Search results for 'daodejing' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ellen Y. Zhang (2012). Weapons Are Nothing but Ominous Instruments: The Daodejing's View on War and Peace. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):473-502.score: 24.0
    The Daodejing (DDJ) is an ancient Chinese text traditionally taken as a representative Daoist classic expressing a distinctive philosophy from the Warring States Period (403–221 BCE). This essay explicates the ethical dimensions of the DDJ paying attention to issues related to war and peace. The discussion consists of four parts: (1) “naturalness” as an onto-cosmological argument for a philosophy of harmony, balance, and peace; (2) war as a sign of the disruption of the natural pattern of things initiated by (...)
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  2. Karyn L. Lai (2000). The Daodejing: Resources for Contemporary Feminist Thinking. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):131–153.score: 21.0
  3. Karyn L. Lai (2007). Ziran and Wuwei in the Daodejing : An Ethical Assessment. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (4):325-337.score: 18.0
    In Daoist philosophy, the self is understood as an individual interdependent with others, and situated within a broader environment. Within this framework, the concept ziran is frequently understood in terms of naturalness or nature while wuwei is explained in terms of non-oppressive government. In many existing accounts, little is done to connect these two key Daoist concepts. Here, I suggest that wuwei and ziran are correlated, ethical, concepts. Together, they provide a unifying ethical framework for understanding the philosophy of the (...)
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  4. Hektor K. T. Yan (2009). A Paradox of Virtue: The Daodejing on Virtue and Moral Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 59 (2):pp. 173-187.score: 18.0
    Based on a reading of chapter 38 of the Daodejing , this article examines the relationship between the virtues and moral motivation. Laozi puts forward a view which might be termed a "paradox of virtue"—the phenomenon that a conscious pursuit of virtue can lead to a diminishing of virtue. It aims to show that Laozi's criticisms on the focus on the virtues and characters of agents, and his overall view on morality, pose challenges to a way of moral thinking (...)
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  5. Yoav Ariel & Gil Raz (2010). Anaphors or Cataphors? A Discussion of the Two Qi 其 Graphs in the First Chapter of the Daodejing. Philosophy East and West 60 (3):391-421.score: 18.0
    No one realized that the book and the labyrinth were one and the same.道可道[也],非常[恆]道名可名[也],非常[恆]名无名,天地[萬物]之始有名,萬物之母 故常[恆]無欲,以觀其眇常[恆]有欲,以觀其徼[噭]此兩者同出而異名同謂之玄,玄之又玄,眾眇之門。The dao that can be spoken of is not the constant DaoThe name that can be named is not the constant name;Nameless, it is the beginning of heaven and earth [the myriad things]Named, it is the mother of the myriad things. Therefore,Constantly without desire, observe its marvels;Constantly with desire, observe its manifestationsThese two are the same, when emerged they are named differently.When merged, this is called mystery, (...)
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  6. Dan Heilbrunn (2009). Hermann Hesse and the Daodejing on the Wu 無 and You 有 of Sage-Leaders. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):79-93.score: 18.0
    Hermann Hesse (1877–1962), the poet, novelist, man of letters, and painter, created characters who, like the Daoist sages, had many paradoxical characteristics. Some of Hesse’s characters manage their paradoxical natures well and, like the balanced sages, are able to be simultaneously changing yet stable, full of life but also empty, in unison with nature and the social world. Centered between interchanging extremes, these balanced individuals are carefree yet self-controlled, efficacious in their work yet seemingly inactive, and successful in sustaining leadership (...)
