Search results for 'dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner (2011). The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia: An Historical and Philosophical Analysis. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):41-63.
    This essay selectively reviews, from an historical and philosophical perspective, the dopamine (DA) hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS; Table 1 lists the abbreviations used in this essay). Our goal is not to adjudicate the validity of the theory—although we arrive at a generally skeptical conclusion—but to focus on the process whereby the DHS has evolved over time and been evaluated. Since its inception, the DHS has been the most prominent etiologic theory in psychiatry and is still referred to (...)
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  2.  29
    Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner (2011). Further Thoughts on the Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):73-75.
    We are gratified at the largely positive comments on our essay on the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS) by these two distinguished commentators from the fields of biological psychiatry (Dr. Tamminga) and the philosophy of psychiatry (Dr. Murphy). There is little that they have said with which we disagree. Rather, we want to expand briefly on their commentaries.We found Dr. Tamminga's reactions to be particularly fascinating because she has been an "insider" to the story of the DHS (...)
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  3.  7
    Neal R. Swerdlow & George F. Koob (1987). Dopamine, Schizophrenia, Mania, and Depression: Toward a Unified Hypothesis of Cortico-Striatopallido-Thalamic Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):197.
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  4. Michael H. Joseph (1993). The Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia: Beyond the Dopamine Hypothesis to Behavioural Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):203.
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  5. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2012). Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):542-551.
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of mental disorders. I (...)
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  6.  31
    Matteo Colombo (2014). Deep and Beautiful. The Reward Prediction Error Hypothesis of Dopamine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45 (1):57-67.
    According to the reward-prediction error hypothesis of dopamine, the phasic activity of dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain signals a discrepancy between the predicted and currently experienced reward of a particular event. It can be claimed that this hypothesis is deep, elegant and beautiful, representing one of the largest successes of computational neuroscience. This paper examines this claim, making two contributions to existing literature. First, it draws a comprehensive historical account of the main steps that led to the (...)
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  7.  6
    Matthew C. Keller (2008). Problems with the Imprinting Hypothesis of Schizophrenia and Autism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):273-274.
    Crespi & Badcock (C&B) convincingly argue that autism and schizophrenia are diametric malfunctions of the social brain, but their core imprinting hypothesis is less persuasive. Much of the evidence they cite is unrelated to their hypothesis, is selective, or is overstated; their hypothesis lacks a clearly explained mechanism; and it is unclear how their explanation fits in with known aspects of the disorders.
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  8.  2
    Theodore Sarbin (1990). Toward the Obsolescence of the Schizophrenia Hypothesis. Journal of Mind and Behavior 11 (3-4):259-284.
    The disease construction of schizophrenia is no longer tenable. That construction originated during a period of rapid growth of biological science based on mechanistic principles. Crude diagnostis measures failed to differentiate absurd, unwanted conduct due to biological conditions from atypical conduct directed to solving existential or identity problems. The construction was communicated - in the absence of solid evidence - by medical practitioners by means of symbolic, rhetorical, and organizational acts. The patient came to be regarded as an object (...)
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  9.  27
    Jonathan Kenneth Burns (2004). Elaborating the Social Brain Hypothesis of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):868-885.
    I defend the case for an evolutionary theory of schizophrenia and the social brain, arguing that such an exercise necessitates a broader methodology than that familiar to neuroscience. I propose a reworked evolutionary genetic model of schizophrenia, drawing on insights from commentators, buttressing my claim that psychosis is a costly consequence of sophisticated social cognition in humans. Expanded models of social brain anatomy and the spectrum of psychopathologies are presented in terms of upper and lower social brain and (...)
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  10.  5
    Giovanni Stanghellini (2016). Some Suggestions to Integrate the Self-Disorder Hypothesis of Schizophrenia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (3):213-215.
    A significant cluster of complaints of persons affected by schizophrenia, for example, their feeling ephemeral, lacking core identity, being affected by a diminished sense of existing as a self-present subject, point to the disruptions of structural aspects of the core self. These and similar disturbances aggregate significantly and selectively in the schizophrenia spectrum disorders, occur and are detectable in adolescents at risk of future schizophrenic disorder, and have a tendency to persist. All this led to the proposal that (...)
