Search results for 'cultural transmission' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Laureano Castro, Alfonso Medina & Miguel A. Toro (2004). Hominid Cultural Transmission and the Evolution of Language. Biology and Philosophy 19 (5):721-737.score: 240.0
    This paper presents the hypothesis that linguistic capacity evolved through the action of natural selection as an instrument which increased the efficiency of the cultural transmission system of early hominids. We suggest that during the early stages of hominization, hominid social learning, based on indirect social learning mechanisms and true imitation, came to constitute cumulative cultural transmission based on true imitation and the approval or disapproval of the learned behaviour of offspring. A key factor for this (...)
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  2. Thomas L. Griffiths, Stephan Lewandowsky & Michael L. Kalish (2013). The Effects of Cultural Transmission Are Modulated by the Amount of Information Transmitted. Cognitive Science 37 (5):953-967.score: 240.0
    Information changes as it is passed from person to person, with this process of cultural transmission allowing the minds of individuals to shape the information that they transmit. We present mathematical models of cultural transmission which predict that the amount of information passed from person to person should affect the rate at which that information changes. We tested this prediction using a function-learning task, in which people learn a functional relationship between two variables by observing the (...)
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  3. Michelle A. Kline, Robert Boyd & Joseph Henrich (2013). Teaching and the Life History of Cultural Transmission in Fijian Villages. Human Nature 24 (4):351-374.score: 240.0
    Much existing literature in anthropology suggests that teaching is rare in non-Western societies, and that cultural transmission is mostly vertical (parent-to-offspring). However, applications of evolutionary theory to humans predict both teaching and non-vertical transmission of culturally learned skills, behaviors, and knowledge should be common cross-culturally. Here, we review this body of theory to derive predictions about when teaching and non-vertical transmission should be adaptive, and thus more likely to be observed empirically. Using three interviews conducted with (...)
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  4. Louis Lefebvre (2013). Brains, Innovations, Tools and Cultural Transmission in Birds, Non-Human Primates, and Fossil Hominins. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 210.0
  5. R. Alexander Bentley & Michael John O'Brien (2012). Cultural Evolutionary Tipping Points in the Storage and Transmission of Information. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 204.0
    Human culture has evolved through a series of major tipping points in information storage and communication. The first was the appearance of language, which enabled communication between brains and allowed humans to specialize in what they do and to participate in complex mating games. The second was information storage outside the brain, most obviously expressed in the “Upper Paleolithic Revolution”—the sudden proliferation of cave art, personal adornment, and ritual in Europe some 35,000–45,000 years ago. More recently, this storage has taken (...)
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  6. Pascal Boyer (1998). Cultural Transmission with an Evolved Intuitive Ontology: Domain-Specific Cognitive Tracks of Inheritance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):570-571.score: 180.0
    Atran's account of cultural transmission can be further refined by considering constraints from early-developed, domain-specific intuitive ontological understanding. These suggest specific predictions about the cultural survival of “memes,” depending on the way they activate intuitive understanding. There is no general dynamic of cultural inheritance; only complex predictions for domain-specific competencies that cut across cultural domains.
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  7. Luis Castro-Nogueira Laureano Castro, A. Castro-Nogueira Miguel & A. Toro Miguel (2010). Cultural Transmission and Social Control of Human Behavior. Biology and Philosophy 25 (3).score: 180.0
    Humans have developed the capacity to approve or disapprove of the behavior of their children and of unrelated individuals. The ability to approve or disapprove transformed social learning into a system of cumulative cultural inheritance, because it increased the reliability of cultural transmission. Moreover, people can transmit their behavioral experiences (regarding what can and cannot be done) to their offspring, thereby avoiding the costs of a laborious, and sometimes dangerous, evaluation of different cultural alternatives. Our thesis (...)
