Search results for 'constitution' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stephen Barker & Mark Jago (2014). Monism and Material Constitution. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 95 (1):189-204.score: 24.0
    Are the sculpture and the mass of gold which permanently makes it up one object or two? In this article, we argue that the monist, who answers ‘one object’, cannot accommodate the asymmetry of material constitution. To say ‘the mass of gold materially constitutes the sculpture, whereas the sculpture does not materially constitute the mass of gold’, the monist must treat ‘materially constitutes’ as an Abelardian predicate, whose denotation is sensitive to the linguistic context in which it appears. We (...)
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  2. Lynne Rudder Baker (2000). Persons and Bodies: A Constitution View. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    What is a human person, and what is the relation between a person and his or her body? In her third book on the philosophy of mind, Lynne Rudder Baker investigates what she terms the person/body problem and offers a detailed account of the relation between human persons and their bodies. Baker's argument is based on the 'Constitution View' of persons and bodies, which aims to show what distinguishes persons from all other beings and to show how we can (...)
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  3. Hagit Benbaji (2008). Constitution and the Explanatory Gap. Synthese 161 (2):183 - 202.score: 24.0
    Proponents of the explanatory gap claim that consciousness is a mystery. No one has ever given an account of how a physical thing could be identical to a phenomenal one. We fully understand the identity between water and H2O but the identity between pain and the firing of C-fibers is inconceivable. Mark Johnston [Journal of philosophy (1997), 564–583] suggests that if water is constituted by H2O, not identical to it, then the explanatory gap becomes a pseudo-problem. This is because all (...)
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  4. Christine M. Korsgaard (1999). Self-Constitution in the Ethics of Plato and Kant. Journal of Ethics 3 (1):1-29.score: 24.0
    Plato and Kant advance a constitutional model of the soul, in which reason and appetite or passion have different structural and functional roles in the generation of motivation, as opposed to the familiar Combat Model in which they are portrayed as independent sources of motivation struggling for control. In terms of the constitutional model we may explain what makes an action different from an event. What makes an action attributable to a person, and therefore what makes it an action, is (...)
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  5. Nicholas Aroney (2009). The Constitution of a Federal Commonwealth: The Making and Meaning of the Australian Constitution. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    By analysing original sources and evaluating conceptual frameworks, this book discusses the idea proclaimed in the Preamble to the Constitution that Australia is a federal commonwealth. Taking careful account of the influence which the American, Canadian and Swiss Constitutions had upon the framers of the Australian Constitution, the author shows how the framers wrestled with the problem of integrating federal ideas with inherited British traditions and their own experiences of parliamentary government. In so doing, the book explains how (...)
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  6. Dan Zahavi (1992). Constitution and Ontology: Some Remarks on Husserl's Ontological Position in the Logical Investigations. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 9 (2):111-124.score: 24.0
    One of the major exegetical difficulties in connection with Husserl's Logical Investigations has always been the clarification of his ontological position and the closely related concept of constitution. Ever since the publication of the first edition - which will be the point of departure - in 1900-1, there has been an ongoing discussion as to which concept of reality Husserl had committed himseff, initiated with a realistic interpretation by his G6ttingen Students. My aim in the following paper will be (...)
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  7. Jochen Dreher (2009). Phenomenology of Friendship: Construction and Constitution of an Existential Social Relationship. [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (4):401-417.score: 24.0
    Friendship, as a unique form of social relationship, establishes a particular union among individual human beings which allows them to overcome diverse boundaries between individual subjects. Age, gender or cultural differences do not necessarily constitute an obstacle for establishing friendship and as a social phenomenon, it might even include the potential to exist independently of space and time. This analysis in the interface of social science and phenomenology focuses on the principles of construction and constitution of this specific form (...)
