Search results for 'disability' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Legislating Disability (2005). Fiona Kumari Campbell. In Shelley Tremain (ed.), Foucault and the Government of Disability. University of Michigan Press 108.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  9
    Melinda Hall (2016). Horrible Heroes: Liberating Alternative Visions of Disability in Horror. The Disability Studies Quarterly 36 (1).
    Understanding disability requires understanding its social construction, and social construction can be read in cultural products. In this essay, I look to one major locus for images of persons with disabilities—horror. Horror films and fiction use disability imagery to create and augment horror. I first situate my understanding of disability imagery in the horror genre using a case study read through the work of Julia Kristeva. But, I go on to argue that trademark moves in the horror (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Shelley Tremain (2005). Foucault, Governmentality, and Critical Disability Theory: An Introduction. In Foucault and the Government of Disability. University of Michigan Press 1--24.
  4.  16
    David Shoemaker (2010). Responsibility, Agency, and Cognitive Disability. In Eva Feder Kittay & Licia Carlson (eds.), Cognitive Disability and its Challenge to Moral Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell 201--223.
    This is a reprint of the paper "Responsibility and Disability," first published in Metaphilosophy in 2009. It articulates some similarities and differences between psychopaths and individuals with mild intellectual disabilities that have important implications for both types of agents' moral and criminal responsibility.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  21
    Susan Wendell (1996). The Rejected Body: Feminist Philosophical Reflections on Disability. Routledge.
    The Rejected Body argues that feminist theorizing has been skewed toward non-disabled experience, and that the knowledge of people with disabilities must be integrated into feminist ethics, discussions of bodily life, and criticism of the cognitive and social authority of medicine. Among the topics it addresses are who should be identified as disabled; whether disability is biomedical, social or both; what causes disability and what could 'cure' it; and whether scientific efforts to eliminate disabling physical conditions are morally (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   59 citations  
  6.  39
    Vuko Andrić & Joachim Wündisch (2015). Is It Bad to Be Disabled? Adjudicating Between the Mere-Difference and the Bad-Difference Views of Disability. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (3):1–16.
    This paper examines the impact of disability on wellbeing and presents arguments against the mere-difference view of disability. According to the mere-difference view, disability does not by itself make disabled people worse off on balance. Rather, if disability has a negative impact on wellbeing overall, this is only so because society is not treating disabled people the way it ought to treat them. In objection to the mere-difference view, it has been argued, roughly, that the view (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  52
    Shelley Tremain (2016). Dialogues on Disability. The Philosophers' Magazine 72 (1).
  8.  35
    Shelley Tremain (2015). This is What a Historicist and Relativist Feminist Philosophy of Disability Looks Like. Foucault Studies (19).
    ABSTRACT: With this article, I advance a historicist and relativist feminist philosophy of disability. I argue that Foucault’s insights offer the most astute tools with which to engage in this intellectual enterprise. Genealogy, the technique of investigation that Friedrich Nietzsche famously introduced and that Foucault took up and adapted in his own work, demonstrates that Foucault’s historicist approach has greater explanatory power and transgressive potential for analyses of disability than his critics in disability studies have thus far (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  19
    Rosemarie Garland-Thomson (2012). The Case for Conserving Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 9 (3):339-355.
    It is commonly believed that disability disqualifies people from full participation in or recognition by society. This view is rooted in eugenic logic, which tells us that our world would be a better place if disability could be eliminated. In opposition to this position, I argue that that disability is inherent in the human condition and consider the bioethical question of why we might want to conserve rather than eliminate disability from our shared world. To do (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  10. Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris (2006). Disability, Enhancement and the Harm -Benefit Continuum. In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Publishers
    Suppose that you are soon to be a parent and you learn that there are some simple measures that you can take to make sure that your child will be healthy. In particular, suppose that by following the doctor’s advice, you can prevent your child from having a disability, you can make your child immune from a number of dangerous diseases and you can even enhance its future intelligence. All that is required for this to happen is that you (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  61
    Anita Ho (2008). The Individualist Model of Autonomy and the Challenge of Disability. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):193-207.
