Search results for 'cyborgs' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Evan Selinger & Timothy Engström (2008). A Moratorium on Cyborgs: Computation, Cognition, and Commerce. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):327-341.score: 22.0
    By examining the contingent alliance that has emerged between the computational theory of mind and cyborg theory, we discern some questionable ways in which the literalization of technological metaphors and the over-extension of the “computational” have functioned, not only to influence conceptions of cognition, but also by becoming normative perspectives on how minds and bodies should be transformed, such that they can capitalize on technology’s capacity to enhance cognition and thus amend our sense of what it is to be “human”. (...)
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  2. Bradley E. Lewis (2003). Prozac and the Post-Human Politics of Cyborgs. Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (1-2):49-63.score: 22.0
    Working through the lens of Donna Haraway's cyborg theory and directed at the example of Prozac, I address the dramatic rise of new technoscience in medicine and psychiatry. Haraway's cyborg theory insists on a conceptualization and a politics of technoscience that does not rely on universal “Truths” or universal “Goods” and does not attempt to return to the “pure” or the “natural.” Instead, Haraway helps us mix politics, ethics, and aesthetics with science and scientific recommendations, and she helps us understand (...)
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  3. Casper Bruun Jensen (2008). Developing/Development Cyborgs. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):375-385.score: 20.0
    The paper takes as its starting point Donna Haraway’s suggestion, “The actors are cyborg, nature is coyote, and the geography is elsewhere”. It discusses first the understanding of the cyborg promoted by Haraway as illustrating an ontological non-humanist disposition, rather than a periodizing claim. The second part of the paper examines some instances of low-tech cyborg identities, which have emerged in developing countries (elsewhere) as a consequence of development initiatives. The paper argues that the quite literal attempts to develop (...) in such countries gives rise to developments not foreseen or controllable by the development industries. If cyborg identities are developing and minds and bodies shaped in the frictions between culture, technology, economy, and development projects and activities then what are the implications for cognitive studies. In the final part of the paper this question is considered and it is suggested that cognitive studies would do well to expand their analytical foci to take into account cyborg bodies and minds found “elsewhere”. (shrink)
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  4. Marie Fox (2000). Pre-Persons, Commodities or Cyborgs: The Legal Construction and Representation of the Embryo. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (2):171-188.score: 20.0
    This paper explores how embryos have been representedin law. It argues that two main models haveunderpinned legal discourse concerning the embryo. Onediscourse, which has become increasingly prevalent,views embryos as legal subjects or persons. Suchrepresentations are facilitated by technologicaldevelopments such as ultrasound imaging. In additionto influencing Parliamentary debate prior to thepassage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act1990, images of embryos as persons featureprominently in popular culture, including advertisingand films, and this discourse came to the fore in the`orphaned embryo' debate in (...)
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  5. Hilary Lim (1999). Caesareans and Cyborgs. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (2):133-173.score: 20.0
    This paper argues that cyborg perspectives offer real possibilities for the debate around enforced caesareans and the search for a language to encompass embodied maternal subjectivity. It is suggested, with reference to the fictional narrative of Star Trek, that cyborg figures have the power to disrupt the liberal subject and the body in legal discourse, not least because the plethora of cyborgs challenges simple conceptions of connections/disconnections between bodies. Feminist readings of case law relating to enforced caesarean sections have (...)
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  6. V. DaVion (1999). Theoretical Versus Applied Ethics: A Look at Cyborgs. Ethics and the Environment 4 (1):73-77.score: 18.0
    In this brief comment I will focus on Chris Cuomo's (1998) discussions of theoretical versus applied ethics, and apply this discussion to her suggestion that the cyborg myth, as discussed by Donna Haraway, can be a helpful ecological feminist ideal. Although I agree with Cuomo that some aspects of the cyborg myth might be helpful, I will explore some disturbing aspects of cyborgs. Cuomo is certainly aware of the dangers of the cyborg myth, mentioning many some of them herself (...)
