Search results for 'coordination' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Flavia Padovani (2011). Relativizing the Relativized a Priori: Reichenbach's Axioms of Coordination Divided. Synthese 181 (1):41 - 62.score: 24.0
    In recent years, Reichenbach's 1920 conception of the principles of coordination has attracted increased attention after Michael Friedman's attempt to revive Reichenbach's idea of a "relativized a priori". This paper follows the origin and development of this idea in the framework of Reichenbach's distinction between the axioms of coordination and the axioms of connection. It suggests a further differentiation among the coordinating axioms and accordingly proposes a different account of Reichenbach's "relativized a priori".
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  2. William A. Phillips & Steven M. Silverstein (2003). Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):65-82.score: 24.0
    The concept of locally specialized functions dominates research on higher brain function and its disorders. Locally specialized functions must be complemented by processes that coordinate those functions, however, and impairment of coordinating processes may be central to some psychotic conditions. Evidence for processes that coordinate activity is provided by neurobiological and psychological studies of contextual disambiguation and dynamic grouping. Mechanisms by which this important class of cognitive functions could be achieved include those long-range connections within and between cortical regions that (...)
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  3. Teresa Marques & Manuel García-Carpintero (2014). Disagreement About Taste: Commonality Presuppositions and Coordination. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-25.score: 24.0
    The paper confronts the disagreement argument for relativism about matters of taste, defending a specific form of contextualism. It is first considered whether the disagreement data might manifest an inviariantist attitude speakers pre-reflectively have. Semantic and ontological enlightenment should then make the impressions of disagreement vanish, or at least leave them as lingering ineffectual Müller-Lyer-like illusions; but it is granted to relativists that this does not fully happen. López de Sa’s appeal to presuppositions of commonality and Sundell’s appeal to metalinguistic (...)
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  4. Giuseppe Attanasi, Astrid Hopfensitz, Emiliano Lorini & Frédéric Moisan (2014). The Effects of Social Ties on Coordination: Conceptual Foundations for an Empirical Analysis. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):47-73.score: 24.0
    This paper investigates the influence that social ties can have on behavior. After defining the concept of social ties that we consider, we introduce an original model of social ties. The impact of such ties on social preferences is studied in a coordination game with outside option. We provide a detailed game theoretical analysis of this game while considering various types of players, i.e., self-interest maximizing, inequity averse, and fair agents. In addition to these approaches that require strategic reasoning (...)
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  5. Nicola Dimitri (2003). Coordination in an Email Game Without ``Almost Common Knowledge''. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 12 (1):1-11.score: 24.0
    The paper presents a variation of the EMAIL Game, originally proposed byRubinstein (American Economic Review, 1989), in which coordination ofthe more rewarding-risky joint course of actions is shown to obtain, evenwhen the relevant game is, at most, ``mutual knowledge.'' In the exampleproposed, a mediator is introduced in such a way that two individualsare symmetrically informed, rather than asymmetrically as in Rubinstein,about the game chosen by nature. As long as the message failure probabilityis sufficiently low, with the upper bound being (...)
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  6. Steve Alpern & Diane J. Reyniers (2002). Spatial Dispersion as a Dynamic Coordination Problem. Theory and Decision 53 (1):29-59.score: 24.0
    Following Schelling (1960), coordination problems have mainly been considered in a context where agents can achieve a common goal (e.g., rendezvous) only by taking common actions. Dynamic versions of this problem have been studied by Crawford and Haller (1990), Ponssard (1994), and Kramarz (1996). This paper considers an alternative dynamic formulation in which the common goal (dispersion) can only be achieved by agents taking distinct actions. The goal of spatial dispersion has been studied in static models of habitat selection, (...)
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  7. [deleted]Marlene Meyer, Harold Bekkering, Markus Paulus & Sabine Hunnius (2010). Joint Action Coordination in 2½- and 3-Year-Old Children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 24.0
    When acting jointly with others, adults can be as proficient as when acting individually. However how young children coordinate their actions with another person and how their action coordination develops during early childhood is not well understood. By means of a sequential button-pressing game, which could be played jointly or individually, the action coordination of 2½- and 3-year-old children was examined. Performance accuracy and variability of response timing were taken as indicators of coordination ability. Results showed substantial (...)
