Search results for 'constraints' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Dorit Ganson (2008). Evidentialism and Pragmatic Constraints on Outright Belief. Philosophical Studies 139 (3):441 - 458.score: 24.0
    Evidentialism is the view that facts about whether or not an agent is justified in having a particular belief are entirely determined by facts about the agent’s evidence; the agent’s practical needs and interests are irrelevant. I examine an array of arguments against evidentialism (by Jeremy Fantl, Matthew McGrath, David Owens, and others), and demonstrate how their force is affected when we take into account the relation between degrees of belief and outright belief. Once we are sensitive to one of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ingo Brigandt (2007). Typology Now: Homology and Developmental Constraints Explain Evolvability. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 22 (5):709-725.score: 24.0
    By linking the concepts of homology and morphological organization to evolvability, this paper attempts to (1) bridge the gap between developmental and phylogenetic approaches to homology and to (2) show that developmental constraints and natural selection are compatible and in fact complementary. I conceive of a homologue as a unit of morphological evolvability, i.e., as a part of an organism that can exhibit heritable phenotypic variation independently of the organism’s other homologues. An account of homology therefore consists in explaining (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Finding the Way in Phenotypic Space: The Origin and Maintenance of Constraints on Organismal Form. Annals of Botany 100:433-438.score: 24.0
    Background: One of the all-time questions in evolutionary biology regards the evolution of organismal shapes, and in particular why certain forms appear repeatedly in the history of life, others only seldom and still others not at all. Recent research in this field has deployed the conceptual framework of constraints and natural selection as measured by quantitative genetic methods. -/- Scope: In this paper I argue that quantitative genetics can by necessity only provide us with useful statistical sum- maries that (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Rob Clifton, Jeffrey Bub & Hans Halvorson (2003). Characterizing Quantum Theory in Terms of Information-Theoretic Constraints. Foundations of Physics 33 (11):1561-1591.score: 24.0
    We show that three fundamental information-theoretic constraints -- the impossibility of superluminal information transfer between two physical systems by performing measurements on one of them, the impossibility of broadcasting the information contained in an unknown physical state, and the impossibility of unconditionally secure bit commitment -- suffice to entail that the observables and state space of a physical theory are quantum-mechanical. We demonstrate the converse derivation in part, and consider the implications of alternative answers to a remaining open question (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Joseph Shin (forthcoming). Time Constraints and Pragmatic Encroachment on Knowledge. Episteme:1-24.score: 24.0
    Citing some recent experimental findings, I argue for the surprising claim that in some cases the less time you have the more you know. More specifically, I present some evidence to suggest that our ordinary knowledge ascriptions are sometimes sensitive to facts about an epistemic subject's truth-irrelevant time constraints such that less (time) is more (knowledge). If knowledge ascriptions are sensitive in this manner, then this is some evidence of pragmatic encroachment. Along the way, I consider comments made by (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Patrick A. Tully (2005). The Doctrine of Double Effect and the Question of Constraints on Business Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 58 (1-3):51 - 63.score: 24.0
    . How does the doctrine of double effect apply to business decisions to sell products which may be harmful to consumers? Lawrence Masek believes that some authors have misapplied the doctrine to this type of decision and, as a consequence, have committed themselves to placing unwarranted constraints on businesses. Seeking to correct this mistake, Masek presents his account of how the doctrine applies here, an account which is rather permissive but which, he claims, nevertheless preserves the virtues of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Sanjay Reddy (2005). The Role of Apparent Constraints in Normative Reasoning: A Methodological Statement and Application to Global Justice. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 9 (1-2):119 - 125.score: 24.0
    The assumptions that are made about the features of the world that are relatively changeable by agents and those that are not (constraints) play a central role in determining normative conclusions. In this way, normative reasoning is deeply dependent on accounts of the empirical world. Successful normative reasoning must avoid the naturalization of constraints and seek to attribute correctly to agents what is and is not in their power to change. Recent discourse on global justice has often come (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Sebastiano Bavetta & Marco Del Seta (2001). Constraints and the Measurement of Freedom of Choice. Theory and Decision 50 (3):213-238.score: 24.0
