Search results for 'diagrams' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  77
    Solomon Feferman (2012). And so On...: Reasoning with Infinite Diagrams. Synthese 186 (1):371 - 386.
    This paper presents examples of infinite diagrams (as well as infinite limits of finite diagrams) whose use is more or less essential for understanding and accepting various proofs in higher mathematics. The significance of these is discussed with respect to the thesis that every proof can be formalized, and a "pre" form of this thesis that every proof can be presented in everyday statements-only form.
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  2. Gerard Allwein & Jon Barwise (eds.) (1996). Logical Reasoning with Diagrams. Oxford University Press.
    One effect of information technology is the increasing need to present information visually. The trend raises intriguing questions. What is the logical status of reasoning that employs visualization? What are the cognitive advantages and pitfalls of this reasoning? What kinds of tools can be developed to aid in the use of visual representation? This newest volume on the Studies in Logic and Computation series addresses the logical aspects of the visualization of information. The authors of these specially commissioned papers explore (...)
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  3.  31
    Ryo Takemura (2013). Proof Theory for Reasoning with Euler Diagrams: A Logic Translation and Normalization. Studia Logica 101 (1):157-191.
    Proof-theoretical notions and techniques, developed on the basis of sentential/symbolic representations of formal proofs, are applied to Euler diagrams. A translation of an Euler diagrammatic system into a natural deduction system is given, and the soundness and faithfulness of the translation are proved. Some consequences of the translation are discussed in view of the notion of free ride, which is mainly discussed in the literature of cognitive science as an account of inferential efficacy of diagrams. The translation enables (...)
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  4.  74
    Thomas Mormann, Squares of Oppositions, Commutative Diagrams, and Galois Connections for Topological Spaces and Similarity Structures.
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate the relationship between Aristotelian conceptual oppositions, commutative diagrams of relational structures, and Galois connections.This is done by investigating in detail some examples of Aristotelian conceptual oppositions arising from topological spaces and similarity structures. The main technical device for this endeavor is the notion of Galois connections of order structures.
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  5.  39
    Lorenzo Magnani & Riccardo Dossena (2005). Perceiving the Infinite and the Infinitesimal World: Unveiling and Optical Diagrams in Mathematics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 10 (1):7-23.
    Many important concepts of the calculus are difficult to grasp, and they may appear epistemologically unjustified. For example, how does a real function appear in “small” neighborhoods of its points? How does it appear at infinity? Diagrams allow us to overcome the difficulty in constructing representations of mathematical critical situations and objects. For example, they actually reveal the behavior of a real function not “close to” a point (as in the standard limit theory) but “in” the point. We are (...)
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  6.  98
    Peter C.-H. Cheng (2011). Probably Good Diagrams for Learning: Representational Epistemic Recodification of Probability Theory. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):475-498.
    The representational epistemic approach to the design of visual displays and notation systems advocates encoding the fundamental conceptual structure of a knowledge domain directly in the structure of a representational system. It is claimed that representations so designed will benefit from greater semantic transparency, which enhances comprehension and ease of learning, and plastic generativity, which makes the meaningful manipulation of the representation easier and less error prone. Epistemic principles for encoding fundamental conceptual structures directly in representational schemes are described. The (...)
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  7.  99
    Marco Panza (2012). The Twofold Role of Diagrams in Euclid's Plane Geometry. Synthese 186 (1):55-102.
    Proposition I.1 is, by far, the most popular example used to justify the thesis that many of Euclid’s geometric arguments are diagram-based. Many scholars have recently articulated this thesis in different ways and argued for it. My purpose is to reformulate it in a quite general way, by describing what I take to be the twofold role that diagrams play in Euclid’s plane geometry (EPG). Euclid’s arguments are object-dependent. They are about geometric objects. Hence, they cannot be diagram-based unless (...)
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  8.  64
    Michael Lynch (1991). Science in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Moral and Epistemic Relations Between Diagrams and Photographs. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):205-226.
    Sociologists, philosophers and historians of science are gradually recognizing the importance of visual representation. This is part of a more general movement away from a theory-centric view of science and towards an interest in practical aspects of observation and experimentation. Rather than treating science as a matter of demonstrating the logical connection between theoretical and empirical statements, an increasing number of investigations are examining how scientists compose and use diagrams, graphs, photographs, micrographs, maps, charts, and related visual displays. This (...)
