Search results for 'conviction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kimberley Brownlee (2012). Conscience and Conviction: The Case for Civil Disobedience. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    This book shows that civil disobedience is generally more defensible than private conscientious objection. -/- Part I explores the morality of conviction and conscience. Each of these concepts informs a distinct argument for civil disobedience. The conviction argument begins with the communicative principle of conscientiousness. According to this principle, having a conscientious moral conviction means not just acting consistently with our beliefs and judging ourselves and others by a common moral standard. It also means not seeking to (...)
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  2. Daniel J. O'Keefe (2012). Conviction, Persuasion, and Argumentation: Untangling the Ends and Means of Influence. [REVIEW] Argumentation 26 (1):19-32.score: 24.0
    This essay offers a start on sorting out the relationships of argumentation and persuasion by identifying two systematic ways in which definitions of argumentation differ, namely, their descriptions of the ends and of the means involved in argumentative discourse. Against that backdrop, the traditional “conviction-persuasion” distinction is reassessed. The essay argues that the traditional distinction correctly recognizes the difference between the end of influencing attitudes and that of influencing behavior—but that it misanalyzes the means of achieving the latter (by (...)
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  3. David James Anderson (2012). Knowledge and Conviction. Synthese 187 (2):377-392.score: 24.0
    Much philosophical effort has been exerted over problems having to do with the correct analysis and application of the concept of epistemic justification. While I do not wish to dispute the central place of this problem in contemporary epistemology, it seems to me that there is a general neglect of the belief condition for knowledge. In this paper I offer an analysis of 'degrees of belief' in terms of a quality I label 'conviction', go on to argue that one (...)
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  4. William Smith (forthcoming). The Burdens of Conviction: Brownlee on Civil Disobedience. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-14.score: 24.0
    Kimberley Brownlee’s Conscience and Conviction offers a powerful defence of civil disobedience as a conscientious and communicative mode of protest. The overall argument of the book is important and compelling, but this critical commentary explores certain aspects of Brownlee’s view that warrant further consideration and clarification. Those aspects relate to her suggestion that civil disobedience is a dialogic mode of communication, her attempt to ground a moral right of civil disobedience in a principle of humanism, and her belief that (...)
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  5. Wendy Larcombe (2011). Falling Rape Conviction Rates: (Some) Feminist Aims and Measures for Rape Law. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):27-45.score: 24.0
    Rape conviction rates have fallen to all-time lows in recent years, prompting governments to explore a range of strategies to improve them. This paper argues that, while the current legal impunity for rape cannot be condoned, increasing conviction rates is not in itself a valid objective of law reform. The paper problematises the measure of rape law that conviction rates provide by developing an account of (some) feminist aims for rape law reform. Three feminist aims and associated (...)
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  6. Gregory M. Simon (2012). Conviction Without Being Convinced: Maintaining Islamic Certainty in Minangkabau, Indonesia. Ethos 40 (3):237-257.score: 21.0
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  7. Gerald Gaus & Kevin Vallier (2009). The Roles of Religious Conviction in a Publicly Justified Polity: The Implications of Convergence, Asymmetry and Political Institutions. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (1-2):51-76.score: 18.0
    Our concern in this essay are the roles of religious conviction in what we call a “publicly justified polity” — one in which the laws conform to the Principle of Public Justification, according to which (in a sense that will become clearer) each citizen must have conclusive reason to accept each law as binding. According to “justificatory liberalism,”1 this public justification requirement follows from the core liberal commitment of respect for the freedom and equality of all citizens.2 To respect (...)
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  8. Matthew Pianalto (2011). Moral Conviction. Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (4):381-395.score: 18.0
    We often praise people who stand by their convictions in the face of adversity and practice what they preach. However, strong moral convictions can also motivate atrocious acts. Two significant questions here are (1) whether conviction itself — taken as a mode of belief — has any distinctive value, or whether all the value of conviction derives from its substantive content, and (2) how conviction can be made responsible in a way that mitigates the risks of falling (...)