    This paper introduces considerations about constraints in the construction of measures of an agent's freedom. It starts with motivating the exercise from both the philosophical and the informational point of view. Then it presents two rankings of opportunity sets based on information about the extent of options and the constraints that a decision maker faces. The first ranking measures freedom as variety of choice; the second as non-restrictedness in choice.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert L. Goldstone & David Landy (2010). Domain-Creating Constraints. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1357-1377.score: 24.0
    The contributions to this special issue on cognitive development collectively propose ways in which learning involves developing constraints that shape subsequent learning. A learning system must be constrained to learn efficiently, but some of these constraints are themselves learnable. To know how something will behave, a learner must know what kind of thing it is. Although this has led previous researchers to argue for domain-specific constraints that are tied to different kinds/domains, an exciting possibility is that kinds/domains (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Dale Jacquette (2013). Syntactical Constraints on Definitions. Metaphilosophy 44 (1-2):145-156.score: 24.0
    This essay considers arguments for and against syntactical constraints on the proper formalization of definitions, originally owing to Alfred Tarski. It discusses and refutes an application of the constraints generalized to include a prohibition against not only object-place but also predicate-place variables in higher-order logic in a criticism of a recent effort to define the concept of heterologicality in a strengthened derivation of Grelling's paradox within type theory requirements. If the objections were correct, they would offer a more (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Katherine Yoshida, Mijke Rhemtulla & Athena Vouloumanos (2012). Exclusion Constraints Facilitate Statistical Word Learning. Cognitive Science 36 (5):933-947.score: 24.0
    The roles of linguistic, cognitive, and social-pragmatic processes in word learning are well established. If statistical mechanisms also contribute to word learning, they must interact with these processes; however, there exists little evidence for such mechanistic synergy. Adults use co-occurrence statistics to encode speech–object pairings with detailed sensitivity in stochastic learning environments (Vouloumanos, 2008). Here, we replicate this statistical work with nonspeech sounds and compare the results with the previous speech studies to examine whether exclusion constraints contribute equally to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Cliff Hooker (2013). On the Import of Constraints in Complex Dynamical Systems. Foundations of Science 18 (4):757-780.score: 24.0
    Complexity arises from interaction dynamics, but its forms are co-determined by the operative constraints within which the dynamics are expressed. The basic interaction dynamics underlying complex systems is mostly well understood. The formation and operation of constraints is often not, and oftener under appreciated. The attempt to reduce constraints to basic interaction fails in key cases. The overall aim of this paper is to highlight the key role played by constraints in shaping the field of complex (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Zoltan Miklosi (2014). A Puzzle About Free Speech, Legitimacy, and Countermajoritarian Constraints. Res Publica 20 (1):27-43.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that there is a tension between two central features of Dworkin’s partnership conception of democracy. The conception holds, on the one hand, that it is a necessary condition of the legitimacy of the decisions of a political majority that every member of the political community has a very robust right to publicly criticize those decisions. A plausible interpretation of this argument is that free political speech constitutes a normatively privileged vehicle for political minorities to become majorities, and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Holly Lawford-Smith (2010). Feasibility Constraints for Political Theories. Dissertation, Australian National Universityscore: 21.0
  15. David Makinson & Leendert van der Torre (2001). Constraints for Input/Output Logics. Journal of Philosophical Logic 30 (2):155-185.score: 21.0
    In a previous paper we developed a general theory of input/output logics. These are operations resembling inference, but where inputs need not be included among outputs, and outputs need not be reusable as inputs. In the present paper we study what happens when they are constrained to render output consistent with input. This is of interest for deontic logic, where it provides a manner of handling contrary-to-duty obligations. Our procedure is to constrain the set of generators of the input/output system, (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Steven Rosenberg & Wallace E. Lambert (1974). Contextual Constraints and the Perception of Speech. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (1):178.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Martti Kuokkanen (1993). On the Structuralist Constraints in Social Scientific Theorizing. Theory and Decision 35 (1):19-54.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1978). Computational Models and Empirical Constraints. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):98-128.score: 21.0