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  9.  18
    James R. Griesemer (1991). Must Scientific Diagrams Be Eliminable? The Case of Path Analysis. Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):155-180.
    Scientists use a variety of modes of representation in their work, but philosophers have studied mainly sentences expressing propositions. I ask whether diagrams are mere conveniences in expressing propositions or whether they are a distinct, ineliminable mode of representation in scientific texts. The case of path analysis, a statistical method for quantitatively assessing the relative degree of causal determination of variation as expressed in a causal path diagram, is discussed. Path analysis presents a worst case for arguments against eliminability (...)
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  10.  62
    Brice Halimi (2012). Diagrams as Sketches. Synthese 186 (1):387-409.
    This article puts forward the notion of “evolving diagram” as an important case of mathematical diagram. An evolving diagram combines, through a dynamic graphical enrichment, the representation of an object and the representation of a piece of reasoning based on the representation of that object. Evolving diagrams can be illustrated in particular with category-theoretic diagrams (hereafter “diagrams*”) in the context of “sketch theory,” a branch of modern category theory. It is argued that sketch theory provides a diagrammatic* (...)
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  11.  7
    Yuri Sato & Koji Mineshima (2015). How Diagrams Can Support Syllogistic Reasoning: An Experimental Study. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 24 (4):409-455.
    This paper explores the question of what makes diagrammatic representations effective for human logical reasoning, focusing on how Euler diagrams support syllogistic reasoning. It is widely held that diagrammatic representations aid intuitive understanding of logical reasoning. In the psychological literature, however, it is still controversial whether and how Euler diagrams can aid untrained people to successfully conduct logical reasoning such as set-theoretic and syllogistic reasoning. To challenge the negative view, we build on the findings of modern diagrammatic logic (...)
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  12.  10
    Francisco Franchetti & William H. Sandholm (2013). An Introduction to Dynamo: Diagrams for Evolutionary Game Dynamics. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 8 (2):167-178.
    Dynamo: Diagrams for Evolutionary Game Dynamics is free, open-source software used to create phase diagrams and other images related to dynamical systems from evolutionary game theory. We describe how to use the software’s default settings to generate phase diagrams quickly and easily. We then explain how to take advantage of the software’s intermediate and advanced features to create diagrams that highlight the key properties of the dynamical system under study. Sample code and output are provided to (...)
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  13.  21
    Gregg De Young (2012). Mathematical Diagrams From Manuscript to Print: Examples From the Arabic Euclidean Transmission. Synthese 186 (1):21-54.
    In this paper, I explore general features of the “architecture” (relations of white space, diagram, and text on the page) of medieval manuscripts and early printed editions of Euclidean geometry. My focus is primarily on diagrams in the Arabic transmission, although I use some examples from both Byzantine Greek and medieval Latin manuscripts as a foil to throw light on distinctive features of the Arabic transmission. My investigations suggest that the “architecture” often takes shape against the backdrop of an (...)
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  14.  19
    Ari Gross (2012). Pictures and Pedagogy: The Role of Diagrams in Feynman's Early Lectures. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 43 (3):184-194.
    This paper aims to give a substantive account of how Feynman used diagrams in the first lectures in which he explained his new approach to quantum electrodynamics. By critically examining unpublished lecture notes, Feynman’s use and interpretation of both "Feynman diagrams" and other visual representations will be illuminated. This paper discusses how the morphology of Feynman’s early diagrams were determined by both highly contextual issues, which molded his images to local needs and particular physical characterizations, and an (...)
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  15.  6
    Ryo Takemura (2015). Counter-Example Construction with Euler Diagrams. Studia Logica 103 (4):669-696.
    One of the traditional applications of Euler diagrams is as a representation or counterpart of the usual set-theoretical models of given sentences. However, Euler diagrams have recently been investigated as the counterparts of logical formulas, which constitute formal proofs. Euler diagrams are rigorously defined as syntactic objects, and their inference systems, which are equivalent to some symbolic logical systems, are formalized. Based on this observation, we investigate both counter-model construction and proof-construction in the framework of Euler (...). We introduce the notion of “counter-diagrammatic proof”, which shows the invalidity of a given inference, and which is defined as a syntactic manipulation of diagrams of the same sort as inference rules to construct proofs. Thus, in our Euler diagrammatic framework, the completeness theorem can be formalized in terms of the existence of a diagrammatic proof or a counter-diagrammatic proof. (shrink)
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  16.  15
    Kathi Fisler (1999). Timing Diagrams: Formalization and Algorithmic Verification. [REVIEW] Journal of Logic, Language and Information 8 (3):323-361.
