Search results for 'democratic theory' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  31
    Thom Brooks (2006). Ian Shapiro, The State of Democratic Theory:The State of Democratic Theory. Ethics 116 (2):442-444.
  2. Arash Abizadeh (2008). Democratic Theory and Border Coercion: No Right to Unilaterally Control Your Own Borders. Political Theory 36 (1):37-65.
    The question of whether or not a closed border entry policy under the unilateral control of a democratic state is legitimate cannot be settled until we first know to whom the justification of a regime of control is owed. According to the state sovereignty view, the control of entry policy, including of movement, immigration, and naturalization, ought to be under the unilateral discretion of the state itself: justification for entry policy is owed solely to members. This position, however, is (...)
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  3.  16
    Robert E. Goodin (2008). Innovating Democracy: Democratic Theory and Practice After the Deliberative Turn. OUP Oxford.
    Revisioning macro-democratic processes in light of the processes and promise of micro-deliberation, Innovating Democracy provides an integrated perspective on democratic theory and practice after the deliberative turn.
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  4.  8
    Brooke A. Ackerly (2006). Deliberative Democratic Theory for Building Global Civil Society: Designing a Virtual Community of Activists. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):113.
    The questions of this article are: what can we learn from deliberative democratic theory, its critics, the practices of local deliberative communities, the needs of potential participants, and the experiences of virtual communities that would be useful in designing a technology-facilitated institution for global civil society that is deliberative and democratic in its values? And what is the appropriate design of such an online institution so that it will be attentive to the undemocratic forces enabled (...)
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  5.  15
    Jamie Terence Kelly (2012). Framing Democracy: A Behavioral Approach to Democratic Theory. Princeton University Press.
    The past thirty years have seen a surge of empirical research into political decision making and the influence of framing effects--the phenomenon that occurs when different but equivalent presentations of a decision problem elicit different judgments or preferences. During the same period, political philosophers have become increasingly interested in democratic theory, particularly in deliberative theories of democracy. Unfortunately, the empirical and philosophical studies of democracy have largely proceeded in isolation from each other. As a result, philosophical treatments of (...)
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  6.  8
    Adrian Blau (2011). Rationality and Deliberative Democracy: A Constructive Critique of John Dryzek's Democratic Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 10 (1):37.
    John Dryzek's justification of deliberative democracy rests on a critique of instrumental rationality and a defence of Habermas's idea of communicative rationality. I question each stage of Dryzek's theory. It defines instrumental rationality broadly but only criticises narrow applications of it. It conflates communicative rationality with Habermas's idea of ‘discourse’ – the real motor of Dryzek's democratic theory. Deliberative democracy can be better defended by avoiding overstated criticisms of instrumental rationality, by altering the emphasis on communicative rationality, (...)
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  7.  2
    J. Seery (2013). Stumbling Toward a Democratic Theory of Incest. Political Theory 41 (1):5-32.
    Prompted by the prominence of incest themes in the U.S. literary canon, the author raises and explores the idea of a “democratic theory of incest.” To that end, the paper uncovers, tracks, and documents the interest in incest throughout the Western canon of political thought. It then presents and addresses a “standoff” in theoretical circles today: whereas many nonliberal political theorists have continued and developed the canonical interest in the politics of incest, contemporary liberals have largely dropped out (...)
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  8.  4
    Nathan Widder (2004). The Relevance of Nietzsche to Democratic Theory: Micropolitics and the Affirmation of Difference. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (2):188.
    This paper argues that Nietzsche presents an ontology of excess that, by problematizing the logic of identity, can positively contribute to democratic theory and practice. This ontology is missed by a wide range of interpreters who try to depoliticize Nietzsche's thought, align it with the agonisms of contemporary mass democracy, or re-align it with an aristocratic politics of fixed hierarchy. While Nietzsche himself may not extend this ontology onto the political domain, the writings of Foucault, and Deleuze and (...)
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  9.  3
    Philip E. Converse (2006). Democratic Theory and Electoral Reality. Critical Review 18 (1-3):297-329.
    In response to the dozen essays published here, which relate my 1964 paper on ?The Nature of Belief Systems in the Mass Publics? to normative requirements of democratic theory, I note, inter alia, a major misinterpretation of my old argument, as well as needed revisions of that argument in the light of intervening data. Then I address the degree to which there may be some long?term secular change in the parameters that I originally laid out. In the final (...)