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  9. Larry Cunningham (2005). The Innocent Prisoner and the Appellate Prosecutor: Some Thoughts on Post-Conviction Prosecutorial Ethics After Dretke V. Haley. Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (2):12-24.score: 18.0
    We typically think of prosecutorial ethics as encompassing a special set of obligations for prosecutors during the pretrial and trial stages of a criminal case. In the literature and in rules of professional responsibility much attention is paid to the charging function, contact with unrepresented persons, plea negotiations, discovery, and courtroom decorum. Our concern with prosecutorial ethics at these stages is rooted primarily in due process and fairness to the accused. [W]hile he may strike hard blows, the Supreme Court wrote (...)
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  10. David Lefkowitz (forthcoming). Should the Law Convict Those Who Act From Conviction? Reflections on a Demands-of-Conscience Criminal Defense. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-19.score: 18.0
    How should the judge or jury in a just criminal court treat a civil disobedient, someone who performs a conscientiously motivated communicative breach of the criminal law? Kimberley Brownlee contends that all else equal a court of law should neither convict nor punish such offenders. Though I agree with this conclusion, I contend that Brownlee mischaracterizes the nature of the criminal defense to which civil disobedients are entitled. Whereas Brownlee maintains that such actors ought to be excused for their criminal (...)
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  11. Prof em Dr Hans-Ulrich Hoche (forthcoming). In Search of an Integrated Logic of Conviction and Intention. Philosophical Explorations.score: 18.0
    According to a two-level criterion for combination tests in the field of ordinary language (C-CT), moral 'ought'-sentences may be taken to imply 'I intend'-sentences partly semantically and partly pragmatically. If so, a trenchant linguistic analysis of the concept of moral obligation cannot do without a non-classical logic which allows to model these important kinds of ordinary-language implications by means of purely syntactical derivations. For this purpose, an integrated logic of conviction and intention has been tentatively devised by (...)
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  12. David Campbell (2001). Conviction Seeking Efficacy: Sustainable Agriculture and the Politics of Co-Optation. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 18 (4):353-363.score: 18.0
    Proponents of sustainable agriculture seek deeply rooted social changes, but to advance this agenda requires political credibility and work with diverse partners. Asthe literature on political co-optation makesclear, the tension between conviction andcredibility is persistent and unavoidable; nota problem to be solved so much as a built-incondition of movement politics. Drawing on acase history of California's largestsustainable agriculture organization, astructural assessment is made of the strategicchoices facing movement leaders, organizationaltensions that accompany these choices, andperceived gains and losses. The case (...)
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  13. Stéphane Courtois (2011). Conscientious Conviction and Subjective Preference: On What Grounds Should Religious Practices Be Accommodated? Philosophical Papers 40 (1):27-53.score: 16.0
    In this paper, I seek to challenge two prevailing views about religious accommodation. The first maintains that religious practices deserve accommodation only if they are regarded as something unchosen on a par with the involuntary circumstances of life people must face. The other view maintains that religious practices are nothing more than preferences but questions the necessity of their accommodation. Against these views, I argue that religious conducts, even on the assumption that they represent voluntary behaviours, deserve in certain circumstances (...)
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  14. Linda J. Skitka & Daniel C. Wisneski (2011). Moral Conviction and Emotion. Emotion Review 3 (3):328-330.score: 16.0
    People’s feelings about political issues are often experienced as moral convictions, that is, as rooted in beliefs about right and wrong, morality and immorality. The authors tested and found that morally convicted policy preferences are associated with positive as well as negative emotions among policy supporters and opponents, respectively, and that positive and negative emotions partially mediate the effects of moral convictions on relevant behavioral intentions (i.e., willingness to engage in activism).
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  15. Christopher J. Eberle & Rick Rubel (2012). Religious Conviction in the Profession of Arms. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (3):171-185.score: 16.0
    Abstract Many political theorists have argued that religious reasons should play a rather limited role in public or political settings. So, for example, according to the Doctrine of Religious Restraint, citizens and legislators ought not allow religious reasons to play a decisive role in justifying public policies. Many military professionals seem to believe that some version of that doctrine applies in military settings, that is, that military professionals should not allow their religious convictions to determine how they exercise command authority. (...)
