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Bibliography: Disgust in Normative Ethics
  1. John Deigh (2006). The Politics of Disgust and Shame. Journal of Ethics 10 (4):383 - 418.score: 24.0
    This is a critical study of Martha Nussbaum’s Hiding from Humanity. Central to Nussbaum’s book are arguments against society’s or the state’s using disgust and shame to forward the aims of the criminal law. Patrick Devlin’s appeal to the common man’s disgust to determine what acts of customary morality should be made criminal is an example of how society might use disgust to forward the aims of the criminal law. The use of so-called shaming penalties as alternative (...)
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  2. Richard Arneson (2007). Shame, Stigma, and Disgust in the Decent Society. Journal of Ethics 11 (1):31 - 63.score: 24.0
    Would a just society or government absolutely refrain from shaming or humiliating any of its members? "No," says this essay. It describes morally acceptable uses of shame, stigma and disgust as tools of social control in a decent (just) society. These uses involve criminal law, tort law, and informal social norms. The standard of moral acceptability proposed for determining the line is a version of perfectionistic prioritarian consequenstialism. From this standpoint, criticism is developed against Martha Nussbaum's view that to (...)
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  3. Luca Barlassina (2013). Simulation is Not Enough: A Hybrid Model of Disgust Attribution on the Basis of Visual Stimuli. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):401-419.score: 24.0
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the Theory-Theory (TT), mindreading is based on one's possession of a Theory of Mind. On the other hand, the Simulation Theory (ST) maintains that one arrives at the attribution of a mental state by simulating it in one's own mind. In this paper, I propose a ST-TT hybrid model of the ability to attribute disgust on the basis of visual stimuli such as facial expressions, body postures, (...)
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  4. Jason A. Clark & Daniel M. T. Fessler (forthcoming). The Role of Disgust in Norms, and of Norms in Disgust Research: Why Liberals Shouldn't Be Morally Disgusted by Moral Disgust. Topoi:1-16.score: 24.0
    Recently, many critics have argued that disgust is a morally harmful emotion, and that it should play no role in our moral and legal reasoning. Here we defend disgust as a morally beneficial moral capacity. We believe that a variety of liberal norms have been inappropriately imported into both moral psychology and ethical studies of disgust: disgust has been associated with conservative authors, values, value systems, and modes of moral reasoning that are seen as inferior to (...)
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  5. Jennifer Marilynn Barker (2011). Chew on This: Disgust, Delay, and the Documentary Image in Food, Inc. Film-Philosophy 15 (2):70-89.score: 24.0
    In comparison to activist films with an “in your face” aesthetic, Food, Inc. seems positively tame. Rather than shock viewers with direct images of distasteful, disgusting, immoral, and outrageous practices in the food industry, it provokes and performs physical and moral disgust by its paradoxical (and perhaps quintessentially documentary) combination of proximity and immediacy with distance and delay. This close textual analysis reveals the film’s use of images to defer, deflect, and dodge, in such a way as to emphasize (...)
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  6. Marta Gil (2013). Review of Daniel Kelly: Yuck! The Nature and Moral Significance of Disgust. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (1):221-223.score: 24.0
    Perhaps the most remarkable feature about this book is the effort made by its author in order to shed light on the most intriguing question that surrounds disgust: how is it possible for disgust to be so flexible with its objects? This book is highly recommended for those readers interested in the latest and most exciting aspects of current scholarship on the study of the emotions. Readers too who are interested on evolutionary psychology, moral psychology or neuroethics will (...)
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  7. Ditte Marie Munch‐Jurišić (2014). Perpetrator Abhorrence: Disgust as a Stop Sign. Metaphilosophy 45 (2):270-287.score: 24.0
    Most contemporary research on disgust can be divided into “disgust advocates” and “disgust skeptics.” The so-called advocates argue that disgust can have a positive influence on our moral judgment; skeptics warn that it can mislead us toward prejudice and discrimination. This article compares this disagreement to a structurally similar debate in the field of genocide studies concerning the phenomenon of “perpetrator abhorrence.” While some soldiers report having felt strong disgust in the moment of committing or (...)