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  8. Robert A. Wilson (2005). Persons, Social Agency, and Constitution. Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):49-69.score: 24.0
    In her recent book Persons and Bodies1, Lynne Rudder Baker has defended what she calls the constitution view of persons. On this view, persons are constituted by their bodies, where “constitution” is a ubiquitous, general metaphysical relation distinct from more familiar relations, such as identity and part-whole composition.
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  9. Ronald McIntyre (2012). &Quot;we-Subjectivity&Quot;: Husserl on Community and Communal Constitution. In Christel Fricke & Dagfinn Føllesdal (eds.), Intersubjectivity and Objectivity in Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl. Ontos Verlag. 8--61.score: 24.0
    I experience the world as comprising not only pluralities of individual persons but also interpersonal communal unities – groups, teams, societies, cultures, etc. The world, as experienced or "constituted", is a social world, a “spiritual” world. How are these social communities experienced as communities and distinguished from one another? What does it mean to be a “community”? And how do I constitute myself as a member of some communities but not of others? Moreover, the world of experience is not constituted (...)
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  10. Nick Zangwill (2012). Constitution and Causation. Metaphysica 13 (1):1-6.score: 24.0
    I argue that the constitution relation transmits causal efficacy and thus is a suitable relation to deploy in many troubled areas of philosophy, such as the mind–body problem. We need not demand identity.
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  11. István Aranyosi (2007). Shadows of Constitution. The Monist 90 (3):415-431.score: 24.0
    Mainstream metaphysics has been preoccupied by inquiring into the nature of major kinds of entities, like objects, properties and events, while avoiding minor entities, like shadows or holes. However, one might want to hope that dealing with such minor entities could be profitable for even solving puzzles about major entities. I propose a new ontological puzzle, the Shadow of Constitution Puzzle, incorporating the old puzzle of material constitution, with shadows in the role of the minor entity to guide (...)
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  12. Andrew Jason Cohen (1999). Communitarianism 'Social Constitution,' and Autonomy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (2):121–135.score: 24.0
    Communitarians like Alasdair MacIntyre, Charles Taylor, and Michael Sandel, defend what we may call the ‘social constitution thesis.’ This is the view that participation in society makes us what we are. This claim, however, is ambiguous. In an attempt to shed some light on it and to better understand the impact its truth would have on our beliefs regarding autonomy, I offer four possible ways it could be understood and four corresponding senses of individual independence and autonomy. I also (...)
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  13. Wolfgang Huemer (2003). Husserl and Haugeland on Constitution. Synthese 137 (3):345-368.score: 24.0
    Both Husserl and Haugeland develop an account of constitution to address the question of how our mental episodes can be about physical objects and thus, through the intentional relation, bridge the gap between the mental and the physical. The respective theories of the two philosophers of very different background show not only how mental episodes can have empirical content, but also how this content is shaped by past experiences or a holistic background of other mental episodes. In this article (...)
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  14. Robert Sokolowski (1964). The Formation of Husserl's Concept of Constitution. The Hague, M. Nijhoff.score: 24.0
    In tracing the formation of Husserl's concept of constitution, we hope to further the understanding of what he considers a philosophical explanation. ...
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  15. Joseph Jedwab (2013). A Critique of Baker's Constitution View. Metaphysica 14 (1):47-62.score: 24.0
    The paper presents, motivates, critiques, and proposes revisions to Baker’s Constitution View, which includes her definitions of constitution, derivative features, and numerical sameness. The paper argues that Baker should add a mereological clause to her definition of constitution in order to avoid various counterexamples.
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  16. Marek Piechowiak (2009). Elementy prawnonaturalne w stosowaniu Konstytucji RP [Natural-Law Elements in Application of the Constitution of the Republic of Poland]. Przegląd Sejmowy 17 (5 (94)):71-90.score: 24.0
    Recognizing inherent and inalienable nature of dignity and universality of certain values, the Constitution of the Republic of Poland, introduces to the foundations of Polish legal system some elements of natural law which may be used for application of the Basic Law. Constitutional recognition of these elements only makes sense on the assumption of their cognizability. Therefore, as an important element of constitutional concept of natural law is taken the recognition of the argument of cognitivism according to which moral (...)
