Search results for 'deictic codes' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dana H. Ballard, Mary M. Hayhoe, Polly K. Pook & Rajesh P. N. Rao (1997). Deictic Codes for the Embodiment of Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):723-742.score: 168.0
    To describe phenomena that occur at different time scales, computational models of the brain must incorporate different levels of abstraction. At time scales of approximately 1/3 of a second, orienting movements of the body play a crucial role in cognition and form a useful computational level embodiment level,” the constraints of the physical system determine the nature of cognitive operations. The key synergy is that at time scales of about 1/3 of a second, the natural sequentiality of body movements can (...)
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  2. Arthur M. Glenberg (1997). Deictic Codes for Embodied Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):749-749.score: 156.0
    Ballard et al. claim that fixations bind variables to cognitive pointers. I comment on three aspects of this claim: (1) its contribution to the interpretation of indexical language; (2) empirical support for the use of very few deictic pointers; (3) nonetheless, abstract pointers cannot be taken as prototypical cognitive representations.
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  3. J. Scott Jordan (1997). Spatial Perception is Contextualized by Actual and Intended Deictic Codes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):750-751.score: 156.0
    Ballard et al. model eye position as a deictic pointer for spatial perception. Evidence from research on gaze control indicates, however, that shifts in actual eye position are neither necessary nor sufficient to produce shifts in spatial perception. Deictic context is instead provided by the interaction between two deictic pointers; one representing actual eye position, and the other, intended eye position.
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  4. Julie Epelboim (1997). Deictic Codes, Embodiment of Cognition, and the Real World. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):746-746.score: 150.0
    It is unlikely that Ballard et al.'s embodiment theory has general applicability to cognition because it is based on experiments that neglect the importance of meaning, purpose, and learning in cognitive tasks. Limitations of the theory are illustrated with examples from everyday life and the results of recent experiments using cognitive and visuomotor tasks.
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  5. Boris M. Velichkovsky (1997). On the Variety of “Deictic Codes”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):757-757.score: 150.0
    Eye movements play a variety of roles in perception, cognition, and communication. The roles are revealed by the duration of fixations reflecting the quality of processing in the first line. We describe possible roles of eye fixations in different temporal diapasons. These forms of processing may be specific to sensorimotor coordinations. Any generalization to other domains should be cautious.
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  6. Robert A. Wilson (1997). Pointers, Codes, and Embodiment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):757-758.score: 120.0
    This commentary raises three questions about the target article: What are pointers or deictic devices? Why insist on deictic codes for cognition rather than deixis simpliciter? And in what sense is cognition embodied, on this view?
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  7. Austen Clark (2004). Feature-Placing and Proto-Objects. Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):443-469.score: 30.0
    This paper contrasts three different schemes of reference relevant to understanding systems of perceptual representation: a location-based system dubbed "feature-placing", a system of "visual indices" referring to things called "proto-objects", and the full sortal-based individuation allowed by a natural language. The first three sections summarize some of the key arguments (in Clark, 2000) to the effect that the early, parallel, and pre-attentive registration of sensory features itself constitutes a simple system of nonconceptual mental representation. In particular, feature integration--perceiving something as (...)
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  8. Mark S. Schwartz (2005). Universal Moral Values for Corporate Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):27 - 44.score: 24.0
    How can one establish if a corporate code of ethics is ethical in terms of its content? One important first step might be the establishment of core universal moral values by which corporate codes of ethics can be ethically constructed and evaluated. Following a review of normative research on corporate codes of ethics, a set of universal moral values is generated by considering three sources: (1) corporate codes of ethics; (2) global codes of ethics; and (3) (...)
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  9. Mark S. Schwartz (2004). Effective Corporate Codes of Ethics: Perceptions of Code Users. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (4):323 - 343.score: 24.0
    The study examines employee, managerial, and ethics officer perceptions regarding their companies codes of ethics. The study moves beyond examining the mere existence of a code of ethics to consider the role that code content and code process (i.e. creation, implementation, and administration) might play with respect to the effectiveness of codes in influencing behavior. Fifty-seven in-depth, semi-structured interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The factors viewed by respondents to be (...)