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  8. Pierre Barbaroux & Gilles Enée (2005). Spontaneous Coordination and Evolutionary Learning Processes in an Agent-Based Model. Mind and Society 4 (2):179-195.score: 24.0
    This paper is concerned with adaptive learning and coordination processes. Implementing agent-based modeling techniques (Learning Classifier Systems, LCS), we focus on the twofold impact of cognitive and environmental complexity on learning and coordination. Within this framework, we introduce the notion of Adaptive Learning Agent with Rule-based Memory (ALARM), which is a particular class of Artificial Adaptive Agent (AAA, Holland and Miller 1991). We show that equilibrium is approached to a high degree, but never perfectly reached. We also demonstrate (...)
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  9. Rossella Argenziano & Itzhak Gilboa (2012). History as a Coordination Device. Theory and Decision 73 (4):501-512.score: 24.0
    Coordination games often have multiple equilibria. The selection of equilibrium raises the question of belief formation: how do players generate beliefs about the behavior of other players? This article takes the view that the answer lies in history, that is, in the outcomes of similar coordination games played in the past, possibly by other players. We analyze a simple model in which a large population plays a game that exhibits strategic complementarities. We assume a dynamic process that faces (...)
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  10. Yves Couturier, Dominique Gagnon & Louise Belzile (2012). Les compétences procédurales requises à la coordination dédiée. Phronesis 1 (2):15-23.score: 24.0
    This article reflects on the skills required in trades services to people dedicated to coordinate services in complex clinical situations because of their multidimensionality and chronicity. All human activity requires for its proper effectuation, the coordination of interdependencies between actors. Coordination of interdependencies is done in ordinary mode, in everyday activities, but also in dedicated mode, that is to say, through a practice that has a primary mandate to manage them in a conscious, voluntary and accountable for intervention (...)
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  11. Laurens K. Hessels (2013). Coordination in the Science System: Theoretical Framework and a Case Study of an Intermediary Organization. [REVIEW] Minerva 51 (3):317-339.score: 24.0
    Many science systems are witnessing the rise of intermediary organizations with a coordinating mission, but to date a systematic understanding of their function and effects is lacking. The aim of this paper is to contribute to the understanding of the coordinating efforts of intermediary organizations. Starting from the definition of coordination as the establishment or strengthening of a relationship among the activities in a system, with the aim to enhance their common effectiveness, I develop a heuristic framework that facilitates (...)
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  12. Mark Jeffreys (2008). How Can “Cheap Talk” Yield Coordination, Given a Conflict? Mind and Society 7 (1):95-108.score: 24.0
    ChickenHawk is a social-dilemma game that distinguishes uncoordinated from coordinated cooperation. In tests with players belonging to a culturally homogeneous population, natural-language “cheap talk” led to efficient coordination, while nonlinguistic signaling yielded uncoordinated altruism. In a subsequent test with players from a moderately more heterogeneous population nearby, the “cheap talk” condition still produced better coordination than other signaling conditions, but at a lower level and with fewer acts of altruism overall. Implications are: (1) without language, even willing cooperators (...)
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  13. Richard Schuster (2002). Cooperative Coordination as a Social Behavior. Human Nature 13 (1):47-83.score: 24.0
    Coordinating behavior is widespread in contexts that include courtship, aggression, and cooperation for shared outcomes. The social significance of cooperative coordination (CC) is usually downplayed by learning theorists, evolutionary biologists, and game theorists in favor of an individual behavior → outcome perspective predicated on maximizing payoffs for all participants. To more closely model CC as it occurs under free-ranging conditions, pairs of rats were rewarded for coordinated shuttling within a shared chamber with unrestricted social interaction. Results show that animals (...)
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  14. [deleted]C. A. Coey, M. Varlet & M. J. Richardson (2011). Coordination Dynamics in a Socially Situated Nervous System. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:164-164.score: 24.0
    Traditional theories of cognitive science have typically accounted for the organization of human behavior by detailing the requisite computational or representational functions and identifying neurological mechanisms that might perform these functions. Put simply, such approaches hold that neural activity causes behavior. This same general framework has been extended to accounts of human social behavior via explanatory concepts such as “common-coding” and “co-representation”, and much recent neurological research has been devoted to brain structures that might execute these social-cognitive functions. Although these (...)
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  15. Walter Elberfeld (2000). An Analysis of Stability Sets in Pure Coordination Games. Theory and Decision 49 (3):235-248.score: 24.0
    We calculate the Lebesgue–measures of the stability sets of Nash-equilibria in pure coordination games. The results allow us to observe that the ordering induced by the Lebesgue–measure of stability sets upon strict Nash-equilibria does not necessarily agree with the ordering induced by risk–dominance. Accordingly, an equilibrium selection theory based on the Lebesgue–measure of stability sets would be necessarily different from one which uses the Nash-property as a point of orientation.