    It is argued that the traditional distinction between artificial intelligence and cognitive simulation amounts to little more than a difference in style of research - a different ordering in goal priorities and different methodological allegiances. Both enterprises are constrained by empirical considerations and both are directed at understanding classes of tasks that are defined by essentially psychological criteria. Because of the different ordering of priorities, however, they occasionally take somewhat different stands on such issues as the power/generality trade-off and on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Wayne D. Gray & Wai‐Tat Fu (2004). Soft Constraints in Interactive Behavior: The Case of Ignoring Perfect Knowledge in‐the‐World for Imperfect Knowledge in‐the‐Head*,*. Cognitive Science 28 (3):359-382.score: 21.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Arno G. Wouters (2007). Design Explanation: Determining the Constraints on What Can Be Alive. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 67 (1):65-80.score: 20.0
    This paper is concerned with reasonings that purport to explain why certain organisms have certain traits by showing that their actual design is better than contrasting designs. Biologists call such reasonings ‘functional explanations’. To avoid confusion with other uses of that phrase, I call them ‘design explanations’. This paper discusses the structure of design explanations and how they contribute to scientific understanding. Design explanations are contrastive and often compare real organisms to hypothetical organisms that cannot possibly exist. They are not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Kathryn Paxton George (1992). Moral and Nonmoral Innate Constraints. Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):189-202.score: 20.0
    Charles J. Lumsden and E.O. Wilson, in their writings together and individually, have proposed that human behaviors, whether moral or nonmoral, are governed by innate constraints (which they have termed epigenetic rules). I propose that if a genetic component of moral behavior is to be discovered, some sorting out of specifically moral from nonmoral innate constraints will be necessary. That some specifically moral innate constraits exist is evidenced by virtuous behaviors exhibited in nonhuman mammals, whose behavior is usually (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. James Genone (2014). Evidential Constraints on Singular Thought. Mind and Language 29 (1):1-25.score: 18.0
    In this article, I argue that in typical cases of singular thought, a thinker stands in an evidential relation to the object of thought suitable for providing knowledge of the object's existence. Furthermore, a thinker may generate representations that purport to refer to particular objects in response to appropriate, though defeasible, evidence of the existence of such an object. I motivate these constraints by considering a number of examples introduced by Robin Jeshion in support of a view she calls (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jussi Suikkanen (2009). Consequentialism, Constraints and The Good-Relative-To: A Reply to Mark Schroeder. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy (March 2009):1-9.score: 18.0
    Recently, it has been a part of the so-called consequentializing project to attempt to construct versions of consequentialism that can support agent-relative moral constraints. Mark Schroeder has argued that such views are bound to fail because they cannot make sense of the agent relative value on which they need to rely. In this paper, I provide a fitting-attitude account of both agent-relative and agent-neutral values that can together be used to consequentialize agent-relative constraints.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Uskali Mäki (2009). Economics Imperialism: Concept and Constraints. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (3):351-380.score: 18.0
    The paper seeks to offer [1] an explication of a concept of economics imperialism, focusing on its epistemic aspects; and [2] criteria for its normative assessment. In regard to [1], the defining notion is that of explanatory unification across disciplinary boundaries. As to [2], three kinds of constraints are proposed. An ontological constraint requires an increased degree of ontological unification in contrast to mere derivational unification. An axiological constraint derives from variation in the perceived relative significance of the facts (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael V. Antony (2006). Simulation Constraints, Afterlife Beliefs, and Common-Sense Dualism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):462-463.score: 18.0
    Simulation constraints cannot help in explaining afterlife beliefs in general because belief in an afterlife is a precondition for running a simulation. Instead, an explanation may be found by examining more deeply our common-sense dualistic conception of the mind or soul.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Gary Hatfield (2003). Representation and Constraints: The Inverse Problem and the Structure of Visual Space. Acta Psychologica 114:355-378.score: 18.0
    Visual space can be distinguished from physical space. The ?rst is found in visual experi- ence, while the second is de?ned independently of perception. Theorists have wondered about the relation between the two. Some investigators have concluded that visual space is non- Euclidean, and that it does not have a single metric structure. Here it is argued (1) that visual space exhibits contraction in all three dimensions with increasing distance from the observer, (2) that experienced features of this contraction (including (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Peter W. Ross (2006). Empirical Constraints on the Problem of Free Will. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 125-144.score: 18.0