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  17. Marek Piechowiak (2010). Wokół konstytucyjnej ochrony życia. Próba oceny propozycji nowelizacji Konstytucji RP [Constitutional Protection of Life: An Attempt to Assess the Proposal for Amendment of Poland’s Constitution]. Przegląd Sejmowy 18 (1 (96)):25-47.score: 24.0
    This article first of all attempts to assess the proposals of 2006–2007 to amend Poland’s Constitution, aimed mostly at strengthening constitutional protection of unborn human life. Parliamentary work on this proposal begins with the submission of the Deputy’s bill on amendment of the Constitution, published in the Sejm Paper No. 993 of September 5, 2006, and ends with a series of votes at the 39th sitting of the Sejm of the fifth term of office, held on April 13, (...)
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  18. Carl Gillett (2013). Constitution, and Multiple Constitution, in the Sciences: Using the Neuron to Construct a Starting Framework. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 23 (3):309-337.score: 24.0
    Inter-level mechanistic explanations in the sciences have long been a focus of philosophical interest, but attention has recently turned to the compositional character of these explanations which work by explaining higher level entities, whether processes, individuals or properties, using the lower level entities they take to compose them. However, we still have no theoretical account of the constitution or parthood relations between individuals deployed in such explanations, nor any accounts of multiple constitution. My primary focus in this paper (...)
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  19. William Hasker (2004). The Constitution View of Persons: A Critique. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (1):23-34.score: 24.0
    This paper discusses the “constitution view” of human persons, as set forth by Lynne Rudder Baker in her book, Persons and Bodies. The metaphysical notion of constitution is explained and briefly defended. It is shown, however, that the view that human persons are constituted by their bodies faces difficulties in specifying the “person-favorable conditions” under which a human body constitutes a person. Furthermore, none of the arguments in support of the claim that humans are constituted by (but not (...)
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  20. Gunnar Declerck & Olivier Gapenne (2009). Actuality and Possibility: On the Complementarity of Two Registers in the Bodily Constitution of Experience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):285-305.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the usefulness of the concept of possibility , and not merely that of actuality , for an inquiry into the bodily constitution of experience. The paper will study how the possibilities of action that may (or may not) be available to the subject help to shape the meaning attributed to perceived objects and to the situation occupied by the subject within her environment. This view will be supported by reference to empirical (...)
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  21. Roman Altshuler (forthcoming). Free Will, Narrative, and Retroactive Self-Constitution. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-17.score: 24.0
    John Fischer has recently argued that the value of acting freely is the value of self-expression. Drawing on David Velleman’s earlier work, Fischer holds that the value of a life is a narrative value and free will is valuable insofar as it allows us to shape the narrative structure of our lives. This account rests on Fischer’s distinction between regulative control and guidance control. While we lack the former kind of control, on Fischer’s view, the latter is all that is (...)
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  22. Piechowiak (2011). W Sprawie Aksjologicznej Spójności Konstytucji RP. Dobro Wspólne Czy Godność Człowieka?, [Axiological Consistency of the Polish Constitution: Common Good or Human Dignity?]. In Stanisław Leszek Stadniczeńko (ed.), Jednolitość aksjologiczna systemu prawa w rozwijających się państwach demokratycznych Europy. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Opolskiego. 111-124.score: 24.0
    The author poses a question: which of the two fundamental, constitutional values – common good or human dignity – can be considered to be the cornerstone, the unifying value in the Constitution of the Republic of Poland from 1997. The paper shows the crucial reasons for accepting each of these values as primary and also presents the underlying relationships between these values . The prominence of a given value for defining the aim of the constitution and the legal (...)
