Search results for 'domestic animals' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Robert Heeger (2005). Reasonable Partiality to Domestic Animals. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (1-2):123 - 139.score: 192.0
    The paper deals with partiality flowing from special relationships. Two main problems are discussed. The first concerns the relationship between partiality and genuine moral obligations. If partiality can bring about such obligations only if it is reasonable, what requirements should it meet in order to be reasonable? The second problem is one of animal ethics. Can the concept of reasonable partiality help us articulate what is morally at stake in a current discussion about the treatment of domestic animals, (...)
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  2. Grace Clement (2011). “Pets or Meat”? Ethics and Domestic Animals. Journal of Animal Ethics 1 (1):46-57.score: 152.0
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  3. Dianne Romain (1990). Feminist Reflections on Humans and Other Domestic Animals. Between the Species 6 (4):15.score: 150.0
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  4. R. D. Sharma & R. Kumar (1987). Historical Background and Analysis of Scientific Content of Ancient Indian Litterature on Practices for the Treatment of Diseases of Domestic Animals. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 22 (1):158-163.score: 150.0
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  5. Charles Darwin (1883/1998). The Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 132.0
    The publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859 ignited a public storm he neither wanted nor enjoyed. Having offered his book as a contribution to science, Darwin discovered to his dismay that it was received as an affront by many scientists and as a sacrilege by clergy and Christian citizens. To answer the criticism that his theory was a theory only, and a wild one at that, he published two volumes in 1868 to demonstrate that evolution was (...)
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  6. Paul Veatch Moriarty (2013). The Ethics of Assisting Domestic and Wild Animals. Society and Animals 21 (3):315-317.score: 126.0
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  7. Frank R. Ascione, Claudia V. Weber & David S. Wood (1997). The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered. Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.score: 126.0
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  8. Lewis Holloway (2003). What a Thing, Then, is This Cow...": Positioning Domestic Livestock Animals in the Texts and Practices of Small-Scale "Self-Sufficiency. Society and Animals 11 (2):145-165.score: 126.0
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  9. Richard Yarwood & Nick Evans (1998). New Places for" Old Spots": The Changing Geographies of Domestic Livestock Animals. Society and Animals 6 (2):137-165.score: 126.0
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  10. Richard Yarwood & Nick Evans (1998). New Places for "Old Spots": The Changing Geographies of Domestic Livestock Animals. Society and Animals 6 (2):137-165.score: 126.0
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  11. Frank R. Ascione, David S. Wood & Claudia V. Weber (1997). The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered. Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.score: 126.0
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  12. Charles Darwin (1988). Variation of Animals and Plants Under Domestication. New York University Press.score: 120.0
    Are they needed? To be sure. The Darwinian industry, industrious though it is, has failed to provide texts of more than a handful of Darwin's books. If you want to know what Darwin said about barnacles (still an essential reference to cirripedists, apart from any historical importance) you are forced to search shelves, or wait while someone does it for you; some have been in print for a century; various reprints have appeared and since vanished." -Eric Korn,Times Literary Supplement Charles (...)
     
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  13. Josephine Donovan (2013). Provincial Life with Animals. Society and Animals 21 (1):17-33.score: 96.0
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  14. Joel Marks (2010). Live Free or Die. [REVIEW] Animal Law 17 (1):243-250.score: 92.0
    In On Their Own Terms (Darien, CT: Nectar Bat Press, 2010), Lee Hall articulates a theory that wild animals, due to their autonomous nature, are endowed with rights, but domesticated animals lack rights because they are not autonomous. Hall then argues that the rights of wild animals require that humans let them alone, and that, despite the fact that domestic animals lack rights, humans are required to take care of them because it is humans who (...)
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  15. Stephen St C. Bostock (1993). Zoos and Animal Rights: The Ethics of Keeping Animals. Routledge.score: 72.0
    Zoos and animal rights seem utterly opposed to each other. In this controversial and timely book, Stephen Bostock argues that they can develop a more harmonious relationship. He examines the diverse ethical and technical issues involved, including human cruelty, human domination over animals, the well-being of wild animals outside their natural habitat, and the nature of wild and domestic animals. In his analysis, Bostock draws attention to the areas which give rise to misconceptions. This book explores (...)
