Search results for 'creationism about fiction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Stuart Brock (2010). The Creationist Fiction: The Case Against Creationism About Fictional Characters. Philosophical Review 119 (3):337-364.
    This essay explains why creationism about fictional characters is an abject failure. Creationism about fictional characters is the view that fictional objects are created by the authors of the novels in which they first appear. This essay shows that, when the details of creationism are filled in, the hypothesis becomes far more puzzling than the linguistic data it is used to explain. No matter how the creationist identifies where, when and how fictional objects are created, (...)
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  2.  79
    David Sackris (2013). A Defense of Causal Creationism in Fiction. Philosophical Writings 41 (1):32-46.
    In this paper I seek defend the view that fictional characters are author-created abstract entities against objections offered by Stuart Brock in his paper “The Creationist Fiction: The Case against Creationism about Fictional Characters.” I argue that his objections fall far short of his goal of showing that if philosophers want to believe in fictional characters as abstract objects, they should not view them as author-created. My defense of creationism in fiction in part rests on (...)
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  3.  79
    Jeffrey Goodman (2004). A Defense of Creationism in Fiction. Grazer Philosophische Studien 67 (1):131-155.
    Creationism is the conjunction of the following theses: (i) fictional individuals (e.g. Sherlock Holmes) actually exist; (ii) fictional names (e.g., 'Holmes') are at least sometimes genuinely referential; (iii) fictional individuals are the creations of the authors who first wrote (or spoke, etc.) about them. CA Creationism is the conjunction of (i) - (iii) and the following thesis: (iv) fictional individuals are contingently existing abstracta; they are non-concrete artifacts of our world and various other possible worlds. TakashiYagisawa has (...)
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  4. Franck Lihoreau (ed.) (2011). Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag.
    The essays collected in this volume are all concerned with the connection between fiction and truth. This question is of utmost importance to metaphysics, philosophy of language, philosophical logic and epistemology, raising in each of these areas and at their intersections a large number of issues related to creation, existence, reference, identity, modality, belief, assertion, imagination, pretense, etc. All these topics and many more are addressed in this collection, which brings together original essays written from various points of view (...)
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  5. Stefano Predelli (2008). Modal Monsters and Talk About Fiction. Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (3):277-297.
    This paper argues in favor of a treatment of discourse about fiction in terms of operators on character, that is, Kaplanesque ‘monsters’. The first three sections criticize the traditional analysis of ‘according to the fiction’ as an intensional operator, and the approach to fictional discourse grounded on the notion of contextual shifts. The final sections explain how an analysis in terms of monsters yields the correct readings for a variety of examples involving modal and temporal indexicals.
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  6. Daniel Nolan & Alexander Sandgren (2014). Creationism and Cardinality. Analysis 74 (4):615-622.
    Creationism about fictional entities requires a principle connecting what fictions say exist with which fictional entities really exist. The most natural way of spelling out such a principle yields inconsistent verdicts about how many fictional entities are generated by certain inconsistent fictions. Avoiding inconsistency without compromising the attractions of creationism will not be easy.
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  7.  47
    Stefano Predelli (1997). Talk About Fiction. Erkenntnis 46 (1):69-77.
    I present a novel explanation of the apparent truth of certain remarks about fiction, such as an utterance of ''Salieri commissioned the Requiem'' during a discussion of the movie Amadeus. I criticize the traditional view, which alleges that the uttered sentence abbreviates the longer sentence ''it is true in the movie Amadeus that Salieri commissioned the Requiem''. I propose a solution which appeals to some independently motivated results concerning the contexts relevant for the semantic evaluation of indexical expressions.
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  8.  2
    François Recanati, Talk About Fiction.
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  9. Maarten Boudry, Stefaan Blancke & Johan Braeckman (2010). How Not to Attack Intelligent Design Creationism: Philosophical Misconceptions About Methodological Naturalism. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 15 (3):227-244.
    In recent controversies about Intelligent Design Creationism (IDC), the principle of methodological naturalism (MN) has played an important role. In this paper, an often neglected distinction is made between two different conceptions of MN, each with its respective rationale and with a different view on the proper role of MN in science. According to one popular conception, MN is a self-imposed or intrinsic limitation of science, which means that science is simply not equipped to deal with claims of (...)
