Search results for 'criticism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jonathan Allen (1998). The Situated Critic or the Loyal Critic? Rorty and Walzer on Social Criticism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (6):25-46.score: 27.0
    This article addresses the question whether the model of social criticism as 'connected' or 'loyal' which is advanced by Richard Rorty and Michael Walzer offers an adequate picture of social criticism. Two claims are made. First, it is suggested that loyalty is an internally conflicted concept, with three components: a recognition of situatedness in a particular relationship; an affirmation of that relationship by the loyal agent; a set of values or local principles. Where the third component is prominent, (...)
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  2. Gilbert Plumer (2012). Cognition and Literary Ethical Criticism. In Frank Zenker (ed.), Argumentation: Cognition & Community. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation [CD-ROM]. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation.score: 24.0
    “Ethical criticism” is an approach to literary studies that holds that reading certain carefully selected novels can make us ethically better people, e.g., by stimulating our sympathetic imagination (Nussbaum). I try to show that this nonargumentative approach cheapens the persuasive force of novels and that its inherent bias and censorship undercuts what is perhaps the principal value and defense of the novel—that reading novels can be critical to one’s learning how to think.
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  3. David Carrier (2002). Rosalind Krauss and American Philosophical Art Criticism: From Formalism to Beyond Postmodernism. Praeger.score: 24.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction: The Rise of Philosophical Art Criticism 1 -- Chapter 1. In the Beginning Was Formalism 17 -- Chapter 2. The Structuralist Adventure 33 -- Chapter 3. The Historicist, Antiessentialist Definition of Art 55 -- Chapter 4. Resentment and Its Discontents 71 -- Chapter 5. The Deconstruction of Structuralism 87 -- Afterword: The Fate of Philosophical Art Criticism 111.
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  4. Italo Testa (2009). Criticism and Normativity. Brandom and Habermas Between Kant and Hegel. In D. Canale G. Tuzet (ed.), The Rules of Inference. Inferentialism in Law and Philosophy, Egea, Milano. Egea (pp. pp. 29-44).score: 24.0
    In this paper, making reference to Robert Brandom's philosophical proposal - and against the background of Brandom's debate with Jürgen Habermas - I shall endeavor, first, to define the relation between recognition and normativity and then between recognition and criticism; in the final part of the paper I shall suggest a perspective that approaches recognition in terms of capacities. On this basis I attempt to see the critical attitude as something that is founded more on individual potentials than on (...)
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  5. Alessandro Giovannelli (2007). The Ethical Criticism of Art: A New Mapping of the Territory. Philosophia 35 (2):117-127.score: 24.0
    The goal of this paper is methodological. It offers a comprehensive mapping of the theoretical positions on the ethical criticism of art, correcting omissions and inadequacies in the conceptual framework adopted in the current debate. Three principles are recommended as general guidelines: ethical amenability, basic value pluralism, and relativity to ethical dimension. Hence a taxonomy distinguishing between different versions of autonomism, moralism, and immoralism is established, by reference to criteria that are different from what emerging in the current literature. (...)
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  6. Gerhard Zecha (1992). Value-Neutrality and Criticism. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 23 (1):153-164.score: 24.0
    Among the methodological rules of the social sciences we find the principles of value-neutrality and the principle of criticism. Both principles are of vital importance in the social sciences, but both seem to conflict with one another. The principle of criticism excludes value-judgments from the social sciences, because they cannot be empirically tested. Hence, criticism methodologically implies value-neutrality. Yet there is the opposing view that it is precisely the critical social researcher who looks beyond mere 'social facts' (...)
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  7. L. V. Brettler (1975). Blumberg on Moral Criticism. Mind 84 (336):579-582.score: 24.0
    D. Blumbergi identifies three kinds of moral criticism: (i) of an individual for violating a moral practice in his society, (2) of a moral practice but not the individual who participates in it, and (3) of both an individual and the practice in accordance with which he acts ('practice- personal' criticism) (p. 348). According to Mr. Blumberg, successful derivation of a conclusive 'ought'-statement from statements about socially-created obligations would show how moral criticisms of type 1 are justified. Moral (...)
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  8. Jan Albert Laar & Erik C. W. Krabbe (2013). The Burden of Criticism: Consequences of Taking a Critical Stance. [REVIEW] Argumentation 27 (2):201-224.score: 24.0