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  8. Louis M. Herman & Adam A. Pack (2001). Laboratory Evidence for Cultural Transmission Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):335-337.score: 180.0
    The mechanisms for cultural transmission remain disputable and difficult to validate through observational field studies alone. If controlled experimental laboratory investigation reveals that a putative mechanism is demonstrable in the species under study, then inferences that the same mechanism is operating in the field observation are strengthened.
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  9. Kenny Smith, Simon Kirby & Andrew D. M. Smith (2008). The Brain Plus the Cultural Transmission Mechanism Determine the Nature of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):533-534.score: 180.0
    We agree that language adapts to the brain, but we note that language also has to adapt to brain-external constraints, such as those arising from properties of the cultural transmission medium. The hypothesis that Christiansen & Chater (C&C) raise in the target article not only has profound consequences for our understanding of language, but also for our understanding of the biological evolution of the language faculty.
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  10. Nathaniel Wolloch (2013). Barbarian Tribes, American Indians and Cultural Transmission: Changing Perspectives From the Enlightenment to Tocqueville. History of Political Thought 34 (3):507-539.score: 180.0
    This article examines the change which occurred in discussions of cultural transmission between the Enlightenment and the liberal outlook of the nineteenth century. The former is exemplified mainly by eighteenth-century historical discussions, the latter by the thought of Alexis de Tocqueville. An interest in the influence of advanced Western cultures on seemingly inferior non-Western societies was consistent throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It was manifested mainly in discussions of the barbarian conquest of the Roman Empire on the (...)
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  11. Richard Hillyer (2007). Hobbes and His Poetic Contemporaries: Cultural Transmission in Early Modern England. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 180.0
    As an exceptionally long-lived author (1588-1679) whose protracted development, late appearance in print, subsequent muzzling, and profound notoriety raise fascinating questions about how, when, and to what effect his thinking exerted an impact as he sought to transform an entire culture, Hobbes supplies the ideal focus for a study of cultural transmission in early modern England. Ranging from Jonson to Rochester and including several critically neglected figures, select poetic contemporaries variously illuminate the scope of Hobbes’s writing and the (...)
     
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  12. Andrew Whiten (2001). Imitation and Cultural Transmission in Apes and Cetaceans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):359-360.score: 156.0
    Recent evidence suggests imitation is more developed in some cetaceans than the authors imply. Apart from apes, only dolphins have so far shown a grasp of what it is to imitate; moreover dolphins ape humans more clearly than do apes. Why have such abilities not been associated with the kind of progressive cultural complexity characteristic of humans?
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  13. Karen W. Pryor (2001). Cultural Transmission of Behavior in Animals: How a Modern Training Technology Uses Spontaneous Social Imitation in Cetaceans and Facilitates Social Imitation in Horses and Dogs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):352-352.score: 156.0
    Social learning and imitation is central to culture in cetaceans. The training technology used with cetaceans facilitates reinforcing imitation of one dolphin's behavior by another; the same technology, now widely used by pet owners, can lead to imitative learning in such unlikely species as dogs and horses. A capacity for imitation, and thus for cultural learning, may exist in many species.
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  14. Barbara J. King (2000). Another Frame Shift: From Cultural Transmission to Cultural Co-Construction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):154-155.score: 152.0
    Laland et al.'s bidirectional model is a welcome starting point that can be enhanced by a full incorporation of systems thinking into its framework. Systems thinkers note that culture is not transmitted linearly in chunks but is co-constructed within subgroups. Niche construction, particularly among primates, should be studied primarily through the effects that social relationships have on selection pressures.
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  15. Pascal Boyer (2009). Cognitive Predispositions and Cultural Transmission. In Pascal Boyer & James Wertsch (eds.), Memory in Mind and Culture. Cambridge. 288.score: 152.0
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  16. Shaun Nichols, Is Religion What We Want? Motivation and the Cultural Transmission of Religious Representations.score: 150.0
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  17. Nicholas Shea (2006). The Biological Basis of Cultural Transmission. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):259-266.score: 150.0
    Review of: Kim Sterelny: Thought in a Hostile World. Oxford: Blackwell, 2003.