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  10.  31
    Holloway Sparks (1997). Dissident Citizenship: Democratic Theory, Political Courage, and Activist Women. Hypatia 12 (4):74-110.
    In this essay, I argue that contemporary democratic theory gives insufficient attention to the important contributions dissenting citizens make to democratic life. Guided by the dissident practices of activist women, I develop a more expansive conception of citizenship that recognizes dissent and an ethic of political courage as vital elements of democratic participation. I illustrate how this perspective on citizenship recasts and reclaims women's courageous dissidence by reconsidering the well-known story of Rosa Parks.
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  11.  9
    Ian Shapiro (2005). The State of Democratic Theory: A Reply to James Fishkin. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (1):79-83.
    I respond to Fishkin?s critique of my book The State of Democratic Theory. I reiterate my defense of a competitive model of democracy geared to reducing domination, rather than Fishkin?s deliberative model that deploys structured discussion to enlighten mass preferences. In light of the literatures on framing effects and the value of mutually independent judgments, I question whether the procedures Fishkin recommends would produce outcomes that are better informed rather than differently informed. Recognizing that deliberation might sometimes be (...)
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  12.  3
    Tom Hoffman (1998). Rationality Reconceived: The Mass Electorate and Democratic Theory. Critical Review 12 (4):459-480.
    Abstract Early voting behavior research confronted liberal democratic theory with the average American citizen's meager ability to think politically. Since then, several lines of analysis have tried to vindicate the mass electorate. Most recently, some researchers have attempted to reconceptualize the political reasoning process by viewing it in the aggregate, while others describe individuals as effective?albeit inarticulate?employers of cognitive shortcuts. While mass publics may, in these ways, be described as ?rational,? they still fail to meet the basic requirements (...)
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  13.  15
    James Fishkin (2005). Defending Deliberation: A Comment on Ian Shapiro's The State of Democratic Theory. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (1):71-78.
    This comment responds to Shapiro?s State of Democratic Theory. First, it argues that the map of democratic possibilities in the book, dividing forms of democracy into aggregative and deliberative, conflates and obscures important democratic alternatives. Second, I argue that one of the possibilities this map obscures, deliberation with aggregation, avoids the critique Shapiro directs at deliberative democracy. While some of his criticisms are appropriate to other categories, they do not apply to this one. Third, I argue (...)
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  14. Robert Talisse (2010). Saving Pragmatist Democratic Theory. Etica E Politica 12 (1):12-27.
    Deweyan democracy is inherently comprehensive in the Rawlsian sense and therefore unable to countenance the fact of reasonable pluralism. This renders Deweyan democracy nonviable on pragmatic grounds. Given the Deweyan pragmatists’ views about the proper relation between philosophy and politics, unless there is a viable pragmatist alternative to Deweyan democracy, pragmatism itself is jeopardized. I develop a pragmatist alternative to Deweyan democracy rooted in a Peircean social epistemology. Peircean democracy can give Deweyan pragmatists all they should want from a (...) theory while avoiding the anti-pluralistic implications of Dewey’s own democratic theory. After presenting the arguments against Deweyan democracy and for Peircean democracy, I address a criticism of Peircean democracy recently posed by Matthew Festenstein. (shrink)
     
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  15.  12
    Cui Zhang (2008). Setting up a new model of the democratic theory ‐ research on Habermas' theory of public sphere. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:1095-1103.
    Public sphere is an important idea of Habermas in the early research, which guided his latter research, especially in political philosophy field. According to Habermas ’ research on public sphere, this paper researches public sphere’s significance in solving the legalization crisis of capitalism and remedying the democratic theory of bourgeoisie. Public sphere idea set up a new model of the democratic theory, deliberative democracy, which is better than democracy of both liberalism and republicanism, and become the (...)
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  16.  8
    Jeff Noonan (2013). Subjecthood and Self-Determination: The Limitations of Postmodernism as Democratic Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (sup1):147-169.
    (1999). Subjecthood and Self-Determination: The Limitations of Postmodernism as Democratic Theory. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 29, Supplementary Volume 25: Civilization and Oppression, pp. 147-169.
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  17.  16
    David Owen (2012). Constituting the Polity, Constituting the Demos: On the Place of the All Affected Interests Principle in Democratic Theory and in Resolving the Democratic Boundary Problem. Ethics and Global Politics 5 (3):129-152.