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  10. Alberto Voltolini (2011). How Creationism Supports for Kripke’s Vichianism on Fiction. In F. Lihoreau (ed.), Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag 38--93.
    In this paper, I want to show that a reasonable thesis on truth in fiction, Fictional Vichianism (FV)—according to which fictional truths are true because they are stipulated to be true—can be positively endorsed if one grounds Kripke’s justification for (FV), that traces back to the idea that names used in fiction never refer to concrete real individuals, into a creationist position on fictional entities that allows for a distinction between the pretending and the characterizing use of (...)-involving sentences. Thus, sticking to (FV) provides a reason for a metaphysically moderate ontological realism on fictional entities. (shrink)
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  11. Peter Alward (2012). Empty Revelations: An Essay on Talk About, and Attitudes Toward, Fiction. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    What mysteries lie at the heart of fiction's power to enchant and engage the mind? Empty Revelations considers a number of philosophical problems that fiction raises, including the primary issue of how we can think and talk about things that do not exist. Peter Alward covers thought-provoking terrain, exploring fictional truth, the experience of being "caught up" in a story, and the boundaries between fiction and non-fiction. At the centre of Alward's argument is a figure (...)
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  12. Takashi Yagisawa (2001). Against Creationism in Fiction. Noûs 35 (s15):153-172.
    Sherlock Holmes is a fictional individual. So is his favorite pipe. Our pre-theoretical intuition says that neither of them is real. It says that neither of them really, or actually, exists. It also says that there is a sense in which they do exist, namely, a sense in which they exist “in the world of” the Sherlock Holmes stories. Our pre-theoretical intuition says in general of any fictional individual that it does not actually exist but exists “in the world of” (...)
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  13. William D’Alessandro (2016). Explicitism About Truth in Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (1):53-65.
    The problem of truth in fiction concerns how to tell whether a given proposition is true in a given fiction. Thus far, the nearly universal consensus has been that some propositions are ‘implicitly true’ in some fictions: such propositions are not expressed by any explicit statements in the relevant work, but are nevertheless held to be true in those works on the basis of some other set of criteria. I call this family of views ‘implicitism’. I argue that (...)
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  14.  7
    Kathleen H. Corriveau, Eva E. Chen & Paul L. Harris (2015). Judgments About Fact and Fiction by Children From Religious and Nonreligious Backgrounds. Cognitive Science 39 (2):353-382.
    In two studies, 5- and 6-year-old children were questioned about the status of the protagonist embedded in three different types of stories. In realistic stories that only included ordinary events, all children, irrespective of family background and schooling, claimed that the protagonist was a real person. In religious stories that included ordinarily impossible events brought about by divine intervention, claims about the status of the protagonist varied sharply with exposure to religion. Children who went to church or (...)
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  15.  8
    Maria Leone (2015). Real World and Ideal World in Rousseau: On the Need of Fiction to Think About Politics. Trans/Form/Ação 38 (SPE):43-56.
    RESUMO:A hipótese desenvolvida nos leva a confrontar três textos do corpusrousseauísta: o Segundo Discurso, Júlia ou A Nova Heloísa e o extrato do Primeiro Diálogo, em que há a ficção do mundo ideal, textos que, apesar do seu estatuto genérico diferente, estão em coerência e convergência teórica. Desejamos evidenciar um aspecto da unidade problemática do pensamento de Rousseau concernente à abordagem crítica da sociedade de seus contemporâneos e sua concepção do papel das Letras e dos Espetáculos. A preocupação do filósofo (...)
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  16.  23
    Min Xu (2015). The Creator-Determining Problem and Conjunctive Creationism About Fictional Characters. Dialogue 54 (3):455-468.
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  17. Francois Recanati (1998). Talk About Fiction. Lingua E Stile 33 (3):547-558.
  18. Mark Currie (2010). About Time: Narrative, Fiction and the Philosophy of Time. Edinburgh University Press.
     
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  19. Marian Hillar (2012). Creationism and Evolution. Misconceptions About Science and Religion. Dialogue and Universalism 22 (4):133-160.
