies and terminological vagueness. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000