    This essay considers the role of the ‘all affected interests’ principle in democratic theory, focusing on debates concerning its form, substance and relationship to the resolution of the democratic boundary problem. It begins by defending an ‘all actually affected’ formulation of the principle against Goodin’s ‘incoherence argument’ critique of this formulation, before addressing issues concerning how to specify the choice set appropriate to the principle. Turning to the substance of the principle, the argument rejects Nozick’s dismissal of (...)
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  18.  23
    David Ellerman (2009). The Workplace: A Forgotten Topic in Democratic Theory? Kettering Review:51-57.
    Early democratic theorists such as Kant considered the effects of being a servant or, in modern terms, an employee to be so negative that such dependent people should be denied the vote. John Stuart Mill and John Dewey also noted the negative effects of the employment relation on the development of democratic habits and civic virtues but rather than deny the franchise to employees, they pushed for workplace democracy where workers would be a member of their company rather (...)
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  19.  9
    Ronald J. Pestritto (2012). Roosevelt, Wilson, and the Democratic Theory of National Progressivism. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (2):318-334.
    The American Progressive Movement argued for both a democratization of the political process and deference to expert administrators. Relying on the work of Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson, the article endeavors to explore this tension and make some preliminary suggestions as to how it might be reconciledinto a single democratic theory. Both Roosevelt and Wilson criticize the principles of the original Constitution for being insufficiently democratic and overly suspicious of the popular will, and they want to make (...)
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  20.  12
    Eva Erman (2009). What is Wrong with Agonistic Pluralism?: Reflections on Conflict in Democratic Theory. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (9):1039-1062.
    During the last couple of decades, concurrently with an increased awareness of the complexity of ethical conflicts, political theorists have directed attention to how constitutional democracy should cope with a fact of incommensurable doctrines. Poststructuralists such as Chantal Mouffe claim that ethical conflicts are fundamentally irreconcilable, which is indeed a view shared by many liberal theorists. The question of whether ethical conflicts are in principle irreconcilable is an important one since the answer has implications for what democratic institutions are (...)
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  21.  6
    Richard Lichtman (1969). The Fa Ade of Equality in Liberal Democratic Theory. Inquiry 12 (1-4):170 – 208.
    Liberal democratic theory is the ideological expression of capitalism. Its paramount function is to justify the distribution of property and power which permits a minority of men to exploit and dominate the lives of the majority. A crucial device for carrying out this task is the elaboration of a theory of political equality which maintains the economic foundation of capitalism. But as capitalism is itself an evolving system, so the theory which protects its interests passes through (...)
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  22. Daniel Bray & Steven Slaughter (2015). Global Democratic Theory: A Critical Introduction. Polity.
    Global Democratic Theory is the first comprehensive introduction to the changing contours of democracy in today’s hyperconnected world. Accessibly written for readers new to the topic, it considers the impact of globalization and global forms of governance and activism on democratic politics and examines how democratic theory has responded to address these challenges, including calls for new forms of democracy to be developed beyond the nation-state and for greater public participation and accountability in existing global (...)
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  23. Daniel Bray & Steven Slaughter (2015). Global Democratic Theory: A Critical Introduction. Polity.
    Global Democratic Theory is the first comprehensive introduction to the changing contours of democracy in today’s hyperconnected world. Accessibly written for readers new to the topic, it considers the impact of globalization and global forms of governance and activism on democratic politics and examines how democratic theory has responded to address these challenges, including calls for new forms of democracy to be developed beyond the nation-state and for greater public participation and accountability in existing global (...)
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  24. Daniel Bray & Steven Slaughter (2015). Global Democratic Theory: A Critical Introduction. Polity.
    Global Democratic Theory is the first comprehensive introduction to the changing contours of democracy in today’s hyperconnected world. Accessibly written for readers new to the topic, it considers the impact of globalization and global forms of governance and activism on democratic politics and examines how democratic theory has responded to address these challenges, including calls for new forms of democracy to be developed beyond the nation-state and for greater public participation and accountability in existing global (...)
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  25. Robert E. Goodin (2012). Innovating Democracy: Democratic Theory and Practice After the Deliberative Turn. OUP Oxford.
    Revisioning macro-democratic processes in light of the processes and promise of micro-deliberation, Innovating Democracy provides an integrated perspective on democratic theory and practice after the deliberative turn.
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  26. Jamie Terence Kelly (2012). Chapter Four. Behavioral Democratic Theory Applied. In Framing Democracy: A Behavioral Approach to Democratic Theory. Princeton University Press 74-96.
