Search results for 'diagrams' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Gerard Allwein & Jon Barwise (eds.) (1996). Logical Reasoning with Diagrams. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    One effect of information technology is the increasing need to present information visually. The trend raises intriguing questions. What is the logical status of reasoning that employs visualization? What are the cognitive advantages and pitfalls of this reasoning? What kinds of tools can be developed to aid in the use of visual representation? This newest volume on the Studies in Logic and Computation series addresses the logical aspects of the visualization of information. The authors of these specially commissioned papers explore (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Michael Lynch (1991). Science in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Moral and Epistemic Relations Between Diagrams and Photographs. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):205-226.score: 18.0
    Sociologists, philosophers and historians of science are gradually recognizing the importance of visual representation. This is part of a more general movement away from a theory-centric view of science and towards an interest in practical aspects of observation and experimentation. Rather than treating science as a matter of demonstrating the logical connection between theoretical and empirical statements, an increasing number of investigations are examining how scientists compose and use diagrams, graphs, photographs, micrographs, maps, charts, and related visual displays. This (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Brice Halimi (2012). Diagrams as Sketches. Synthese 186 (1):387-409.score: 18.0
    This article puts forward the notion of “evolving diagram” as an important case of mathematical diagram. An evolving diagram combines, through a dynamic graphical enrichment, the representation of an object and the representation of a piece of reasoning based on the representation of that object. Evolving diagrams can be illustrated in particular with category-theoretic diagrams (hereafter “diagrams*”) in the context of “sketch theory,” a branch of modern category theory. It is argued that sketch theory provides a diagrammatic* (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Solomon Feferman (2012). And so On...: Reasoning with Infinite Diagrams. Synthese 186 (1):371 - 386.score: 18.0
    This paper presents examples of infinite diagrams (as well as infinite limits of finite diagrams) whose use is more or less essential for understanding and accepting various proofs in higher mathematics. The significance of these is discussed with respect to the thesis that every proof can be formalized, and a "pre" form of this thesis that every proof can be presented in everyday statements-only form.
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Marco Panza (2012). The Twofold Role of Diagrams in Euclid's Plane Geometry. Synthese 186 (1):55-102.score: 18.0
    Proposition I.1 is, by far, the most popular example used to justify the thesis that many of Euclid’s geometric arguments are diagram-based. Many scholars have recently articulated this thesis in different ways and argued for it. My purpose is to reformulate it in a quite general way, by describing what I take to be the twofold role that diagrams play in Euclid’s plane geometry (EPG). Euclid’s arguments are object-dependent. They are about geometric objects. Hence, they cannot be diagram-based unless (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lorenzo Magnani & Riccardo Dossena (2005). Perceiving the Infinite and the Infinitesimal World: Unveiling and Optical Diagrams in Mathematics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 10 (1):7-23.score: 18.0
    Many important concepts of the calculus are difficult to grasp, and they may appear epistemologically unjustified. For example, how does a real function appear in “small” neighborhoods of its points? How does it appear at infinity? Diagrams allow us to overcome the difficulty in constructing representations of mathematical critical situations and objects. For example, they actually reveal the behavior of a real function not “close to” a point (as in the standard limit theory) but “in” the point. We are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ryo Takemura (2013). Proof Theory for Reasoning with Euler Diagrams: A Logic Translation and Normalization. Studia Logica 101 (1):157-191.score: 18.0
    Proof-theoretical notions and techniques, developed on the basis of sentential/symbolic representations of formal proofs, are applied to Euler diagrams. A translation of an Euler diagrammatic system into a natural deduction system is given, and the soundness and faithfulness of the translation are proved. Some consequences of the translation are discussed in view of the notion of free ride, which is mainly discussed in the literature of cognitive science as an account of inferential efficacy of diagrams. The translation enables (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kathi Fisler (1999). Timing Diagrams: Formalization and Algorithmic Verification. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (3):323-361.score: 18.0