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  16. [deleted]A. K. Kuhlen, C. Allefeld & J. D. Haynes (2011). Content-Specific Coordination of Listeners' to Speakers' EEG During Communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:266-266.score: 24.0
    Cognitive neuroscience has recently begun to extend its focus from the isolated individual mind to two or more individuals coordinating with each other. In this study we uncover a coordination of neural activity between the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG) of two people – a person speaking and a person listening. The EEG of one set of twelve participants (“speakers”) was recorded while they were narrating short stories. The EEG of another set of twelve participants (“listeners”) was recorded while watching audiovisual (...)
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  17. Ingo Reich (2009). What Asymmetric Coordination in German Tells Us About the Syntax and Semantics of Conditionals. Natural Language Semantics 17 (3):219-244.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I argue on empirical grounds that (VL-initial) Asymmetric Coordination in German cannot be reduced to a syntactic structure of the form [if S1, then S2], but rather needs to be analyzed as some kind of adjunction to the if-clause, i.e., along the lines of [[if S1] and S2]. This conclusion gives rise to an apparent mismatch between syntactic structure (narrow scope of if) and semantic interpretation (wide scope of if). To resolve this paradoxical situation, I propose (...)
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  18. Solen Sausset, Eric Lambert & Thierry Olive (2013). Flexibility of Orthographic and Graphomotor Coordination During a Handwritten Copy Task: Effect of Time Pressure. Frontiers in Psychology 4:866.score: 24.0
    The coordination of the various processes involved in language production is a subject of keen debate in writing research. Some authors hold that writing processes can be flexibly coordinated according to task demands, whereas others claim that process coordination is entirely inflexible. For instance, orthographic planning has been shown to be resource-dependent during handwriting, but inflexible in typing, even under time pressure. The present study therefore went one step further in studying flexibility in the coordination of orthographic (...)
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  19. [deleted]Julius Verrel, Steven Pologe, Wayne Manselle, Ulman Lindenberger & Marjorie Woollacott (2013). Exploiting Biomechanical Degrees of Freedom for Fast and Accurate Changes in Movement Direction: Coordination Underlying Quick Bow Reversals During Continuous Cello Bowing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that accurate and efficient motor performance may be achieved by task-specific exploitation of biomechanical degrees of freedom. We investigate coordination of the right arm in a task requiring a sudden yet precisely controlled reversal of movement direction: bow reversals during continuous (“legato”) tone production on a stringed instrument. Ten advanced or professional cello players (at least ten years of practice) and ten age-matched novice players took part in the study. Kinematic data from the bow (...)
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  20. [deleted]J. A. Scott Kelso Viviane Kostrubiec, Pier-Giorgio Zanone, Armin Fuchs (2012). Beyond the Blank Slate: Routes to Learning New Coordination Patterns Depend on the Intrinsic Dynamics of the Learner—Experimental Evidence and Theoretical Model. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 24.0
    Using an approach that combines experimental studies of bimanual movements to visual stimuli and theoretical modeling, the present paper develops a dynamical account of sensorimotor learning, that is, how new skills are acquired and old ones modified. A significant aspect of our approach is the focus on the individual learner as the basic unit of analysis, in particular the quantification of predispositions and capabilities that the individual learner brings to the learning environment. Such predispositions constitute the learner’s behavioral repertoire, captured (...)
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  21. Martin J. Pickering Chiara Gambi (2011). A Cognitive Architecture for the Coordination of Utterances. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    Dialogue partners coordinate with each other to reach a common goal. The analogy with other joint activities has sparked interesting observations (e.g., about the norms governing turn taking) and has informed studies of linguistic alignment in dialogue. However, the parallels between language and action have not been fully explored, especially with regard to the mechanisms that support moment-by-moment coordination during language use in conversation. We review the literature on joint actions to show (i) what sorts of mechanisms allow (...) and (ii) which types of experimental paradigms can be informative of the nature of such mechanisms. Regarding (i), there is converging evidence that the actions of others can be represented in the same format as one’s own actions. Furthermore, the predicted actions of others are taken into account in the planning of one’s own actions. Similarly, we propose that interlocutors find it easy to coordinate their acts of production because they can represent their partner’s utterances, they can use these representations to build predictions, which are taken into account in the planning of self-generated utterances. Regarding (ii), we propose a new methodology to study interactive language that combines joint tasks with traditional psycholinguistic methods. In one class of paradigms, two participants are involved in simultaneous production and we manipulate the relationship between their utterances to investigate whether representations of other-generated utterances are built automatically. In a second class of paradigms, the production of an utterance is distributed between two speakers (i.e., they complete each other’s utterances). The timing of their contributions is varied; we are interested in the extent to which predictions about other-generated utterances are integrated in the planning of one’s own utterances. Finally, we argue that our account of joint language use leads to a new view on isolated comprehension. (shrink)
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  22. Yves Couturier, Dominique Gagnon & Louise Belzile (2012). Les Compétences Procédurales Requises à la Coordination dédiéeProcedural Skills Required to Dedicated Coordination. Phronesis 1 (2):15-23.score: 24.0
    This article reflects on the skills required in trades services to people dedicated to coordinate services in complex clinical situations because of their multidimensionality and chronicity. All human activity requires for its proper effectuation, the coordination of interdependencies between actors. Coordination of interdependencies is done in ordinary mode, in everyday activities, but also in dedicated mode, that is to say, through a practice that has a primary mandate to manage them in a conscious, voluntary and accountable for intervention (...)