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  16. Jeffrey Friedman (2012). Motivated Skepticism or Inevitable Conviction? Dogmatism and the Study of Politics. Critical Review 24 (2):131-155.score: 16.0
    Taber and Lodge's 2006 paper provides powerful evidence that one's prior beliefs shape one's reception of new evidence in a manner that can best be described as ?inadvertently dogmatic.? This is especially true for people who are well informed, which dovetails with findings going back to Converse (1964) showing political beliefs to be ideologically constrained (rigid) among the relatively well informed. What may explain the coincidence of dogmatism and knowledgeability is the very process of learning about politics, which must use (...)
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  17. Nolen Gertz (2011). Conviction Versus Convention. Res Publica 17 (2):203-209.score: 15.0
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  18. Kevin Mulligan (2013). Acceptance, Acknowledgment, Affirmation, Agreement, Assertion, Belief, Certainty, Conviction, Denial, Judgment, Refusal & Rejection. In Mark Textor (ed.), Judgement and Truth in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Palgrave.score: 15.0
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  19. Simon Blackburn (2003). Fiction and Conviction. Philosophical Papers 32 (3):243-260.score: 15.0
    Abstract In this piece I take issue with Bernard Williams's interpretation of Herodotus as lacking something of our conception of time. I claim that there is nothing so unusual in the interleaving of myth or fiction and history that Williams finds in Herodotus. I also reflect on the difficulty of separating acceptance of truth from acceptance of myth, metaphor, and model, not only in history but also in science.
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  20. Gordon R. Mitchell & Marcus Paroske (2000). Fact, Friction, and Political Conviction in Science Policy Controversies. Social Epistemology 14 (2 & 3):89 – 107.score: 15.0
  21. Alan R. White (1977). Knowledge Without Conviction. Mind 86 (342):224-236.score: 15.0
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  22. Lucas Swaine (2009). Review of J. Caleb Clanton, Religion and Democratic Citizenship: Inquiry and Conviction in the American Public Square. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).score: 15.0
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  23. Alessia T. Bell (2000). Criminal Law/Medical Malpractice: Court Strikes Down Murder Conviction of Physician Where Inappropriate Care Led to Patient's Death. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (2):194-195.score: 15.0
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  24. Jonathan Ives (2008). Does a Belief in God Lead to Moral Cowardice?: The Difference Between Courage of Moral Conviction and Acquisition. Think 7 (20):57-68.score: 15.0
    In our seventh and final piece on the theme , Jonathan Ives argues that reliance on God as an external source of moral authority leads to a kind of moral cowardice.
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  25. A. M. Suggate (2001). Book Reviews : Christian Thinking and Social Order: Conviction Politics From the 1930s to the Present Day, Edited by Marjorie Reeves. London: Cassell,1999. 224 Pp. Pb. $27.95. ISBN 0-304-70248-X. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 14 (1):108-110.score: 15.0
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  26. Eric Thomas Weber Andrew F. Smith (2009). Religion and Democratic Citizenship: Inquiry and Conviction in the American Public Square (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (3):pp. 449-456.score: 15.0
  27. Valerie Tiberius (2002). Maintaining Conviction and the Humean Account of Normativity. Topoi 21 (1-2):165-173.score: 15.0
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  28. Douglas Blyth (2000). Socrates' Trial and Conviction of the Jurors in Plato's. Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (1):1-22.score: 15.0
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  29. Dougal Blyth (2000). Socrates' Trial and Conviction of the Jurors in Plato's "Apology". Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (1):1 - 22.score: 15.0
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  30. Carlos Gil-Díaz (2009). Spain's Record Organ Donations: Mining Moral Conviction. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (03):256-.score: 15.0
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  31. Andrew F. Smith (2007). Communication and Conviction: A Jamesian Contribution to Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (4):pp. 259-274.score: 15.0
  32. Radoslav A. Tsanoff (1942). Conviction and Tolerance. Philosophical Review 51 (2):105-123.score: 15.0
  33. Kevin Carnahan (2007). Conviction and Conflict: Islam, Christianity and World Order. By Michael Nazir-Ali. Heythrop Journal 48 (4):653–654.score: 15.0
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  34. Edward Langerak (2006). Religious Conviction in Liberal Politics. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):213-221.score: 15.0
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  35. Claude Savary (1980). La conviction idéologique par Colette Moreux Montréal, Les Presses de l'Université du Québec, 1978, 126 pages. [REVIEW] Dialogue 19 (04):632-642.score: 15.0
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  36. Bruce Silver (2004). George Ripley and Miracles: External Evidence Versus Internal Conviction. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):19–36.score: 15.0
    I maintain that George Ripley (1802-1880) is among the most philosophically searching New England transcendentalists. In this essay I argue that Ripley’s denial that God’s miracles are the sole evidence of Christian truth clarifies the issues and debate that divide empiricists who seek evidence for truth through external verification and intuitionists who maintain that religious truth is manifest only within the minds, hearts, and special senses of true believers.
