Search results for 'creationism about fiction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stuart Brock (2010). The Creationist Fiction: The Case Against Creationism About Fictional Characters. Philosophical Review 119 (3):337-364.score: 107.3
    This essay explains why creationism about fictional characters is an abject failure. Creationism about fictional characters is the view that fictional objects are created by the authors of the novels in which they first appear. This essay shows that, when the details of creationism are filled in, the hypothesis becomes far more puzzling than the linguistic data it is used to explain. No matter how the creationist identifies where, when and how fictional objects are created, (...)
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  2. Franck Lihoreau (ed.) (2011). Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag.score: 72.0
    The essays collected in this volume are all concerned with the connection between fiction and truth. This question is of utmost importance to metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophical logic and epistemology, raising in each of these areas and at their intersections a large number of issues related to creation, existence, reference, identity, modality, belief, assertion, imagination, pretense, etc. All these topics and many more are addressed in this collection, which brings together original essays written from various points of view (...)
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  3. Stefano Predelli (2008). Modal Monsters and Talk About Fiction. Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (3):277-297.score: 62.0
    This paper argues in favor of a treatment of discourse about fiction in terms of operators on character, that is, Kaplanesque ‘monsters’. The first three sections criticize the traditional analysis of ‘according to the fiction’ as an intensional operator, and the approach to fictional discourse grounded on the notion of contextual shifts. The final sections explain how an analysis in terms of monsters yields the correct readings for a variety of examples involving modal and temporal indexicals.
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  4. Jeffrey Goodman (2004). A Defense of Creationism in Fiction. Grazer Philosophische Studien 67 (1):131-155.score: 59.0
    Creationism is the conjunction of the following theses: (i) fictional individuals (e.g. Sherlock Holmes) actually exist; (ii) fictional names (e.g., 'Holmes') are at least sometimes genuinely referential; (iii) fictional individuals are the creations of the authors who first wrote (or spoke, etc.) about them. CA Creationism is the conjunction of (i) - (iii) and the following thesis: (iv) fictional individuals are contingently existing abstracta; they are non-concrete artifacts of our world and various other possible worlds. TakashiYagisawa has (...)
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  5. Stefano Predelli (1997). Talk About Fiction. Erkenntnis 46 (1):69-77.score: 56.0
    I present a novel explanation of the apparent truth of certain remarks about fiction, such as an utterance of ''Salieri commissioned the Requiem'' during a discussion of the movie Amadeus. I criticize the traditional view, which alleges that the uttered sentence abbreviates the longer sentence ''it is true in the movie Amadeus that Salieri commissioned the Requiem''. I propose a solution which appeals to some independently motivated results concerning the contexts relevant for the semantic evaluation of indexical expressions.
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  6. Maarten Boudry, Stefaan Blancke & Johan Braeckman (2010). How Not to Attack Intelligent Design Creationism: Philosophical Misconceptions About Methodological Naturalism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 15 (3):227-244.score: 54.0
    In recent controversies about Intelligent Design Creationism (IDC), the principle of methodological naturalism (MN) has played an important role. In this paper, an often neglected distinction is made between two different conceptions of MN, each with its respective rationale and with a different view on the proper role of MN in science. According to one popular conception, MN is a self-imposed or intrinsic limitation of science, which means that science is simply not equipped to deal with claims of (...)
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  7. Alberto Voltolini (2011). How Creationism Supports for Kripke’s Vichianism on Fiction. In F. Lihoreau (ed.), Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag. 38--93.score: 51.0
    In this paper, I want to show that a reasonable thesis on truth in fiction, Fictional Vichianism (FV)—according to which fictional truths are true because they are stipulated to be true—can be positively endorsed if one grounds Kripke’s justification for (FV), that traces back to the idea that names used in fiction never refer to concrete real individuals, into a creationist position on fictional entities that allows for a distinction between the pretending and the characterizing use of (...)-involving sentences. Thus, sticking to (FV) provides a reason for a metaphysically moderate ontological realism on fictional entities. (shrink)
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  8. Takashi Yagisawa (2001). Against Creationism in Fiction. Noûs 35 (s15):153-172.score: 45.0
    Sherlock Holmes is a fictional individual. So is his favorite pipe. Our pre-theoretical intuition says that neither of them is real. It says that neither of them really, or actually, exists. It also says that there is a sense in which they do exist, namely, a sense in which they exist “in the world of” the Sherlock Holmes stories. Our pre-theoretical intuition says in general of any fictional individual that it does not actually exist but exists “in the world of” (...)