    In recent decades, the intertwining ideas of self-determination and well-being have received tremendous support in bioethics. Discussions regarding self-determination, or autonomy, often focus on two dimensions—the capacity of the patient and the freedom from external coercion. The practice of obtaining informed consent, for example, has become a standard procedure in therapeutic and research medicine. On the surface, it appears that patients now have more opportunities to exercise their self-determination than ever. Nonetheless, discussions of patient autonomy in the bioethics literature, which (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  12.  32
    Lucas P. Halpin, Science and Disability.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  12
    Gail Weiss (2015). The Normal, the Natural, and the Normative: A Merleau-Pontian Legacy to Feminist Theory, Critical Race Theory, and Disability Studies. Continental Philosophy Review 48 (1):77-93.
    This essay argues that Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of embodiment can be an extremely helpful ally for contemporary feminist theorists, critical race theorists, and disability studies scholars because his work suggests that the gender, race, and ability of bodies are not innate or fixed features of those bodies, much less corporeal indicators of physical, social, psychic, and even moral inferiority, but are themselves dynamic phenomena that have the potential to overturn accepted notions of normalcy, naturalness, and normativity. Taking seriously (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. Bennett Foddy & Julian Savulescu (2010). Relating Addiction to Disease, Disability, Autonomy, and the Good Life. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):35-42.
    Concepts We thank all three commentators for extremely constructive, insightful, and gracious commentaries. We cannot address all their valuable points. In this response, we elucidate and relate the concepts of addiction, disease, disability, autonomy, and well-being. We examine some of the implications of these relationships in the context of the helpful responses made by our commentators. We begin with the definitions of the relevant concepts which we employ: ¥? ? ? Addiction (Liberal Concept): An addiction is a strong appetite. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  76
    David Shoemaker (2009). Responsibility and Disability. Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):438-461.
    This essay explores the boundaries of the moral community—the collection of agents eligible for moral responsibility—by focusing on those just inside it and those just outside it. In particular, it contrasts mild mental retardation with psychopathy, specifically among adults. For those who work with and know them, adults with mild mental retardation are thought to be obvious members of the moral community (albeit not full-fledged members). For those who work with and theorize about adult psychopaths, by contrast, they are not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16.  5
    Barbara E. Gibson (2006). Disability, Connectivity and Transgressing the Autonomous Body. Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (3):187-196.
    This paper explores the interconnectedness of persons with disabilities, technologies and the environment by problematizing Western notions of the independent, autonomous subject. Drawing from Deleuze and Guattari’s reconfiguration of the static subject as active becoming, prevailing discourses valorizing independence are critiqued as contributing to the marginalization of bodies marked as disabled. Three examples of disability “dependencies”—man-dog, man-machine, and woman-woman connectivities—are used to illustrate that subjectivity is partial and transitory. Disability connectivity thus serves a signpost for an expanded understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  17. Mark Greene & Steven Augello (2011). Everworse: What's Wrong with Selecting for Disability? Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (2):131-140.
    In this paper we challenge the moral consensus against selection for disability. Our discussion will concern only those disabilities that are compatible with a life worth living from the point of view of the disabled individual. We will argue that an influential, impersonal argument against selection for disability falls to a counterexample. We will then show how the reach of the counterexample can be broadened to make trouble for anyone who objects to selection for disability. If we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  94
    Christine James (2008). Philosophy of Disability. Essays in Philosophy 9 (1):1-10.
    Disability has been a topic of heightened philosophical interest in the last 30 years. Disability theory has enriched a broad range of sub-specializations in philosophy. The call for papers for this issue welcomed papers addressing questions on normalcy, medical ethics, public health, philosophy of education, aesthetics, philosophy of sport, philosophy of religion, and theories of knowledge. This issue of Essays in Philosophy includes nine essays that approach the philosophy of disability in three distinct ways: The first set (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  8
    Mario Toboso (2011). Rethinking Disability in Amartya Sen's Approach: ICT and Equality of Opportunity. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):107-118.