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  10. Mark John Somers (2001). Ethical Codes of Conduct and Organizational Context: A Study of the Relationship Between Codes of Conduct, Employee Behavior and Organizational Values. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (2):185 - 195.score: 24.0
    Codes of ethics are being increasingly adopted in organizations worldwide, yet their effects on employee perceptions and behavior have not been thoroughly addressed. This study used a sample of 613 management accountants drawn from the United States to study the relationship between corporate and professional codes of ethics and employee attitudes and behaviors. The presence of corporate codes of ethics was associated with less perceived wrongdoing in organizations, but not with an increased propensity to report observed unethical (...)
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  11. M. Schwartz (2001). The Nature of the Relationship Between Corporate Codes of Ethics and Behaviour. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):247 - 262.score: 24.0
    A study was conducted in order to examine the relationship between corporate codes of ethics and behaviour. Fifty-seven interviews of employees, managers, and ethics officers were conducted at four large Canadian companies. The study found that codes of ethics are a potential factor influencing the behaviour of corporate agents. Reasons are provided why codes are violated as well as complied with. A set of eight metaphors are developed which help to explain how codes of ethics influence (...)
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  12. Betsy Stevens (2008). Corporate Ethical Codes: Effective Instruments for Influencing Behavior. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 78 (4):601 - 609.score: 24.0
    This paper reviews studies of corporate ethical codes published since 2000 and concludes that codes be can effective instruments for shaping ethical behavior and guiding employee decision-making. Culture and effective communication are key components to a code’s success. If codes are embedded in the culture and embraced by the leaders, they are likely to be successful. Communicating the code’s precepts in an effective way is crucial to its success. Discussion between employees and management is a key component (...)
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  13. Muel Kaptein & Mark S. Schwartz (2008). The Effectiveness of Business Codes: A Critical Examination of Existing Studies and the Development of an Integrated Research Model. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):111 - 127.score: 24.0
    Business codes are a widely used management instrument. Research into the effectiveness of business codes has, however, produced conflicting results. The main reasons for the divergent findings are: varying definitions of key terms; deficiencies in the empirical data and methodologies used; and a lack of theory. In this paper, we propose an integrated research model and suggest directions for future research.
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  14. Cynthia Stohl, Michael Stohl & Lucy Popova (2009). A New Generation of Corporate Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):607 - 622.score: 24.0
    Globalization theories posit organizational convergence, suggesting that Codes of Ethics will become commonplace and include greater consideration of global issues. This study explores the degree to which the Codes of Ethics of 157 corporations on the Global 500 and/or Fortune 500 lists include the "third generation" of corporate social responsibility. Unlike first generation ethics, which focus on the legal context of corporate behavior, and second generation ethics, which locate responsibility to groups directly associated with the corporation, third generation (...)
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  15. Nicola Higgs-Kleyn & Dimitri Kapelianis (1999). The Role of Professional Codes in Regarding Ethical Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 19 (4):363 - 374.score: 24.0
    This paper investigates the regulation of ethical behavior of professionals. Ethical perceptions of South African professionals operating in the business community (specifically accountants, lawyers and engineers) concerning their need for and awareness of professional codes, and the frequency and acceptability of peer contravention of such codes were sought. The existence of conflict between corporate codes and professional codes was also investigated. Results, based on 217 replies, indicated that the professionals believe that codes are necessary and (...)
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  16. Heather E. Canary & Marianne M. Jennings (2008). Principles and Influence in Codes of Ethics: A Centering Resonance Analysis Comparing Pre- and Post-Sarbanes-Oxley Codes of Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):263 - 278.score: 24.0
    This study examines the similarities and differences in pre- and post-Sarbanes-Oxley corporate ethics codes and codes of conduct using the framework of structuration theory. Following the passage of the Sarbanes-Oxley (SOX) legislation in 2002 in the United States, publicly traded companies there undertook development and revision of their codes of ethics in response to new regulatory requirements as well as incentives under the U.S. Corporate Sentencing Guidelines, which were also revised as part of the SOX mandates. Questions (...)