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  8. Lotte Veenstra Agneta H. Fischer, Daniela Becker (2012). Emotional Mimicry in Social Context: The Case of Disgust and Pride. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    A recent review on facial mimicry concludes that emotional mimicry is less ubiquitous than has been suggested, and only occurs in interactions that are potentially affiliative (see Hess & Fischer, 2012). We hypothesize that individuals do not mimic facial expressions that can be perceived as offensive, such as disgust, and mimic positive emotion displays, but only when the context is affiliative (i.e. with intimates). Second, we expect that in spontaneous interactions not mimicry, but empathic feelings with the other predict (...)
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  9. Judith Andre (2005). Disgust, Dignity, and a Public Intellectual. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (1):52-57.score: 24.0
    Martha Nussbaum’s Hiding from Humanity is eloquent and thought-provoking. I criticize some of her central arguments, particularly her construal of disgust and her exposition of shame. But I applaud the book as a whole. It is possible that richness and engagement are more important in the work of public intellectuals than is technical precision. If so, Nussbaum has fulfilled her role. It is more likely that both qualities are important, but difficult to combine. In that case, we can still (...)
     
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  10. Aurel Kolnai (2004). On Disgust. Open Court.score: 24.0
    The problem of disgust has until recently been neglected in the scientific literature. In comparison to the scientific (psychological and metaphysical) interest that has been applied to hatred, anxiety, and similar phenomena, disgust — although a common and important factor in our emotional life — has been unexplored, or it has been viewed as a “higher degree of dislike,” as “nausea,” or as a phenomenon of the “repression of urges.” We here show how the feeling of disgust (...)
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  11. Tarja Laine (2011). Imprisoned in Disgust: Roman Polanski's Repulsion. Film-Philosophy 15 (2):36-50.score: 24.0
    Noël Carroll has suggested that scary films scare because our emotions are structured by the disgusting and dangerous properties of the films’ monsters. By contrast, this essay argues that some scary films scare through more direct means than can be explained by entertaining in thought, say, the impure properties of Count Dracula. It is the film itself that disgusts and frightens, by ‘taking over’ the spectator so that their consciousness of the film is ‘contaminated’ by the ‘spirit’ of horror. In (...)
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  12. Thom Brooks (2007). Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):329–331.score: 21.0
    This is a book review of Martha C. Nussbaum - "Hiding from Humanity".
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  13. Christoph Randler, Eberhard Hummel & Pavol Prokop (2012). Practical Work at School Reduces Disgust and Fear of Unpopular Animals. Society and Animals 20 (1):61-74.score: 21.0
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  14. Jan Schweckendiek, Tim Klucken, Christian J. Merz, Sabine Kagerer, Bertram Walter, Dieter Vaitl & Rudolf Stark (2013). Learning to Like Disgust: Neuronal Correlates of Counterconditioning. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  15. Alexander J. Skolnick & Vivian A. Dzokoto (2013). Disgust and Contamination: A Cross-National Comparison of Ghana and the United States. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
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  16. Joshua May (2014). Does Disgust Influence Moral Judgment? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):125-141.score: 18.0
    Recent empirical research seems to show that emotions play a substantial role in moral judgment. Perhaps the most important line of support for this claim focuses on disgust. A number of philosophers and scientists argue that there is adequate evidence showing that disgust significantly influences various moral judgments. And this has been used to support or undermine a range of philosophical theories, such as sentimentalism and deontology. I argue that the existing evidence does not support such arguments. At (...)
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  17. Daniel Kelly, The Ethics of Disgust.score: 18.0
    I argue that the recent debate about the role disgust deserves in ethical thought has been impoverished by an inadequate understanding of the emotion itself. After considering Kass and Nussbaum’s respective positions in that debate, and the implausible views of the nature of disgust on which their arguments rest, I describe my own view, which makes sense of the wealth of recent, often puzzling, empirical work done on the emotion. This view sees disgust as being primarily responsible (...)
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  18. Michelle Meagher (2003). Jenny Saville and a Feminist Aesthetics of Disgust. Hypatia 18 (4):23-41.score: 18.0
    : This essay examines an aesthetics of disgust through an analysis of the work of Scottish painter Jenny Saville. Saville's paintings suggest that there is something valuable in retaining and interrogating our immediate and seemingly unambivalent reactions of disgust. I contrast Saville's representations of disgust to the repudiation of disgust that characterizes contemporary corporeal politics. Drawing on the theoretical work of Elspeth Probyn and Julia Kristeva, I suggest that an aesthetics of disgust reveals the fundamental (...)