    This article presents an analysis of the concept of disability in Amartya Sen’s capabilities and functionings approach in the context of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT). Following a critical review of the concept of disability—from its traditional interpretation as an essentially medical concept to its later interpretation as a socially constructed category—we will introduce the concept of functional diversity. The importance of human diversity in the capabilities and functionings approach calls for incorporating this concept into the analysis of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  40
    Nikki Sullivan (2008). Dis-Orienting Paraphilias? Disability, Desire, and the Question of (Bio)Ethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):183-192.
    In 1977 John Money published the first modern case histories of what he called ‘apotemnophilia’, literally meaning ‘amputation love’ [Money et al., The Journal of Sex Research, 13(2):115–12523, 1977], thus from its inception as a clinically authorized phenomenon, the desire for the amputation of a healthy limb or limbs was constituted as a sexual perversion conceptually related to other so-called paraphilias. This paper engages with sex-based accounts of amputation-related desires and practices, not in order to substantiate the paraphilic model, but (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  21.  38
    Steven D. Edwards (1998). The Body as Object Versus the Body as Subject: The Case of Disability. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (1):47-56.
    This paper is prompted by the charge that the prevailing Western paradigm of medical knowledge is essentially Cartesian. Hence, illness, disease, disability, etc. are said to be conceived of in Cartesian terms. The paper attempts to make use of the critique of Cartesianism in medicine developed by certain commentators, notably Leder (1992), in order to expose Cartesian commitments in conceptions of disability. The paper also attempts to sketch an alternative conception of disability — one partly inspired by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  22.  5
    Joseph Kaufert, Rhonda Wiebe, Karen Schwartz, Lisa Labine, Zana Marie Lutfiyya & Catherine Pearse (2010). End-of-Life Ethics and Disability: Differing Perspectives on Case-Based Teaching. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):115-126.
    The way in which medical professionals engage in bioethical issues ultimately reflects the type of care such patients are likely to receive. It is therefore critical for doctors and other health care professionals to have a broad understanding of disability. Our purpose in this paper is to explore ways of teaching bioethical issues to first year medical students by integrating alternative approaches. Such approaches include (a) the use of the narrative format, (b) the inclusion of a disability perspective, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  64
    Christine James (2009). Language and Emotional Knowledge: A Case Study on Ability and Disability in Williams Syndrome. Biosemiotics 2 (2):151-167.
    Williams Syndrome provides a striking test case for discourses on disability, because the characteristics associated with Williams Syndrome involve a combination of “abilities” and “disabilities”. For example, Williams Syndrome is associated with disabilities in mathematics and spatial cognition. However, Williams Syndrome individuals also tend to have a unique strength in their expressive language skills, and are socially outgoing and unselfconscious when meeting new people. Children with Williams are said to be typically unafraid of strangers and show a greater interest (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  34
    S. M. Reindal (2000). Disability, Gene Therapy and Eugenics - a Challenge to John Harris. Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (2):89 - 94.
    This article challenges the view of disability presented by Harris in his article, “Is gene therapy a form of eugenics?”1 It is argued that his definition of disability rests on an individual model of disability, where disability is regarded as a product of biological determinism or “personal tragedy” in the individual. Within disability theory this view is often called “the medical model” and it has been criticised for not being able to deal with (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  25.  41
    María G. Navarro (2013). Review of A History of Intelligence and 'Intellectual Disability': The Shaping of Psychology in Early Modern Europe by C. F. Goodey. [REVIEW] Seventeenth-Century News 71 (1 & 2).
    A History of Intelligence and “Intellectual Disability” examines how the concepts of intellectual ability and disability became part of psychology, medicine and biology. Focusing on the period between the Protestant Reform and 1700, this book shows that in many cases it has been accepted without scientific and psychological foundations that intelligence and disability describe natural or trans-historical realities.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  31
    M. Morgan Holmes (2008). Mind the Gaps: Intersex and (Re-Productive) Spaces in Disability Studies and Bioethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):169-181.