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  7. James Behuniak Jr (2009). "Embracing the One" in the Daodejing. Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 364-381.score: 18.0
    "Embracing the One" (baoyi 抱—) and "holding to the One" (zhiyi 孰—) are phrases that appear in different versions of the Daodejing. This essay argues that, in a specific philosophical context, these two phrases represent competing philosophical attitudes that stem from opposing cosmological visions. The recently unearthed "Great One Produces the Waters" (Taiyishengshui ) assists in the reconstruction of this philosophical context, as does a re-reading of the "One" in the famous generative sequence of chapter 42 of the (...). Ultimately, it is argued, the phrase "embracing the One" represents an attitude that is quintessential "Daoist" in nature, while "holding to the One" signifies the adoption of the Daodejing by competing philosophical interests. (shrink)
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  8. Laozi (2008). Daodejing. OUP Oxford.score: 18.0
    'Of ways you may speak, but not the Perennial Way; By names you may name, but not the Perennial Name.' -/- The best-loved of all the classical books of China and the most universally popular, the Daodejing or Classic of the Way and Life-Force is a work that defies definition. It encapsulates the main tenets of Daoism, and upholds a way of being as well as a philosophy and a religion. The dominant image is of the Way, the mysterious (...)
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  9. Erica Brindley (2008). The Philosophy of the Daodejing – by Hans-Georg Moeller. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (1):185–188.score: 15.0
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  10. Joel Krueger (2009). Knowing Through the Body: The Daodejing and Dewey. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):31-52.score: 15.0
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  11. Yoav Ariel Gil Raz (2010). Anaphors or Cataphors? A Discussion of the Two Qi 其 Graphs in the First Chapter of the Daodejing. Philosophy East and West 60 (3):391-421.score: 15.0
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  12. Erin M. Cline (2004). Two Interpretations of de in the Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):219–233.score: 15.0
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  13. Steven Shankman (2006). The daodeJing of Laozi – Philip J. Ivanhoedao de Jing: The Book of the Way – Moss Roberts. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):303–308.score: 15.0
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  14. Guenter Wohlfart & Translated by Marty Heitz (2003). Heidegger and Laozi: Wu (Nothing)—on Chapter 11 of the Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (1):39–59.score: 15.0
  15. Lin Ma (2009). Character of the Feminine in Lévinas and the Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):261-276.score: 15.0
  16. A. T. Nuyen (2000). The Dao of Ethics: From the Writings of Levinas to the Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (3):287–298.score: 15.0
  17. Xing Wen (2008). Wagner, Rudolf G., a Chinese Reading of the Daodejing : Wang Bi's Commentary on the Laozi, with Critical Text and Translation. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):467-471.score: 15.0
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  18. Joshua M. Hall (2012). Hyperion as Daoist Masterpiece: Keats and the Daodejing. Asian Philosophy 22 (3):225-237.score: 15.0
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  19. Lin Ma (2012). Levinas and the Daodejing on the Feminine: Intercultural Reflections. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (S1):152-170.score: 15.0
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  20. Munshiram Manoharlal (2009). Buddhist Attitudes to Other Religions. Edited by Perry Schmidt-Leukel. St. Ottilien, Germany: EOS Verlag, 2008. Pp. 299. Paper@ 19, 80. China: Fragile Superpower. By Susan L. Shirk. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008. Pp. Xi+ 320. Paper $16.95. Daodejing: A Literal-Critical Translation. By Joseph Hsu. Lanham: University Press Of. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 59 (3):407-408.score: 15.0
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  21. Guenter Wohlfart & Marty Heitz (2003). Heidegger and Laozi: Wu (Nothing)—on Chapter 11 of the Daodejing. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (1):39-59.score: 15.0
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  22. Ronnie Littlejohn (2009). China : Too Twisted to Fit a Carpenter's Square : Using and Teaching the Daodejing. In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.score: 15.0
     
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  23. Deborah A. Sommer (2012). The Ji Self in Early Chinese Texts. In Jason Dockstader Hans-Georg Moller & Gunter Wohlfahrt (eds.), Selfhood East and West: De-Constructions of Identity. Traugott Bautz. 17-45.score: 9.0
    The ji 己self is a site, storehouse, or depot of individuated allotment associated with the possession of things and qualities: wholesome and unwholesome desires (yu 欲) and aversions, emotions such as anxiety, and positive values such as humaneness and reverence. Each person's allotment is unique, and its "contents" are collected, measured, reflected on, and then distributed to others. The Analects, Mencius, Xunzi, Daodejing, and Zhuangzi each have their own vision for negotiating the space between self and other. Works as (...)