    Timing diagrams are popular in hardware design. They have been formalized for use in reasoning tasks, such as computer-aided verification. These efforts have largely treated timing diagrams as interfaces to established notations for which verification is decidable; this has restricted timing diagrams to expressing only regular language properties. This paper presents a timing diagram logic capable of expressing certain context-free and context-sensitive properties. It shows that verification is decidable for properties expressible in this logic. More specifically, it (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Peter C.-H. Cheng (2011). Probably Good Diagrams for Learning: Representational Epistemic Recodification of Probability Theory. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):475-498.score: 18.0
    The representational epistemic approach to the design of visual displays and notation systems advocates encoding the fundamental conceptual structure of a knowledge domain directly in the structure of a representational system. It is claimed that representations so designed will benefit from greater semantic transparency, which enhances comprehension and ease of learning, and plastic generativity, which makes the meaningful manipulation of the representation easier and less error prone. Epistemic principles for encoding fundamental conceptual structures directly in representational schemes are described. The (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. James R. Griesemer (1991). Must Scientific Diagrams Be Eliminable? The Case of Path Analysis. Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):155-180.score: 18.0
    Scientists use a variety of modes of representation in their work, but philosophers have studied mainly sentences expressing propositions. I ask whether diagrams are mere conveniences in expressing propositions or whether they are a distinct, ineliminable mode of representation in scientific texts. The case of path analysis, a statistical method for quantitatively assessing the relative degree of causal determination of variation as expressed in a causal path diagram, is discussed. Path analysis presents a worst case for arguments against eliminability (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Gregg De Young (2012). Mathematical Diagrams From Manuscript to Print: Examples From the Arabic Euclidean Transmission. Synthese 186 (1):21-54.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I explore general features of the “architecture” (relations of white space, diagram, and text on the page) of medieval manuscripts and early printed editions of Euclidean geometry. My focus is primarily on diagrams in the Arabic transmission, although I use some examples from both Byzantine Greek and medieval Latin manuscripts as a foil to throw light on distinctive features of the Arabic transmission. My investigations suggest that the “architecture” often takes shape against the backdrop of an (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Ari Gross (2012). Pictures and Pedagogy: The Role of Diagrams in Feynman's Early Lectures. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 43 (3):184-194.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to give a substantive account of how Feynman used diagrams in the first lectures in which he explained his new approach to quantum electrodynamics. By critically examining unpublished lecture notes, Feynman’s use and interpretation of both "Feynman diagrams" and other visual representations will be illuminated. This paper discusses how the morphology of Feynman’s early diagrams were determined by both highly contextual issues, which molded his images to local needs and particular physical characterizations, and an (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Francisco Franchetti & William H. Sandholm (2013). An Introduction to Dynamo: Diagrams for Evolutionary Game Dynamics. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 8 (2):167-178.score: 18.0
    Dynamo: Diagrams for Evolutionary Game Dynamics is free, open-source software used to create phase diagrams and other images related to dynamical systems from evolutionary game theory. We describe how to use the software’s default settings to generate phase diagrams quickly and easily. We then explain how to take advantage of the software’s intermediate and advanced features to create diagrams that highlight the key properties of the dynamical system under study. Sample code and output are provided to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Renée Raphael (2013). Teaching Through Diagrams. Early Science and Medicine 18 (1-2):201-230.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Peter C.‐H. Cheng (2002). Electrifying Diagrams for Learning: Principles for Complex Representational Systems. Cognitive Science 26 (6):685-736.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Eyal Shahar & Doron J. Shahar (2012). Causal Diagrams and Change Variables. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):143-148.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Martin Gardner (1982). Logic Machines and Diagrams. University of Chicago Press.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Martin Gardner (1958/1968). Logic Machines, Diagrams and Boolean Algebra. New York, Dover Publications.