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  17. Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood (2005). Global Business Citizenship and Voluntary Codes of Ethical Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):55 - 67.score: 24.0
    This article describes the theory and process of global business citizenship (GBC) and applies it in an analysis of characteristics of company codes of business conduct. GBC is distinguished from a commonly used term, “corporate citizenship,” which often denotes corporate community involvement and philanthropy. The GBC process requires (1) a set of fundamental values embedded in the corporate code of conduct and in corporate policies that reflect universal ethical standards; (2) implementation throughout the organization with thoughtful awareness of where (...)
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  18. Sean Valentine & Tim Barnett (2002). Ethics Codes and Sales Professionals' Perceptions of Their Organizations' Ethical Values. Journal of Business Ethics 40 (3):191 - 200.score: 24.0
    Most large companies and many smaller ones have adopted ethics codes, but the evidence is mixed as to whether they have a positive impact on the behavior of employees. We suggest that one way that ethics codes could contribute to ethical behavior is by influencing the perceptions that employees have about the ethical values of organizations. We examine whether a group of sales professionals in organizations with ethics codes perceive that their organizational context is more supportive of (...)
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  19. Jang B. Singh (2011). Determinants of the Effectiveness of Corporate Codes of Ethics: An Empirical Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):385-395.score: 24.0
    Recent figures reported by KPMG confirm the growing prevalence of corporate codes of ethics globally. Svensson et al. (Bus Ethics 18:389–407, 2009 ) in surveys of the largest corporations in Australia, Canada, and Sweden found a similar trend. The increased prevalence of corporate codes of ethics has been accompanied by heightened research interest in various aspects of these documents, e.g., the contents and focus of the codes. However, there is a paucity of research examining the effectiveness of (...)
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  20. Diane Michelfelder & Sharon A. Jones (2013). Sustaining Engineering Codes of Ethics for the Twenty-First Century. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (1):237-258.score: 24.0
    How much responsibility ought a professional engineer to have with regard to supporting basic principles of sustainable development? While within the United States, professional engineering societies, as reflected in their codes of ethics, differ in their responses to this question, none of these professional societies has yet to put the engineer’s responsibility toward sustainability on a par with commitments to public safety, health, and welfare. In this paper, we aim to suggest that sustainability should be included in the paramountcy (...)
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  21. Michael J. Selgelid (2009). Dual-Use Research Codes of Conduct: Lessons From the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 3 (3):175-183.score: 24.0
    This paper considers multiple meanings of the expression ‘dual use’ and examines lessons to be learned from the life sciences when considering ethical and policy issues associated with the dual-use nature of nanotechnology (and converging technologies). After examining recent controversial dual-use experiments in the life sciences, it considers the potential roles and limitations of science codes of conduct for addressing concerns associated with dual-use science and technology. It concludes that, rather than being essentially associated with voluntary self-governance of the (...)
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  22. Luis Rodriguez-Dominguez, Isabel Gallego-Alvarez & Isabel Maria Garcia-Sanchez (2009). Corporate Governance and Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):187 - 202.score: 24.0
    As a result of recent corporate scandals, several rules have focused on the role played by Boards of Directors on the planning and monitoring of corporate codes of ethics. In theory, outside directors are in a better position than insiders to protect and further the interests of all stakeholders because of their experience and their sense of moral and legal obligations. Female directors also tend to be more sensitive to ethics according to several past studies which explain this affirmation (...)
