Search results for 'dopamine' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  4
    Neal R. Swerdlow & George F. Koob (1987). Dopamine, Schizophrenia, Mania, and Depression: Toward a Unified Hypothesis of Cortico-Striatopallido-Thalamic Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):197.
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  2. Richard A. Depue & Paul F. Collins (1999). Neurobiology of the Structure of Personality: Dopamine, Facilitation of Incentive Motivation, and Extraversion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):491-517.
    Extraversion has two central characteristics: (1) interpersonalengagement, which consists of affiliation (enjoying and valuing close interpersonal bonds, being warm and affectionate) and agency (being socially dominant, enjoying leadership roles, being assertive, being exhibitionistic, and having a sense of potency in accomplishing goals) and (2) impulsivity, which emerges from the interaction of extraversion and a second, independent trait (constraint). Agency is a more general motivational disposition that includes dominance, ambition, mastery, efficacy, and achievement. Positive affect (a combination of positive feelings and (...)
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  3.  84
    Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner (2011). The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia: An Historical and Philosophical Analysis. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):41-63.
    This essay selectively reviews, from an historical and philosophical perspective, the dopamine (DA) hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS; Table 1 lists the abbreviations used in this essay). Our goal is not to adjudicate the validity of the theory—although we arrive at a generally skeptical conclusion—but to focus on the process whereby the DHS has evolved over time and been evaluated. Since its inception, the DHS has been the most prominent etiologic theory in psychiatry and is still referred to widely in (...)
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  4.  23
    Matteo Colombo (2014). Deep and Beautiful. The Reward Prediction Error Hypothesis of Dopamine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 45 (1):57-67.
    According to the reward-prediction error hypothesis of dopamine, the phasic activity of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain signals a discrepancy between the predicted and currently experienced reward of a particular event. It can be claimed that this hypothesis is deep, elegant and beautiful, representing one of the largest successes of computational neuroscience. This paper examines this claim, making two contributions to existing literature. First, it draws a comprehensive historical account of the main steps that led to the formulation and (...)
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  5.  9
    J. Palmer, C. Mohr, P. Krummenacher & P. Brugger (2007). Implicit Learning of Sequential Bias in a Guessing Task: Failure to Demonstrate Effects of Dopamine Administration and Paranormal Belief☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):498-506.
    Previous research suggests that implicit sequence learning is superior for believers in the paranormal and individuals with increased cerebral dopamine. Thirty-five healthy participants performed feedback-guided anticipations of four arrow directions. A 100-trial random sequence preceded two 100-trial biased sequences in which visual targets on trial t tended to be displaced 90° clockwise or counter-clockwise from those on t − 1. ISL was defined as a positive change during the course of the biased run in the difference between pro-bias and (...)
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  6.  26
    Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner (2011). Further Thoughts on the Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):73-75.
    We are gratified at the largely positive comments on our essay on the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS) by these two distinguished commentators from the fields of biological psychiatry (Dr. Tamminga) and the philosophy of psychiatry (Dr. Murphy). There is little that they have said with which we disagree. Rather, we want to expand briefly on their commentaries.We found Dr. Tamminga's reactions to be particularly fascinating because she has been an "insider" to the story of the DHS as it (...)
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  7.  22
    Dominic Murphy (2011). Dopamine and Discovery. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):69-71.
    Kendler and Schaffner have written an exemplary case study of the rise of the dopamine hypothesis and, if not its fall, at least its stagnation and transmutation. They bring out well both the state of the science and the opportunities offered by the theory to consider some famous philosophical theories of scientific progress. So well, in fact, have they done this, that I do not have a lot to say about it. I will just mention one or two points (...)
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  8.  13
    Jeffery R. Wickens & E. Gail Tripp (2005). Altered Sensitivity to Reward in Children with ADHD: Dopamine Timing is Off. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):445-446.