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  37. Jack Coulehan, Peter C. Williams, S. van Mccrary & Catherine Belling (2003). The Best Lack All Conviction: Biomedical Ethics, Professionalism, and Social Responsibility. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (01):21-38.score: 15.0
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  38. Alexander Livingston (2013). Stuttering Conviction: Commitment and Hesitation in William James|[Rsquo]| Oration to Robert Gould Shaw. Contemporary Political Theory 12 (4):255.score: 15.0
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  39. Christopher Adair-Toteff (2011). Protestant Ethics and the Spirit of Politics: Weber on Conscience, Conviction and Conflict. History of the Human Sciences 24 (1):19-35.score: 15.0
    Readers of The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism recognize that Weber attempts to provide an ideal account of development of modern rational capitalism. What readers apparently do not realize is that Weber believes that there is a political development that is parallel to this economic development. Weber believed that Luther’s passive theology and doctrine of two kingdoms lead to quiet resignation in earthly matters. Luther advises shunning politics and avoiding political confrontation. In contrast, Weber held that Calvin’s theology (...)
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  40. David Bain & F. M. Ahl (1993). Sophocles' Oedipus: Evidence and Self-Conviction. Journal of Hellenic Studies 113:189.score: 15.0
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  41. Conrad Harkins & Peter J. Colosi (2001). The Courage of Conviction An Essay in Honor of Philotheus Böhner, O.F.M. Franciscan Studies 59 (1):91-108.score: 15.0
  42. P. Marshall (1991). Book Review : Belief, Values and Policies: Conviction Politics in a Secular Age, by Duncan B. Forrester. Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1989. Viii + 110 Pp. N.P. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (1):94-95.score: 15.0
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  43. Marcella Smith (2003). Child Safety: Homicide by Child Abuse: South Carolina Upholds Conviction Under "Crack Mom" Law. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 31 (3):457-458.score: 15.0
  44. James Burns (2012). Jacques-Pierre Brissot: From Scepticism to Conviction. History of European Ideas 38 (4):508-526.score: 15.0
    Summary The career of Jacques-Pierre Brissot (1754?1793) featured two phases, separated dramatically by the Revolution of 1789. Before the revolutionary crisis and the subsequent political struggle that was to cost him his life, Brissot was an avocet who never practised but sought instead a career as a writer?and indeed as a philosophe, seeing himself as an ally of Diderot. The improbability of such an alliance was not lessened by his early and continuing alliance with Linguet. Before embarking in1778 on what (...)
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  45. Eccy de Jonge (2003). Christopher J. Eberle, Religious Conviction in Liberal Politics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (3):176-178.score: 15.0
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  46. Daniel Desroches (1998). RICŒUR, Paul, La Critique Et la Conviction. Entretien Avec François Azouvi Et Marc de LaunayRICŒUR, Paul, La Critique Et la Conviction. Entretien Avec François Azouvi Et Marc de Launay. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 54 (3):637-641.score: 15.0
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  47. Samuel Hamilton-Poore (forthcoming). Book Review: Lord, Have Mercy: Praying for Justice with Conviction and Humility. [REVIEW] Interpretation 62 (2):218-218.score: 15.0
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  48. Gilbert Hottois (1996). Éthique de la Responsabilité Et Éthique de la Conviction. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 52 (2):489-498.score: 15.0
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  49. Fred Kersten (1978). The Life Concept and Life Conviction: A Phenomenological Sketch. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 3 (2):107-128.score: 15.0
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  50. John King-Farlow (1968). Cogency, Conviction, and Coercion. International Philosophical Quarterly 8 (3):464-473.score: 15.0
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