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  7. Andy Clark (2003). Natural-Born Cyborgs: Minds, Technologies and the Future of Human Intelligence. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In Natural-Born Cyborgs, Clark argues that what makes humans so different from other species is our capacity to fully incorporate tools and supporting cultural ...
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  8. Hugo Letiche (1999). Emergence: Cyborgs Versus Cognitivist (Social) Darwinism. Emergence 1 (3):16-36.score: 18.0
    The rob of knowledge workers in our society is an increasing focus of press and academic attention. Letiche suggests that knowledge workers often both work in and create "McDonaldized" simulacra, i.e. spaces for action that are less than real. He argues that the very concept of organizing is challenged by the tensions implicit in t h semi-ness of the semi-reality of subspaces. The arena for his argument is that of information technology. The language of his argument is that of identity, (...)
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  9. John Protevi & Roger Pippin (2008). Affect, Agency and Responsibility: The Act of Killing in the Age of Cyborgs. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):405-413.score: 17.0
    Draft 13 April 2007. Under review at Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences.
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  10. Alison Adam (2003). Cyborgs in the Chinese Room: Boundaries Transgressed and Boundaries Blurred. In John M. Preston & Michael A. Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press. 319--337.score: 17.0
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  11. Emma Palese (2012). Robots and Cyborgs: To Be or to Have a Body? Poiesis and Praxis 8 (4):191-196.score: 16.0
    Starting with service robotics and industrial robotics, this paper aims to suggest philosophical reflections about the relationship between body and machine, between man and technology in our contemporary world. From the massive use of the cell phone to the robots which apparently “feel” and show emotions like humans do. From the wearable exoskeleton to the prototype reproducing the artificial sense of touch, technological progress explodes to the extent of embodying itself in our nakedness. Robotics, indeed, is inspired by biology in (...)
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  12. Anne Balsamo (2000). Reading Cyborgs Writing Feminism. In Gill Kirkup (ed.), The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University. 148--158.score: 16.0
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  13. William Grassie (1996). Donna Haraway's Metatheory of Science and Religion: Cyborgs, Trickster, and Hermes. Zygon 31 (2):285-304.score: 15.0
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  14. Kevin Warwick (2010). Future Issues with Robots and Cyborgs. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 4 (3).score: 15.0
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  15. Andy Clark (2006). Author's Reply to Symposium on Natural-Born Cyborgs. Metascience.score: 15.0
    Thought happens. Here I sit, sipping coffee, scribbling on paper, accessing files, reading and re-reading those four wonderful, challenging, yet immaculately constructive reviews. And somewhere, and to my eternal surprise, thought happens. But where, amidst the whirl of organization, should we locate the cognitive process? One possibility is that everything worth counting as (all or part) of any genuinely cognitive process hereabouts is firmly located inside the head, safe behind the ancient fortress of skin and skull. All the rest, according (...)
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  16. Joanna Zylinska (2001). On Spiders, Cyborgs, and Being Scared: The Feminine and the Sublime. Manchester University Press.score: 15.0
    This innovative book explores one of the most important concepts in contemporary cultural debates: the sublime. Joanna Zylinska looks at the consequences of feminism and its rethinking of sexual differences, and how it has led to the sublime tradition. She argues that what is generally considered aesthetics can now be more productive thought of in terms of ethics instead. Looking at a range of diverse discourses—Orlan's carnal art, philosophies of the everyday, the French feminism of Cixous and Irigaray, and the (...)