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  11.  4
    G. W. Arbuthnott (1982). Support for the Hypothesis That the Actions of Dopamine Are “Not Merely Motor”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):54.
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  12.  3
    Chittaranjan Andrade, Rajiv Radhakrishnan & Praveen P. Fernandes (2012). Psychopharmacology of Schizophrenia: The Future Looks Bleak. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):4.
    Introduction: More than half a century after the introduction of effective pharmacotherapy for the illness, in most patients schizophrenia remains a chronic, relapsing condition with poor long-term outcomes. Methods: We examine the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia from different perspectives to understand why there have not been significant advances, and to consider what the future might hold in store. Results: We argue that the treatment of schizophrenia addresses the phenotype and not the cause; that the causes may not (...)
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  13.  37
    Jonathan Kenneth Burns (2004). An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social (...)
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  14.  12
    William T. Carpenter Jr (2012). The Future of Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapeutics: Not so Bleak. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):13.
    Chlorpromazine efficacy in schizophrenia was observed 60 years ago. Advances in pharmacotherapy of this disorder have been modest with effectiveness still limited to the psychosis psychopathology and mechanism still dependent on dopamine antagonism. While a look backward may generate pessimism, future discovery may be far more robust. The near future will see significant changes in paradigms applied in discovery. Rather than viewing schizophrenia as a disease entity represented by psychosis, the construct will be deconstructed into component psychopathology (...)
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  15. Jay Joseph (1999). A Critique of the Finnish Adoptive Family Study of Schizophrenia. Journal of Mind and Behavior 20 (2):133-154.
    This paper evaluates the ongoing Finnish Adoptive Family Study of Schizophrenia. The Tienari, Lahti et al. study is the most recent attempt to use adoptees as a way of testing the hypothesis that schizophrenia carries a genetic component, and the purpose here is to present what is probably the first in-depth critical analysis of its findings. The published reports of Tienari and associates are the primary focus of analysis, while problems with other schizophrenia adoption studies using (...)
     
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  16. James McClenon (2011). Evolutionary Theories of Schizophrenia: An Experience-Centered Review. Journal of Mind and Behavior 32 (2):135-150.
    The ongoing incidence of schizophrenia is considered a paradox, as the disorder has genetic basis yet confers survival handicaps. Researchers have not reached consensus regarding theories explaining this contradiction. Major evolutionary theories hypothesize that schizophrenia is: a byproduct of other evolutionary processes, linked to survival advantages that counteract disadvantages, associated with processes such as shamanism conferring advantages to groups, a consequence of modern environments, a result of random processes, such as mutations. A null hypothesis argues that philosophical (...)
     
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  17.  15
    Yue Chen (2003). Spatial Integration in Perception and Cognition: An Empirical Approach to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):86-87.
    Evidence for a dysfunction in cognitive coordination in schizophrenia is emerging, but it is not specific enough to prove (or disprove) this long-standing hypothesis. Many aspects of the external world are spatially mapped in the brain. A comprehensive internal representation relies on integration of information across space. Focus on spatial integration in the perceptual and cognitive processes will generate empirical data that shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
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  18.  13
    J. A. Gray, J. Feldon, J. N. P. Rawlins, D. R. Hemsley & A. D. Smith (1991). The Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):1-20.
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  19.  19
    A. NeumAnn, S. Blairy, D. Lecompte & P. PhiliPpot (2007). Specificity Deficit in the Recollection of Emotional Memories in Schizophrenia☆☆☆. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):469-484.
    The influence of emotion on episodic and autobiographical memory in schizophrenia was investigated. Using an experiential approach, the states of awareness accompanying recollection of pictures from the IAPS and of associated autobiographical memories was recorded. Results show that schizophrenia impairs episodic and autobiographical memories in their critical feature: autonoetic awareness, i.e., the type of awareness experienced when mentally reliving events from one’s past. Schizophrenia was also associated with a reduction of specific autobiographical memories. The impact of stimulus (...)