    Timing diagrams are popular in hardware design. They have been formalized for use in reasoning tasks, such as computer-aided verification. These efforts have largely treated timing diagrams as interfaces to established notations for which verification is decidable; this has restricted timing diagrams to expressing only regular language properties. This paper presents a timing diagram logic capable of expressing certain context-free and context-sensitive properties. It shows that verification is decidable for properties expressible in this logic. More specifically, it (...)
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  17.  1
    Renata de Freitas & Petrucio Viana (2015). Set Venn Diagrams Applied to Inclusions and Non-Inclusions. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 24 (4):457-485.
    In this work, formulas are inclusions \ and non-inclusions \ between Boolean terms \ and \. We present a set of rules through which one can transform a term t in a diagram \ and, consequently, each inclusion \ ) in an inclusion \ ) between diagrams. Also, by applying the rules just to the diagrams we are able to solve the problem of verifying if a formula \ is consequence of a, possibly empty, set \ of formulas (...)
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  18.  1
    François Schwarzentruber (2015). Drawing Interactive Euler Diagrams From Region Connection Calculus Specifications. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 24 (4):375-408.
    This paper describes methods for generating interactive Euler diagrams. User interaction is needed to improve the aesthetic quality of the drawing without writing tedious formal specifications. More precisely, the user can modify the diagram’s layout on the fly by mouse control. We prove that the satisfiability problem is in \ and we provide two syntactic fragments such that the corresponding restricted satisfiability problem is already \-hard. We describe an improved local search based approach, a method inspired from the gradient (...)
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  19. David Barker-Plummer, David I. Beaver, Johan van Benthem & Patrick Scotto di Luzio (eds.) (2002). Words, Proofs and Diagrams. Center for the Study of Language and Inf.
    The past twenty years have witnessed extensive collaborative research between computer scientists, logicians, linguists, philosophers, and psychologists. These interdisciplinary studies stem from the realization that researchers drawn from all fields are studying the same problem. Specifically, a common concern amongst researchers today is how logic sheds light on the nature of information. Ancient questions concerning how humans communicate, reason and decide, and modern questions about how computers should communicate, reason and decide are of prime interest to researchers in various disciplines. (...)
     
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  20.  11
    Sun-Joo Shin & Giovanna Corsi (1997). The Logical Status of Diagrams. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):290-291.
  21.  3
    Martin Gardner (1982). Logic Machines and Diagrams. University of Chicago Press.
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  22.  6
    Julie Heiser & Barbara Tversky (2006). Arrows in Comprehending and Producing Mechanical Diagrams. Cognitive Science 30 (3):581-592.
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  23.  4
    Peter C.‐H. Cheng (2002). Electrifying Diagrams for Learning: Principles for Complex Representational Systems. Cognitive Science 26 (6):685-736.
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  24. Mark Greaves (2001). The Philosophical Status of Diagrams. Center for the Study of Language and Inf.
    This dissertation explores the reasons why structured graphics have been largely ignored in the representation and reasoning components of contemporary theories of axiomatic systems. In particular, it demonstrates that for the case of modern logic and geometry, there are systematic forces in the intellectual history of these disciplines which have driven the adoption of sentential representational styles over diagrammatic ones. These forces include: the changing views of the role of intuition in the procedures and formalisms of formal proof; the historical (...)
     
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  25.  6
    Eyal Shahar & Doron J. Shahar (2012). Causal Diagrams and Change Variables. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (1):143-148.
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  26.  9
    Chris Reed & Glenn Rowe (2005). Translating Toulmin Diagrams: Theory Neutrality in Argument Representation. Argumentation 19 (3):267-286.
    The Toulmin diagram layout is very familiar and widely used, particularly in the teaching of critical thinking skills. The conventional box-and-arrow diagram is equally familiar and widespread. Translation between the two throws up a number of interesting challenges. Some of these challenges represent slightly different ways of looking at old and deep theoretical questions. Others are diagrammatic versions of questions that have already been addressed in artificial intelligence models of argument. But there are further questions that are posed as a (...)