    Some critical reactions hardly give clues to the arguer as to how to respond to them convincingly. Other critical reactions convey some or even all of the considerations that make the critic critical of the arguer’s position and direct the arguer to defuse or to at least contend with them. First, an explication of the notion of a critical reaction will be provided, zooming in on the degree of “directiveness” that a critical reaction displays. Second, it will be examined whether (...)
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  9. Frances E. Mascia-Lees (2000). Taking a Stand in a Postfeminist World: Toward an Engaged Cultural Criticism. State University of New York Press.score: 24.0
    Taking a Stand in a Postfeminist World offers an engaged cultural criticism in a postfeminist context.
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  10. Andrew Gibson (2009). Just Above the Fray - Interpretive Social Criticism and the Ends of Social Justice. Studies in Social Justice 2 (1):102-118.score: 24.0
    The article lays down the broad strokes of an interpretive approach to social criticism. In developing this approach, the author stresses the importance of both a pluralistic notion of social justice and a rich ideal of personal growth. While objecting to one-dimensional conceptions of social justice centering on legal equality, the author develops the idea of there being multiple "spheres of justice", including the spheres of "care" and "merit". Each of these spheres, he argues, is subject to historical interpretation. (...)
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  11. Zach VanderVeen (2010). Bearing the Lightning of Possible Storms: Foucault's Experimental Social Criticism. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (4):467-484.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that Michel Foucault explicitly rejected the model of critique by which he is often understood—by both his defenders and detractors. Rather than justifying norms that could be said to represent “the people;” judging institutions, norms, and practices accordingly; and creating programs for others to enact, he theorized and practiced an experimental social criticism in which specific intellectuals help people work through “intolerable” situations by multiplying the ways they can think about and act upon them. As Foucault’s (...)
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  12. Dorota Kozicka (2011). Stanisław Brzozowski's Performative Criticism. Studies in East European Thought 63 (4):257-266.score: 24.0
    Stanisław Brzozowski was active as philosopher and literary critic for only a few years at the turn of the twentieth century, yet his writings are still inspire contemporary thinkers and critics. In every important phase of the development of Polish literary criticism, Polish intellectuals have acknowledged Brzozowski as a writer who had the courage and critical acumen to confront modernity and examine closely contemporary trends of thought from the perspective of social and individual life. This continued presence of the (...)
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  13. Jan Albert van Laar & Erik Cw Krabbe (2013). The Burden of Criticism: Consequences of Taking a Critical Stance. [REVIEW] Argumentation 27 (2):201-224.score: 24.0
    Some critical reactions hardly give clues to the arguer as to how to respond to them convincingly. Other critical reactions convey some or even all of the considerations that make the critic critical of the arguer’s position and direct the arguer to defuse or to at least contend with them. First, an explication of the notion of a critical reaction will be provided, zooming in on the degree of “directiveness” that a critical reaction displays. Second, it will be examined whether (...)
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  14. Maurice A. Finocchiaro (1987). Six Types of Fallaciousness: Toward a Realistic Theory of Logical Criticism. [REVIEW] Argumentation 1 (3):263-282.score: 24.0
    I begin by formulating the problem of the nature of fallacy in terms of the logic of the negative evaluation of argument, that is, in terms of a theory of logical criticism; here I discuss several features of my approach and several advantages vis-à-vis other approaches; a main feature of my approach is the concern to avoid both formalist and empiricist excesses. I then define six types of fallaciousness, labeled formal, explanatory, presuppositional, positive, semantical, and persuasive; they all involve (...)
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  15. Ai Mizokawa (2013). Relationships Between Maternal Emotional Expressiveness and Children's Sensitivity to Teacher Criticism. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Caregivers’ emotional responses to children influence children’s social and emotional development. This study investigated the association between maternal emotional expressiveness in the context of mother–child interactions and young children’s sensitivity to teacher criticism. Sensitivity to teacher criticism was assessed among 53 Japanese preschoolers using hypothetical scenarios in which a puppet child representing the participant made a small error, and a puppet teacher pointed out the error. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure maternal expressiveness. The results demonstrated that negative (...)
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  16. Louis Althusser (1976). Essays in Self-Criticism. Humanities Press.score: 24.0
    Reply to John Lewis: Note on "The critique of the personality cult". Remark on the category "Process without a subject or goal(s)"--Elements of self-criticism: On the evolution of the young Marx.--Is it simple to be a Marxist in philosophy? "Something new".
     