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  27. Jamie Terence Kelly (2012). Chapter Three. Behavioral Democratic Theory. In Framing Democracy: A Behavioral Approach to Democratic Theory. Princeton University Press 59-73.
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  28. Filimon Peonidis (2008). Aristotle's Relevance to Modern Democratic Theory. Archiv Fuer Rechts- Und Sozialphilosphie 94 (3):283-294.
    In this essay instead of trying to deal with the dubious question whether Aristotle is a democratic or an oligarchic thinker, I try to investigate whether he has developed particular views that can be constructively engaged by modern democratic theory. I argue that we can locate a rough model of democracy in Aristotle in which direct and representative democracy successfully converge and complement each other. This model is indispensable for reflecting on the nature and the future course (...)
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  29.  31
    Jeff Noonan (2005). Modernization, Rights, and Democratic Society: The Limits of Habermas's Democratic Theory. [REVIEW] Res Publica 11 (2):101-123.
    Jürgen Habermas’s discourse-theoretic reconstruction of the normative foundations of democracy assumes the formal separation of democratic political practice from the economic system. Democratic autonomy presupposes a vital public sphere protected by a complex schedule of individual rights. These rights are supposed to secure the formal and material conditions for democratic freedom. However, because Habermas argues that the economy must be left to function according to endogenous market dynamics, he accepts as a condition of democracy (the formal separation (...)
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  30. Corey Brettschneider (2005). Balancing Procedures and Outcomes Within Democratic Theory: Corey Values and Judicial Review. Political Studies 53:423-451.
    Democratic theorists often distinguish between two views of democratic procedures. ‘Outcomes theorists’ emphasize the instrumental nature of these procedures and argue that they are only valuable because they tend to produce good outcomes. In contrast, ‘proceduralists’ emphasize the intrinsic value of democratic procedures, for instance, on the grounds that they are fair. In this paper. I argue that we should reject pure versions of these two theories in favor of an understanding of the democratic ideal that (...)
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  31.  2
    Robert Garner (forthcoming). Animal Rights and the Deliberative Turn in Democratic Theory. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116630937.
    Deliberative democracy has been castigated by those who regard it as exclusive and elitist because of its failure to take into account a range of structural inequalities existing within contemporary liberal democracies. As a result, it is suggested, deliberative arenas will merely reproduce these inequalities, advantaging the already powerful extolling mainstream worldviews excluding the interests of the less powerful and those expounding alternative worldviews. Moreover, the tactics employed by those excluded social movements seeking to right an injustice are typically those (...)
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  32.  8
    Trevor Latimer (forthcoming). Plural Voting and Political Equality: A Thought Experiment in Democratic Theory. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885115591344.
    I demonstrate that a set of well-known objections defeat John Stuart Mill’s plural voting proposal, but do not defeat plural voting as such. I adopt the following as a working definition of political equality: a voting system is egalitarian if and only if departures from a baseline of equally weighted votes are normatively permissible. I develop an alternative proposal, called procedural plural voting, which allocates plural votes procedurally, via the free choices of the electorate, rather than according to a substantive (...)
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  33.  14
    Nadia Urbinati (2004). Condorcet's Democratic Theory of Representative Government. European Journal of Political Theory 3 (1):53-75.
    The basic theoretical premise of this article is that representation does not necessarily imply a break with democratic principles. Its goal is to challenge the traditional liberal-elitist approach to representative government according to which this system is a mixed regime that is not identifiable with democracy since its main institution, election, is a mechanism that is inherently aristocratic, although it can be implemented in a democratic way. I question this powerful argument by questioning its main assumption: the idea (...)
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  34.  8
    Josh Corngold (2011). Misplaced Priorities: Gutmann’s Democratic Theory, Children’s Autonomy, and Sex Education Policy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (1):67-84.
  35.  4
    M. S. Williams & M. E. Warren (2014). A Democratic Case for Comparative Political Theory. Political Theory 42 (1):26-57.
    Globalization generates new structures of human interdependence and vulnerability while also posing challenges for models of democracy rooted in territorially bounded states. The diverse phenomena of globalization have stimulated two relatively new branches of political theory: theoretical accounts of the possibilities of democracy beyond the state; and comparative political theory, which aims at bringing non-Western political thought into conversation with the Western traditions that remain dominant in the political theory academy. This article links these two theoretical responses (...)