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  27.  9
    Frederik Stjernfelt & Ahti-Veikko Pietarinen (2015). Peirce and Diagrams: Two Contributors to an Actual Discussion Review Each Other. Synthese 192 (4):1073-1088.
    The following two review papers have a common origin. Pietarinen’s book Signs of Logic and Stjernfelt’s book Diagrammatology were both published in the same Synthese Library Series being published by Springer. The two books also share the common topic of diagrammatic reasoning in Charles Peirce’s work. Beginning in a conference Applying Peirce held in Helsinki in conjunction with the World Congress of Semiotics in June 2007, two authors have commented upon these books under the headline of Synthese Library Book Session (...)
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  28.  14
    Renée Raphael (2013). Teaching Through Diagrams. Early Science and Medicine 18 (1-2):201-230.
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  29. Martin Gardner (1958). Logic Machines, Diagrams and Boolean Algebra. New York, Dover Publications.
     
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  30.  2
    Eyal Shahar (2013). Causal Diagrams, Gastroesophageal Reflux and Erosive Oesophagitis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 19 (5):976-983.
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  31.  71
    David Sherry (2009). The Role of Diagrams in Mathematical Arguments. Foundations of Science 14 (1-2):59-74.
    Recent accounts of the role of diagrams in mathematical reasoning take a Platonic line, according to which the proof depends on the similarity between the perceived shape of the diagram and the shape of the abstract object. This approach is unable to explain proofs which share the same diagram in spite of drawing conclusions about different figures. Saccheri’s use of the bi-rectangular isosceles quadrilateral in Euclides Vindicatus provides three such proofs. By forsaking abstract objects it is possible to give (...)
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  32.  52
    Nicholaos Jones (2014). Bowtie Structures, Pathway Diagrams, and Topological Explanation. Erkenntnis 79 (5):1135-1155.
    While mechanistic explanation and, to a lesser extent, nomological explanation are well-explored topics in the philosophy of biology, topological explanation is not. Nor is the role of diagrams in topological explanations. These explanations do not appeal to the operation of mechanisms or laws, and extant accounts of the role of diagrams in biological science explain neither why scientists might prefer diagrammatic representations of topological information to sentential equivalents nor how such representations might facilitate important processes of explanatory reasoning (...)
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  33. Laura Perini (2005). Explanation in Two Dimensions: Diagrams and Biological Explanation. Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):257-269.
    Molecular biologists and biochemists often use diagrams to present hypotheses. Analysis of diagrams shows that their content can be expressed with linguistic representations. Why do biologists use visual representations instead? One reason is simple comprehensibility: some diagrams present information which is readily understood from the diagram format, but which would not be comprehensible if the same information was expressed linguistically. But often diagrams are used even when concise, comprehensible linguistic alternatives are available. I explain this phenomenon (...)
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  34.  49
    Benjamin Sheredos, Daniel Burnston, Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel (2013). Why Do Biologists Use So Many Diagrams? Philosophy of Science 80 (5):931-944.
    Diagrams have distinctive characteristics that make them an effective medium for communicating research findings, but they are even more impressive as tools for scientific reasoning. Focusing on circadian rhythm research in biology to explore these roles, we examine diagrammatic formats that have been devised to identify and illuminate circadian phenomena and to develop and modify mechanistic explanations of these phenomena.
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  35.  85
    Nicholaos Jones & Olaf Wolkenhauer (2012). Diagrams as Locality Aids for Explanation and Model Construction in Cell Biology. Biology and Philosophy 27 (5):705-721.
    Using as case studies two early diagrams that represent mechanisms of the cell division cycle, we aim to extend prior philosophical analyses of the roles of diagrams in scientific reasoning, and specifically their role in biological reasoning. The diagrams we discuss are, in practice, integral and indispensible elements of reasoning from experimental data about the cell division cycle to mathematical models of the cycle’s molecular mechanisms. In accordance with prior analyses, the diagrams provide functional explanations of (...)
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  36.  54
    Rachel A. Ankeny (2000). Fashioning Descriptive Models in Biology: Of Worms and Wiring Diagrams. Philosophy of Science 67 (3):272.