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  23. Marta Campdelacreu (2013). Do We Need Two Notions of Constitution? Philosophia 41 (2):503-519.score: 24.0
    Traditionally, constitutionalists have offered just one notion of constitution to analyse the relation that an object, such as a statue or a chain, bears to the object/s from which it is made: let us say, a piece of marble in the first case or a piece of metal in the second. Robert Wilson proposes to differentiate two notions of constitution and, in this way, to offer constitutionalists a more varied range of metaphysical tools. To justify the introduction of (...)
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  24. Jean-Luc Petit (2003). On the Relation Between Recent Neurobiological Data on Perception (and Action) and the Husserlian Theory of Constitution. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):281-298.score: 24.0
    The phenomenological theory of constitution promises a solution for the problem of consciousness insofar as it changes the traditional terms of this problem by systematically correlating subject and object in the unifying context of intentional acts. I argue that embodied constitution must depend upon the role of kinesthesia as a constitutive operator. In pursuing the path of intentionality in its descent from an idealistic level of pure constitution to this fully embodied kinesthetic constitution, we are able (...)
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  25. Amie L. Thomasson (2007). Wolfgang Huemer, the Constitution of Consciousness: A Study in Analytic Phenomenology (Series: Studies in Philosophy). [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 23 (2):161-167.score: 24.0
    This is an interesting and ambitious book, bringing Husserl’s account of constitution to bear on the enduring problem of how mind and world are related. The study does not aim to be a contribution to Husserl scholarship (though it certainly reflects deep understanding of central parts of Husserl’s work), but rather to bring aspects of Husserlian phenomenology into dialog with more recent analytic work in philosophy of mind to make philosophical progress.
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  26. Tomasz Kakol (2005). The Samep-Relation as a Response to Critics of Baker's Theory of Constitution. Journal of Philosophical Logic 34 (5/6):561 - 579.score: 24.0
    According to the so-called "standard account" regarding the problem of material constitution, a statue and a lump of clay that makes it up are not identical. The usual objection is that this view yields many objects in the same place at the same time. Lynne Rudder Baker's theory of constitution is a recent and sophisticated version of the standard account. She argues that the aforementioned objection can be answered by defining a relation of being the same P as (...)
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  27. Bill E. Lawson (1997). Property or Persons: On a “Plain Reading” of the United States Constitution. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 1 (3):291-303.score: 24.0
    The views of Frederick Douglass, Thurgood Marshall, and Clarence Thomas on how the United States Constitution should be read are examined. Thomas claims that his understanding of the Constitution aligns with Douglass. I conclude that Thomas misunderstands the strategy of Douglass and fails to appreciate the honesty of Marshall.
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  28. Jens Harbecke (2013). The Role of Supervenience and Constitution in Neuroscientific Research. Synthese:1-19.score: 24.0
    This paper is concerned with the notions of supervenience and mechanistic constitution as they have been discussed in the philosophy of neuroscience. Since both notions essentially involve specific dependence and determination relations among properties and sets of properties, the question arises whether the notions are systematically connected and how they connect to science. In a first step, some definitions of supervenience and mechanistic constitution are presented and tested for logical independence. Afterwards, certain assumptions fundamental to neuroscientific inquiry are (...)
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  29. Simon Evnine (2011). Constitution and Composition: Three Approaches to Their Relation. Protosociology 27.score: 24.0
    Constitution is the relation between something and what it is made of. Composition is the relation between something and its parts. I examine three different approaches to the relation between constitution and composition. One approach, associated with neo-Aristotelians like Mark Johnston and Kathrin Koslicki, identifies constitution with composition. A second, popular with those sympathetic to classical mereology such as Judith Thomson, defines constitution in terms of parthood. A third, advocated strongly by Lynne Baker, takes constitution (...)