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  19. Carolyn Parkinson, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Philipp E. Koralus, Angela Mendelovici, Victoria McGeer & Thalia Wheatley (2011). Is Morality Unified? Evidence That Distinct Neural Systems Underlie Moral Judgments of Harm, Dishonesty, and Disgust. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 23 (10):3162-3180.score: 18.0
    Much recent research has sought to uncover the neural basis of moral judgment. However, it has remained unclear whether "moral judgments" are sufficiently homogenous to be studied scientifically as a unified category. We tested this assumption by using fMRI to examine the neural correlates of moral judgments within three moral areas: (physical) harm, dishonesty, and (sexual) disgust. We found that the judgment ofmoral wrongness was subserved by distinct neural systems for each of the different moral areas and that these (...)
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  20. Jonathan Haidt, Disgust: The Body and Soul Emotion in the 21st Century.score: 18.0
    The present volume is, we believe, the first-ever edited volume devoted to the emotion of disgust. In this chapter we address the following issues: 1. Why was disgust almost completely ignored until about 1990, 2. Why has there been a great increase in attention to disgust since about 1990?, 3. The outline of an integrative, body-to-soul preadaptation theory of disgust, 4. Some specific features of disgust that make it particularly susceptible to laboratory research and particularly (...)
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  21. Ellen K. Feder (2011). Tilting the Ethical Lens: Shame, Disgust, and the Body in Question. Hypatia 26 (3):632-650.score: 18.0
    Cheryl Chase has argued that “the problem” of intersex is one of “stigma and trauma, not gender,” as those focused on medical management would have it. Despite frequent references to shame in the critical literature, there has been surprisingly little analysis of shame, or of the disgust that provokes it. This paper investigates the function of disgust in the medical management of intersex and seeks to understand the consequences—material and moral—with respect to the shame it provokes.Conventional ethical approaches (...)
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  22. Yoel Inbar, David A. Pizarro, Joshua Knobe & Paul Bloom (2009). Disgust Sensitivity Predicts Intuitive Disapproval of Gays. Emotion 9 (3): 435– 43.score: 18.0
    Two studies demonstrate that a dispositional proneness to disgust (“disgust sensitivity”) is associated with intuitive disapproval of gay people. Study 1 was based on previous research showing that people are more likely to describe a behavior as intentional when they see it as morally wrong (see Knobe, 2006, for a review). As predicted, the more disgust sensitive participants were, the more likely they were to describe an agent whose behavior had the side effect of causing gay men (...)
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  23. David Archard (2008). Disgust, Offensiveness and the Law. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):314-321.score: 18.0
    abstract Martha Nussbaum's concern is to limit the role that emotions can legitimately play in the definition of the criminal law. She would allow nuisance laws to curtail the occasioning of disgust but only disgust of a certain kind. Problems arise for her account when she extends this analysis to the prevention of offensiveness. Unavoidable is an evaluation of those beliefs subscription to which explains the taking of offence. Hence the principal problem for a liberalism of the kind (...)
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  24. Carolyn Korsmeyer (2010). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    What is disgust? -- Attractive aversions -- Delightful, delicious, disgusting -- Varieties of aesthetic disgust -- The magnetism of disgust -- Hearts -- The foul and the fair.
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  25. Colin McGinn (2011). The Meaning of Disgust. OUP USA.score: 18.0
    Disgust has a strong claim to be a distinctively human emotion. But what is it to be disgusting? What unifies the class of disgusting things? Colin McGinn sets out to analyze the content of disgust, arguing that life and death are implicit in its meaning. Disgust is a kind of philosophical emotion, reflecting the human attitude to the biological world. Yet it is an emotion we strive to repress. It may have initially arisen as a method of (...)
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  26. A. D. Block & S. E. Cuypers (2012). Why Darwinians Should Not Be Afraid of Mary Douglas--And Vice Versa: The Case of Disgust. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (4):459-488.score: 18.0
    Evolutionary psychology and human sociobiology often reject the mere possibility of symbolic causality. Conversely, theories in which symbolic causality plays a central role tend to be both anti-nativist and anti-evolutionary. This article sketches how these apparent scientific rivals can be reconciled in the study of disgust. First, we argue that there are no good philosophical or evolutionary reasons to assume that symbolic causality is impossible. Then, we examine to what extent symbolic causality can be part of the theoretical toolbox (...)