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  23. Viktoriya Semeshenko, Alexis Garapin, Bernard Ruffieux & Mirta B. Gordon (2010). Information-Driven Coordination: Experimental Results with Heterogeneous Individuals. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 69 (1):119-142.score: 24.0
    We study experimentally a coordination game with N heterogeneous individuals under different information treatments. We explore the effects of information on the emergence of Pareto-efficient outcomes, by means of a gradual decrease of the information content provided to the players in successive experiments. We observe that successful coordination is possible with private information alone, although not on a Pareto-optimal equilibrium. Reinforcement-based learning models reproduce the qualitative trends of the experimental results.
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  24. Friederike Moltmann (1992). Coordination and Comparatives. Dissertation, MITscore: 21.0
  25. Giacomo Sillari (2013). Rule-Following as Coordination: A Game-Theoretic Approach. Synthese 190 (5):871-890.score: 21.0
    Famously, Kripke has argued that the central portion of the Philosophical Investigations describes both a skeptical paradox and its skeptical solution. Solving the paradox involves the element of the community, which determines correctness conditions for rule-following behavior. What do such conditions precisely consist of? Is it accurate to say that there is no fact to the matter of rule following? How are the correctness conditions sustained in the community? My answers to these questions revolve around the idea (cf. P.I. §§198, (...)
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  26. Judith Mehta, Chris Starmer & Robert Sugden (1994). Focal Points in Pure Coordination Games: An Experimental Investigation. Theory and Decision 36 (2):163-185.score: 21.0
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  27. Peter Vanderschraaf & Diana Richards (1997). Joint Beliefs in Conflictual Coordination Games. Theory and Decision 42 (3):287-310.score: 21.0
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  28. Kerry L. Marsh, Michael J. Richardson & R. C. Schmidt (2009). Social Connection Through Joint Action and Interpersonal Coordination. Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):320-339.score: 21.0
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  29. Geraldine L. Pellecchia, Kevin Shockley & M. T. Turvey (2005). Concurrent Cognitive Task Modulates Coordination Dynamics. Cognitive Science 29 (4):531-557.score: 21.0
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  30. F. Kramarz (1996). Dynamic Focal Points in N-Person Coordination Games. Theory and Decision 40 (3):277-313.score: 21.0
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  31. Egli Efstathiou (1969). Effects of Exposure Time and Magnitude of Prism Transform on Eye-Hand Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):235.score: 21.0
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  32. W. R. Miles (1921). The Pursuitmeter: An Apparatus for Measuring the Adequacy of Neuromuscular Coordination Described Together with Illustrative Results. Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (2):77.score: 21.0
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  33. Daniel C. Richardson, Rick Dale & John M. Tomlinson (2009). Conversation, Gaze Coordination, and Beliefs About Visual Context. Cognitive Science 33 (8):1468-1482.score: 21.0
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  34. Giacomo Sillari (2010). Rule-Following and Coordination: A Game-Theoretic Perspective. Rivista di Filosofia 101 (3):355-386.score: 21.0
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  35. Karl U. Smith (1947). Bilateral Integrative Action of the Cerebral Cortex in Man in Verbal Association and Sensori-Motor Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 37 (5):367.score: 21.0
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  36. Ralph J. Berger & James M. Walker (1972). Oculomotor Coordination Following REM and Non-REM Sleep Periods. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (2):216.score: 21.0
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  37. Martha E. Hardt, Richard Held & Martin J. Steinbach (1971). Adaptation to Displaced Vision: A Change in the Central Control of Sensorimotor Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):229.score: 21.0
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  38. M. Korins (1934). A Study in Eye-Hand Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (6):878.score: 21.0
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  39. Sau-Him Lau & Vai-Lam Mui, Using Turn Taking to Mitigate Coordination and Conflict Problems in the Repeated Battle of the Sexes Game.score: 21.0
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  40. [deleted]Marie Ragert, Tim Schroeder & Peter E. Keller (2013). Knowing Too Little or Too Much: The Effects of Familiarity with a Co-Performer's Part on Interpersonal Coordination in Musical Ensembles. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  41. R. C. Travis (1938). Comparison of the Influence of Monetary Reward and Electric Shocks on Learning in Eye-Hand Coordination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (4):423.score: 21.0