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  30. James T. Turner Jr (2014). No Explanation of Persons, No Explanation of Resurrection: On Lynne Baker's Constitution View and the Resurrection of Human Persons. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 76 (3):297-317.score: 24.0
    I don’t think Lynne Rudder Baker’s constitution view can account for personal identity problems of a synchronic or diachronic nature. As such, it cannot accommodate the Christian’s claim of eschatological bodily resurrection-a principle reason for which she gives this account. In light of this, I press objections against her constitution view in the following ways: First, I critique an analogy she draws between Aristotle’s “accidental sameness” and constitution. Second, I address three problems for Baker’s constitution view (...)
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  31. Marek Piechowiak (2007). Służebność państwa wobec człowieka i jego praw jako naczelna idea Konstytucji RP z 2 kwietnia 1997 roku – osiągnięcie czy zadanie? [Subordination of the State to the Individual and to Human Rights as a Central Idea of Poland’s Constitution of 2 April 1997: A Goal or an Achievement?]. Przegląd Sejmowy 15 (4 (81)):65-91.score: 24.0
    The article deals with relations between the individual and human rights on the one hand, and the State on the other, in the context of the Constitution of the Republic of Poland. The author poses the question whether the idea of subordination of the State to the individual is really a central idea of that constitution. He puts forward many arguments against such suggestion. These arguments relate, above all, to the arrangement of the constitution: a chapter concerning (...)
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  32. Robert Francescotti (2005). Constitution and the Necessity of Identity. Logique Et Analyse 48 (192):311-321.score: 24.0
    It is tempting to think that in the case of complete spatio-temporal coincidence, the statue is identical with the constituent lump of clay. However, some philosophers have thought that accepting constitution as identity in this type of case forces one to reject the necessity of identity. I show that there is no conflict here. By distinguishing between an object's being necessarily an F and an object's being necessity identical with an F, we can see that accepting the necessity of (...)
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  33. Mika Ojakangas (2012). Potentia Absoluta Et Potentia Ordinata Dei: On the Theological Origins of Carl Schmitt's Theory of Constitution. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 45 (4):505-517.score: 24.0
    In line with his theory of secularization according to which all significant concepts of the modern theory of the state are secularized theological concepts, Carl Schmitt argues in Constitutional Theory that people’s (Volk) constitution-making power in modern democracy is analogical to God’s potestas constituens in medieval theology. It is also undoubtedly possible to find a resemblance between Schmitt’s constitution-making power and God’s power as it is described in medieval theology. In the same sense as the constitution-making power (...)
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  34. Paul James Cardwell (2010). Reforming an Unwritten Constitution? Exploring Changes in the United Kingdom, 1997–2010. Jurisprudence 121 (3):73-95.score: 24.0
    This article considers the major constitutional reforms which have taken place in the United Kingdom during the period of government by the Labour Party, 1997-2010. Within the context of the UK’s unwritten constitution, the article first considers how ‘constitutional’ law can be identified when compared with a written constitution, such as that of the Republic of Lithuania. The article then analyses the major reforms which have taken place since 1997, the political reasons behind them, the processes of reform (...)
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  35. Gediminas Mesonis (2009). Some Aspects of the Interpretation of the Constitution: the Possibility and Limits of Valuable (Moral) Arguments. Jurisprudence 116 (2):45-59.score: 24.0
    Constitution is an exclusive legal document, and its interpretation is a process – a continuous work of explanation of its content, the end and qualitative perfection of which may only be considered taking into account the limits of intellectual potential of the particular time. The interpretation of constitution is a permanent process, which is influenced and determined by plenty of conceptual factors. Firstly the supreme juridical power of the constitution as well as its integrity determines the opportunities (...)
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  36. S. Orestis Palermos (2014). Loops, Constitution and Cognitive Extension. Cognitive Systems Research 27:25-41.score: 24.0
    The ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, the ‘cognitive bloat’ worry, and the persisting theoretical confusion about the fundamental difference between the hypotheses of embedded (HEMC) and extended (HEC) cognition are three interrelated worries, whose common point—and the problem they accentuate—is the lack of a principled criterion of constitution. Attempting to address the ‘causal-constitution’ fallacy, mathematically oriented philosophers of mind have previously suggested that the presence of non-linear relations between the inner and the outer contributions is sufficient for cognitive extension. The (...)