    The biological sciences have become increasingly reliant on so-called 'model organisms'. I argue that in this domain, the concept of a descriptive model is essential for understanding scientific practice. Using a case study, I show how such a model was formulated in a preexplanatory context for subsequent use as a prototype from which explanations ultimately may be generated both within the immediate domain of the original model and in additional, related domains. To develop this concept of a descriptive model, I (...)
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  37.  90
    John Mumma & Marco Panza (2012). Diagrams in Mathematics: History and Philosophy. Synthese 186 (1):1-5.
    Diagrams are ubiquitous in mathematics. From the most elementary class to the most advanced seminar, in both introductory textbooks and professional journals, diagrams are present, to introduce concepts, increase understanding, and prove results. They thus fulfill a variety of important roles in mathematical practice. Long overlooked by philosophers focused on foundational and ontological issues, these roles have come to receive attention in the past two decades, a trend in line with the growing philosophical interest in actual mathematical practice.
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  38. Nathaniel Miller (2007). Euclid and His Twentieth Century Rivals: Diagrams in the Logic of Euclidean Geometry. Center for the Study of Language and Inf.
    Twentieth-century developments in logic and mathematics have led many people to view Euclid’s proofs as inherently informal, especially due to the use of diagrams in proofs. In _Euclid and His Twentieth-Century Rivals_, Nathaniel Miller discusses the history of diagrams in Euclidean Geometry, develops a formal system for working with them, and concludes that they can indeed be used rigorously. Miller also introduces a diagrammatic computer proof system, based on this formal system. This volume will be of interest to (...)
     
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  39.  31
    Letitia Meynell (2008). Why Feynman Diagrams Represent. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):39 – 59.
    There are two distinct interpretations of the role that Feynman diagrams play in physics: (i) they are calculational devices, a type of notation designed to keep track of complicated mathematical expressions; and (ii) they are representational devices, a type of picture. I argue that Feynman diagrams not only have a calculational function but also represent: they are in some sense pictures. I defend my view through addressing two objections and in so doing I offer an account of representation (...)
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  40.  19
    Marc Champagne (2016). Diagrams of the Past: How Timelines Can Aid the Growth of Historical Knowledge. Cognitive Semiotics 9 (1):11-44.
    Historians occasionally use timelines, but many seem to regard such signs merely as ways of visually summarizing results that are presumably better expressed in prose. Challenging this language-centered view, I suggest that timelines might assist the generation of novel historical insights. To show this, I begin by looking at studies confirming the cognitive benefits of diagrams like timelines. I then try to survey the remarkable diversity of timelines by analyzing actual examples. Finally, having conveyed this (mostly untapped) potential, I (...)
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  41.  24
    Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel (2015). Diagrams as Tools for Scientific Reasoning. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 6 (1):117-131.
    We contend that diagrams are tools not only for communication but also for supporting the reasoning of biologists. In the mechanistic research that is characteristic of biology, diagrams delineate the phenomenon to be explained, display explanatory relations, and show the organized parts and operations of the mechanism proposed as responsible for the phenomenon. Both phenomenon diagrams and explanatory relations diagrams, employing graphs or other formats, facilitate applying visual processing to the detection of relevant patterns. Mechanism (...) guide reasoning about how the parts and operations work together to produce the phenomenon and what experiments need to be done to improve on the existing account. We examine how these functions are served by diagrams in circadian rhythm research. (shrink)
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  42.  59
    Jessica Carter (2010). Diagrams and Proofs in Analysis. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (1):1 – 14.
    This article discusses the role of diagrams in mathematical reasoning in the light of a case study in analysis. In the example presented certain combinatorial expressions were first found by using diagrams. In the published proofs the pictures were replaced by reasoning about permutation groups. This article argues that, even though the diagrams are not present in the published papers, they still play a role in the formulation of the proofs. It is shown that they play a (...)
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  43.  43
    Ivahn Smadja (2012). Local Axioms in Disguise: Hilbert on Minkowski Diagrams. Synthese 186 (1):315-370.
    While claiming that diagrams can only be admitted as a method of strict proof if the underlying axioms are precisely known and explicitly spelled out, Hilbert praised Minkowski’s Geometry of Numbers and his diagram-based reasoning as a specimen of an arithmetical theory operating “rigorously” with geometrical concepts and signs. In this connection, in the first phase of his foundational views on the axiomatic method, Hilbert also held that diagrams are to be thought of as “drawn formulas”, and formulas (...)