    With a few notable exceptions disability studies has not taken account of intersexuality, and it is principally through the lenses of feminist and queer-theory oriented ethical discussions but not through ‘straight’ bioethics that modes valuing intersex difference have been proposed. Meanwhile, the medical presupposition that intersex characteristics are inherently disabling to social viability remains the taken-for-granted truth from which clinical practice proceeds. In this paper I argue against bioethical perspectives that justify extensive and invasive pre- and post-natal medical interference (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  59
    Carol J. Gill (2004). Depression in the Context of Disability and the “Right to Die”. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (3):171-198.
    Arguments in favor of legalized assisted suicide often center on issues of personal privacy and freedom of choice over one's body. Many disability advocates assert, however, that autonomy arguments neglect the complex sociopolitical determinants of despair for people with disabilities. Specifically, they argue that social approval of suicide for individuals with irreversible conditions is discriminatory and that relaxing restrictions on assisted suicide would jeopardize, not advance, the freedom of persons with disabilities to direct the lives they choose. This paper (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  28.  12
    Adam Cureton (2006). Some Advantages to Having a Parent with a Disability. Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):31-34.
    Fertility specialists, adoption agents, judges and others sometimes take themselves to have a responsibility to fairly adjudicate conflicts that may arise between the procreative and parenting interests of people with disabilities and the interests that their children or potential children have to be nurtured, cared for and protected. An underlying assumption is that having a disability significantly diminishes a person's parenting abilities. My aim is to challenge the claim that having a disability tends to make someone a bad (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  71
    Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky (2008). Bioethics and Disability Rights: Conflicting Values and Perspectives. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):111-123.
    Continuing tensions exist between mainstream bioethics and advocates of the disability rights movement. This paper explores some of the grounds for those tensions as exemplified in From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice by Allen Buchanan and coauthors, a book by four prominent bioethicists that is critical of the disability rights movement. One set of factors involves the nature of disability and impairment. A second set involves presumptions regarding social values, including the importance of intelligence in relation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  5
    G. Thomas Couser (2011). What Disability Studies Has to Offer Medical Education. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (1):21-30.
    Disability studies can be of great value to medical education first, by placing the medical paradigm in the broad context of a sequence of ways of understanding and responding to disability that have emerged in the last two thousand years or so; second, by reminding medical professionals that people with disabilities have suffered as well as profited from medical treatment in the last two hundred years; finally, by providing access to a distinctive point of view from which the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  31.  60
    David Shaw (2008). Deaf by Design: Disability and Impartiality. Bioethics 22 (8):407-413.
    In 'Benefit, Disability and the Non-Identity Problem', Hallvard Lillehammer uses the case of a couple who chose to have deaf children to argue against the view that impartial perspectives can provide an exhaustive account of the rightness and wrongness of particular reproductive choices. His conclusion is that the traditional approach to the non-identity problem leads to erroneous conclusions about the morality of creating disabled children. This paper will show that Lillehammer underestimates the power of impartial perspectives and exaggerates the (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  32.  14
    Susan M. Squier (2008). So Long as They Grow Out of It: Comics, The Discourse of Developmental Normalcy, and Disability. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 29 (2):71-88.
    This essay draws on two emerging fields—the study of comics or graphic fiction, and disability studies—to demonstrate how graphic fictions articulate the embodied, ethical, and sociopolitical experiences of impairment and disability. Examining David B’s Epileptic and Paul Karasik and Judy Karasik’s The Ride Together, I argue that these graphic novels unsettle conventional notions of normalcy and disability. In so doing, they also challenge our assumed dimensions and possibilities of the comics genre and medium, demonstrating the great potential (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  33.  55
    Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.) (2009). Disability and Disadvantage. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction ADAM CURETON AND KIMBERLEY BROWNLEE Disability and disadvantage are interrelated topics that raise important and sometimes overlooked issues in ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  8
    Fiona Kumari Campbell (2009). Medical Education and Disability Studies. Journal of Medical Humanities 30 (4):221-235.
    The biomedicalist conceptualization of disablement as a personal medical tragedy has been criticized by disability studies scholars for discounting the difference between disability and impairment and the ways disability is produced by socio-environmental factors. This paper discusses prospects for partnerships between disability studies teaching/research and medical education; addresses some of the themes around the necessity of critical disability studies training for medical students; and examines a selection of issues and themes that have arisen from (...) education courses within medical schools globally. The paper concludes that providing there is a commitment from senior management, universities are well positioned to apply both vertical and horizontal approaches to teaching disability studies to medical students. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35.  22
    Robert McRuer (2002). Critical Investments: AIDS, Christopher Reeve, and Queer/Disability Studies. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 23 (3-4):221-237.