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Julie Heiser & Barbara Tversky (2006). Arrows in Comprehending and Producing Mechanical Diagrams. Cognitive Science 30 (3):581-592.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Chris Reed & Glenn Rowe (2005). Translating Toulmin Diagrams: Theory Neutrality in Argument Representation. Argumentation 19 (3):267-286.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Eyal Shahar (2013). Causal Diagrams, Gastroesophageal Reflux and Erosive Oesophagitis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):976-983.score: 15.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Laura Perini (2005). Explanation in Two Dimensions: Diagrams and Biological Explanation. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):257-269.score: 14.0
    Molecular biologists and biochemists often use diagrams to present hypotheses. Analysis of diagrams shows that their content can be expressed with linguistic representations. Why do biologists use visual representations instead? One reason is simple comprehensibility: some diagrams present information which is readily understood from the diagram format, but which would not be comprehensible if the same information was expressed linguistically. But often diagrams are used even when concise, comprehensible linguistic alternatives are available. I explain this phenomenon (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Sherry (2009). The Role of Diagrams in Mathematical Arguments. Foundations of Science 14 (1-2):59-74.score: 14.0
    Recent accounts of the role of diagrams in mathematical reasoning take a Platonic line, according to which the proof depends on the similarity between the perceived shape of the diagram and the shape of the abstract object. This approach is unable to explain proofs which share the same diagram in spite of drawing conclusions about different figures. Saccheri’s use of the bi-rectangular isosceles quadrilateral in Euclides Vindicatus provides three such proofs. By forsaking abstract objects it is possible to give (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Peter J. Taylor & Ann S. Blum (1991). Ecosystem as Circuits: Diagrams and the Limits of Physical Analogies. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):275-294.score: 14.0
    Diagrams refer to the phenomena overtly represented, to analogous phenomena, and to previous pictures and their graphic conventions. The diagrams of ecologists Clarke, Hutchinson, and H.T. Odum reveal their search for physical analogies, building on the success of World War II science and the promise of cybernetics. H.T. Odum's energy circuit diagrams reveal also his aspirations for a universal and natural means of reducing complexity to guide the management of diverse ecological and social systems. Graphic conventions concerning (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Dominique Tournès (2012). Diagrams in the Theory of Differential Equations (Eighteenth to Nineteenth Centuries). Synthese 186 (1):257-288.score: 14.0
    Diagrams have played an important role throughout the entire history of differential equations. Geometrical intuition, visual thinking, experimentation on diagrams, conceptions of algorithms and instruments to construct these diagrams, heuristic proofs based on diagrams, have interacted with the development of analytical abstract theories. We aim to analyze these interactions during the two centuries the classical theory of differential equations was developed. They are intimately connected to the difficulties faced in defining what the solution of a differential (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Jessica Carter (2010). Diagrams and Proofs in Analysis. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (1):1 – 14.score: 12.0
    This article discusses the role of diagrams in mathematical reasoning in the light of a case study in analysis. In the example presented certain combinatorial expressions were first found by using diagrams. In the published proofs the pictures were replaced by reasoning about permutation groups. This article argues that, even though the diagrams are not present in the published papers, they still play a role in the formulation of the proofs. It is shown that they play a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. William Mark Goodwin, Diagrams and Explanation in Organic Chemistry.score: 12.0
    Organic chemists have been able to develop a robust, theoretical understanding of the phenomena they study; however, the primary theoretical devices employed in this field are not mathematical equations or laws, as is the case in most other physical sciences. Instead it is the diagram, and in particular the structural formula, that carries the explanatory weight in the discipline. To understand how this is so, it is necessary to investigate both the nature of the diagrams employed in organic chemistry (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John Mumma & Marco Panza (2012). Diagrams in Mathematics: History and Philosophy. Synthese 186 (1):1-5.score: 12.0