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  9. Hélène Otzenberger Marie-Noëlle Metz-Lutz, Yannick Bressan, Nathalie Heider (2010). What Physiological Changes and Cerebral Traces Tell Us About Adhesion to Fiction During Theater-Watching? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 45.0
    Live theater is typically designed to alter the state of mind of the audience. Indeed, the perceptual inputs issuing from a live theatrical performance are intended to represent something else, and the actions, emphasised by the writing and staging, are the key prompting the adhesion of viewers to fiction, i.e. their belief that it is real. This phenomenon raises the issue of the cognitive processes governing access to a fictional reality during live theater and of their cerebral underpinnings. To (...)
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  10. Mark Currie (2010). About Time: Narrative, Fiction and the Philosophy of Time. Edinburgh University Press.score: 42.0
     
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  11. Robert T. Pennock, Controversy About Creationism.score: 39.0
    Teach the Controversy? Kansas just can't get a break. In 1999, the state became an international laughingstock when creationists on the State Board of Education, led by Steve Abrams, gutted what would have been a model science curriculum, removing the theme of evolution as well as mentions of the Big Bang and the geological timescale (Pennock, 1999b, 2000). These board members and the creationist groups that assisted them seemed to confirm every stereotype of Kansas as an ignorant backwater. The creationists (...)
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  12. R. Stecker (2011). Should We Still Care About the Paradox of Fiction? British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):295-308.score: 39.0
    The paradox of fiction presents an inconsistent triad of propositions, all of which are purported to be plausible or difficult to abandon. Here is an instance of the paradox: (1) Sally pities Anna (where Anna is the character Anna Karenina). (2) To pity someone, one must believe that they exist and are suffering. (3) Sally does not believe that Anna exists. Here is the problem. The paradox was formulated during the heyday of the cognitive theory of the emotions when (...)
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  13. Marian Hillar (2012). Creationism and Evolution. Misconceptions About Science and Religion. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (4):133-160.score: 39.0
    Creationism is an ancient worldview that was incorporated into ancient religious doctrines and survived in the western world due to its domination by religious institution such as the Catholic and Protestant Churches. Slowly, with the development of democratic political systems and science, the church lost its power of dominance over intellectual enterprises, and evolution became accepted by the majority as the inherent process in nature. Nevertheless, creationism is still very much alive among various fundamentalist churches and their organizations (...)
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  14. Sergio Della Sala (ed.) (2007). Tall Tales About the Mind and Brain: Separating Fact From Fiction. OUP Oxford.score: 39.0
    Does listening to Mozart make us more intelligent? Is there such a thing as a gay gene? Does the size of the brain matter? Does the moon influence our behaviour? Can we communicate with the dead? Can graphology tell us anything about a person's character? Is the human brain clonable? What role do dreams have in cognition? Can mind conquer matter and diseases? Are out-of-body experiences possible? Can we trust our intuitions? -/- To some, the answer to all these (...)
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  15. Frederick Kroon (2011). The Fiction of Creationism. In Franck Lihoreau (ed.), Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag. 38--203.score: 39.0
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  16. Nicholas Rescher (1996). Questions About the Nature of Fiction. In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction Updated: Theories of Fictionality, Narratology, and Poetics. University of Toronto Press. 30--38.score: 39.0
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  17. P. Lamarque (2009). Much Ado About Nonexistence: Fiction and Reference. Philosophical Review 118 (3):406-409.score: 36.0
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  18. Claudia Mills (2000). Appropriating Others' Stories: Some Questions About the Ethics of Writing Fiction. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (2):195–206.score: 36.0
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  19. Alex Orenstein (2003). Fiction, Prepositional Attitudes, and Some Truths About Falsehood. Dialectica 57 (2):177–190.score: 36.0
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  20. Marian Hillar (2000). Creationism and Evolution Misconceptions About Science and Religion and the Socinian Solution. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 8:1-27.score: 36.0
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  21. Andrzej Zabłudowski (1974). Concerning a Fiction About How Facts Are Forecast. Journal of Philosophy 71 (4):97-112.score: 36.0
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  22. Umit Cizre (2001). The Truth and Fiction About (Turkey's) Human Rights Politics. Human Rights Review 3 (1):55-77.score: 36.0
    Despite their strong transnational links and support in the second half of the 1990s, Turkish NGOs have not yet had a “tremendous” impact on domestic political and social change. But new points of contact have been established in the public sphere between governmental agencies and the IHV and IHD, with both sides engaged in an argumentative process, which may, in the long run, lead to the subscriptive phase of “human rights talk” and deed. The general tenor of this essay may (...)