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  23. Kathryn Gordon & Maiko Miyake (2001). Business Approaches to Combating Bribery: A Study of Codes of Conduct. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):161 - 173.score: 24.0
    The question of what firms do internally in the fight against bribery is probably as important to the successful outcome of that fight as formal anti-bribery law and enforcement. This paper looks at corporate approaches to anti-bribery commitment and compliance management using an inventory of 246 codes of conduct. It suggests that, while bribery is often mentioned in the codes of conduct, there is considerable diversity in the language and concepts adopted in anti-bribery commitments. This diversity is a (...)
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  24. Lutz Preuss (2009). Ethical Sourcing Codes of Large Uk-Based Corporations: Prevalence, Content, Limitations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):735 - 747.score: 24.0
    Codes of conduct have become the perhaps most often used tool to manage corporate social responsibility (CSR). Researchers have primarily analysed such documents at company-wide or trans-company levels, whereas there is a dearth of studies into the use of codes for particular corporate functions. Hence, this article will examine one particular group of sub-company level codes, namely codes of conduct that stipulate CSR criteria for suppliers. Examining such ethical sourcing policies adopted by the FTSE100 corporations, the (...)
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  25. Scott J. Vitell & Encarnación Ramos Hidalgo (2006). The Impact of Corporate Ethical Values and Enforcement of Ethical Codes on the Perceived Importance of Ethics in Business: A Comparison of U.S. And Spanish Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):31 - 43.score: 24.0
    This two country study examines the effect of corporate ethical values and enforcement of a code of ethics on perceptions of the role of ethics in the overall success of the firm. Additionally, the impact of organizational commitment and of individual variables such as ethical idealism and relativism was examined. The rationale for examining the perceived importance of the role of ethics in this manner is to determine the extent to which the organization itself can influence employee perceptions regarding ethics (...)
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  26. Donald F. Arnold, Richard A. Bernardi, Presha E. Neidermeyer & Josef Schmee (2007). The Effect of Country and Culture on Perceptions of Appropriate Ethical Actions Prescribed by Codes of Conduct: A Western European Perspective Among Accountants. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):327 - 340.score: 24.0
    Recognizing the growing interdependence of the European Union and the importance of codes of conduct in companies’ operations, this research examines the effect of a country’s culture on the implementation of a code of conduct in a European context. We examine whether the perceptions of an activity’s ethicality relates to elements found in company codes of conduct vary by country or according to Hofstede’s (1980, Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA)) cultural constructs of: Uncertainty Avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism, (...)
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  27. Ans Kolk & Rob van Tuldere (2002). Child Labor and Multinational Conduct: A Comparison of International Business Andstakeholder Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):291-301.score: 24.0
    Increasing attention to the issue of child labor has been reflected in codes of conduct that emerged in the past decade in particular. This paper examines the way in which multinationals, business associations, governmental and non-governmental organizations deal with child labor in their codes. With a standardized framework, it analyzes 55 codes drawn up by these different actors to influence firms external, societal behavior. The exploratory study helps to identify the main issues related to child labor and (...)
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  28. Ivana S. Mijatovic & Dusan Stokic (2010). The Influence of Internal and External Codes on CSR Practice: The Case of Companies Operating in Serbia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):533 - 552.score: 24.0
    In this article, our aim is to examine the difference between the corporate social responsibility (CSR) practice of the multinational companies (MNCs) and of the domestic companies operating in Serbia, as well as the influence of internal self-regulations such as statements of corporate values and codes of conduct, and external self-regulations such as the implementation of the ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 standards on CSR practice. The CSR practice is observed in five CSR areas: employee relations, customer relations, environmental (...)
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  29. Lutz Preuss (2010). Codes of Conduct in Organisational Context: From Cascade to Lattice-Work of Codes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):471 - 487.score: 24.0
    Codes of conduct have proliferated not only at company level, but also at supra-and suborganisational levels. However, the latter have remained an under-researched area within the CSR literature. Hence, this article examined what range of organisational and sub-organisational codes large companies - here the FTSE100 constituent companies -have developed. The article isolated seven different types of organisational and sub-organisational codes, which together with six supraorganisational ones form a lattice-work of intermeshing documents. Such a division of labour between (...)