    With the success of cognitive science's interdisciplinary approach to studying the mind, many theorists have taken up the strategy of appealing to science to address long standing disputes about metaphysics and the mind. In a recent case in point, philosophers and psychologists, including Robert Kane, Daniel C. Dennett, and Daniel M. Wegner, are exploring how science can be brought to bear on the debate about the problem of free will. I attempt to clarify the current debate by considering how empirical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Henning Hahn (2012). Justifying Feasibility Constraints on Human Rights. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (2):143-157.score: 18.0
    It is a crucial question whether practicalities should have an impact in developing an applicable theory of human rights—and if, how (far) such constraints can be justified. In the course of the non-ideal turn of today’s political philosophy, any entitlements (and social entitlements in particular) stand under the proviso of practical feasibility. It would, after all, be unreasonable to demand something which is, under the given political and economic circumstances, unachievable. Thus, many theorist—particularly those belonging to the liberal camp—begin (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. David Phiroze Christensen (2004). Putting Logic in its Place: Formal Constraints on Rational Belief. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    What role, if any, does formal logic play in characterizing epistemically rational belief? Traditionally, belief is seen in a binary way - either one believes a proposition, or one doesn't. Given this picture, it is attractive to impose certain deductive constraints on rational belief: that one's beliefs be logically consistent, and that one believe the logical consequences of one's beliefs. A less popular picture sees belief as a graded phenomenon.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Douglas N. Kutach (2003). Time Travel and Consistency Constraints. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1098-1113.score: 18.0
    The possibility of time travel, as permitted in General Relativity, is responsible for constraining physical fields beyond what laws of nature would otherwise require. In the special case where time travel is limited to a single object returning to the past and interacting with itself, consistency constraints can be avoided if the dynamics is continuous and the object's state space satisfies a certain topological requirement: that all null-homotopic mappings from the state-space to itself have some fixed point. Where consistency (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. N. Cufaro-Petroni, C. Dewdney, P. R. Holland, A. Kyprianidis & J. P. Vigier (1987). Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Constraints on Quantum Action at a Distance: The Sutherland Paradox. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 17 (8):759-773.score: 18.0
    Assuming that future experiments confirm Aspect's discovery of nonlocal interactions between quantum pairs of correlated particles, we analyze the constraints imposed by the EPR reasoning on the said interactions. It is then shown that the nonlocal relativistic quantum potential approach plainly satisfies the Einstein causality criteria as well as the energy-momentum conservation in individual microprocesses. Furthermore, this approach bypasses a new causal paradox for timelike separated EPR measurements deduced by Sutherland in the frame of an approach by means of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Mark Sacks (1997). Transcendental Constraints and Transcendental Features. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 5 (2):164 – 186.score: 18.0
    Transcendental idealism has been conceived of in philosophy as a position that aims to secure objectivity without traditional metaphysical underpinnings. This article contrasts two forms of transcendental idealism that have been identified: one in the work of Kant, the other in the later Wittgenstein. The distinction between these two positions is clarified by means of a distinction between transcendental constraints and transcendental features. It is argued that these conceptions provide the - fundamentally different - bases of the two positions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Douglas Kutach (2003). Time Travel and Consistency Constraints. Philosophy of Science 70 (5):1098-1113.score: 18.0
    The possibility of time travel, as permitted in General Relativity, is responsible for constraining physical fields beyond what the laws normally require. In the special case where time travel is limited to a single object returning to the past and interacting with itself, consistency constraints can be avoided if the dynamics is continuous and the object’s state space satisfies a certain topological requirement: that all null-homotopic mappings from the state-space to itself have some fixed point. Where consistency constraints (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Roger Sansom (2009). The Nature of Developmental Constraints and the Difference-Maker Argument for Externalism. Biology and Philosophy 24 (4):441-459.score: 18.0