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  24. Franklin Perkins (2013). The Spontaneous Generation of the Human in the “Heng Xian”. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (2):225-240.score: 9.0
    This essay argues that the “Heng Xian” bridges between two distinct discourses that were both prevalent in the late fourth century. One discourse focused on the origination of the natural world through a spontaneous process of differentiation, a position familiar from the Daodejing and “Tai yi sheng shui.” The other focused on the specific ways in which different kinds of things live, a position known primarily from Ru discussions centering on the concept of xing 性, the nature or spontaneous (...)
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  25. Barry Allen (2014). Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.score: 9.0
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial arts perspective. I do not (...)
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  26. Ronnie Littlejohn, Daoist Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 6.0
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  27. Ronnie Littlejohn, Wang Bi. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 6.0
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  28. Eric Sean Nelson (2009). Responding with Dao : Early Daoist Ethics and the Environment. Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 294-316.score: 3.0
    Early Daoism, as articulated in the Daodejing and the Zhuangzi, indirectly addresses environmental issues by intimating a non-reductive naturalistic ethics calling on humans to be open and responsive to the specificities and interconnections of the world and environment to which they belong. "Dao" is not a substantial immanent or transcendent entity but the lived enactment of the intrinsic worth of the "myriad things" and the natural world occurring through how humans address and are addressed by them. Early Daoism potentially (...)
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  29. Hans-Rudolf Kantor (2011). 'Right Words Are Like the Reverse'—The Daoist Rhetoric and the Linguistic Strategy in Early Chinese Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 20 (3):283-307.score: 3.0
    ?Right words are like the reverse? is the concluding remark of chap. 78 in the Daoist classic Daodejing. Quoted in treatises composed by Seng Zhao (374?414), it designates the linguistic strategy used to unfold the Buddhist Madhyamaka meaning of ?emptiness? and ?ultimate truth?. In his treatise Things Do not Move, Seng Zhao demonstrates that ?motion and stillness? are not really contradictory, performing the deconstructive meaning of Buddhist ?emptiness? via the corresponding linguistic strategy. Though the topic of the discussion and (...)
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  30. Karyn L. Lai (2003). Conceptual Foundations for Environmental Ethics: A Daoist Perspective. Environmental Ethics 25 (3):247-266.score: 3.0
    The concepts dao and de in the Daodejing may be evoked to support a distinctive and plausible account of environmental holism. Dao refers to the totality of particulars, including the relations that hold between them, and the respective roles and functions of each within the whole. De refers to the distinctiveness of each particular, realized meaningfully only within the context of its interdependence with others, and its situatedness within the whole. Together, dao and de provide support for an ethical (...)
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  31. Heather L. Reid (2010). Athletic Virtue: Between East and West. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 4 (1):16 – 26.score: 3.0
    Despite the rich philosophical heritage of the East, the connection between athletics and education for character or virtue is more commonly associated with the West. Classical Eastern philosophy does focus on virtue, but it seems to exclude sport as a means of cultivation since the Confucian is uninterested in victory and the Daoist seeks passivity and avoids contention. A closer look reveals, however, that Eastern conceptions of virtue have much in common with those of Ancient Greece so often linked to (...)
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  32. Lin Ma (2006). Deciphering Heidegger's Connection with theDaodejing. Asian Philosophy 16 (3):149-171.score: 3.0
    This paper carries out an intensive study of Heidegger's famous reflection on the word dao and of his citations from the Daodejing, with the purpose of elucidating his complex relation with Daoist thinking. First I examine whether dao could be said to be a guideword for Heidegger's path of thinking. Then I discuss Heidegger's citations, in six places of his writings, from five chapters of the Daodejing, by situating them in the immediate textual context as well as against (...)