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  20.  8
    J. P. Ginsberg (2003). Setting Domain Boundaries for Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):88-89.
    The claim that the disorganized subtype of schizophrenia results from glutamate hypofunction is enhanced by consideration of current subtypology of schizophrenia, symptom definition, interdependence of neurotransmitters, and the nature of the data needed to support the hypothesis. Careful specification clarifies the clinical reality of disorganization as a feature of schizophrenia and increases the utility of the subtype.
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  21.  23
    David Miguel Gray (2014). Failing to Self-Ascribe Thought and Motion: Towards a Three-Factor Account of Passivity Symptoms in Schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research 152 (1):28-32.
    There has recently been emphasis put on providing two-factor accounts of monothematic delusions. Such accounts would explain (1) whether a delusional hypothesis (e.g. someone else is inserting thoughts into my mind) can be understood as a prima facie reasonable response to an experience and (2) why such a delusional hypothesis is believed and maintained given its implausibility and evidence against it. I argue that if we are to avoid obfuscating the cognitive mechanisms involved in monothematic delusion formation we (...)
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  22.  96
    Michael A. Schwartz, Osborne P. Wiggins, Jean Naudin & Manfred Spitzer (2005). Rebuilding Reality: A Phenomenology of Aspects of Chronic Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):91-115.
    Schizophrenia, like other pathological conditions of mental life, has not been systematically included in the general study of consciousness. By focusing on aspects of chronic schizophrenia, we attempt to remedy this omission. Basic components of Husserl’s phenomenology (intentionality, synthesis, constitution, epoche, and unbuilding) are explicated and then employed in an account of chronic schizophrenia. In schizophrenic experience, basic constituents of reality are lost and the subject must try to explicitly re-constitute them. “Automatic mental life” is weakened such (...)
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  23.  9
    Adolfo G. Sadile & Davide Viggiano (2005). Is the Hypodopaminergic Hypothesis Plausible as Neural Bases of ADHD? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):440-441.
    The “dynamic developmental theory” is based on hypofunctioning dopamine systems that follow an early overactivity phase. The theory does not consider recent experimental evidences from different attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) models and the heterogeneity of the disorder. Alternatives are proposed that integrate available information gathered from clinical and experimental studies, with theoretical constructs.
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  24.  9
    Yazan Abu Ghazal (2014). Perspectivity in Psychiatric Research: The Psychopathology of Schizophrenia in Postwar Germany. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):103-111.
    The reorganization of psychiatric knowledge at the turn of the twentieth century derived from Emil Kraepelin’s clinical classification of psychoses. Surprisingly, within just few years, Kraepelin’s simple dichotomy between dementia praecox and manic-depressive psychosis succeeded in giving psychiatry a new framework that is still used until the present day. Unexpectedly, Kraepelin’s simple clinical scheme based on the dichotomy replaced the significantly more differentiated nosography that dominated psychiatric research in the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Moreover, although all the (...)
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  25.  7
    Miriam Kyselo (2016). The Enactive Approach and Disorders of the Self - the Case of Schizophrenia. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (4):591-616.
    The paper discusses two recent approaches to schizophrenia, a phenomenological and a neuroscientific approach, illustrating how new directions in philosophy and cognitive science can elaborate accounts of psychopathologies of the self. It is argued that the notion of the minimal and bodily self underlying these approaches is still limited since it downplays the relevance of social interactions and relations for the formation of a coherent sense of self. These approaches also illustrate that we still lack an account of how (...)
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  26.  97
    Jeffrey A. Gray (1995). The Contents of Consciousness: A Neuropsychological Conjecture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):659-76.
    Drawing on previous models of anxiety, intermediate memory, the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, and goal-directed behaviour, a neuropsychological hypothesis is proposed for the generation of the contents of consciousness. It is suggested that these correspond to the outputs of a comparator that, on a moment-by-moment basis, compares the current state of the organism's perceptual world with a predicted state. An outline is given of the information-processing functions of the comparator system and of the neural systems which mediate them. (...)