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  23. Jeffrey Goodman (2013). Alward, Peter. Empty Revelations: An Essay on Talk About, and Attitudes Toward, Fiction. McGill‐Queen's University Press, 2012, X + 206 Pp., $95.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):392-394.score: 36.0
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  24. Marie-Noëlle Metz-Lutz, Yannick Bressan, Nathalie Heider & Hélène Otzenberger (2010). What Physiological Changes and Cerebral Traces Tell Us About Adhesion to Fiction During Theater-Watching? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 36.0
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  25. Peter Alexander Meyers (2012). Abandoned to Ourselves: Being an Essay on the Emergence and Implications of Sociology in the Writings of Mr. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, with Special Attention to His Claims About the Moral Significance of Dependence in the Composition and Self-Transformation of the Social Bond, & Aimed to Uncover Tensions Between Those Two Perspectives: Creationism and Social Evolution, That Remain Embedded in Our Common Sense & Which Still Impede the Human Science of Politics--. Yale University Press.score: 36.0
    Society as the ethical starting point for political inquiry -- The moral relevance of dependence -- Nature and the moral frame of society -- Morality in the order of the will.
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  26. Randy Moore, Murray Jensen & Jay Hatch (2003). Twenty Questions: What Have the Courts Said About the Teaching of Evolution and Creationism in Public Schools? Bioscience 53 (8):766.score: 36.0
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  27. F. Seddon (forthcoming). Some Truths About Pulp Fiction. Film and Philosophy.score: 36.0
     
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  28. Leverett T. Smith Jr (1983). Five Books About Sports in American Fiction. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 10 (1):92-106.score: 36.0
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  29. Andrzej Zabludowski (1974). Concerning a Fiction About How Facts Are Forecast. Journal of Philosophy 71 (4):97 - 112.score: 36.0
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  30. Anthony Everett (2013). Sainsbury on Thinking About Fictional Things. Acta Analytica:1-14.score: 34.0
    In a number of places Mark Sainsbury has recently developed an attractive irrealist account of fiction and intentionality, on which there are no fictional objects or exotic intentional entities. A central component of his account is an ambitious argument, which aims to establish that the truth of intensional transitives such as “I think about Holmes” and “Alexander feared Zeus” does not require the existence of fictional or intentional objects. It would be good news indeed for the irrealist if (...)
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  31. Stavroula Glezakos (forthcoming). Truth and Reference in Fiction. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Routledge.score: 29.0
    Fiction is often characterized by way of a contrast with truth, as, for example, in the familiar couplet “Truth is always strange/ Stranger than fiction" (Byron 1824). And yet, those who would maintain that “we will always learn more about human life and human personality from novels than from scientific psychology” (Chomsky 1988: 159) hold that some truth is best encountered via fiction. The scrupulous novelist points out that her work depicts no actual person, either living (...)
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  32. Peter Lamarque (1990). Reasoning to What is True in Fiction. Argumentation 4 (3):333-346.score: 29.0
    The paper discusses the principle by which we reason to what is ‘true in fiction’. The focus is David Lewis's article ‘Truth in Fiction’ (1978) which proposes an analysis in terms of counterfactuals and possible worlds. It is argued thatLewis's account is inadequate in detail and also in principle in that it conflicts radically with basic and familiar tenets of literary criticism. Literary critical reasoning about fiction concerns not the discovery of facts in possible worlds but (...)
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  33. Rocco J. Gennaro (2000). Fiction, Pleasurable Tragedy, and the HOT Theory of Consciousness. Philosophical Papers 29 (2):107-20.score: 27.0
    [Final version in Philosophical Papers, 2000] Much has been made over the past few decades of two related problems in aesthetics. First, the "feeling fiction problem," as I will call it, asks: is it rational to be moved by what happens to fictional characters? How can we care about what happens to people who we know are not real?[i] Second, the so-called "paradox of tragedy" is embodied in the question: Why or how is it that we take pleasure (...)