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  16. Steve Cooke (2011). Duties to Companion Animals. Res Publica 17 (3):261-274.score: 72.0
    This paper outlines the moral contours of human relationships with companion animals. The paper details three sources of duties to and regarding companion animals: (1) from the animal’s status as property, (2) from the animal’s position in relationships of care, love, and dependency, and (3) from the animal’s status as a sentient being with a good of its own. These three sources of duties supplement one another and not only differentiate relationships with companion animals from wild (...) and other categories of domestic animals such as livestock, but they also overlap to provide moral agents with additional reasons for preventing and avoiding harm to companion animals. The paper concludes that not only do owners and bystanders have direct and indirect duties to protect companion animals from harm, but also that these duties have the potential, in some circumstances, to clash with duties owed to the state and fellow citizens. (shrink)
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  17. Justin E. H. Smith (ed.) (2006). The Problem of Animal Generation in Early Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    This book examines the early modern science of generation, which included the study of animal conception, heredity, and fetal development. Analyzing how it influenced the contemporary treatment of traditional philosophical questions, it also demonstrates how philosophical presuppositions about mechanism, substance, and cause informed the interpretations offered by those conducting empirical research on animal reproduction. Composed of cutting-edge essays written by an international team of leading scholars, the book offers a fresh perspective on some of the basic problems in early modern (...)
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  18. Deborah Cao (2011). Visibility and Invisibility of Animals in Traditional Chinese Philosophy and Law. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (3):351-367.score: 72.0
    There is yet to be any animal welfare or protection law for domestic animals in China, one of the few countries in the world today that do not have such laws. However, in Chinese imperial law, there were legal provisions adopted more than a 1,000 years ago for the care and treatment of domestic working animals. Furthermore, in traditional Chinese philosophy, animals were regarded as constituent part of the organic whole of the cosmos by ancient (...)
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  19. J. R. Bellerby (1965). Farm Animal Welfare and World Food. London, One World Publications.score: 70.0
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  20. William Sayers (2009). Animal Vocalization and Human Polyglossia in Walter of Bibbesworth's Thirteenth-Century Domestic Treatise in Anglo-Norman French and Middle English. Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):525-541.score: 66.0
    Walter of Bibbesworth’s late thirteenth-century versified treatise on French vocabulary relevant to the management of estates in Britain has the first extensive list of animal vocalizations in a European vernacular. Many of the Anglo-Norman French names for animals and their sounds are glossed in Middle English, inviting both diachronic and synchronic views of the capacity of these languages for onomatopoetic formation and reflection on the interest of these social and linguistic communities in zoosemiotics.
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  21. William Youatt (1839/2003). The Obligation and Extent of Humanity to Brutes: Principally Considered with Reference to Domesticated Animals (1839). Edwin Mellen Press.score: 64.0
     
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  22. Traci Warkentin (2006). Dis/Integrating Animals: Ethical Dimensions of the Genetic Engineering of Animals for Human Consumption. [REVIEW] AI and Society 20 (1):82-102.score: 60.0
    Research at the intersections of feminism, biology and philosophy provides dynamic starting grounds for this discussion of genetic technologies and animals. With a focus on animal bodies, I will examine moral implications of the genetic engineering of “domesticated” animals—primarily pigs and chickens—for the purposes of human consumption. Concepts of natural and artificial, contamination and purity, integrity and fragmentation and mind and body will feature in the discussion. In this respect, Margaret Atwood’s novel, Oryx and Crake, serves as a (...)
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  23. E. G. Beauchamp (1990). Animals and Soil Sustainability. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 3 (1):89-98.score: 60.0
    Domestic livestock animals and soils must be considered together as part of an agroecosystem which includes plants. Soil sustainability may be simply defined as the maintenance of soil productivity for future generations. There are both positive and negative aspects concerning the role of animals in soil sustainability. In a positive sense, agroecosystems which include ruminant animals often also include hay forage-or pasture-based crops in the humid regions. Such crops stabilize the soil by decreasing erosion, improving soil (...)