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  18. Marjorie Rhodes, Sarah-Jane Leslie & Christina Tworek (2012). Cultural Transmission of Social Essentialism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 109 (34):13526-13531.score: 150.0
  19. Robert Boyd & Peter J. Richerson, Transmission Coupling Mechanisms: Cultural Group Selection.score: 150.0
    The application of phylogenetic methods to cultural variation raises questions about how cultural adaption works and how it is coupled to cultural transmission. Cultural group selection is of particular interest in this context because it depends on the same kinds of mechanisms that lead to tree-like patterns of cultural variation. Here, we review ideas about cultural group selection relevant to cultural phylogenetics. We discuss why group selection among multiple equilibria is not subject (...)
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  20. Rachel L. Day, Jeremy R. Kendal & Kevin N. Laland (2001). Validating Cultural Transmission in Cetaceans. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):330-331.score: 150.0
    The evidence of high cognitive abilities in cetaceans does not stand up to close scrutiny under the standards established by laboratory researchers. This is likely to lead to a sterile debate between laboratory and field researchers unless fresh ways of taking the debate forward are found. A few suggestions as to how to do this are proposed.
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  21. Marcus W. Feldman, Luigi L. Cavalli-Sforza & Lev A. Zhivotovsky (forthcoming). On the Complexity of Cultural Transmission and Evolution. Complexity.score: 150.0
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  22. Chanan Alexander (1981). Cultural Transmission and Economic Development: A Critique of Educational Positivism. Educational Theory 31 (3-4):351-358.score: 150.0
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  23. Laureano Castro, Luis Castro-Nogueira, Miguel A. Castro-Nogueira & Miguel A. Toro (2010). Cultural Transmission and Social Control of Human Behavior. Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):347-360.score: 150.0
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  24. Hannah Cornish (2010). Investigating How Cultural Transmission Leads to the Appearance of Design Without a Designer in Human Communication Systems. Interaction Studies 11 (1):112-137.score: 150.0
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  25. Peter Midford (1993). Cultural Transmission is More Than Cultural Learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):529.score: 150.0
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  26. Alanson Van Fleet (1979). Learning to Teach: The Cultural Transmission Analogy. Journal of Thought 14 (4):281-90.score: 150.0
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  27. Sirojuddin Arif (2008). Essays on Cultural Transmission. By Maurice Bloch. Pp. 174 + Xi. (Berg, Oxford, New York, 2005.) £16.99, ISBN 184520287-2, Paperback. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 40 (1):159-160.score: 150.0
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  28. Ray Burnett & Kathryn A. Burnett (2011). This Chapter Deals with the Role and Function of Song in Relation to Individ-Ual and Communal Well-Being in Small Gaelic-Speaking Island Communities, and the Re-Presentation of This Legacy of Song That has Come Down to Recent Times. By Way of Grounding, It Introduces the Island Song Heritage and Out-Lines the Role of Culture and Song and the Cultural Transmission Process Within. In Godfrey Baldacchino (ed.), Island Songs: A Global Repertoire. Scarecrow Press. 81.score: 150.0
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  29. Catherine Jami (1999). “European Science in China” or “Western Learning”? Representations of Cross-Cultural Transmission, 1600–1800. Science in Context 12 (3).score: 150.0
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  30. Jonathan A. Lanman (2007). Essays on Cultural Transmission. By Maurice Bloch. Pp. 174. (Berg Publishers, Oxford, 2005.) £16.99, ISBN 1-84520-287-2, Paperback. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 39 (4):633-634.score: 150.0
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  31. Louis Lefebvre (2000). Feeding Innovations and Their Cultural Transmission in Bird Populations. In Celia Heyes & Ludwig Huber (eds.), The Evolution of Cognition. Mit Press. 311--328.score: 150.0
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  32. L. Lefebvre (2000). The Origin and Cultural Transmission of Feeding Innovations in Birds. In Celia Heyes & Ludwig Huber (eds.), The Evolution of Cognition. Mit Press. 311--328.score: 150.0