    Diagrams are ubiquitous in mathematics. From the most elementary class to the most advanced seminar, in both introductory textbooks and professional journals, diagrams are present, to introduce concepts, increase understanding, and prove results. They thus fulfill a variety of important roles in mathematical practice. Long overlooked by philosophers focused on foundational and ontological issues, these roles have come to receive attention in the past two decades, a trend in line with the growing philosophical interest in actual mathematical practice.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Rachel A. Ankeny (2000). Fashioning Descriptive Models in Biology: Of Worms and Wiring Diagrams. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):272.score: 12.0
    The biological sciences have become increasingly reliant on so-called 'model organisms'. I argue that in this domain, the concept of a descriptive model is essential for understanding scientific practice. Using a case study, I show how such a model was formulated in a preexplanatory context for subsequent use as a prototype from which explanations ultimately may be generated both within the immediate domain of the original model and in additional, related domains. To develop this concept of a descriptive model, I (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Eric Hammer & Norman Danner (1996). Towards a Model Theory of Diagrams. Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (5):463 - 482.score: 12.0
    A logical system is studied whose well-formed representations consist of diagrams rather than formulas. The system, due to Shin [2, 3], is shown to be complete by an argument concerning maximally consistent sets of diagrams. The argument is complicated by the lack of a straight forward counterpart of atomic formulas for diagrams, and by the lack of a counterpart of negation for most diagrams.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Letitia Meynell (2008). Why Feynman Diagrams Represent. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):39 – 59.score: 12.0
    There are two distinct interpretations of the role that Feynman diagrams play in physics: (i) they are calculational devices, a type of notation designed to keep track of complicated mathematical expressions; and (ii) they are representational devices, a type of picture. I argue that Feynman diagrams not only have a calculational function but also represent: they are in some sense pictures. I defend my view through addressing two objections and in so doing I offer an account of representation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Sun-Joo Shin (1994). Peirce and the Logical Status of Diagrams. History and Philosophy of Logic 15 (1):45-68.score: 12.0
    In this paper, I aim to identify Peirce?s great contribution to logical diagrams and its limit.Peirce is the first person who believed that the same logical status can be given to diagrams as to symbolic systems.Even though this belief led him to invent his own graphical system, Existential Graphs, the success or failure of this system does not determine the value of Peirce?s general insights about logical diagrams.In order to make this point clear, I will show that (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Ivahn Smadja (2012). Local Axioms in Disguise: Hilbert on Minkowski Diagrams. Synthese 186 (1):315-370.score: 12.0
    While claiming that diagrams can only be admitted as a method of strict proof if the underlying axioms are precisely known and explicitly spelled out, Hilbert praised Minkowski’s Geometry of Numbers and his diagram-based reasoning as a specimen of an arithmetical theory operating “rigorously” with geometrical concepts and signs. In this connection, in the first phase of his foundational views on the axiomatic method, Hilbert also held that diagrams are to be thought of as “drawn formulas”, and formulas (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. D. B. Gowin (2005). The Art of Educating with V Diagrams. Cambridge University Press.score: 12.0
    This book focuses on the mind and its ability to seek answers to unknown or unanswered questions. The theory of educating provides the grounding for using V diagrams by students, educators, researchers, and parents. Teachers make lesson plans using V diagrams and concept maps. They become expert coaches in guiding student performances. Students learn to construct their own knowledge. They change from question-answerers to question-askers. Parents share meaning with their children and their children's teachers and administrators. Administrators monitor (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. P. N. Johnson-Laird (2002). Peirce, Logic Diagrams, and the Elementary Operations of Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning 8 (1):69 – 95.score: 12.0
    This paper describes Peirce's systems of logic diagrams, focusing on the so-called ''existential'' graphs, which are equivalent to the first-order predicate calculus. It analyses their implications for the nature of mental representations, particularly mental models with which they have many characteristics in common. The graphs are intended to be iconic, i.e., to have a structure analogous to the structure of what they represent. They have emergent logical consequences and a single graph can capture all the different ways in which (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Nicholaos Jones & Olaf Wolkenhauer (2012). Diagrams as Locality Aids for Explanation and Model Construction in Cell Biology. Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):705-721.score: 12.0