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  24. Clare Palmer (1997). The Idea of the Domesticated Animal Contract. Environmental Values 6 (4):411 - 425.score: 60.0
    Some recent works have suggested that the relationship between human beings and domesticated animals might be described as contractual. This paper explores how the idea of such an animal contract might relate to key characteristics of social contract theory, in particular to issues of the change in state from 'nature' to 'culture'; to free consent and irrevocability; and to the benefits and losses to animals which might follow from such a contract. The paper concludes that there are important (...)
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  25. Katinka Waelbers, Frans Stafleu & Frans W. A. Brom (2004). Not All Animals Are Equal Differences in Moral Foundations for the Dutch Veterinary Policy on Livestock and Animals in Nature Reservations. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (6):497-515.score: 58.0
    The Netherlands is a small country with many people and much livestock. As a result, animals in nature reservations are often living near cattle farms. Therefore, people from the agricultural practices are afraid that wild animals will infect domestic livestock with diseases like Swine Fever and Foot and Mouth Disease. To protect agriculture (considered as an important economic practice), very strict regulations have been made for minimizing this risk. In this way, the practice of animal farming has (...)
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  26. M. Segala (2000). [Animal electricity, animal magnetism, universal galvanism: in search of universal harmony between humanity and nature]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 54 (1):71-84.score: 58.0
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  27. Pär Segerdahl (2007). Can Natural Behavior Be Cultivated? The Farm as Local Human/Animal Culture. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 20 (2):167-193.score: 56.0
    Although the notion of natural behavior occurs in many policy-making and legal documents on animal welfare, no consensus has been reached concerning its definition. This paper argues that one reason why the notion resists unanimously accepted definition is that natural behavior is not properly a biological concept, although it aspires to be one, but rather a philosophical tendency to perceive animal behavior in accordance with certain dichotomies between nature and culture, animal and human, original orders and invented artifacts. The paper (...)
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  28. Lyudmila Trut, Irina Oskina & Anastasiya Kharlamova (2009). Animal Evolution During Domestication: The Domesticated Fox as a Model. Bioessays 31 (3):349-360.score: 56.0
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  29. Mark Rowlands, Animals That Act for Moral Reasons.score: 54.0
    Non-human animals (henceforth, “animals”) are typically regarded as moral patients rather than moral agents. Let us define these terms as follows: 1) X is a moral patient if and only if X is a legitimate object of moral concern: that is, roughly, X is something whose interests should be taken into account when decisions are made concerning it or which otherwise impact on it. 2) X is a moral agent if and only if X can be morally evaluated–praised (...)
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  30. Richard Haynes (2011). Competing Conceptions of Animal Welfare and Their Ethical Implications for the Treatment of Non-Human Animals. Acta Biotheoretica 59 (2):105-120.score: 54.0
    Animal welfare has been conceptualized in such a way that the use of animals in science and for food seems justified. I argue that those who have done this have appropriated the concept of animal welfare, claiming to give a scientific account that is more objective than the sentimental account given by animal liberationists. This strategy seems to play a major role in supporting merely limited reform in the use of animals and seems to support the assumption that (...)
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  31. John Muckelbauer (2011). Domesticating Animal Theory. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (1):95-100.score: 52.0
    For Descartes, animals are automata like machines that merely react to stimuli, but do not have any true responses. … They are the opposite of humans who are free, rational, and have souls. … The automatic actions of animals assure us of the freedom of our own— we are not animals; therefore we are not automata. I must confess that when, a few years ago, I first began to notice the emergence of theoretical interest in “animality”—especially in (...)
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  32. Eileen O'Rourke (2000). The Reintroduction and Reinterpretation of the Wild. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 13 (1):144-165.score: 52.0
    This paper is concerned with changing social representations of the ``wild,'' in particular wild animals. We argue that within a contemporary Western context the old agricultural perception of wild animals as adversarial and as a threat to domestication, is being replaced by an essentially urban fascination with certain emblematic wild animals, who are seen to embody symbols of naturalness and freedom. On closer examination that carefully mediatized ``naturalness'' may be but another form of domestication. After an historical (...)