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  17. Arthur Coleman Danto (1998). The Wake of Art: Essays: Criticism, Philosophy and the Ends of Taste. G+B Arts Int'l.score: 24.0
    Since the mid-1980s, Arthur C. Danto has been increasingly concerned with the implications of the demise of modernism. Out of the wake of modernist art, Danto discerns the emergence of a radically pluralistic art world. His essays illuminate this novel art world as well as the fate of criticism within it. As a result, Danto has crafted the most compelling philosophy of art criticism since Clement Greenberg. Gregg Horowitz and Tom Huhn analyze the constellation of philosophical and critical (...)
     
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  18. Arnold Isenberg (1973). Aesthetics and the Theory of Criticism. Chicago,University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Aesthetics: Music and ideas. Formalism. Perception, meaning, and the subject matter of art. The technical factor in art. The aesthetic function of language. The problem of belief. On defining metaphor.--Criticism: Cordelia absent. A poem by Frost and some principles of criticism. Critical communication. "Pretentious" as an aesthetic predicate. Superlatives. Some problems of interpretation.--Ethics and moral psychology: Natural pride and natural shame. Deontology and the ethics of lying. Ethical and aesthetic criticism.--Appendices (p. [283]-316).--A. Analytical philosophy and the (...)
     
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  19. Deven M. Patel (2011). Shared Typologies of Kāmaśāstra, Alaṅkāraśāstra and Literary Criticism. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (1):101-122.score: 24.0
    This paper brings kāmaśāstra into conversation with poetics (alaṅkāraśāstra) and modes of literary criticism associated with Sanskrit literature (kāvya). It shows how historical intersections between kāvya, kāmaśāstra, and alaṅkāraśāstra have produced insightful cross-domain typologies to understand the nature and value of canonical works of Sanskrit literature. In addition to exploring kāmaśāstra typologies broadly as conceptual models and analytical categories useful in literary-critical contexts, this paper takes up a specific formulation from the kāmaśāstra (the padminī-citriṇī-śaṅkhinī-hastinī type-casting of females) used by (...)
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  20. Roger W. H. Savage (2010). Hermeneutics and Music Criticism. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Aesthetics, hermeneutics, criticism -- Social Werktreue and the subjectivization of aesthetics -- From musike to metaphysics -- Formalist aesthetics and musical hermeneutics -- Deconstructing the disciplinary divide -- The question of metaphor -- Mimesis and the hermeneutics of music -- Political critique and the politics of music criticism -- Toward a hermeneutics of music criticism.
     
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  21. Friedrich Schleiermacher (1998). Hermeneutics and Criticism and Other Writings. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The founding text of modern hermeneutics. Written by the philosopher and theologian Friedrich Schleiermacher as a method for the interpretation and textual criticism of the New Testament, it develops ideas about language and the interpretation of texts that are in many respects still unsurpassed and are becoming current in the contemporary philosophy of language. Contrary to the traditional view of Schleiermacher as a theorist of empathetic interpretation, in this text he offers a view of understanding that acknowledges both the (...)
     