    Despite general agreement that altered reward sensitivity is involved in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), a wide range of different alterations has been proposed. We cite work showing abnormal sensitivity to delay of reward, together with abnormal sensitivity to individual instances of reward. We argue that at the cellular level these behavioural characteristics might indicate that dopamine timing is off in children with ADHD.
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  9.  10
    Leonard D. Katz (1999). Dopamine and Serotonin: Integrating Current Affective Engagement with Longer-Term Goals. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):527-527.
    Interpreting VTA dopamine activity as a facilitator of affective engagement fits Depue & Collins's agency dimension of extraverted personality and also Watson's and Tellegen's (1985) engagement dimension of state mood. Serotonin, by turning down the gain on dopaminergic affective engagement, would permit already prepotent responses or habits to prevail against the behavior-switching incentive-simulation-driven temptations of the moment facilitated by fickle VTA DA. Intelligent switching between openly responsive affective engagement and constraint by long-term plans, goals, or values presumably involves environment-sensitive (...)
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  10.  7
    Jon C. Horvitz (2002). Dopamine, Parkinson's Disease, and Volition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-586.
    Disruptions in dopamine transmission within the basal ganglia (BG) produce deficits in voluntary actions, that is, in the interface between cortically-generated goal representation and BG-mediated response selection. Under conditions of dopamine loss in humans and other animals, responses are impaired when they require internal generation, but are relatively intact when elicited by external stimuli.
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  11.  1
    Robert D. Oades (1999). Dopamine: Go/No-Go Motivation Versus Switching. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):532-533.
    Sensitivity to incentive motivation has a formative influence on extraversion. Mesoamygdaloid dopamine (DA) activity may, at one level, act as a micro-gate permitting an incentive to influence behavioral organization – “Go/No-Go” in this scheme. Data on function elsewhere in the mesocorticolimbic DA system are taken to support this particular function. At another level of analysis, the data in Depue & Collins's review, along with those on the rest of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) system, may fit better with a (...)
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  12.  3
    Petra Netter & Juergen Hennig (1999). Moderators and Mechanisms Relating Personality to Reward and Dopamine: Some Findings and Open Questions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):531-532.
    Data from further human experiments touch four open questions in the target article. (1) Extinction of reward acquisition postulated by Depue & Collins's model could not be confirmed if correlating craving for, liking of, and satisfaction from smoking. (2) Intraindividual correspondence between responsivity to dopamine agonists and antagonists could likewise not be confirmed. (3) Nicotine craving and drug-induced hormone responses were not substantially correlated. (4) Low serotonin can be the cause and not just the moderator of dopaminergic sensitivity, and (...)
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  13.  5
    Don M. Tucker (1999). Dopamine Tightens, Not Loosens. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):537-538.
    Depue & Collins propose that extraversion should be separated from the impulsivity-constraint dimension of personality, and that the VTA dopamine system is the primary engine of extraversion. Although their focus is on personality traits, it may be useful to consider the evidence on psychological state changes, related both to affective arousal and to drug effects. This evidence shows that there are inherent relations between extraversion and impulsivity-constraint, and that there are influences of dopamine on impulsivity-constraint that are not (...)
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  14.  0
    Andrew M. Brooks & Gregory S. Berns (2013). Aversive Stimuli and Loss in the Mesocorticolimbic Dopamine System. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (6):281-286.
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  15.  7
    Soghra Akbari Chermahini & Bernhard Hommel (2010). The (B)Link Between Creativity and Dopamine: Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates Predict and Dissociate Divergent and Convergent Thinking. Cognition 115 (3):458-465.
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  16.  7
    César Avila, Alfonso Barrós, Generós Ortet, Maria Antònia Parcet & M. Ignacio Ibañez (2003). Brief Report Set‐Shifting and Sensitivity to Reward: A Possible Dopamine Mechanism for Explaining Disinhibitory Disorders. Cognition and Emotion 17 (6):951-959.
  17.  2
    Paul R. Solomon & Andrew Crider (1982). Attention, Dopamine, and Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):75.