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  33. Robert J. Shepherd (2007). Perpetual Unease or Being at Ease? -- Derrida, Daoism, and the 'Metaphysics of Presence'. Philosophy East and West 57 (2):227-243.score: 3.0
    : Interesting work has been done on the striking similarities between the key arguments of the late Jacques Derrida and Daoism. While named otherwise, such Derridean signposts as the metaphysics of presence, the duality of language, and logocentrism are found in Daoist views of the relationship between reality, speech, writing, and knowledge. However, where the limits of language lead Derrida is different from where they take the authors of the Zhuangzi and the Daodejing, in particular regarding the question of (...)
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  34. Hagop Sarkissian (2010). The Darker Side of Daoist Primitivism. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):312-329.score: 3.0
    The Primitivist (responsible for chapters 8-11 of the heterogeneous Zhuangzi) has largely been interpreted as just another exponent of the philosophy of the Laozi or Daodejing. This is a shame, because the Primitivist is an idiosyncratic thinker whose theories do not simply reiterate those found in the Laozi. In this essay, I argue that even though the Primitivist embraced some of the values of the Laozi’s brand of Daoism, (e.g. simplicity, harmony with nature, being rid of knowledge, etc.) he (...)
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  35. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Levinas and Kierkegaard: The Akedah, the Dao, and Aporetic Ethics. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):164-184.score: 3.0
    In this article, Kierkegaard's depiction of the teleological suspension of the ethical is contrasted with Levinas's articulation of the emergence of the ethical in the Akedah narrative drawing on Jewish, Christian, and Chinese philosophical and religious perspectives. The narrative of Abraham's binding of Isaac illustrates both the distance and nearness between Kierkegaard and Levinas. Both realize that the encounter with God is a traumatic one that cannot be defined, categorized, or sublimated through ordinary ethical reflection or the everyday social-moral life (...)
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  36. K. -M. Wong (2006). The Butterfly in the Garden: Utopia and the Feminine in The Story of the Stone. Diogenes 53 (1):122-134.score: 3.0
    With Peach Blossom Spring and other poetical works written by Tao Qian in the 5th century, there was born a vision of utopia that remains forever etched into the Chinese collective imaginary. Thirteen centuries later, Cao Xueqin drew inspiration from it when he gave form to the ‘Grandview Garden’, a universe with fundamentally female characteristics and one of the centres for the plot of The Story of the Stone, a masterpiece of Chinese romantic fiction also known as ‘Dream of the (...)
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  37. James A. Highland (2010). Daoism and Deliberative Dialogue. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 17 (1):46-55.score: 3.0
    I argue that there is a great deal in common between a Daoist sage and a contemporary moderator of deliberative dialogues. The most fundamental similarity is harmonious interaction of people facing the challenges of contemporary life. As they encourage and facilitate community action, the actions of the moderator of deliberative dialogue exemplify noncoercive action, wuwei, in the way such dialogue is eventually structured and in the ways the moderator acts to help all participants realize some common ground from which they (...)
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  38. Sung-Hae Kim (2008). The Immortal World. Environmental Ethics 30 (2):135-157.score: 3.0
    Four Daoist texts illustrate the dynamic image of the Daoist immortal world on which a Daoist environmental ethics can be built. The first text is the Daodejing with two of the oldest commentaries. The second is Tao Hongjing’s Diagram of Rank and Functions of True Spirits. The third is the collection of poems by Immortal Changchun, titled Panxiji. The fourth is the Morning and Evening Liturgical Prayer Book of the Quanzhen Order, which represents Daoist ecological concerns for the natural (...)
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  39. Ronnie Littlejohn & Jeffrey Dippmann (eds.) (2011). Riding the Wind With Liezi: New Perspectives on the Daoist Classic. State University of New York.score: 3.0
    The Liezi is the forgotten classic of Daoism. Along with the Laozi (Daodejing) and the Zhuangzi, it's been considered a Daoist masterwork since the mid-eighth century, yet unlike those well-read works, the Liezi is little known and receives scant scholarly attention. Nevertheless, the Liezi is an important text that sheds valuable light on the early history of Daoism, particularly the formative period of sectarian Daoism. We do not know exactly what shape the original text took, but what remains is (...)
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