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  22. Jan Albert van Laar (forthcoming). Criticism in Need of Clarification. Argumentation:1-23.score: 24.0
    It furthers the dialectic when the opponent is clear about what motivates and underlies her critical stance, even if she does not adopt an opposite standpoint, but merely doubts the proponent’s opinion. Thus, there is some kind of burden of criticism. In some situations, there should an obligation for the opponent to offer explanatory counterconsiderations, if requested, whereas in others, there is no real dialectical obligation, but a mere responsibility for the opponent to cooperate by providing her motivations for (...)
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  23. Sean Burke (1998). The Death and Return of the Author: Criticism and Subjectivity in Barthes, Foucault and Derrida. Edinburgh University Press.score: 21.0
    In the revised and updated edition of this popular book, Sean Burke shows how the attempt to abolish the author is fundamentally misguided and philosophically ...
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  24. Imre Lakatos & Alan Musgrave (eds.) (1970). Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    Two books have been particularly influential in contemporary philosophy of science: Karl R. Popper's Logic of Scientific Discovery, and Thomas S. Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions. Both agree upon the importance of revolutions in science, but differ about the role of criticism in science's revolutionary growth. This volume arose out of a symposium on Kuhn's work, with Popper in the chair, at an international colloquium held in London in 1965. The book begins with Kuhn's statement of his position followed (...)
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  25. R. G. Collingwood (2005). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    This is the long-awaited publication of a set of writings by the British philosopher, historian, and archaeologist R.G. Collingwood (1889-1943) on critical, anthropological, and cultural themes only hinted at in his previously available work. At the core are six essays on folktale and magic in which Collingwood applies the principles of his philosophy of history to problems in the long-term evolution of human society and culture. The volume opens with three substantial introductory essays by the editors, authorities in their various (...)
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  26. Italo Testa (2007). Criticism From Within Nature: The Dialectic Between First and Second Nature From McDowell to Adorno. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (4):473-497.score: 21.0
    I tackle the definition of the relation between first and second nature while examining some problems with McDowell's conception. This, in the first place, will bring out the need to extend the notion of second nature to the social dimension, understanding it not just as `inner' second nature — individual mind — but also as `outer' second nature — objective spirit. In the second place the dialectical connection between these two notions of second nature will point the way to a (...)
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  27. Dion Scott-Kakures (1997). Self-Knowledge, Akrasia, and Self-Criticism. Philosophia 25 (1-4):267-295.score: 21.0
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  28. Erik Krabbe & Jan van Laar (2011). The Ways of Criticism. Argumentation 25 (2):199-227.score: 21.0
    This paper attempts to systematically characterize critical reactions in argumentative discourse, such as objections, critical questions, rebuttals, refutations, counterarguments, and fallacy charges, in order to contribute to the dialogical approach to argumentation. We shall make use of four parameters to characterize distinct types of critical reaction. First, a critical reaction has a focus, for example on the standpoint, or on another part of an argument. Second, critical reactions appeal to some kind of norm, argumentative or other. Third, they each have (...)
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  29. J. Gregory (2010). The Political Philosophy of Walzer's Social Criticism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1093-1111.score: 21.0
    This article calls for a critical re-evaluation of Walzer’s theory of justice. It argues that there is a deep tension between Walzer’s social criticism and his complex equality. Social criticism is based on the normative value of a connected and ‘whole’ self, and complex equality is based upon a value pluralism that threatens to fragment this sense of wholeness. Walzer therefore commissions a tacit premise, borrowing from the same ‘political philosophy’ that he explicitly repudiates, and which social (...) is intended to supplant. This premise is a Kantian-inspired conception of self; brought to the argument as an a priori premise and thus in violation of Walzer’s own stated commitment to ‘internalism’ and ‘interpretation’. Furthermore, this same conception of self is the moral source of Walzer’s substantive commitment to the universal value of pluralist political regimes. The article closes with a suggested reconciliation of the inherent tension within Walzer’s theory. (shrink)
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  30. Christopher Bartel (2012). The Puzzle of Historical Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):213-222.score: 21.0
    Works of fiction are often criticized for their historical inaccuracies. But this practice poses a problem: why would we criticize a work of fiction for its historical inaccuracy given that it is a work of fiction? There is an intuition that historical inaccuracies in works of fiction diminish their value as works of fiction; and yet, given that they are works of fiction, there is also an intuition that such works should be free from the constraints of historical truth. The (...)
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  31. Morris Weitz (1964). Hamlet and the Philosophy of Literary Criticism. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
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  32. T. J. Diffey (1975). Morality and Literary Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 33 (4):443-454.score: 21.0
    If the idea of morality is approached by way both of common sense views about morality and common philosophical accounts of it, then the meaning of the term "moral" as this is sometimes used in literary criticism must seem puzzling. the puzzle is illustrated rather than solved, but some tentative suggestions are made. for instance common notions about what morality is may be too narrow.
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  33. Weixiang Ding (2011). Zhu Xi's Choice, Historical Criticism and Influence—An Analysis of Zhu Xi's Relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):521-548.score: 21.0
    As a great synthesist for the School of Principles of the Northern and Southern Song dynasties, Zhu Xi’s influence over the School of Principles was demonstrated not only through his positive theoretical creation, but also through his choice and critical awareness. Zhu’s relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism is a typical case; and his activities, ranging from his research of Buddhism (the Chan School) in his early days to his farewell to the Chan School as a student of Li Dong from (...)