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  27. Daniel Kelly & Nicolae Morar (2014). Against the Yuck Factor: On the Ideal Role of Disgust in Society. Utilitas 26 (2):153-177.score: 18.0
    The view we defend is that in virtue of its nature, disgust is not fit to do any moral or social work whatsoever, and that there are no defensible uses for disgust in legal or political institutions. We first describe our favoured empirical theory of the nature of disgust. Turning from descriptive to normative issues, we address the best arguments in favour of granting disgust the power to justify certain judgements, and to serve as a social (...)
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  28. Kevin Patrick Tobia (forthcoming). The Effects of Cleanliness and Disgust on Moral Judgment. Philosophical Psychology.score: 18.0
    Recent experimental studies report the influence of disgust and cleanliness manipulations on moral judgment, yet little attention has been given to interpreting these studies together or developing models of the causal influence of cleanliness and disgust manipulations on moral judgment. I propose considerations for the causal modeling of these effects. The conclusions are not decisive in favor of one theory of disgust and cleanliness, but suggest several distinct causal roles of disgust and cleanliness-type manipulations. The incorrect (...)
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  29. David Pizarro, Yoel Inbar & Chelsea Helion (2011). On Disgust and Moral Judgment. Emotion Review 3 (3):267-268.score: 18.0
    Despite the wealth of recent work implicating disgust as an emotion central to human morality, the nature of the causal relationship between disgust and moral judgment remains unclear. We distinguish between three related claims regarding this relationship, and argue that the most interesting claim (that disgust is a moralizing emotion) is the one with the least empirical support.
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  30. Susan Wessel (2010). The Morality of Disgust in Jerome and John Chrysostom. Augustinianum 50 (1):147-162.score: 18.0
    Jerome and John Chrysostom explored the disgust and revulsion that people often feel when confronted with the suffering of another human being. Theyattempted morally to reform their listeners by showing them that they were just as vulnerable as those whom they disparaged, and by breaking down false barriers between the self and other. Jerome presented graphic details of one woman’s ministry to the sick and poor, while Chrysostom criticized the aloofspectator who encouraged the sick and poor to perform. (...) was thereby re-conceived as an inappropriate response to human suffering. (shrink)
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  31. Nina Strohminger (2014). Disgust Talked About. Philosophy Compass 9 (7):478-493.score: 18.0
    Disgust, the emotion of rotting carcasses and slimy animalitos, finds itself at the center of several critical questions about human culture and cognition. This article summarizes recent developments, identify active points of debate, and provide an account of where the field is heading next.
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  32. Tereza Hadravová (2012). Carolyn Korsmeyer, Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Estetika 49 (1):116-121.score: 18.0
    A review of Carolyn Korsmeyer´s Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011, 208 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-975694-0).
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  33. Julian Hanich (2011). Toward a Poetics of Cinematic Disgust. Film-Philosophy 15 (2):11-35.score: 18.0
    This essay tries to categorize the range of artistic options that filmmakers currently have at hand to evoke bodily disgust. It asks: If we examine the variety of disgusting scenes at the movies, how can we usefully distinguish them? I present five categorical distinctions indicating choices filmmakers often implicitly make when disgust comes into play. (1) Temporality: Does the filmmaker confront us with the disgusting object suddenly or anticipatorily ? (2) Presence: Does the director allow us to perceive (...)
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  34. Gary D. Sherman & Jonathan Haidt (2011). Cuteness and Disgust: The Humanizing and Dehumanizing Effects of Emotion. Emotion Review 3 (3):245-251.score: 18.0
    Moral emotions are evolved mechanisms that function in part to optimize social relationships. We discuss two moral emotions— disgust and the “cuteness response”—which modulate social-engagement motives in opposite directions, changing the degree to which the eliciting entity is imbued with mental states (i.e., mentalized). Disgust-inducing entities are hypo-mentalized (i.e., dehumanized); cute entities are hyper-mentalized (i.e., “humanized”). This view of cuteness—which challenges the prevailing view that cuteness is a releaser of parental instincts (Lorenz, 1950/1971)—explains (a) the broad range of (...)
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  35. Judith André (2005). Review Essay/Disgust, Dignity, and a Public Intellectual. Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (1):52-57.score: 18.0
    Martha C. Nussbaum, Hiding from Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law. Princeton Nf: Princeton University Press, 2004, xv #;pl 413 pp.