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  33. Oba Osamu & Joshua A. Fogel (2013). Books and Boats: Sino-Japanese Relations and Cultural Transmission in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. Philosophy East and West 63 (2).score: 150.0
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  34. Dennis H. Passe & Glayde Whitney (1979). Cultural Transmission of Learned Behavior Among Male Bobwhite Quail (Colinus Virginianus). Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 13 (4):206-208.score: 150.0
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  35. Peter J. Richerson & Robert Boyd (1981). Models to Study Cultural Transmission A Theory of Cultural Evolution: Cultural Transmission L. L. Cavalli-Sforza M. W. Feldman. [REVIEW] BioScience 31 (2):164-164.score: 150.0
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  36. Marjoris Mirabal Nápoles, José Betancourt Betancour, Yolexis Prieto Cordobés & Neyda Fernández Franch (2013). Socio-cultural attitudes to face of the infections of sexual transmission in Medicine students. Humanidades Médicas 13 (1):56-71.score: 144.0
    Introducción: Camagüey ocupa el cuarto lugar nacional en cuanto al número de infectados con VIH/SIDA, después de La Habana, Santiago de Cuba y Holguín. Camagüey se encuentra dentro de los 45 municipios con mayor prevalencia en Cuba. Objetivo: identificar las actitudes socioculturales frente a las infecciones de transmisión sexual en estudiantes de primer año de Medicina. Método: en noviembre de 2011 se realizó un estudio analítico, de corte transversal, a una muestra de estudiantes de la Universidad de Ciencias Médicas "Carlos (...)
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  37. José Ferreirós (2009). C.K. Raju. Cultural Foundations of Mathematics: The Nature of Mathematical Proof and the Transmission of the Calculus From India to Europe in the 16th C. Ce. History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 17 (3):nkn028.score: 120.0
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  38. Alex Mesoudi, Andrew Whiten & Kevin N. Laland (2006). Towards a Unified Science of Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):329-347.score: 120.0
    We suggest that human culture exhibits key Darwinian evolutionary properties, and argue that the structure of a science of cultural evolution should share fundamental features with the structure of the science of biological evolution. This latter claim is tested by outlining the methods and approaches employed by the principal subdisciplines of evolutionary biology and assessing whether there is an existing or potential corresponding approach to the study of cultural evolution. Existing approaches within anthropology and archaeology demonstrate a good (...)
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  39. Scott Woodcock (2006). The Significance of Non-Vertical Transmission of Phenotype for the Evolution of Altruism. Biology and Philosophy 21 (2):213-234.score: 120.0
    My aim in this paper is to demonstrate that a very simple learning rule based on imitation can help to sustain altruism as a culturally transmitted pattern or behaviour among agents playing a standard prisoner’s dilemma game. The point of this demonstration is not to prove that imitation is single-handedly responsible for existing levels of altruism (a thesis that is false), nor is the point to show that imitation is an important factor in explanations for the evolution of altruism (a (...)
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  40. J. Ferreiros (2009). C.K. RAJU. Cultural Foundations of Mathematics: The Nature of Mathematical Proof and the Transmission of the Calculus From India to Europe in the 16th C. CE. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 17 (3):378-381.score: 120.0
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  41. Alex Mesoudi & Michael J. O'Brien (2008). The Learning and Transmission of Hierarchical Cultural Recipes. Biological Theory 3 (1):63-72.score: 120.0
  42. Katharine MacDonald (2007). Cross-Cultural Comparison of Learning in Human Hunting. Human Nature 18 (4):386-402.score: 120.0
    This paper is a cross-cultural examination of the development of hunting skills and the implications for the debate on the role of learning in the evolution of human life history patterns. While life history theory has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the evolution of the human life course, other schools, such as cultural transmission and social learning theory, also provide theoretical insights. These disparate theories are reviewed, and alternative and exclusive predictions are identified. This (...)