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  33. Christian Gamborg, Bart Gremmen, Stine B. Christiansen & Peter Sandøe (2010). De-Domestication: Ethics at the Intersection of Landscape Restoration and Animal Welfare. Environmental Values 19 (1):57 - 78.score: 50.0
    De-domestication is the deliberate establishment of a population of domesticated animals or plants in the wild. In time, the population should be able to reproduce, becoming self-sustainable and incorporating 'wild' animals. Often de-domestication is part of a larger nature restoration scheme, aimed at creating landscapes anew, or re-creating former habitats . De-domestication is taken up in this paper because it both engages and raises questions about the major norms governing animals and nature. The debate here concerns whether (...)
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  34. Gary P. Moberg (forthcoming). Using Risk Assessment to Define Domestic Animal Welfare. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics.score: 50.0
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  35. William J. Fielding (2010). Domestic Violence and Dog Care in New Providence, The Bahamas. Society and Animals 18 (2):183-203.score: 48.0
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  36. Vonne Lund & I. Anna S. Olsson (2006). Animal Agriculture: Symbiosis, Culture, or Ethical Conflict? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (1):47-56.score: 44.0
    Several writers on animal ethics defend the abolition of most or all animal agriculture, which they consider an unethical exploitation of sentient non-human animals. However, animal agriculture can also be seen as a co-evolution over thousands of years, that has affected biology and behavior on the one hand, and quality of life of humans and domestic animals on the other. Furthermore, animals are important in sustainable agriculture. They can increase efficiency by their ability to transform materials (...)
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  37. Catherine Larrère & Raphaël Larrère (2000). Animal Rearing as a Contract? Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 12 (1):51-58.score: 44.0
    Can animals, and especially cattle, be the subject ofmoral concern? Should we care about their well-being?Two competing ethical theories have addressed suchissues so far. A utilitarian theory which, inBentham's wake, extends moral consideration to everysentient being, and a theory of the rights orinterests of animals which follows Feinberg'sconceptions. This includes various positions rangingfrom the most radical (about animal liberation) tomore moderate ones (concerned with the well-being ofanimals). Notwithstanding their diversity, theseconceptions share some common flaws. First, as anextension of (...)
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  38. Joel MacClellan (2013). What the Wild Things Are: A Critique on Clare Palmer's" What (If Anything) Do We Owe Animals?&Quot;. Between the Species: An Electronic Journal for the Study of Philosophy and Animals 16 (1):6.score: 44.0
    This paper critiques Clare Palmer’s “What (if anything) do we owe wild animals?” on three grounds. First, it is argued that, Palmer’s opening case study notwithstanding, there are good empirical reasons to think that we should assist domesticated horses and not wild deer. Then, Palmer’s claim that “wildness is not a capacity” is brought into question, and it is argued that wildness connotes certain capacities which wild animals generally have and which domesticated animals generally lack. Lastly, the (...)
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  39. Kay Anderson (1998). Animal Domestication in Geographic Perspective. Society and Animals 6 (2):119-135.score: 42.0
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  40. Nerissa Russell (2002). The Wild Side of Animal Domestication. Society and Animals 10 (3):285-302.score: 42.0
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  41. Katsuyoshi Fukui (1996). Co-Evolution Between Humans and Domesticates: The Cultural Selection of Animal Coat-Colour Diversity Among the Bodi. In R. F. Ellen & Katsuyoshi Fukui (eds.), Redefining Nature: Ecology, Culture, and Domestication. Berg. 319--386.score: 42.0
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  42. Robert Garner (2012). Rawls, Animals and Justice: New Literature, Same Response. [REVIEW] Res Publica 18 (2):159-172.score: 40.0
    This article seeks to revisit the relationship between Rawls’s contractarianism and the moral status of animals, paying particular attention to the recent literature. Despite Rawls’s own reluctance to include animals as recipients of justice, and my own initial scepticism, a number of scholars have argued that his theory does provide resources that are useful for the animal advocate. The first type takes Rawls’s exclusion of animals from his theory of justice at face value but argues that (...) can still be protected within a moral realm independently of justice, or indirectly through the motivations of human contractors. The second type adapts his theory in a way that enables animals to be included within a contractarian theory of justice. It is argued, though, that none of the responses offered is successful in providing a sphere of protection for animals from within Rawls’s contractarian theory. It is doubtful if Rawls’s intention was for animals to receive a significant degree of protection within a moral realm independently of justice, and equally doubtful if the contractors in the original position would be motivated to act on behalf of animals. In the case of the second, whilst Rawlsian resources can be utilised to justify the attempt to amend the veil of ignorance so as to include animals, these are not dependent on a contractural agreement. Similarly, placing emphasis on social-co-operation as a means of incorporating animals into a theory of justice is flawed, not least because, paradoxically, it works for domesticated animals whilst they are being exploited. (shrink)
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  43. Jac A. A. Swart (2004). The Wild Animal as a Research Animal. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (2):181-197.score: 40.0
    Most discussions on animal experimentation refer to domesticated animals and regulations are tailored to this class of animals. However, wild animals are also used for research, e.g., in biological field research that is often directed to fundamental ecological-evolutionary questions or to conservation goals. There are several differences between domesticated and wild animals that are relevant for evaluation of the acceptability of animal experiments. Biological features of wild animals are often more critical as compared with domesticated (...)