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  34. David Simpson (ed.) (1988). The Origins of Modern Critical Thought: German Aesthetic and Literary Criticism From Lessing to Hegel. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    Originally published in 1988, this book provides a comprehensive anthology in English of the major texts of German literary and aesthetic theory between Lessing ...
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  35. H. Turker (2013). Horkheimer's Criticism of Husserl. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (7):619-635.score: 21.0
    This article focuses on Max Horkheimer’s criticism of Husserl’s phenomenology in basic philosophical matters such as method, theory, logic, truth, metaphysics, etc. Horkheimer objects to Husserl’s conception of philosophy as a mathesis universalis and of science as relativistic research. However, he finds Husserl’s criticism of scientific rationalism the most important step for the legitimacy of philosophy. According to him, Husserl’s method is intended to be a science of apriority. But his understanding of apriority is static, is radically abstract, (...)
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  36. William Walker (1994). Locke, Literary Criticism, and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    William Walker's original analysis of John Locke's An Essay Concerning Human Understanding offers a challenging and provocative assessment of Locke's importance as a thinker, bridging the gap between philosophical and literary-critical discussion of his work. He presents Locke as a foundational figure who defines the epistemological and ontological ground on which eighteenth-century and Romantic literature operate and eventually diverge. He is revealed as a crucial figure for emerging modernity, less the familiar empiricist innovator and more the proto-Nietzschean thinker whose text (...)
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  37. Alessandro Giovannelli (2013). Ethical Criticism in Perspective: A Defense of Radical Moralism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):335-348.score: 21.0
    I defend the ethical fittingness theory (EFT), the thesis that whenever it is legitimate ethically to evaluate a representational artwork for the perspective it embodies, such evaluation systematically bears on the work's artistic value. EFT is a form of radical moralism, claiming that the systematic relationship between the selected type of ethical evaluation and artistic evaluation always obtains, for works of any kind. The argument for EFT spells out the implications of ethically judging an artwork for its perspective, where such (...)
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  38. H. Rosa (2004). Four Levels of Self-Interpretation: A Paradigm for Interpretive Social Philosophy and Political Criticism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (5-6):691-720.score: 21.0
    If we are to find the criteria for critical analyses of social arrangements and processes not in some abstract, universalist framework, but from the guiding ‘self-interpretations’ of the societies in question, as contemporary contextualist and ‘communitarian’ approaches to social philosophy suggest, the vexing question arises as to where these self-interpretations can be found and how they are identified. The paper presents a model according to which there are four interdependent as well as partially autonomous spheres or ‘levels’ of socially relevant (...)
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  39. Geoffrey Galt Harpham (1987). The Ascetic Imperative in Culture and Criticism. University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    In this bold interdisciplinary work, Geoffrey Galt Harpham argues that asceticism has played a major role in shaping Western ideas of the body, writing, ethics, ...
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  40. M. Bacon (2006). Rorty and Pragmatic Social Criticism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (7):863-880.score: 21.0
    For pragmatists, the inability to stand outside of the contingencies of human practice does not impede social criticism. However, several pragmatists have argued that Richard Rorty’s position unnecessarily and undesirably circumscribes the scope of social criticism, allowing for nothing more than an appeal to current practices, with no way to challenge or revise them. This article argues against this understanding, showing that on Rorty’s account, social criticism is an interpretive activity in which critics draw on elements within (...)
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  41. Albert Genyo Tsugawa (1967). The Idea of Criticism. University Park, Pennsylvania State University.score: 21.0
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  42. Stephen Melville, Lynne Cook, Michael Newman, Whitney Davis & Guy Brett (2008). The State of Art Criticism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 18 (3).score: 21.0
    About the Author James Elkins is E.C. Chadbourne Chair in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His many books include Pictures and Tears, How to Use Your Eyes, and What Painting Is, all published by Routledge. Michael Newman teaches in the Department of Art History, Theory, and Criticism at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and is Professor of Art Writing at Goldsmiths College in the (...)
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  43. Uttara Natarajan (1998). Hazlitt and the Reach of Sense: Criticism, Morals, and the Metaphysics of Power. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    The "only pretension, of which I am tenacious," wrote Hazlitt, "is that of being a metaphysician"; but his metaphysics, and particularly what this book identifies as his power principle, has until now been neglected. This exciting book studies Hazlitt's development of the power principle as a counter to the pleasure principle of the Utilitarians, and examines the revelation of power in his philosophy of discourse, his account of imaginative structure, his theory of genius, and his moral theory.
     
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  44. Harold Osborne (1955/1973). Aesthetics and Criticism. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 21.0
     
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  45. William Righter (1963). Logic and Criticism. London, Routledge and K. Paul.score: 21.0
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  46. Myron Franklin Brightfield (1932/1968). The Issue in Literary Criticism. New York, Greenwood Press.score: 21.0
     
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  47. Eve Browning (1993). Philosophy and Feminist Criticism: An Introduction. Paragon House.score: 21.0
  48. Edwin Berry Burgum (1930). The New Criticism. New York, Prentice-Hall, Inc..score: 21.0
     
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  49. Leonard J. Clapp (1997). Senses, Sensations and Brain Processes: A Criticism of the Property Dualism Argument. Southwest Philosophy Review 14 (1):139-148.score: 21.0
     
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  50. Alex Clayton & Andrew Klevan (eds.) (2012). The Language and Style of Film Criticism. Routledge.score: 21.0
     
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