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  43. Liane M. Gabora (1993). Cultural Learning as the Transmission Mechanism in an Evolutionary Process. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):519.score: 120.0
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  44. Robert Boyd, Peter J. Richerson & Joseph Henrich (2008). Five Misunderstandings About Cultural Evolution. Human Nature 19 (2):119-137.score: 114.0
    Recent debates about memetics have revealed some widespread misunderstandings about Darwinian approaches to cultural evolution. Drawing from these debates, this paper disputes five common claims: (1) mental representations are rarely discrete, and therefore models that assume discrete, gene-like particles (i.e., replicators) are useless; (2) replicators are necessary for cumulative, adaptive evolution; (3) content-dependent psychological biases are the only important processes that affect the spread of cultural representations; (4) the “cultural fitness” of a mental representation can be inferred (...)
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  45. Peter Richerson (2008). Five Misunderstandings About Cultural Evolution. Human Nature 19 (2):119-137.score: 114.0
    Recent debates about memetics have revealed some widespread misunderstandings about Darwinian approaches to cultural evolution. Drawing from these debates, this paper disputes five common claims: (1) mental representations are rarely discrete, and therefore models that assume discrete, gene-like particles (i.e., replicators) are useless; (2) replicators are necessary for cumulative, adaptive evolution; (3) content-dependent psychological biases are the only important processes that affect the spread of cultural representations; (4) the “cultural fitness” of a mental representation can be inferred (...)
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  46. Mary C. Towner, Mark N. Grote, Jay Venti & Monique Borgerhoff Mulder (2012). Cultural Macroevolution on Neighbor Graphs. Human Nature 23 (3):283-305.score: 114.0
    What are the driving forces of cultural macroevolution, the evolution of cultural traits that characterize societies or populations? This question has engaged anthropologists for more than a century, with little consensus regarding the answer. We develop and fit autologistic models, built upon both spatial and linguistic neighbor graphs, for 44 cultural traits of 172 societies in the Western North American Indian (WNAI) database. For each trait, we compare models including or excluding one or both neighbor graphs, and (...)
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  47. Luke Rendell & Hal Whitehead (2001). Culture in Whales and Dolphins. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):309-324.score: 100.0
    Studies of animal culture have not normally included a consideration of cetaceans. However, with several long-term field studies now maturing, this situation should change. Animal culture is generally studied by either investigating transmission mechanisms experimentally, or observing patterns of behavioural variation in wild populations that cannot be explained by either genetic or environmental factors. Taking this second, ethnographic, approach, there is good evidence for cultural transmission in several cetacean species. However, only the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops) has been (...)
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  48. Mónica Tamariz & Simon Kirby (2014). Culture: Copying, Compression, and Conventionality. Cognitive Science 38 (7).score: 100.0
    Through cultural transmission, repeated learning by new individuals transforms cultural information, which tends to become increasingly compressible (Kirby, Cornish, & Smith, ; Smith, Tamariz, & Kirby, ). Existing diffusion chain studies include in their design two processes that could be responsible for this tendency: learning (storing patterns in memory) and reproducing (producing the patterns again). This paper manipulates the presence of learning in a simple iterated drawing design experiment. We find that learning seems to be the causal (...)
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  49. Helen de Cruz & Johan de Smedt (2012). Evolved Cognitive Biases and the Epistemic Status of Scientific Beliefs. Philosophical Studies 157 (3):411-429.score: 90.0
    Our ability for scientific reasoning is a byproduct of cognitive faculties that evolved in response to problems related to survival and reproduction. Does this observation increase the epistemic standing of science, or should we treat scientific knowledge with suspicion? The conclusions one draws from applying evolutionary theory to scientific beliefs depend to an important extent on the validity of evolutionary arguments (EAs) or evolutionary debunking arguments (EDAs). In this paper we show through an analytical model that cultural transmission (...)
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