    Creationism is an ancient worldview that was incorporated into ancient religious doctrines and survived in the western world due to its domination by religious institution such as the Catholic and Protestant Churches. Slowly, with the development of democratic political systems and science, the church lost its power of dominance over intellectual enterprises, and evolution became accepted by the majority as the inherent process in nature. Nevertheless, creationism is still very much alive among various fundamentalist churches and their organizations (...)
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  20. Robert T. Pennock, Controversy About Creationism.
    Teach the Controversy? Kansas just can't get a break. In 1999, the state became an international laughingstock when creationists on the State Board of Education, led by Steve Abrams, gutted what would have been a model science curriculum, removing the theme of evolution as well as mentions of the Big Bang and the geological timescale (Pennock, 1999b, 2000). These board members and the creationist groups that assisted them seemed to confirm every stereotype of Kansas as an ignorant backwater. The creationists (...)
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  21. Frederick Kroon (2011). The Fiction of Creationism. In Franck Lihoreau (ed.), Truth in Fiction. Ontos Verlag 38--203.
     
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  22.  68
    R. Stecker (2011). Should We Still Care About the Paradox of Fiction? British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):295-308.
    The paradox of fiction presents an inconsistent triad of propositions, all of which are purported to be plausible or difficult to abandon. Here is an instance of the paradox: (1) Sally pities Anna (where Anna is the character Anna Karenina). (2) To pity someone, one must believe that they exist and are suffering. (3) Sally does not believe that Anna exists. Here is the problem. The paradox was formulated during the heyday of the cognitive theory of the emotions when (...)
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  23.  20
    Alex Orenstein (2003). Fiction, Prepositional Attitudes, and Some Truths About Falsehood. Dialectica 57 (2):177–190.
    This paper presents an anti‐realist account of fictional objects. Arguing for the involvement of non‐veridical prepositional attitude ascriptions in the understanding of fiction, I maintain that there is no need to invoke Meinongian objects, possibilia or abstract objects for this purpose. In addition I argue against object dependent views . I make a case for empty names playing a more significant role than that accorded on direct reference accounts of names. I close by noting points of similarity and of (...)
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  24. Sergio Della Sala (ed.) (2007). Tall Tales About the Mind and Brain: Separating Fact From Fiction. OUP Oxford.
    Tall tales presents a sweeping survey of common myths about the mind and brain. In a lighthearted and accessible style, it exposes the truth behind these beliefs, how they are perpetuated, why people believe them, and why they might even exist in the first place.
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  25. Sergio Della Sala (ed.) (2007). Tall Tales About the Mind and Brain: Separating Fact From Fiction. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Does listening to Mozart make us more intelligent? Is there such a thing as a gay gene? Does the size of the brain matter? Does the moon influence our behaviour? Can we communicate with the dead? Can graphology tell us anything about a person's character? Is the human brain clonable? What role do dreams have in cognition? Can mind conquer matter and diseases? Are out-of-body experiences possible? Can we trust our intuitions? To some, the answer to all these questions (...)
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  26. Nicholas Rescher (1996). Questions About the Nature of Fiction. In Calin Andrei Mihailescu & Walid Hamarneh (eds.), Fiction Updated: Theories of Fictionality, Narratology, and Poetics. University of Toronto Press 30--38.
     
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  27. Hatem Rushdy (ed.) (2007). Much Ado About Nonexistence: Fiction and Reference. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Fiction, Reference, and Nonexistence contains a new, contemporary theory of fiction and discusses the connection between language and reality. Martinich and Stroll, two of America's leading philosophers, explore fiction and undertake an analytic philosophical study of fiction and its reference, and its relation to truth.
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  28. Avrum Stroll (2007). Much Ado About Nonexistence: Fiction and Reference. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Fiction, Reference, and Nonexistence contains a new, contemporary theory of fiction and discusses the connection between language and reality. Martinich and Stroll, two of America's leading philosophers, explore fiction and undertake an analytic philosophical study of fiction and its reference, and its relation to truth.
     
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  29.  29
    Marian Hillar (2000). Creationism and Evolution Misconceptions About Science and Religion and the Socinian Solution. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 8:1-27.
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  30.  10
    Andrzej Zabludowski (1974). Concerning a Fiction About How Facts Are Forecast. Journal of Philosophy 71 (4):97 - 112.