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  34. Roman Frigg (2010). Models and Fiction. Synthese 172 (2):251 - 268.score: 27.0
    Most scientific models are not physical objects, and this raises important questions. What sort of entity are models, what is truth in a model, and how do we learn about models? In this paper I argue that models share important aspects in common with literary fiction, and that therefore theories of fiction can be brought to bear on these questions. In particular, I argue that the pretence theory as developed by Walton (1990, Mimesis as make-believe: on (...)
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  35. David Carr (1998). Phenomenology and Fiction in Dennett. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 6 (3):331-344.score: 27.0
    In Consciousness Explained and other works, Daniel Dennett uses the concept of phenomenology (along with his variant, called heterophenomenology) in almost complete disregard of the work of Husserl and his successors in German and French philosophy. Yet it can be argued that many of the most important ideas of Husserl, Merleau-Ponty and others (and not just the idea of intentionality) reappear in Dennett's work in only slightly altered form. In this article I try to show this in two ways, first (...)
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  36. Peter Lamarque (1994). Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    This book examines the complex and varied ways in which fictions relate to the real world, and offers a precise account of how imaginative works of literature can use fictional content to explore matters of universal human interest. While rejecting the traditional view that literature is important for the truths that it imparts, the authors also reject attempts to cut literature off altogether from real human concerns. Their detailed account of fictionality, mimesis, and cognitive value, founded on the methods of (...)
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  37. Jeffrey Goodman (2005). Defending Author-Essentialism. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):200-208.score: 27.0
    Creationism is the view that fictional individuals such as Sherlock Holmes are contingently existing abstracta that come about due to the intentional activities of authors. Author-essentialism is the stronger thesis that the author responsible for bringing a fictional individual into existence at a time is essential to the existence of that individual. Takashi Yagisawa has recently attacked this view on the following grounds: author-essentialists rely on an ontological parallelism between fictional individuals and whole works of fiction, but (...)
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  38. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear (...)
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  39. Helen De Cruz (2013). Is Teaching Children Young Earth Creationism Child Abuse? The Philosophers' Magazine 63:21-23.score: 27.0
    Richard Dawkins has argued on several occasions that bringing up your child religiously is a form of child abuse. According to Dawkins, teaching children about religion is fine (it helps them to understand cultural references, for instance), but indoctrinating children – by which Dawkins means any form of education that teaches religious beliefs as facts – is morally wrong and harmful. Dawkins is not alone: the American theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, for instance, recently argued that teaching Young Earth (...) (henceforth YEC) is a form of child abuse. Here, I want to focus on the role of parents in instilling religious beliefs in their children, especially beliefs that are incompatible with science, such as YEC. Instead of using the rather laden term “child abuse,” I want to tease apart two questions: Are YEC parents harming their children, and is what they do morally wrong? (shrink)
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  40. Alberto Voltolini (2008). The Seven Consequences of Creationism. Metaphysica 10 (1):27-48.score: 27.0
    Creationism with respect to fictional entities, i.e., the position according to which ficta are creations of human practices, has recently become the most popular realist account of fictional entities. For it allows one to hold that there are fictional entities while simultaneously giving such entities a respectable metaphysical status, that of abstract artifacts. In this paper, I will draw what are the ontological and semantical consequences of this position, or at least of all its forms that are genuinely creationist. (...)
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  41. Bijoy H. Boruah (1988). Fiction and Emotion: A Study in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Why do people respond emotionally to works of fiction they know are make-believe? Boruah tackles this question, which is fundamental aesthetics and literary studies, from a totally new perspective. Bringing together the various answers that have been offered by philosophers from Aristotle to Roger Scruton, he shows that while some philosophers have denied any rational basis to our emotional responses to fiction, others have argued that the emotions evoked by fiction are not real emotions at all. In (...)
     
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  42. Benigno Trigo (2013). On Kristeva's Fiction. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 21 (1):60-82.score: 27.0
    An essay about the reception of Kristeva's fiction so far in the popular press and in academic journals, as well as an inquiry into its use and value as a psychoanalytic antidote.