    In his contribution, “Critical Investments: AIDS, Christopher Reeve, and Queer/Disability Studies,” Robert McRuer calls for the recognition of the points of convergence between AIDS theory, queer theory, and disability theory. McRuer points out ways in which minority identity groups such as people with AIDS, gays, lesbians, and bisexuals, and those with so-called disabilities, whose status has been described by others as “impaired,” have resisted this judgment by calling its ideological underpinnings into question. He contends that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36.  11
    Marta Soniewicka (2015). Failures of Imagination: Disability and the Ethics of Selective Reproduction. Bioethics 29 (8):557-563.
    The article addresses the problem of disability in the context of reproductive decisions based on genetic information. It poses the question of whether selective procreation should be considered as a moral obligation of prospective parents. To answer this question, a number of different ethical approaches to the problem are presented and critically analysed: the utilitarian; Julian Savulescu's principle of procreative beneficence; the rights-based. The main thesis of the article is that these approaches fail to provide any appealing principles on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  11
    Gail Landsman (2005). Mothers and Models of Disability. Journal of Medical Humanities 26 (2-3):121-139.
    Based on a qualitative anthropological study of American mothers of infants and young children newly diagnosed with disability, this essay examines how mothers understand their children and define disability in relation to publicly available discourses of disability and identity. In seeking to improve their children’s opportunities in mainstream society, mothers appear to comply with the medical model. But over time and in the process of providing meaning to their experience, mothers retool models, drawing both on the social (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  35
    Jeffrey Blustein (2012). Philosophical and Ethical Issues in Disability. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):573-587.
    What is a disability? What sorts of limitations do persons with disabilities or impairments experience? What is there about having a disability or impairment that makes it disadvantageous for the individuals with it? Are persons with severe cognitive impairments capable of making autonomous decisions? What role should disability play in the construction of theories of justice? Is it ever ethical for parents to seek to create a child with an impairment? This anthology addresses these and other questions (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  46
    Steven D. Edwards (1998). Nordenfelt's Theory of Disability. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):89-100.
    This paper is an attempt to provide a critical evaluation of the theory of disability put forward by Lennart Nordenfelt. The paper is in five sections. The first sets out the main elements of Nordenfelt's theory. The second section elaborates the theory further, identifies a tension in the theory, and three kinds of problems for it. The tension derives from Nordenfelt's attempt to respect two important but conflicting constraints on a theory of health. The problems derive from characterisation of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  37
    Anand Kumar & Barry Smith (2007). The Ontology of Processes and Functions: A Study of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. In Sharing Knowledge through the ICF: 13th Annual North American WHO Collaborating Center Conference on the ICF, Niagara Falls, June 7, 2007. North American WHO Collaborating Center
    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health provides a classification of human bodily functions, which, while exhibiting non-conformance to many formal ontological principles, provides an insight into which basic functions such a classification should include. Its evaluation is an important first step towards such an adequate ontology of this domain. Presented at the 13th Annual North American WHO Collaborating Center Conference on the ICF, 2007.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  45
    Margrit Shildrick (2008). Deciding on Death: Conventions and Contestations in the Context of Disability. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):209-219.
    Conflicts between bioethicists and disability theorists often arise over the permissibility of euthanasia and physician assisted suicide. Where mainstream bioethicists propose universalist guidelines that will direct action across a range of effectively disembodied situations, and take for granted that moral agency requires autonomy, feminist bioethicists demand a contextualisation of the circumstances under which moral decision making is conducted, and stress a more relational view of autonomy that does not require strict standards of independent agency. Nonetheless, neither traditional nor feminist (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  2
    Terrence Ehrman (2015). Disability and Resurrection Identity. New Blackfriars 96 (1066):723-738.