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  18.  1
    Dwight C. German (1982). Dopamine Neurons, Reward and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):59.
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  19.  0
    Richard J. Beninger (1982). The Behavioral Function of Dopamine. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):55.
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  20.  0
    Richard J. Katz (1982). Dopamine and the Limits of Behavioral Reduction – or Why Aren't All Schizophrenics Fat and Happy? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):60.
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  21.  5
    Takashi Okada & Masumi Yamakawa (forthcoming). Characteristic Ligand Substructures to Dopamine Receptors. Joint Workshop of Vietnamese Society of Ai, Sigkbs-Jsai, Ics-Ipsj and Ieice-Sigai on Active Mining.
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  22.  22
    P. Gerrans, Mad Scientists or Unreliable Autobiographers? Dopamine Dysregulation and Delusion.
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  23.  1
    George F. Koob (1982). The Dopamine Anhedonia Hypothesis: A Pharmacological Phrenology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):63.
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  24.  3
    Daphna Shohamy & R. Alison Adcock (2010). Dopamine and Adaptive Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (10):464-472.
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  25.  0
    J. P. Tassin (1987). Dopamine and Mental Illness: And What About the Mesocortical Dopamine System? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):224.
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  26.  1
    P. Collins (1998). Dopamine Observed in the Arcade. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (7):239.
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  27.  5
    A. Antonini, R. Benti, R. Notaris, S. Tesei, A. Zecchinelli, G. Sacilotto, N. Meucci, M. Canesi, C. Mariani, G. Pezzoli & P. Gerundini (2003). 123i-Ioflupane/Spect Binding to Striatal Dopamine Transporter (Dat) Uptake in Patients with Parkinson's Disease, Multiple System Atrophy, and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Neurological Sciences 24 (3).
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  28.  22
    Tia Powell (2007). Wrestling Satan and Conquering Dopamine: Addiction and Free Will. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):14 – 15.
  29.  4
    Nicholas J. Malecek & Russell A. Poldrack (2013). Beyond Dopamine: The Noradrenergic System and Mental Effort. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):698-699.
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  30.  16
    Thomas H. Rammsayer (1999). Dopamine and Extraversion: Differential Responsivity May Be the Key. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):535-536.
    Depue & Collins's general idea of a functional relationship between DA activity and extraversion is an important step toward an integrative biological model of personality. However, focusing primarily on incentive motivation and variations in VTA DA activity as basic behavioral and biological components underlying extraversion appears too limited. Existing data suggest that responsivity to changes in DA activity is higher in introverts than in extraverts. This may reflect a general, extraversion- related characteristic of the entire dopaminergic network in the brain.
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  31.  1
    C. Fiorillo (2010). The Neural Basis of Temporal Prediction and the Role of Dopamine. In Anna C. Nobre & Jennifer T. Coull (eds.), Attention and Time. OUP Oxford 273.
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  32.  3
    Ann E. Kelley (1987). Dopamine and Mental Illness: Phenomenological and Anatomical Considerations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):219.
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  33.  1
    Jeffrey B. Blount, Takeshi Kondoh, Lisa L. Pundt, John Conrad, Elizabeth M. Jansen & Walter C. Low (1995). Immunobiology of Neural Transplants and Functional Incorporation of Grafted Dopamine Neurons. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):48.
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  34.  9
    Daniel John Zizzo (2005). Serotonin, Dopamine, and Cooperation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):370-370.
    Whether or not trait affiliation correlates with human behaviour needs investigating. One should be careful generalizing neuropsychological mechanisms for affiliation, and generalizing an analysis based on one or two neuropsychological mechanisms and mostly studies on rodents, to complex human social interactions. Serotonin is an example of a neurotransmitter playing an important role in cooperation and interacting with the dopaminergic system.
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  35.  1
    Tabitha M. Powledge (1999). Addiction and the Brain The Dopamine Pathway is Helping Researchers Find Their Way Through the Addiction Maze. BioScience 49 (7):513-519.