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  30. Bruce R. Gaumnitz & John C. Lere (2002). Contents of Codes of Ethics of Professional Business Organizations in the United States. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):35 - 49.score: 24.0
    This paper reports an analysis of the content of the codes of ethics of 15 professional business organizations in the United States, representing the broad range of disciplines found in business. The analysis was conducted to identify common ethical issues faced by business professionals. It was also structured to highlight ethical issues that are either unique to or of particular importance for business professionals. No attempt is made to make value judgments about either the codes of ethics studied (...)
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  31. André Sobczak (2003). Codes of Conduct in Subcontracting Networks: A Labour Law Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 44 (2-3):225 - 234.score: 24.0
    In the past ten years, many European companies organised into subcontracting networks have decided to adopt codes of conduct to regulate labour relations and to ensure the respect of fundamental social rights. This paper first determines the context and the issues to be addressed by codes of conduct within networks of companies, and second analyses the terms under which they can be implemented. The paper argues that codes of conduct can complement the standards developed by States, the (...)
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  32. Janet S. Adams, Armen Tashchian & Ted H. Shore (2001). Codes of Ethics as Signals for Ethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 29 (3):199 - 211.score: 24.0
    This study investigated effects of codes of ethics on perceptions of ethical behavior. Respondents from companies with codes of ethics (n = 465) rated role set members (top management, supervisors, peers, subordinates, self) as more ethical and felt more encouraged and supported for ethical behavior than respondents from companies without codes (n = 301). Key aspects of the organizational climate, such as supportiveness for ethical behavior, freedom to act ethically, and satisfaction with the outcome of ethical problems (...)
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  33. Niklas Egels-Zandén (2007). Suppliers' Compliance with Mncs' Codes of Conduct: Behind the Scenes at Chinese Toy Suppliers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (1):45 - 62.score: 24.0
    Despite increased academic and practitioner interest in codes of conduct, there has been little research into the actual compliance of suppliers in developing countries with the codes of conduct of multinational corporations (MNCs). This paper addresses this lack by analysing Chinese suppliers’ level of compliance with Swedish toy retailers’ codes of conduct. Based on unannounced and unofficial interviews with employees of Chinese suppliers, the study shows that all of the nine studied suppliers breached some of the standards (...)
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  34. Steven Scalet (2006). Prisoner's Dilemmas, Cooperative Norms, and Codes of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):309 - 323.score: 24.0
    Prisoner's dilemmas can lead rational people to interact in ways that lead to persistent inefficiencies. These dilemmas create a problem for institutional designers to solve: devise institutions that realign individual incentives to achieve collectively rational outcomes. I will argue that we do not always want to eliminate misalignments between individual incentives and efficient outcomes. Sometimes we want to preserve prisoner's dilemmas, even when we know that they systematically will lead to inefficiencies. No doubt, prisoner's dilemmas can create problems, but they (...)
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  35. Jang B. Singh (2006). A Comparison of the Contents of the Codes of Ethics of Canada's Largest Corporations in 1992 and 2003. Journal of Business Ethics 64 (1):17 - 29.score: 24.0
    This paper compares the findings of content analyses of the corporate codes of ethics of Canada’s largest corporations in 1992 and 2003. For both years, a modified version of a technique used in several other studies was used to determine and categorize the contents of the codes. It was found, inter alia, that, in 2003, as in 1992, more of the codes were concerned with conduct against the firm than with conduct on behalf of the firm. Among (...)
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  36. Till Talaulicar (2009). Barriers Against Globalizing Corporate Ethics: An Analysis of Legal Disputes on Implementing U.S. Codes of Ethics in Germany. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):349 - 360.score: 24.0
    Global firms need to decide on the correspondence between their corporate ethics and the globalization of their activities. When firms go global, they face ethical complexities as they operate in different legal and cultural environments that may impact the admissibility and appropriateness of their approach to institutionalize and implement corporate ethics. Global firms may have good reasons to establish global codes of ethics that are to be obeyed by all employees worldwide. However, developing and implementing such codes can (...)