    Christian hope of resurrection requires that the one raised be the same person who died. Philosophers and theologians alike seek to understand the coherence of bodily resurrection and what accounts for numerical identity between the earthly and risen person. I address this question from the perspective of disability. Is a person with a disability raised in the age to come with that disability? Many theologians argue that disability is essential to one's identity such that it could (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  15
    Nancy J. Hirschmann (2013). Queer/Fear: Disability, Sexuality, and The Other. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (2):139-147.
    This paper examines the relationship between disability and “queerness.” I argue that the hostility frequently expressed against both disabled and queer individuals is a function of fear of the undecidability of the body. I draw on feminist, queer, and disability theory to help us understand this phenomenon and suggest that these different kinds of theories have a complementary relationship. That is, feminist and queer theory help us see how this fear works, disability theory helps us see why (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  11
    Abraham Rudnick (2013). What is a Psychiatric Disability? Health Care Analysis (2):1-9.
    This article aims to clarify the notion of a psychiatric disability. The article uses conceptual analysis, examining and applying established definitions of (general) disability to psychiatric disabilities. This analysis reveals that disability as inability to perform according to expectations or norms is related to impairment as deviation from the (statistical) norm, while disability as inability to achieve (personal) goals is related to impairment as deviation from the (personal) ideal. These two views of impairment and disability (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  37
    Lennart Nordenfelt (1999). On Disability and Illness. A Reply to Edwards. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (2):181-189.
    This paper is a reply to an article by Steven Edwards in a previous issue of Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics. In this paper Edwards discusses two types of problems which he finds to be inherent in my theory of disability, mainly as presented in my On the Nature of Health, Kluwer 1995. First, Edwards discerns a tension in my basic definition of health, a tension between my “subjectivistic” and my “objectivistic” aspirations in the definition. Second, he finds that my (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  11
    Melinda C. Hall (2014). Picturing Disability: Beggar, Freak, Citizen, and Other Photographic Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies 8 (1):121-124.
  47.  20
    Christopher A. Riddle (2013). Defining Disability: Metaphysical Not Political. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):377-384.
    Recent discussions surrounding the conceptualising of disability has resulted in a stalemate between British sociologists and philosophers. The stagnation of theorizing that has occurred threatens not only academic pursuits and the advancement of theoretical interpretations within the Disability Studies community, but also how we educate and advocate politically, legally, and socially. More pointedly, many activists and theorists in the UK appear to believe the British social model is the only effective means of understanding and advocating on behalf of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  11
    Josephine A. Seguna (2014). Disability: An Embodied Reality (or Space) of Dasein. Human Studies 37 (1):31-56.
    The ‘body’ has remained the pivotal and essential mechanism for analysis within disability scholarship. Yet while historically conceptualized as an individual’s fundamental feature, the ‘disabled identity’ has been more recently explained as a function of ‘normalcy’ through social, cultural political, and legal discriminations against difference and deviancy. Disability studies’ established tradition of consultation with philosophical endeavour remains apparently unwilling to exploit or utilize Martin Heidegger’s understanding of ‘Being’ and interpretation of Dasein as a possible framework for unravelling the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  4
    Julie Vedder (2005). Constructing Prevention: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and the Problem of Disability Models. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 26 (2-3):107-120.
    Both the medical model and the social model of disability have substantial drawbacks for the project of creating better lives for people with disabilities; the first denies the value of difference and the effects of discrimination, and the second denies any place for prevention and cure. Using fictional and non-fictional parental narratives of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, this article argues that a third model–a morphological model of disability–can best help us think about respectfully and effectively intervening in (...). (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  5
    Kirsty Johnston (2010). Grafting Orchids and Ugly: Theatre, Disability and Arts-Based Health Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (4):279-294.
    Theatre-based health policy research is an emerging field, and this article investigates the work of one of its leaders. In 2005, prominent medical geneticist and playwright Jeff Nisker and his collaborators produced Orchids, his play concerning pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, to research theatre as a tool for engaging citizens in health policy development. Juxtaposing Orchids with a concurrent disability theatre production in Vancouver entitled Ugly, I argue that disability theatre suggests important means for building inclusiveness in this kind (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000