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  36.  1
    Neir Eshel, Ju Tian & Naoshige Uchida (2013). Opening the Black Box: Dopamine, Predictions, and Learning. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (9):430-431.
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  37.  6
    Trevor J. Crawford, Annelies Broerse & Jans Den Boer (1999). Dopamine and Impairment at the Executive Level. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):678-679.
    Patients with schizophrenia have an impairment in the inhibition of reflexive saccades, as a consequence of a functional impairment of the prefrontal cortex, which has not yet been encapsulated in terms of a formal model. A number of novel and testable hypotheses can be generated from the framework proposed by Findlay & Walker that will stimulate further research. Their framework therefore marks an important step in the development of a comprehensive functional model of saccadic eye movements. Further advances will be (...)
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  38.  1
    T. J. O'Grady (forthcoming). Bile, Magnetism, and Dopamine: Simple Answers to Difficult Problems. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine.
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  39.  1
    Warren B. Miller, David J. Pasta, James Macmurray, Connie Chiu, H. Wu & David Comings (1999). Dopamine Receptor Genes Are Associated with Age at First Sexual Intercourse. Journal of Biosocial Science 31 (1):43-54.
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  40.  1
    César Avila, Alfonso Barrós, Generós Ortet, Maria Antònia Parcet & M. Ignacio Ibañez (2003). Brief Report Set‐Shifting and Sensitivity to Reward: A Possible Dopamine Mechanism for Explaining Disinhibitory Disorders. Cognition and Emotion 17 (6):951-959.
  41.  2
    Fabrizio Doricchi & Cristiano Violani (2000). Mesolimbic Dopamine and the Neuropsychology of Dreaming: Some Caution and Reconsiderations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):930-931.
    New findings point to a role for mesolimbic DA circuits in the generation of dreaming. We disagree with Solms about these structures having an exclusive role in generating dreams. We review data suggesting that dreaming can be interrupted at different levels of processing and that anterior-subcortical lesions associated with dream cessation are unlikely to produce selective hypodopaminergic dynamic impairments. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms].
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  42. C. Ackerman (2009). Dopamine. In Shane J. Lopez (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Positive Psychology. Wiley-Blackwell 288--90.
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  43.  0
    G. W. Arbuthnott (1982). Support for the Hypothesis That the Actions of Dopamine Are “Not Merely Motor.”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):54.
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  44.  0
    Alexander R. Cools (1992). Striatal Structures, Dopamine and the Mobility Gradient Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (2):271-272.
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  45.  0
    A. J. Greenshaw (1985). Dopamine and Circling, or Décalage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (1):175-176.
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  46.  0
    Michael H. Joseph (1993). The Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia: Beyond the Dopamine Hypothesis to Behavioural Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):203.
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  47.  0
    Victor Domingo Ramirez (1987). Neuroendocrinology Dopamine and Neuroendocrine Active Substances Emilio Del Pozo Edward Flückinger. BioScience 37 (9):688-688.
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  48.  0
    Martin Sarter (1991). Dopamine-GABA-Cholinergic Interactions and Negative Schizophrenic Symptomatology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):46-47.
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  49.  0
    Nora D. Volkow, Gene-Jack Wang & Ruben D. Baler (2011). Reward, Dopamine and the Control of Food Intake: Implications for Obesity. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (1):37-46.
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  50. Mark Solms (2000). Dreaming and Rem Sleep Are Controlled by Different Brain Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):843-850.
    The paradigmatic assumption that REM sleep is the physiological equivalent of dreaming is in need of fundamental revision. A mounting body of evidence suggests that dreaming and REM sleep are dissociable states, and that dreaming is controlled by forebrain mechanisms. Recent neuropsychological, radiological, and pharmacological findings suggest that the cholinergic brain stem mechanisms that control the REM state can only generate the psychological phenomena of dreaming through the mediation of a second, probably dopaminergic, forebrain mechanism. The latter mechanism (and thus (...)
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