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  44.  11
    Benjamin Sheredos & William Bechtel, Imagining Mechanisms with Diagrams.
    Some proponents of mechanistic explanation downplay the significant of how-possibly explanations. We argue that developing accounts of mechanisms that could explain a phenomenon is an important aspect of scientific reasoning, one that involves imagination. Although appeals to imagination may seem to obscure the process of reasoning, we illustrate how, by examining diagrams we can gain insights into the construction of mechanistic explanations.
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  45.  10
    Raphael Scholl, Spot the Difference: Causal Contrasts in Scientific Diagrams.
    An important function of scientific diagrams is to identify causal relationships. This commonly relies on contrasts that highlight the effects of specific difference-makers. However, causal contrast diagrams are not an obvious and easy to recognize category because they appear in many guises. In this paper, four case studies are presented to examine how causal contrast diagrams appear in a wide range of scientific reports, from experimental to observational and even purely theoretical studies. It is shown that causal (...)
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  46.  22
    Balakrishnan Chandrasekaran (2011). When is a Bunch of Marks on Paper a Diagram? Diagrams as Homomorphic Representations. Semiotica 2011 (186):69-87.
    That diagrams are analog, i.e., homomorphic, representations of some kind, and sentential representations are not, is a generally held intuition. In this paper, we develop a formal framework in which the claim can be stated and examined, and certain puzzles resolved. We start by asking how physical things can represent information in some target domain. We lay a basis for investigating possible homomorphisms by modeling both the physical medium and the target domain as sets of variables, each with a (...)
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  47.  69
    Barry Smith (2013). Diagrams, Documents, and the Meshing of Plans. In Andras Benedek & Kristof Nyiri (eds.), How To Do Things With Pictures: Skill, Practice, Performance. Peter Lang Edition
    There are two important ways in which, when dealing with documents, we go beyond the boundaries of linear text. First, by incorporating diagrams into documents, and second, by creating complexes of intermeshed documents which may be extended in space and evolve and grow through time. The thesis of this paper is that such aggregations of documents are today indispensable to practically all complex human achievements from law and finance to orchestral performance and organized warfare. Documents provide for what we (...)
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  48.  45
    Eric Hammer & Norman Danner (1996). Towards a Model Theory of Diagrams. Journal of Philosophical Logic 25 (5):463 - 482.
    A logical system is studied whose well-formed representations consist of diagrams rather than formulas. The system, due to Shin [2, 3], is shown to be complete by an argument concerning maximally consistent sets of diagrams. The argument is complicated by the lack of a straight forward counterpart of atomic formulas for diagrams, and by the lack of a counterpart of negation for most diagrams.
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  49.  32
    Scott F. Gilbert (1991). Epigenetic Landscaping: Waddington's Use of Cell Fate Bifurcation Diagrams. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):135-154.
    From the 1930s through the 1970s, C. H. Waddington attempted to reunite genetics, embryology, and evolution. One of the means to effect this synthesis was his model of the epigenetic landscape. This image originally recast genetic data in terms of embryological diagrams and was used to show the identity of genes and inducers and to suggest the similarities between embryological and genetic approaches to development. Later, the image became more complex and integrated gene activity and mutations. These revised epigenetic (...)
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  50.  50
    Michelle M. Fleig-Palmer, Kay A. Hodge & Janet L. Lear (2012). Teaching Ethical Reasoning Using Venn Diagrams. Journal of Business Ethics Education 9:325-342.
    Concern about high-profile ethical lapses by business managers has led to an increasing emphasis on ethics instruction in business schools. Various pedagogical methods are used to expose business students to real-world ethical dilemmas, yet students may not readily grasp the linkages between ethical theories and dilemmas to identify possible ethical solutions. Venn diagrams are a valuable instructional tool in business ethics classes when used with other teaching methodologies such as case studies. We describe how the use of Venn (...) assists students in visualizing the key points of and the connections between ethical theories and dilemmas to shed light on possible ethical solutions. Examples of teaching exercises are provided along with ideas for future research in the use of Venn diagrams in activating moral imagination and improving ethical reasoning. Overall, positive student reactions to the introduction of Venn diagrams in business ethics classrooms support the use of this methodology. (shrink)
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