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  37. Geoffrey Hinton & Ruslan Salakhutdinov (2011). Discovering Binary Codes for Documents by Learning Deep Generative Models. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):74-91.score: 24.0
    We describe a deep generative model in which the lowest layer represents the word-count vector of a document and the top layer represents a learned binary code for that document. The top two layers of the generative model form an undirected associative memory and the remaining layers form a belief net with directed, top-down connections. We present efficient learning and inference procedures for this type of generative model and show that it allows more accurate and much faster retrieval than latent (...)
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  38. Brad S. Long & Cathy Driscoll (2008). Codes of Ethics and the Pursuit of Organizational Legitimacy: Theoretical and Empirical Contributions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (2):173 - 189.score: 24.0
    The focus of this paper is to further a discussion of codes of ethics as institutionalized organizational structures that extend some form of legitimacy to organizations. The particular form of legitimacy is of critical importance to our analysis. After reviewing various theories of legitimacy, we analyze the literature on how legitimacy is derived from codes of ethics to discover which specific form of legitimacy is gained from their presence in organizations. We content analyze a sample of codes (...)
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  39. Cletus S. Brauer (2013). Just Sustainability? Sustainability and Social Justice in Professional Codes of Ethics for Engineers. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):875-891.score: 24.0
    Should environmental, social, and economic sustainability be of primary concern to engineers? Should social justice be among these concerns? Although the deterioration of our natural environment and the increase in social injustices are among today’s most pressing and important issues, engineering codes of ethics and their paramountcy clause, which contains those values most important to engineering and to what it means to be an engineer, do not yet put either concept on a par with the safety, health, and welfare (...)
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  40. Rachele Malavasi, Kalevi Kull & Almo Farina (2014). The Acoustic Codes: How Animal Sign Processes Create Sound-Topes and Consortia Via Conflict Avoidance. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 7 (1):89-95.score: 24.0
    In this essay we argue for the possibility to describe the co-presence of species in a community as a consortium built by acoustic codes, using mainly the examples of bird choruses. In this particular case, the consortium is maintained via the sound-tope that different bird species create by singing in a chorus. More generally, the formation of acoustic codes as well as cohesive communicative systems (the consortia) can be seen as a result of plastic adaptational behaviour of the (...)
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  41. Marina Prieto-Carrón (2008). Women Workers, Industrialization, Global Supply Chains and Corporate Codes of Conduct. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (1):5 - 17.score: 24.0
    The restructured globalized economy has provided women with employment opportunities. Globalisation has also meant a shift towards self-regulation of multinationals as part of the restructuring of the world economy that increases among others things, flexible employment practices, worsening of labour conditions and lower wages for many women workers around the world. In this context, as part of the global trend emphasising Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the 1980s, one important development has been the growth of voluntary Corporate Codes of (...)
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  42. C. E. Harris (2004). Internationalizing Professional Codes in Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):503-521.score: 24.0
    Professional engineering societies which are based in the United States, such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME, now ASME International) are recognizing that their codes of ethics must apply to engineers working throughout the world. An examination of the ethical code of the ASME International shows that its provisions pose many problems of application, especially in societies outside the United States. In applying the codes effectively in the international environment, two principal issues must be addressed. First, (...)
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  43. Lars-Eric Petersen & Franciska Krings (2009). Are Ethical Codes of Conduct Toothless Tigers for Dealing with Employment Discrimination? Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):501 - 514.score: 24.0
    This study examined the influence of two organizational context variables, codes of conduct and supervisor advice, on personnel decisions in an experimental simulation. Specifically, we studied personnel evaluations and decisions in a situation where codes of conduct conflict with supervisor advice. Past studies showed that supervisors’ advice to prefer ingroup over outgroup candidates leads to discriminatory personnel selection decisions. We extended this line of research by studying how codes of conduct and code enforcement may reduce this form (...)