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  31.  32
    Peter Lamarque (2009). Much Ado About Nonexistence: Fiction and Reference. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review 118 (3):406-409.
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  32.  35
    Claudia Mills (2000). Appropriating Others' Stories: Some Questions About the Ethics of Writing Fiction. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (2):195–206.
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  33.  3
    William Irwin & David Kyle Johnson (2014). What Would Dutton Say About the Paradox of Fiction? Philosophy and Literature 38 (1A):A144-A147.
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  34.  18
    Andrzej Zabłudowski (1974). Concerning a Fiction About How Facts Are Forecast. Journal of Philosophy 71 (4):97-112.
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  35.  3
    Jeffrey Goodman (2013). Alward, Peter. Empty Revelations: An Essay on Talk About, and Attitudes Toward, Fiction. McGill‐Queen's University Press, 2012, X + 206 Pp., $95.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):392-394.
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  36. Umit Cizre (2001). The Truth and Fiction About (Turkey's) Human Rights Politics. Human Rights Review 3 (1):55-77.
    Despite their strong transnational links and support in the second half of the 1990s, Turkish NGOs have not yet had a “tremendous” impact on domestic political and social change. But new points of contact have been established in the public sphere between governmental agencies and the IHV and IHD, with both sides engaged in an argumentative process, which may, in the long run, lead to the subscriptive phase of “human rights talk” and deed. The general tenor of this essay may (...)
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  37.  11
    Peter Alexander Meyers (2012). Abandoned to Ourselves: Being an Essay on the Emergence and Implications of Sociology in the Writings of Mr. Jean-Jacques Rousseau, with Special Attention to His Claims About the Moral Significance of Dependence in the Composition and Self-Transformation of the Social Bond, & Aimed to Uncover Tensions Between Those Two Perspectives: Creationism and Social Evolution, That Remain Embedded in Our Common Sense & Which Still Impede the Human Science of Politics--. Yale University Press.
    Society as the ethical starting point for political inquiry -- The moral relevance of dependence -- Nature and the moral frame of society -- Morality in the order of the will.
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  38. F. Seddon (forthcoming). Some Truths About Pulp Fiction. Film and Philosophy.
     
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  39. Leverett T. Smith Jr (1983). Five Books About Sports in American Fiction. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 10 (1):92-106.
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  40.  9
    David Friedell (2016). Abstract Creationism and Authorial Intention. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):129-137.
    creationism about fictional characters is the view that fictional characters are abstract objects that authors create. I defend this view against criticisms from Stuart Brock that hitherto have not been adequately countered. The discussion sheds light on how the number of fictional characters depends on authorial intention. I conclude also that we should change how we think intentions are connected to artifacts more generally, both abstract and concrete.
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  41. Jeffrey Goodman (2005). Defending Author-Essentialism. Philosophy and Literature 29 (1):200-208.
    Creationism is the view that fictional individuals such as Sherlock Holmes are contingently existing abstracta that come about due to the intentional activities of authors. Author-essentialism is the stronger thesis that the author responsible for bringing a fictional individual into existence at a time is essential to the existence of that individual. Takashi Yagisawa has recently attacked this view on the following grounds: author-essentialists rely on an ontological parallelism between fictional individuals and whole works of fiction, but (...)
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  42.  35
    Jeffrey Goodman (2013). Creatures of Fiction, Objects of Myth. Analysis 74 (1):ant090.
    Many who think that some abstracta are artefacts are fictional creationists, asserting that fictional characters are brought about by our activities. Kripke (1973), Salmon (1998, 2002), and Braun (2005) further embrace mythical creationism, claiming that certain entities that figure in false theories, such as phlogiston or Vulcan, are likewise abstracta produced by our intentional activities. I here argue that one may not reasonably take the metaphysical route travelled by the mythical creationist. Even if one holds that fictional characters (...)
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  43. Paul F. Lurquin & Linda Stone (2007). Evolution and Religious Creation Myths: How Scientists Respond. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Polls show that 45% of the American public believes that humans were created about 10,000 years ago and that evolution is a fictitious myth. Another 25% believes that changes in the natural world are directed by a supernatural being with a particular goal in mind. This thinking clashes head on with scientific findings from the past 150 years, and there is a dearth of public critical thinking about the natural world within a scientific framework. Evolution and Religious Creation (...)