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  17. Andrea Woody (1995). Book Review:Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature Donna Haraway. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 62 (2):346-.score: 15.0
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  18. John Cromby & P. Standon (1999). Cyborgs and Stigma: Technology, Disability, Subjectivity. In Ian Parker & Ángel J. Gordo-López (eds.), Cyberpsychology. Routledge. 95--112.score: 15.0
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  19. Terry Dartnall (2004). We Have Always Been . . . Cyborgs. Metascience 13 (2):139-181.score: 15.0
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  20. Carl Elliott (2005). Adventure! Comedy! Tragedy! Robots! How Bioethicists Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace Their Inner Cyborgs. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (1):18-23.score: 15.0
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  21. Yoni Van Den Eede (2012). Of Humans & Cyborgs, Caterpillars & Butterflies. Foundations of Science 17 (4):401-405.score: 15.0
    In response to Peter–Paul Verbeek’s and Paul Levinson’s reviews of my article ‘In Between Us,’ I comment on four criticisms. Firstly, my approach of ‘mediation as such’ does not endorse the view of mediation as secondary to mediata (i.e., entities), but does not exclude it either. Secondly, my concepts of “transparency of use” and of “context” are to be seen as philosophical ‘tools’ and not as mutually exclusive states. Thirdly, I agree with Levinson that technologies do indeed remediate, and mostly (...)
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  22. Paul Bohan Broderick (2007). Andy Clark, Natural Born Cyborgs. Minds and Machines 17 (1):117-120.score: 15.0
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  23. Andrew Butler (2002). On Rob Latham's Consuming Youth: Vampires, Cyborgs, and the Culture of Consumption. Historical Materialism 10 (4):307-316.score: 15.0
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  24. G. J. Shipley (2004). Review: Natural-Born Cyborgs: Minds, Technologies, and the Future of Human Intelligence. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):326-329.score: 15.0
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  25. E. L. Graham (2003). Frankensteins and Cyborgs: Visions of the Global Future in an Age of Technology. Studies in Christian Ethics 16 (1):29-43.score: 15.0
    This paper draws attention to the role of representation in the depiction of scientific and technological innovation as a means of understanding the narratives that circulate concerning the shape of things to come. It considers how metaphors play an important part in the conduct of scientific explanation, and how they do more than describe the world in helping also to shape expectations, normalise particular choices, establish priorities and create needs. In surveying the range of metaphorical responses to the digital and (...)
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  26. John Sutton (2006). Stefano Franchi and Güven Güzeldere, Eds., Mechanical Bodies, Computational Minds: Artificial Intelligence From Automata to Cyborgs Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (6):414-416.score: 15.0
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  27. G. Gillett (2006). Cyborgs and Moral Identity. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (2):79-83.score: 15.0
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  28. Claudia Bruno (2013). Between Goddesses and Cyborgs: Towards a Shared Desire for Sustainability. In Lenart Škof (ed.), Breathing with Luce Irigaray. Bloomsbury. 101.score: 15.0
  29. Andy Clark (2009). Cyborgs Unplugged. In Susan Schneider (ed.), Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence. Wiley-Blackwell. 170.score: 15.0
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  30. Claus Emmeche (2007). A Biosemiotic Note on Organisms, Animals, Machines, Cyborgs, and the Quasi-Autonomy of Robots. Pragmatics and Cognition 15 (3):455-483.score: 15.0
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  31. Robert F. Harle (2002). Cyborgs, Uploading and Immortality — Some Serious Concerns. Sophia 41 (2):73-85.score: 15.0
    Transhumanism and Extropianism are two recent ‘movements’ which aspire to transcend the perceived limitations of human biological evolution. This paper takes a critical look at two of the most controversial aspects of Extropianism—Uploading and Immortality. Uploading is the process by which a human will be able to transfer the entire contents of their brain to a more suitable supercomputational medium. When the newentity exist as software, immortality is virtually assured. This should be possible, it is claimed, within the next fifty (...)