    Using as case studies two early diagrams that represent mechanisms of the cell division cycle, we aim to extend prior philosophical analyses of the roles of diagrams in scientific reasoning, and specifically their role in biological reasoning. The diagrams we discuss are, in practice, integral and indispensible elements of reasoning from experimental data about the cell division cycle to mathematical models of the cycle’s molecular mechanisms. In accordance with prior analyses, the diagrams provide functional explanations of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Scott F. Gilbert (1991). Epigenetic Landscaping: Waddington's Use of Cell Fate Bifurcation Diagrams. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):135-154.score: 12.0
    From the 1930s through the 1970s, C. H. Waddington attempted to reunite genetics, embryology, and evolution. One of the means to effect this synthesis was his model of the epigenetic landscape. This image originally recast genetic data in terms of embryological diagrams and was used to show the identity of genes and inducers and to suggest the similarities between embryological and genetic approaches to development. Later, the image became more complex and integrated gene activity and mutations. These revised epigenetic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Clark Glymour, Using Path Diagrams as a Structural Equation Modelling Tool.score: 12.0
    Linear structural equation models (SEMs) are widely used in sociology, econometrics, biology, and other sciences. A SEM (without free parameters) has two parts: a probability distribution (in the Normal case specified by a set of linear structural equations and a covariance matrix among the “error” or “disturbance” terms), and an associated path diagram corresponding to the causal relations among variables specified by the structural equations and the correlations among the error terms. It is often thought that the path diagram is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Benjamin Sheredos, Daniel Burnston, Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel (2014). Why Do Biologists Use So Many Diagrams? Philosophy of Science 80 (5):931-944.score: 12.0
    Diagrams have distinctive characteristics that make them an effective medium for communicating research findings, but they are even more impressive as tools for scientific reasoning. To explore this role, we examine diagrammatic formats that have been devised by biologists to (a) identify and illuminate phenomena involving circadian rhythms and (b) develop and modify mechanistic explanations of these phenomena.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Laurie Brown (2012). Feynman Diagrams: Conceptual Tools for Theoretical Physicists. [REVIEW] Metascience 21 (1):147-150.score: 12.0
    Feynman diagrams: conceptual tools for theoretical physicists Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9580-y Authors Laurie M. Brown, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60201, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Peter Spirtes, Thomas Richardson, Chris Meek & Richard Scheines, Using Path Diagrams as a Structural Equation Modelling Tool.score: 12.0
    Linear structural equation models (SEMs) are widely used in sociology, econometrics, biology, and other sciences. A SEM (without free parameters) has two parts: a probability distribution (in the Normal case specified by a set of linear structural equations and a covariance matrix among the “error” or “disturbance” terms), and an associated path diagram corresponding to the functional composition of variables specified by the structural equations and the correlations among the error terms. It is often thought that the path diagram is (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Mario Savio (1998). AE (Aristotle-Euler) Diagrams: An Alternative Complete Method for the Categorical Syllogism. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 39 (4):581-599.score: 12.0
    Mario Savio is widely known as the first spokesman for the Free Speech Movement. Having spent the summer of 1964 as a civil rights worker in segregationist Mississippi, Savio returned to the University of California at a time when students throughout the country were beginning to mobilize in support of racial justice and against the deepening American involvement in Vietnam. His moral clairty, his eloquence, and his democratic style of leadership inspired thousands of fellow Berkeley students to protest university regulations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Silvia De Toffoli & Valeria Giardino (2013). Forms and Roles of Diagrams in Knot Theory. Erkenntnis:1-14.score: 12.0