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  36.  3
    Evert van der Zweerde (forthcoming). Parliamentarism and Democratic Theory: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives. Contemporary Political Theory.
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  37.  18
    Jessica Kulynych (2001). No Playing in the Public Sphere: Democratic Theory and the Exclusion of Children. Social Theory and Practice 27 (2):231-264.
  38.  5
    Jason Edwards (2015). The Misguided Search for the Political: Social Weightlessness in Radical Democratic Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 14 (4):e5.
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  39.  9
    R. L. Euben (2010). Review Essay: Making the World Safe for Compatibility: Hashemi, Nader. Islam, Secularism and Liberal Democracy: Toward a Democratic Theory for Muslim Societies New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. 304 Pp. $65.00 . Kamrava, Mehran. Iran's Intellectual Revolution Cambridge. UK: Cambridge University Press. 2008. 288 Pp. $85.00 , $33.99 . March, Andrew F. Islam and Liberal Citizenship: The Search for an Overlapping Consensus by Andrew F. March. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. 360 Pp. $55.00. [REVIEW] Political Theory 38 (3):424-441.
  40.  78
    Mark Considine (1990). Reviews : Frank Cunningham, Democratic Theory and Socialism (Cambridge University Press, 1988). Thesis Eleven 27 (1):252-254.
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  41.  22
    Mathew Humphrey (2007). Ecological Politics and Democratic Theory: The Challenge to the Deliberative Ideal. Routledge.
    This book examines the relationship between environmental and democratic thought and the apparent compatibility of ecology and democracy. Although environmental politics is quite rightly seen as a progressive force, it has also featured a strand of extreme right "eco-authoritarianism" and its proponents have sometimes developed controversial positions on such issues as population policy. There have also been a number of situations where radical environmental activists have broken the laws of democratic societies in pursuit of ecological objectives and the (...)
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  42.  16
    David Ingram (1993). The Limits and Possibilities of Communicative Ethics for Democratic Theory. Political Theory 21 (2):294-321.
  43.  4
    Jason Edwards (2015). The Misguided Search for the Political: Social Weightlessness in Radical Democratic Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 14 (4):e5-e8.
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  44.  9
    Walter L. Adamson (1989). Convergences in Recent Democratic Theory. Theory and Society 18 (1):125-142.
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  45.  45
    Philip Pettit, Towards a Social Democratic Theory.
    democratic approach which sets it in contrast to liberal democratic theories. This is pursued by contrasting the different interpretations of the ideal of equal respect..
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  46.  2
    A. Abizadeh (2008). Democratic Theory and Border Coercion: No Right to Unilaterally Control Your Own Borders. Political Theory 36 (1):37-65.
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  47.  55
    David Schweickart, A Democratic Theory of Economic Exploitation Dialectically Developed.
    I T I S S T A R T L I N G T O realize that the concept of economic exploitation, which has been the focus of intense philosophical debate for what seems like decades now, was barely touched on in John Rawls's 1971 masterwork, A Theory o f Justice, the book that ushered in the present era of Anglo - American social and political philosophy. The subject was broached just once by Rawls, and only to be dismissed (...)
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  48.  14
    John Barry (2009). Ecological Politics and Democratic Theory: The Challenge to the Deliberative Ideal. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (1):115.
  49. Frank Cunningham (1989). [Book Review] Democratic Theory and Socialism. [REVIEW] Science and Society 53 (3):490-492.
    This book is an important contribution to the theory of democracy and socialism. The underlying question it poses is: how, if at all, can one have both socialism and democracy? In posing an answer to this question, Professor Cunningham addresses the following topics: the definition of democracy and whether socialism is necessary to its progress: the socialist retrieval of liberal democracy associated with the work of C. B. Macpherson: the political consciousness that Gramsci placed at the center of socialist (...)
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  50.  3
    Doron Navot (2014). Political Corruption, Democratic Theory, and Democracy. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 9 (3):4-24.
    Doron Navot | : According to recent conceptual proposals, institutional corruption should be understood within the boundaries of the institution and its purpose. Political corruption in democracies, prominent scholars suggest, is characterized by the violation of institutional ideals or behaviors that tend to harm democratic processes and institutions. This paper rejects the idea that compromises, preferences, political agreements, or consent can be the baseline of conceptualization of political corruption. In order to improve the identification of abuse of power, the (...)
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