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  44. Jeroen van Rooijen (1989). Backgrounds of Students of Behavior in Relation to Their Attitude Toward Animal Well-Being. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 2 (3).score: 40.0
    Knowledge of the backgrounds of students of behaviour working in the field of applied animal behavior science may help us to recognize their influence on conclusions reached in a particular study and on more general points of view. This recognition may result in a speed up of the progress in this science, to the benefit of science and animals. Some types are: (1) Eco-ethologists (ethologists of the hunters-type). They like to stalk healthy wild animals in their natural environment. (...)
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  45. Jeroen Rooijen (1989). Backgrounds of Students of Behavior in Relation to Their Attitude Toward Animal Well-Being. Journal of Agricultural Ethics 2 (3):235-240.score: 40.0
    Knowledge of the backgrounds of students of behaviour working in the field of applied animal behavior science may help us to recognize their influence on conclusions reached in a particular study and on more general points of view. This recognition may result in a speed up of the progress in this science, to the benefit of science and animals. Some types are: (1) Eco-ethologists (ethologists of the hunters-type). They like to stalk healthy wild animals in their natural environment. (...)
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  46. C. Rochais, S. Henry, C. Sankey, F. Nassur, A. Góracka-Bruzda & M. Hausberger (2014). Visual Attention, an Indicator of Human-Animal Relationships? A Study of Domestic Horses (Equus Caballus). Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 40.0
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  47. Joseph P. Dudley & Michael H. Woodford (2002). Bioweapons, Biodiversity, and Ecocide: Potential Effects of Biological Weapons on Biological Diversity Bioweapon Disease Outbreaks Could Cause the Extinction of Endangered Wildlife Species, the Erosion of Genetic Diversity in Domesticated Plants and Animals, the Destruction of Traditional Human Livelihoods, and the Extirpation of Indigenous Cultures. BioScience 52 (7):583-592.score: 40.0
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  48. Kate Osto (2010). Rationality in the Domesticated Dog and Other Non-Human Animals. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 29 (2):135-146.score: 40.0
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  49. P. Sandøe, N. Holtug & H. B. Simonsen (1996). Ethical Limits to Domestication. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 9 (2):114-122.score: 38.0
    Through the process of domestication the genetic make-up of farm animals can be changed by means of either selective breeding or genetic engineering. This paper is about the ethical limits to such genetic changes. It is suggested that the ethical significance of domestication has become clear recently in the light of genetic engineering, but that the problem has been there all along. Two ethical approaches to domestication are presented, genetic integrity and animal welfare. It is argued that the welfare (...)
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  50. H. Verhoog (1992). The Concept of Intrinsic Value and Transgenic Animals. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 5 (2):147-160.score: 36.0
    The creation of transgenic animals by means of modern techniques of genetic manipulation is evaluated in the light of different interpretations of the concept of intrinsic value. The zoocentric interpretation, emphasizing the suffering of individual, sentient animals, is described as an extension of the anthropocentric interpretation. In a biocentric or ecocentric approach the concept of intrinsic value first of all denotes independence of humans and a non-instrumental relation to animals. In the zoocentric approach of Bernard Rollin, genetic (...)
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