    One current version of the internalism/externalism debate in evolutionary theory focuses on the relative importance of developmental constraints in evolutionary explanation. The received view of developmental constraints sees them as an internalist concept that tend to be shared across related species as opposed to selective pressures that are not. Thus, to the extent that constraints can explain anything, they can better explain similarity across species, while natural selection is better able to explain their differences. I challenge both (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Hugh J. McCann (1991). Settled Objectives and Rational Constraints. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (1):25-36.score: 18.0
    Some authors reject what they call the "Simple View"---i.e., the principle that anyone who A's intentionally intends to A. My purpose here is to defend this principle. Rejecting the Simple View, I shall claim, forces us to assign to other mental states the functional role of intention: that of providing settled objectives to guide deliberation and action. A likely result is either that entities will be multiplied, or that the resultant account will invite reassertion of reductionist theories. In any case, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Jordi Cat (2005). Modeling Cracks and Cracking Models: Structures, Mechanisms, Boundary Conditions, Constraints, Inconsistencies and the Proper Domains of Natural Laws. Synthese 146 (3):447 - 487.score: 18.0
    The emphasis on models hasn’t completely eliminated laws from scientific discourse and philosophical discussion. Instead, I want to argue that much of physics lies beyond the strict domain of laws. I shall argue that in important cases the physics, or physical understanding, does not lie either in laws or in their properties, such as universality, consistency and symmetry. I shall argue that the domain of application commonly attributed to laws is too narrow. That is, laws can still play an important, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Theresa Lopez, Jennifer Zamzow, Michael Gill & Shaun Nichols (2009). Side Constraints and the Structure of Commonsense Ethics. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):305-319.score: 18.0
    In our everyday moral deliberations, we attend to two central types of considerations – outcomes and moral rules. How these considerations interrelate is central to the long-standing debate between deontologists and utilitarians. Is the weight we attach to moral rules reducible to their conduciveness to good outcomes (as many utilitarians claim)? Or do we take moral rules to be absolute constraints on action that normatively trump outcomes (as many deontologists claim)? Arguments over these issues characteristically appeal to commonsense intuitions (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Catherine Wilson (2004). Moral Animals: Ideals and Constraints in Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In Moral Animals, Catherine Wilson develops a theory of morality based on two fundamental premises: first that moral progress implies the evolution of moral ideals involving restraint and sacrifice; second that human beings are outfitted by nature with selfish motivations, intentions, and ambitions that place constraints on what morality can demand of them. Normative claims, she goes on to show, can be understood as projective hypotheses concerning the conduct of realistically-described nonideal agents in preferred fictional worlds. Such claims differ (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Matej Pavšič (1998). Formulation of a Relativistic Theory Without Constraints. Foundations of Physics 28 (9):1443-1451.score: 18.0
    A relativistic, i.e., Lorentz co-variant theory without constraints is formulated. This is possible if we allow the dynamical variables to depend on an invariant parameter τ. Thus we obtain a dynamical theory in spacetime, called relativistic dynamics. First the case of a point particle, and then of extended objects such as membranes of arbitrary dimensions are considered.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Stein Haugom Olsen (2004). Modes of Interpretation and Interpretative Constraints. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):135-148.score: 18.0
    This article explores the relationship between interpretation and what is normally called ‘understanding’. It is argued that different modes of interpretation define different kinds of ‘mental uptake’ (‘apprehension’), and that some modes of interpretation define types of apprehension for which the concept of ‘understanding’ is inadequate. It is also argued that given a mode of interpretation, the constraints of that mode are necessary in the sense that it is the constraints on how to interpret that define a mode (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Gil Sagi (forthcoming). Formality in Logic: From Logical Terms to Semantic Constraints. Logique Et Analyse.score: 18.0
    In the paper I discuss a prevailing view by which logical terms determine forms of sentences and arguments and therefore the logical validity of arguments. This view is common to those who hold that there is a principled distinction between logical and nonlogical terms and those holding relativistic accounts. I adopt the Tarskian tradition by which logical validity is determined by form, but reject the centrality of logical terms. I propose an alternative framework for logic where logical terms no longer (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Phil Dowe (2007). Constraints on Data in Worlds with Closed Timelike Curves. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):724–735.score: 18.0