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  32. Lisa M. Mitchell & Eugenia Georges (forthcoming). Cross-Cultural Cyborgs: Greek and Canadian Women's Discourses on Fetal Ultrasound. Feminist Studies 23 (2).score: 15.0
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  33. Gretchen Bakke (2009). Book Review: Cyborgs and Barbie Dolls: Feminism, Popular Culture and the Posthuman Body by Kim Toffoletti London: IB Tauris, 2007, Pp. 205, ISBN 978—1-845—11467—1 (Pbk),£ 17.99. [REVIEW] Body and Society 15 (1):112-114.score: 15.0
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  34. Olivier Blondeau (2004). Des hackers aux cyborgs : le bug simondonien. Multitudes 4 (4):91-99.score: 15.0
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  35. Tony Fitzpatrick (1999). Social Policy for Cyborgs. Body and Society 5 (1):93-116.score: 15.0
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  36. Francisco Javier López Frías (2014). The Challenges of Modern Sport to Ethics. From Doping to Cyborgs. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):413-417.score: 15.0
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  37. Bernhard Irrgang (2005). Posthumanes Menschsein?: Künstliche Intelligenz, Cyberspace, Roboter, Cyborgs Und Designer-Menschen: Anthropologie des Künstlichen Menschen Im 21. Jahrhundert. Franz Steiner.score: 15.0
    In den USA ist die anthropologische, ethnographische und philosophische Diskussion uber posthumanes Menschsein in vollem Gange, in Deutschland eher verhalten.
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  38. Ariel Kyrou (2011). Nous sommes tous des cyborgs. Multitudes 1 (1):179-187.score: 15.0
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  39. Evan Selinger & Timothy Engström (2007). On Naturally Embodied Cyborgs: Identities, Metaphors, and Models. Janus Head 9 (2):553-584.score: 15.0
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  40. Adam Toon (2014). Empiricism for Cyborgs. Philosophical Issues 24 (1):409-425.score: 15.0
    One important debate between scientific realists and constructive empiricists concerns whether we observe things using instruments. This paper offers a new perspective on the debate over instruments by looking to recent discussion in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Realists often speak of instruments as ‘extensions’ to our senses. I ask whether the realist may strengthen her view by drawing on the extended mind thesis. Proponents of the extended mind thesis claim that cognitive processes can sometimes extend beyond our brains (...)
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  41. Josep Vives & Francesc Mestres Naval (2012). La convivencia con Los cyborgs Y Los robots: Consideraciones fiLosóficas, ético-Morales Y sociopolíticas. Ludus Vitalis 20 (38):215-243.score: 15.0
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  42. A. Welchman (1997). Funking Up the Cyborgs. Theory, Culture and Society 14 (4):155-162.score: 15.0
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  43. Gordon Calleja & Christian Schwager (2004). Rhizomatic Cyborgs: Hypertextual Considerations in a Posthuman Age. Technoetic Arts: A Journal of Speculative Research 2 (1):3-15.score: 15.0
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  44. David DeGrazia (2003). A Reply to Bradley Lewis's “Prozac and the Post-Human Politics of Cyborgs”. Journal of Medical Humanities 24 (1-2):65-71.score: 15.0
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  45. Stefano Franchi & Güven Güzeldere (eds.) (2004). Mechanical Bodies, Computational Minds: Artificial Intelligence From Automata to Cyborgs. A Bradford Book.score: 15.0
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  46. Marta Isabel González García (1998). Ciencia, cyborgs y mujeres: la reinvención de la naturaleza, de Donna Haraway. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 17 (3):129-130.score: 15.0
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  47. Teresa Aguilar García (2009). El manifiesto para cyborgs. Ludus Vitalis 17 (31):199-208.score: 15.0
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  48. William Grassie (1996). Cyborgs, Trickster, and Hermes: Donna Haraway's Metatheory of Science and Religion. Zygon 2.score: 15.0
     
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  49. Stanley D. Harrison (2000). Cyborgs and Digital SoundWriting: Rearticulating Automated Speech R. Ecognition Typing Programs. Kairos 5.score: 15.0
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  50. Dan Heggs (1999). Cyberpsychology and Cyborgs. In Ian Parker & Ángel J. Gordo-López (eds.), Cyberpsychology. Routledge. 184--201.score: 15.0
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