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  43. Ann-Sophie Barwich (2013). Science and Fiction: Analysing the Concept of Fiction in Science and its Limits. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 44 (2):357-373.score: 27.0
    A recent and growing discussion in philosophy addresses the construction of models and their use in scientific reasoning by comparison with fiction. This comparison helps to explore the problem of mediated observation and, hence, the lack of an unambiguous reference of representations. Examining the usefulness of the concept of fiction for a comparison with non-denoting elements in science, the aim of this paper is to present reasonable grounds for drawing a distinction between these two kinds of representation. In (...)
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  44. Nicholas R. Maradin Iii (2013). Militainment and Mechatronics: Occultatio and the Veil of Science Fiction Cool in United States Air Force Advertisements. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 15 (2):77-86.score: 27.0
    In 2009, the United States Air Force aired a series of science fiction-themed recruitment commercials on network television and their official YouTube channel. In these advertisements, the superimposition of science fiction imagery over depictions of Air Force operations frames these missions as near-future sci-fi adventure, ironically summarized by the tagline: “It’s not science fiction. It’s what we do every day.” Focusing on an early advertisement for the Air Force’s Reaper unmanned aerial vehicle, this essay explores how themes (...)
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  45. Stuart Brock (2002). Fictionalism About Fictional Characters. Noûs 36 (1):1–21.score: 26.7
    Despite protestations to the contrary, philosophers have always been renowned for espousing theories that do violence to common-sense opinion. In the last twenty years or so there has been a growing number of philosophers keen to follow in this tradition. According to these philosophers, if a story of pure fic-tion tells us that an individual exists, then there really is such an individual. According to these realists about fictional characters, ‘Scarlett O’Hara,’ ‘Char-lie Brown,’ ‘Batman,’ ‘Superman,’ ‘Tweedledum’ and ‘Tweedledee’ are (...)
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  46. Jeffrey Goodman (2013). Creatures of Fiction, Objects of Myth. Analysis 74 (1):ant090.score: 26.0
    Many who think that some abstracta are artefacts are fictional creationists, asserting that fictional characters are brought about by our activities. Kripke (1973), Salmon (1998, 2002), and Braun (2005) further embrace mythical creationism, claiming that certain entities that figure in false theories, such as phlogiston or Vulcan, are likewise abstracta produced by our intentional activities. I here argue that one may not reasonably take the metaphysical route travelled by the mythical creationist. Even if one holds that fictional characters (...)
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  47. David Lewis (1978). Truth in Fiction. American Philosophical Quarterly 15 (1):37--46.score: 25.0
    It is advisable to treat some sorts of discourse about fiction with the aid of an intensional operator "in such-And-Such fiction...." the operator may appear either explicitly or tacitly. It may be analyzed in terms of similarity of worlds, As follows: "in the fiction f, A" means that a is true in those of the worlds where f is told as known fact rather than fiction that differ least from our world, Or from the belief (...)
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  48. István Aranyosi (2012). Talking About Nothing. Numbers, Hallucinations, and Fictions. Philosophy 87 (1):145-150.score: 24.0
    If everything exists, then it looks, prima facie, as if talking about nothing is equivalent to not talking about anything. However, we appear as talking or thinking about particular nothings, that is, about particular items that are not among the existents. How to explain this phenomenon? One way is to deny that everything exists, and consequently to be ontologically committed to nonexistent “objects”. Another way is to deny that the process of thinking about such nonexistents (...)
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  49. Elisabeth Camp (2009). Two Varieties of Literary Imagination: Metaphor, Fiction, and Thought Experiments. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):107-130.score: 23.0
    Recently, philosophers have discovered that they have a lot to learn from, or at least to ponder about, fiction. Many metaphysicians are attracted to fiction as a model for our talk about purported objects and properties, such as numbers, morality, and possible worlds, without embracing a robust Platonist ontology. In addition, a growing group of philosophers of mind are interested in the implications of our engagement with fiction for our understanding of the mind and emotions: (...)
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  50. Brian Weatherson (2004). Morality, Fiction, and Possibility. Philosophers' Imprint 4 (3):1-27.score: 23.0
    Authors have a lot of leeway with regard to what they can make true in their story. In general, if the author says that p is true in the fiction we’re reading, we believe that p is true in that fiction. And if we’re playing along with the fictional game, we imagine that, along with everything else in the story, p is true. But there are exceptions to these general principles. Many authors, most notably Kendall Walton and Tamar (...)
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