    It is claimed that unacceptable constraints on initial data are imposed by certain responses to paradoxes that threaten time travel, closed timelike curves (CTCs) and other backwards causation hypotheses. In this paper I argue against the following claims: to say “contradictions are impossible so something must prevent the paradox” commits in general to constraints on initial data, that for fixed point dynamics so-called grey state solutions explain why contradictions do not arise, and the latter have been proved to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Kurt Haller (1997). S-Matrix Elements for Gauge Theories with and Without Implemented Constraints. Foundations of Physics 27 (2):305-313.score: 18.0
    We derive an expression for the relation between two scattering transition amplitudes which, reflect the same dynamics, but which differ in the description of their initial and final state vectors. In one version, the incident and scattered states are elements of a perturbative Fock space, and solve the eigenvalue problem for the “free” pari of the Hamiltonian—the part that remains after the interactions between particle excitations have been “switched off”. Alternatively, the incident and scattered states may be coherent state that (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Sandra L. Borden (2000). A Model for Evaluating Journalist Resistance to Business Constraints. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (3):149 – 166.score: 18.0
    Should journalists resist business constraints they perceive as a threat to their professional integrity? This article suggests that the answer, at least sometimes, is yes. But in choosing a resistance strategy, journalists should not consider the "take this job and shove it" stance as the only option with moral integrity-or even as the best ethical option. This article develops a model of resistance strategies using the experiences of journalists at one newspaper to illustrate the range of options available for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Barry Smith (1989). Constraints on Correspondence. In H. Rutte W. Sauer & W. Gombocz (eds.), Traditionen und Perspektiven der analytischen Philosophie. Festschrift für Rudolf Haller. Hölder/Pichler/Tempsky.score: 18.0
    My aim is to lay down some constraints on a correspondence theory of truth for empirical sentences of a natural language on the basis of a theory according to which that to which a true empirical sentence of such a language corresponds is a part of the natural world. The problem is to find some means of delineating those portions of the world which serve as correspondents, portions of reality otherwise called ‘truthmakers’.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. B. A. C. Saunders & J. van Brakel (1997). Are There Nontrivial Constraints on Colour Categorization? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):167-179.score: 18.0
    In this target article the following hypotheses are discussed: (1) Colour is autonomous: a perceptuolinguistic and behavioural universal. (2) It is completely described by three independent attributes: hue, brightness, and saturation: (3) Phenomenologically and psychophysically there are four unique hues: red, green, blue, and yellow; (4) The unique hues are underpinned by two opponent psychophysical and/or neuronal channels: red/green, blue/yellow. The relevant literature is reviewed. We conclude: (i) Psychophysics and neurophysiology fail to set nontrivial constraints on colour categorization. (ii) (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Mark Q. Gardiner (1995). Operational Constraints and the Model-Theoretic Argument. Erkenntnis 43 (3):395 - 400.score: 18.0
    Putnam's Model-Theoretic argument purports to show that, contrary to what the metaphysical realist is committed to, an epistemically ideal theory which satisfies all operational and theoretical constraints can be guaranteed to be true. He draws the additional antirealist conclusion that there can be no single privileged relation of reference. I argue that the very possibility of a so-called ideal theory satisfying all operational constraints presupposes a determinate relation of reference, and hence Putnam must assume precisely what he denies.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Keith Butler (1994). Neural Constraints in Cognitive Science. Minds and Machines 4 (2):129-62.score: 18.0
    The paper is an examination of the ways and extent to which neuroscience places constraints on cognitive science. In Part I, I clarify the issue, as well as the notion of levels in cognitive inquiry. I then present and address, in Part II, two arguments designed to show that facts from neuroscience are at a level too low to constrain cognitive theory in any important sense. I argue, to the contrary, that there are several respects in which facts from (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Erik De Bakker (2007). Integrity and Cynicism: Possibilities and Constraints of Moral Communication. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (1):119-136.score: 18.0
    Paying thorough attention to cynical action and integrity could result in a less naive approach to ethics and moral communication. This article discusses the issues of integrity and cynicism on a theoretical and on a more practical level. The first part confronts Habermas’s approach of communicative action with Sloterdijk’s concept of cynical reason. In the second part, the focus will be on the constraints and possibilities of moral communication within a business context. Discussing the corporate integrity approach of Kaptein (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000