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  42. R. C. Travis & H. C. Anderson (1938). The Effect of Electric Shock on Learning in Eye-Hand Coördination. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (1):101.score: 21.0
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  43. Social Coordination (2005). Mark A. Sabbagh and Dare Baldwin. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 165.score: 20.0
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  44. Margaret Gilbert (1990). Rationality, Coordination, and Convention. Synthese 84 (1):1 - 21.score: 18.0
    Philosophers using game-theoretical models of human interactions have, I argue, often overestimated what sheer rationality can achieve. (References are made to David Gauthier, David Lewis, and others.) In particular I argue that in coordination problems rational agents will not necessarily reach a unique outcome that is most preferred by all, nor a unique 'coordination equilibrium' (Lewis), nor a unique Nash equilibrium. Nor are things helped by the addition of a successful precedent, or by common knowledge of generally accepted (...)
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  45. Nicholas Almendares & Dimitri Landa (2007). Strategic Coordination and the Law. Law and Philosophy 26 (5):501-529.score: 18.0
    We re-examine the relationship between coordination, legal sanctions, and free-riding in light of the recent controversy regarding the applicability of the coordination problem paradigm of law-making. We argue that legal sanctions can help solve coordination problems by eliminating socially suboptimal equilibrium outcomes. Once coordination has taken place, however, free-riding can not lead to the breakdown of coordination outcomes, even if sanctions may still be effective at increasing the equity of such outcomes. Finally, we argue that (...)
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  46. Samuel Cumming (2013). From Coordination to Content. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (4).score: 18.0
    Frege's picture of attitude states and attitude reports requires a notion of content that is shareable between agents, yet more fine-grained than reference. Kripke challenged this picture by giving a case on which the expressions that resist substitution in an attitude report share a candidate notion of fine-grained content. A consensus view developed which accepted Kripke's general moral and replaced the Fregean picture with an account of attitude reporting on which states are distinguished in conversation by their (private) representational properties. (...)
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  47. Paul Weirich (2007). Initiating Coordination. Philosophy of Science 74 (5):790-801.score: 18.0
    How do rational agents coordinate in a single-stage, noncooperative game? Common knowledge of the payoff matrix and of each player's utility maximization among his strategies does not suffice. This paper argues that utility maximization among intentions and then acts generates coordination yielding a payoff-dominant Nash equilibrium. ‡I thank the audience at my paper's presentation at the 2006 PSA meeting for many insightful points. †To contact the author, please write to: Philosophy Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211; e-mail: WeirichP@missouri.edu.
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  48. Giovanni Pezzulo (2011). Shared Representations as Coordination Tools for Interaction. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (2):303-333.score: 18.0
    Why is interaction so simple? This article presents a theory of interaction based on the use of shared representations as “coordination tools” (e.g., roundabouts that facilitate coordination of drivers). By aligning their representations (intentionally or unintentionally), interacting agents help one another to solve interaction problems in that they remain predictable, and offer cues for action selection and goal monitoring. We illustrate how this strategy works in a joint task (building together a tower of bricks) and discuss its requirements (...)
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  49. David Kirsh (1999). Distrubuted Cognition, Coordination and Environmental Design. Proceedings of the European Conference on Cognitive Science.score: 18.0
    The type of principles which cognitive engineers need to design better work environments are principles which explain interactivity and distributed cognition: how human agents interact with themselves and others, their work spaces, and the resources and constraints that populate those spaces. A first step in developing these principles is to clarify the fundamental concepts of environment, coordination, and behavioural function. Using simple examples, I review changes the distributed perspective forces on these basic notions.
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  50. Maarten C. W. Janssen (2003). Coordination and Cooperation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):165-166.score: 18.0
    This comment makes four related points. First, explaining coordination is different from explaining cooperation. Second, solving the coordination problem is more important for the theory of games than solving the cooperation problem. Third, a version of the Principle of Coordination can be rationalized on individualistic grounds. Finally, psychological game theory should consider how players perceive their gaming situation.
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