    The aim of this article is to explain why knot diagrams are an effective notation in topology. Their cognitive features and epistemic roles will be assessed. First, it will be argued that different interpretations of a figure give rise to different diagrams and as a consequence various levels of representation for knots will be identified. Second, it will be shown that knot diagrams are dynamic by pointing at the moves which are commonly applied to them. For this (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Iulian D. Toader (2004). On Frege's Logical Diagrams. In A. Blackwell, K. Marriott & A. Shimojima (eds.), Diagrammatic Representation and Inference. Springer. 22--25.score: 12.0
    The paper shows that a particular point raised by Schröder – that Frege's conceptual notation fails to be modelled on the formula language of arithmetic – is based on a misunderstanding. After pointing out what seems to be the most advantageous aspect of Frege's diagrams, it gives a serious reason for their eventual cast-off.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Maralee Harrell, Using Argument Diagrams to Improve Critical Thinking Skills in 80-100 What Philosophy Is.score: 12.0
    After determining one set of skills that we hoped our students were learning in the introductory philosophy class at Carnegie Mellon University, we designed an experiment, performed twice over the course of two semesters, to test whether they were actually learning these skills. In addition, there were four different lectures of this course in the Spring of 2004, and five in the Fall of 2004; and the students of Lecturer I (in both semesters) were taught the material using argument (...) as a tool to aid understanding and critical evaluation, while the other students were taught using more traditional methods. We were interested in whether this tool would help the students develop the skills we hoped they would master in this course. In each lecture, the students were given a pre-test at the beginning of the semester, and a structurally identical post-test at the end. We determined that the students did develop the skills in which we were interested over the course of the semester. We also determined that the students who were able to construct argument diagrams gained significantly more than the other students. We conclude that learning how to construct argument diagrams improves a student's ability to analyze, comprehend, and evaluate arguments. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Andrew Arana (2005). Possible M-Diagrams of Models of Arithmetic. In Stephen Simpson (ed.), Reverse Mathematics 2001.score: 12.0
    In this paper I begin by extending two results of Solovay; the first characterizes the possible Turing degrees of models of True Arithmetic (TA), the complete first-order theory of the standard model of PA, while the second characterizes the possible Turing degrees of arbitrary completions of P. I extend these two results to characterize the possible Turing degrees of m-diagrams of models of TA and of arbitrary complete extensions of PA. I next give a construction showing that the conditions (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Adrian Wuthrich (2012). Interpreting Feynman Diagrams as Visualized Models. Spontaneous Generations 6 (1):172-181.score: 12.0
    I give a brief introduction to how Feynman diagrams are used. I review arguments to the effect that they are only used as calculation tools and should not be interpreted as representations of physical processes. Against these arguments, I propose to regard Feynman diagrams as visual models that explain, in some respects, how elementary particles interact.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Giovanna Corsi (1999). Bull's Theorem by the Method of Diagrams. Studia Logica 62 (2):163-176.score: 12.0
    We show how to use diagrams in order to obtain straightforward completeness theorems for extensions of K4.3 and a very simple and constructive proof of Bull's theorem: every normal extension of S4.3 has the finite model property.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Elie During (2012). On the Intrinsically Ambiguous Nature of Space-Time Diagrams. Spontaneous Generations 6 (1):160-171.score: 12.0
    When the German mathematician Hermann Minkowski first introduced the space-time diagrams that came to be associated with his name, the idea of picturing motion by geometric means, holding time as a fourth dimension of space, was hardly new. But the pictorial device invented by Minkowski was tailor-made for a peculiar variety of space-time: the one imposed by the kinematics of Einstein’s special theory of relativity, with its unified, non-Euclidean underlying geometric structure. By plo tting two or more reference frames (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Nicholaos Jones (forthcoming). Bowtie Structures, Pathway Diagrams, and Topological Explanation. Erkenntnis:1-21.score: 12.0
    While mechanistic explanation and, to a lesser extent, nomological explanation are well-explored topics in the philosophy of biology, topological explanation is not. Nor is the role of diagrams in topological explanations. These explanations do not appeal to the operation of mechanisms or laws, and extant accounts of the role of diagrams in biological science explain neither why scientists might prefer diagrammatic representations of topological information to sentential equivalents nor how such representations might facilitate important processes of explanatory reasoning (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000