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  37. Gediminas Mesonis (2009). The Interpretative Nature of Constitution. Jurisprudence 118 (4):47-62.score: 24.0
    The constitution’s standing as a legal act of the highest power not only ensures its exclusive status in the legal system but also determines the hierarchic certainty of all norms within that system. The explicit character of the constitution does not preclude it from ensuring the hierarchical functionality of the legal system. This latter function requires that the limitation “problem” of explicitness be addressed by interpreting the constitution as a systemic document. Applying the constitution, therefore, requires (...)
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  38. Nythamar Oliveira (2000). 'Philosophia semper reformada': Husserlian theses on constitution. Manuscrito 23 (2).score: 24.0
    Starting from the sensuous perception of what is seen, an attempt is made at re-casting a Husserlian theory of constitution of the object of intuition, as one leaves the natural attitude through a transcendental method, by positing several theses so as to avoid the aporias of philosophical binary oppositions such as rationalism and empiri-cism, realism and idealism, logicism and psychologism, subjectivism and objectivism, transcendentalism and ontologism, metaphysics and positivism. Throughout fifty-five theses on constitution, the Husserlian proposal of continuously (...)
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  39. Vytautas Sinkevičius (2012). Drafting of the 1992 Constitution: Passages From the Notes of That Period. Jurisprudence 19 (3):889-906.score: 24.0
    After the Provisional Basic Law (Provisional Constitution) had been adopted on 11 March 1990, it soon became clear that it did not meet the new needs of the society and the state. It became clear that the new Constitution had to be drafted promptly. Its drafting was taking place at the time of heated discussions about various things, but especially about the structure of branches of state power, the empowerment thereof and their interrelations. The author of the article (...)
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  40. Elena Vaitiekienė (2009). The Features of the Mexican Constitution. Jurisprudence 115 (1):89-121.score: 24.0
    In Latin America there are two models of constitutions - the liberal and the most stable Constitution of the Argentine Nation, drafted in 1853, (which was discussed in our previous article) and one of the most radical, comprehensive and unstable – the Constitution of the United Mexican States of 1917. Although both of them were constructed under the model of the US constitution with the influence of Spanish and French constitutionalism and local national traditions, the Argentine constitutionalism (...)
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  41. Iordan Gheorghe Barbulescu & Gabriel Andreescu (2010). References to God and the Christian Tradition in the Treaty Establishing a Constitution for Europe: An Examination of the Background. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 8 (24):207-230.score: 24.0
    The paper offers a survey of the debate on the introduction, in the Preamble of the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe, of references to God and Europe’s Christian tradition. It examines the question of European identity and values which motivates these proposals in relation to (1) the nature of the EU as an essentially political construction; (2) the issue of human rights in the EU; (3) the protection of cultural and religious diversity within the EU. The study shows (...)
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  42. Tadeusz Buksiński (2012). The Struggle for the Legal Status of Religion in the Polish Constitution. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (4):577-583.score: 24.0
    The use of specific language in the democratic Polish Constitution enacted on 2 April 1997 has created the essential differences in the status of religions and Churches in Poland to this in some other countries. It accepts the modern principles and values (tolerance, freedom, mutual independence of state and churches) but precludes the atheistic, hostile or indifferent to religions interpretations and implementations of these values and principles.
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  43. Aivars Endzins (2009). Use of the Europe's Constitutional Heritage in the Jurisdiction of the Constitutional Court When Interpreting Constitution of the Republic of Latvia. Jurisprudence 118 (4):85-96.score: 24.0
    The article analyses the problem of using European constitutional heritage in the practice of the Constitutional Court of the Republic of Latvia when interpreting the Constitution of the Republic of Latvia. The author analyses several judgments of the Constitutional Court of Latvia, wherein the Court refers to European legal heritage, when interpreting separate norms of the Constitution of the Republic of Latvia. Such practice is particularly evident in two categories of cases. The influence of European legal heritage is (...)