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  44. Ingo Winkler (2011). The Representation of Social Actors in Corporate Codes of Ethics. How Code Language Positions Internal Actors. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (4):653-665.score: 24.0
    This article understands codes of ethics as written documents that represent social actors in specific ways through the use of language. It presents an empirical study that investigated the codes of ethics of the German Dax30 companies. The study adopted a critical discourse analysis-approach in order to reveal how the code-texts produce a particular understanding of the various internal social groups for the readers. Language is regarded as social practice that functions at creating particular understandings of individuals and (...)
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  45. Bruce R. Gaumnitz & John C. Lere (2004). A Classification Scheme for Codes of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 49 (4):329-335.score: 24.0
    A great deal of interest in codes of ethics exists in both the business community and the academic community. Within the academic community, this interest has given rise to a number of studies of codes of ethics. Many of these studies have focused on the content of various codes.One important way the study of codes of ethics can be advanced is by applying formal tools of analysis to codes of ethics. An understanding of important dimensions (...)
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  46. Lieske Voget-Kleschin & Setareh Stephan (2013). The Potential of Standards and Codes of Conduct in Governing Large-Scale Land Acquisition in Developing Countries Towards Sustainability. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1157-1179.score: 24.0
    Commercial interest in land (large-scale land acquisition, LaSLA) in developing countries is a hot topic for debate and its potential consequences are contentious: proponents conceive of it as much needed investment into the formerly neglected agricultural sector while opponents point to severe social and environmental effects. This contribution discusses, if and how sustainability standards and codes of conduct can contribute towards governing LaSLA. Based on the WCED-definition we develop a conception of sustainability that allows framing potential negative effects as (...)
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  47. Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic (2009). Managers' Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):343 - 353.score: 24.0
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight (...)
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  48. Luis A. Perez-Batres, Jonathan P. Doh, Van V. Miller & Michael J. Pisani (2012). Stakeholder Pressures as Determinants of CSR Strategic Choice: Why Do Firms Choose Symbolic Versus Substantive Self-Regulatory Codes of Conduct? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 110 (2):157-172.score: 24.0
    To encourage corporations to contribute positively to the environment in which they operate, voluntary self-regulatory codes (SRC) have been enacted and refined over the past 15 years. Two of the most prominent are the United Nations Global Compact and the Global Reporting Initiative. In this paper, we explore the impact of different stakeholders' pressures on the selection of strategic choices to join SRCs. Our results show that corporations react differently to different sets of stakeholder pressures and that the SRC (...)
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  49. Margaret Anne Pierce & John W. Henry (2000). Judgements About Computer Ethics: Do Individual, Co-Worker, and Company Judgements Differ? Do Company Codes Make a Difference. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 28 (4):307 - 322.score: 24.0
    When faced with an ambiguous ethical situation related to computer technology (CT), the individual's course of action is influenced by personal experiences and opinions, consideration of what co-workers would do in the same situation, and an expectation of what the organization might sanction. In this article, the judgement of over three-hundred Association of Information Technology Professionals (AITP) members concerning the actions taken in a series of CT ethical scenarios are examined. Respondents expressed their personal judgement, as well as their perception (...)
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  50. Bin Jiang (2009). Implementing Supplier Codes of Conduct in Global Supply Chains: Process Explanations From Theoretic and Empirical Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):77 - 92.score: 24.0
    Western buying companies impose Supplier Codes of Conduct (SCC) on their suppliers in developing countries; however, many suppliers cannot fully comply with SCC and some of them even cheat in SCC. In this research, we link contract characteristics - price pressure, production complexity, contract duration - to the likelihood of supplier's commitment to SCC through a mediating process: how the buying companies govern their suppliers. Our structural equation model analysis shows that the hierarchy/relational norms governance is a perfect mediator (...)
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