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  44.  13
    Michele Paolini Paoletti (2016). Paradise on the Cheap. Ascriptivism About Ficta. In Mauro Antonelli & Marian David (eds.), Existence, Fiction, Assumption. Meinongian Themes and the History of Austrian Philosophy. Meinong Studies, vol. VI. De Gruyter 99-140.
    In this article I shall present a Meinong-inspired theory of fictional objects. This theory is based on two ideas: fictional objects are mental objects, i.e., they depend for their identity conditions on minded subjects thinking of them; they bear properties in two different ways, i.e., by instantiating properties and by having properties “ascribed” to them. In my perspective, ascription relations hold (at least) between an object, a property and a minded subject. After having presented some data about fictional discourse, (...)
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  45. Stavroula Glezakos (forthcoming). Truth and Reference in Fiction. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Routledge
    Fiction is often characterized by way of a contrast with truth, as, for example, in the familiar couplet “Truth is always strange/ Stranger than fiction" (Byron 1824). And yet, those who would maintain that “we will always learn more about human life and human personality from novels than from scientific psychology” (Chomsky 1988: 159) hold that some truth is best encountered via fiction. The scrupulous novelist points out that her work depicts no actual person, either living (...)
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  46. Roman Frigg (2010). Models and Fiction. Synthese 172 (2):251-268.
    Most scientific models are not physical objects, and this raises important questions. What sort of entity are models, what is truth in a model, and how do we learn about models? In this paper I argue that models share important aspects in common with literary fiction, and that therefore theories of fiction can be brought to bear on these questions. In particular, I argue that the pretence theory as developed by Walton has the resources to answer these (...)
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  47.  23
    Peter Lamarque (1990). Reasoning to What is True in Fiction. Argumentation 4 (3):333-346.
    The paper discusses the principle by which we reason to what is ‘true in fiction’. The focus is David Lewis's article ‘Truth in Fiction’ (1978) which proposes an analysis in terms of counterfactuals and possible worlds. It is argued thatLewis's account is inadequate in detail and also in principle in that it conflicts radically with basic and familiar tenets of literary criticism. Literary critical reasoning about fiction concerns not the discovery of facts in possible worlds but (...)
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  48.  53
    Simon J. Evnine (2015). “But Is It Science Fiction?”: Science Fiction and a Theory of Genre. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 39 (1):1-28.
    If science fiction is a genre, then attempts to think about the nature of science fiction will be affected by one’s understanding of what genres are. I shall examine two approaches to genre, one dominant but inadequate, the other better, but only occasionally making itself seen. I shall then discuss several important, interrelated issues, focusing particularly on science fiction : what it is for a work to belong to a genre, the semantics of genre names, the (...)
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  49. Peter Lamarque & Stein Haugom Olsen (1994). Truth, Fiction, and Literature: A Philosophical Perspective. Oxford University Press.
    This book examines the complex and varied ways in which fictions relate to the real world, and offers a precise account of how imaginative works of literature can use fictional content to explore matters of universal human interest. While rejecting the traditional view that literature is important for the truths that it imparts, the authors also reject attempts to cut literature off altogether from real human concerns. Their detailed account of fictionality, mimesis, and cognitive value, founded on the methods of (...)
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  50. Helen De Cruz (2013). Is Teaching Children Young Earth Creationism Child Abuse? The Philosophers' Magazine 63:21-23.
    Richard Dawkins has argued on several occasions that bringing up your child religiously is a form of child abuse. According to Dawkins, teaching children about religion is fine (it helps them to understand cultural references, for instance), but indoctrinating children – by which Dawkins means any form of education that teaches religious beliefs as facts – is morally wrong and harmful. Dawkins is not alone: the American theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss, for instance, recently argued that teaching Young Earth (...) (henceforth YEC) is a form of child abuse. Here, I want to focus on the role of parents in instilling religious beliefs in their children, especially beliefs that are incompatible with science, such as YEC. Instead of using the rather laden term “child abuse,” I want to tease apart two questions: Are YEC parents harming their children, and is what they do morally wrong? (shrink)
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