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  44. Karolina M. Cern, Piotr W. Juchacz & Bartosz Wojciechowski (2012). Whose Reason or Reasons Speak Through the Constitution? Introduction to the Problematics. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 25 (4):455-463.score: 24.0
    In the following paper sources of a constitution are put in question in general, and more specifically, the constitutional culture of the European Union Law is being investigated in-depth with regard to principles of deliberative democracy and rulings of the Court of Justice of the European Union. The change of a law application paradigm as well as the change of a legal systems’ nature are taken into account.
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  45. Robert Francescotti (2003). Statues and Their Constituents: Whether Constitution is Identity. Metaphysica 4 (2):59-77.score: 24.0
    This paper examines two popular arguments for the nonidentity of the statue and its constituent material. An essentialist response is provided to one of the arguments; that response is then shown to undermine the other argument as well. It is also shown that even if we accept these arguments and concede nonidentity, we can still avoid the further conclusion that constitution is not identity. These ideas are then extended to other applications of the arguments for nonidentity (specifically, their application (...)
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  46. Jens Harbecke (forthcoming). Regularity Constitution and the Location of Mechanistic Levels. Foundations of Science:1-16.score: 24.0
    This paper discusses the role of levels and level-bound theoretical terms in neurobiological explanations under the presupposition of a regularity theory of constitution. After presenting the definitions for the constitution relation and the notion of a mechanistic level in the sense of the regularity theory, the paper develops a set of inference rules that allow to determine whether two mechanisms referred to by one or more accepted explanations belong to the same level, or to different levels. The rules (...)
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  47. Egidijus Jarašiūnas (2012). Qualitative and Quantitative Parameters of the Execution of Foreign Policy in the Lithuanian Constitution. Jurisprudence 19 (3):923-953.score: 24.0
    The present article analyses the qualitative and quantitative parameters of the execution of foreign policy in the Constitution of the Republic of Lithuania. It should be noted that the matters of foreign policy were on the brink of constitutional regulation for a long time. The powers of institutions of the state in the field of foreign relations were established laconically by the Constitutions of first and second “waves” of establishment of constitutionalism. It was argued that the choices of decisions (...)
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  48. Milda Vainiutė (2012). The Preamble of the Constitution: The Key to Understanding the Constitutional Regulatory System. Jurisprudence 19 (3):907-921.score: 24.0
    While analysing constitutions of various countries in the legal literature, usually not only the form and the content but also the structure of the constitution is discussed. The structure of the constitution is an internal organisational order of the norms of the constitution. Although every state has a unique structure of their constitution, however, certain regularities can be discerned. The analysis of the structure of various constitutions leads to a conclusion that normally each constitution consists (...)
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  49. Bryan Pickel (2010). There is No 'Is' of Constitution. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):193 - 211.score: 22.0
    I defend the view that ordinary objects like statues are identical to the pieces of matter from which they are made. I argue that ordinary speakers assert sentences such as ‘this statue is a molded piece of clay’. This suggests that speakers believe propositions which entail that ordinary objects such as statues are the pieces matter from which they are made, and therefore pluralism contradicts ordinary beliefs. The dominant response to this argument purports to find an ambiguity in the word (...)
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  50. H. P. P. Lotter (2000). The South African Constitution Requires Men to Be Feminist. Koers 65 (4).score: 22.0
    Can a man be a feminist? If so, what would it mean? I want to participate in a dialogue between women and men on how to accommodate women’s moral concerns. I propose that the fundamental values of justice embodied in the South African constitutional democracy require men to be feminist. These values provide the best safeguard of the important interests and values of both women and men. Men who accept these values can support the main concerns of feminism. The implications (...)
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