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  36. Carolyn Korsmeyer & Barry Smith (2014). Comment: Kolnai's Disgust. Emotion Review 6 (3):219-220.score: 18.0
    In The Meaning of Disgust, Colin McGinn employs elements of the phenomenological theory of disgust advanced by Aurel Kolnai in 1929. Kolnai’s treatment of what he calls “material” disgust and of its primary elicitors—putrefying organic matter, bodily wastes and secretions, sticky contaminants, vermin—anticipates more recent scientific treatments of this emotion as a mode of protective recoil. While Nina Strohminger charges McGinn with neglecting such scientific studies, we here attempt to show how Kolnai goes beyond experimental findings in (...)
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  37. Edward Royzman & Robert Kurzban (2011). Minding the Metaphor: The Elusive Character of Moral Disgust. Emotion Review 3 (3):269-271.score: 18.0
    Aiming to circumvent metaphor-prone properties of natural language, Chapman, Kim, Susskind, and Anderson (2009) recently reported evidence for morally induced activation of the levator labii region (manifest as an upper lip raise and a nose wrinkle), also implicated in responding to bad tastes and contaminants. Here we point out that the probative value of this type of evidence rests on a particular (and heavily contested) account of facial movements, one which holds them to be “expressions” or automatic read-outs of internal (...)
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  38. Robert William Fischer (forthcoming). Disgust and the Collection of Bovine Fetal Blood. In Elisa Aaltola & John Hadley (eds.), Animal Ethics and Philosophy: Questioning the Orthodoxy. Rowman & Littlefield International.score: 18.0
    At many slaughterhouses, if a pregnant cow is killed, then medical companies pay to harvest the fetus's blood. When you communicate the details of this process to people, many of them are disgusted. I submit that those who are repulsed thereby acquire a reason to believe that this practice is morally wrong. However, it is controversial to maintain that disgust can provide moral guidance. So, I develop a theory of disgust’s moral salience that fits with the empirical work (...)
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  39. Tina Kendall (2011). Introduction: Tarrying with Disgust. Film-Philosophy 15 (2):1-10.score: 18.0
    Introduction for Special Issue on Disgust.
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  40. Susan L. Feagin & Noel Carroll (1992). Monsters, Disgust and Fascination. Philosophical Studies 65 (1-2):75 - 84.score: 15.0
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  41. Edward B. Royzman & John Sabini (2001). Something It Takes to Be an Emotion: The Interesting Case of Disgust. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 31 (1):29–59.score: 15.0
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  42. Joshua Gert (2005). Neo-Sentimentalism and Disgust. Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3):345-352.score: 15.0
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  43. Timothy Schroeder (2012). Kelly , Daniel . Yuck! The Nature and Moral Significance of Disgust . Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2011. Pp. 194. $30.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 122 (2):430-434.score: 15.0
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  44. Daniel Kelly (2013). Moral Disgust and The Tribal Instincts Hypothesis. In Kim Sterelny, Richard Joyce, Brett Calcott & Ben Fraser (eds.), Cooperation and its Evolution. MIT Press.score: 15.0
    Psychological research has been discovering a number of puzzling features of morality and moral cognition recently.2 Zhong & Liljenquist (2006) found that when people are asked to think about an unethical deed or recall one they themselves have committed in the past, issues of physical cleanliness become salient. Zhong & Liljenquist cleverly designate this phenomenon the “Macbeth Effect,” and it takes some interesting forms. For instance, reading a story describing an immoral deed increased people’s desire for products related to cleansing, (...)
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  45. John Kekes (1992). Disgust and Moral Taboos. Philosophy 67 (262):431 - 446.score: 15.0
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  46. Michael Hauskeller (2006). Moral Disgust. Ethical Perspectives 13 (4):571-602.score: 15.0
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  47. Anne E. Monius (2004). Love, Violence, and the Aesthetics of Disgust: Śaivas and Jains in Medieval South India. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (2/3):113-172.score: 15.0
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  48. Martha Nussbaum (1989). Beyond Obsession and Disgust: Lucretius' Genealogy of Love. Apeiron 22 (1):1 - 59.score: 15.0
  49. Filippo Contesi (2012). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):113-116.score: 15.0
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