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  27.  17
    Carol Tamminga (2011). Posing Hypotheses Responsibly in Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):65-67.
    It is easy to say that the analysis by Kendler and Schaffner of the status of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS) is, at the very least, a scholarly read. It includes an exhaustive review of the DHS literature accompanied by a demanding critique. The authors' bar for hypothesis verification is high, and their conclusion is negative—that scientific support is insufficient to retain the hypothesis as such. They proceed to evaluate the reasons they see for (...)
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  28.  5
    Jean-Rémy Martin (2013). Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such deficits may, in addition, lead to an (...)
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  29.  34
    O. Gambini, V. Barbieri & S. Scarone (2004). Theory of Mind in Schizophrenia: First Person Vs Third Person Perspective. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):39-46.
    Patients suffering from schizophrenia have an impaired meta-representation also known as Theory of Mind . Moreover, the presence of delusions or other positive symptoms of schizophrenia has been correlated to poor ToM performances. Lack of insight is a common symptom of schizophrenia and can be considered a critical manifestation of impaired ToM abilities. In particular, the present study addresses the role of perspective ToM ability in schizophrenic patients. Thirty severely delusional schizophrenic patients completely lack insight when interviewed (...)
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  30.  54
    Yasuhiko Murakami (2013). Affection of Contact and Transcendental Telepathy in Schizophrenia and Autism. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):179-194.
    This paper seeks to demonstrate the structural difference in communication of schizophrenia and autism. For a normal adult, spontaneous communication is nothing but the transmission of phantasía (thought) by means of perceptual objects or language. This transmission is first observed in a make-believe play of child. Husserl named this function “perceptual phantasía,” and this function presupposes as its basis the “internalized affection of contact” (which functions empirically in eye contact, body contact, or voice calling me). Regarding autism, because of (...)
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  31.  27
    Colin Hamlin (forthcoming). Towards a Theory of Universes: Structure Theory and the Mathematical Universe Hypothesis. Synthese:1-21.
    The maturation of the physical image has made apparent the limits of our scientific understanding of fundamental reality. These limitations serve as motivation for a new form of metaphysical inquiry that restricts itself to broadly scientific methods. Contributing towards this goal we combine the mathematical universe hypothesis as developed by Max Tegmark with the axioms of Stewart Shapiro’s structure theory. The result is a theory we call the Theory of the Structural Multiverse. The focus is on informal theory development (...)
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  32. Murat Aydede, Language of Thought Hypothesis: State of the Art.
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis (LOTH) is an empirical thesis about thought and thinking. For their explication, it postulates a physically realized system of representations that have a combinatorial syntax (and semantics) such that operations on representations are causally sensitive only to the syntactic properties of representations. According to LOTH, thought is, roughly, the tokening of a representation that has a syntactic (constituent) structure with an appropriate semantics. Thinking thus consists in syntactic operations defined over representations. Most of the (...)
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  33.  24
    David Kyle Johnson (2014). The Failure of the Multiverse Hypothesis as a Solution to the Problem of No Best World. Sophia 53 (4):447-465.
    The multiverse hypothesis is growing in popularity among theistic philosophers because some view it as the preferable way to solve certain difficulties presented by theistic belief. In this paper, I am concerned specifically with its application to Rowe’s problem of no best world, which suggests that God’s existence is impossible given the fact that the world God actualizes must be unsurpassable, yet for any given possible world, there is one greater. I will argue that, as a solution to the (...)
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  34.  26
    J. P. M. A. Maes & A. R. Van Gool (2008). Misattribution of Agency in Schizophrenia: An Exploration of Historical First-Person Accounts. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):191-202.
    This paper provides a concise description and discussion of bottom–up and top–down approaches to misattribution of agency in schizophrenia. It explores if first-person accounts of passivity phenomena can provide support for one of these approaches. The focus is on excerpts in which the writers specifically examine their experiences of external influence. None of the accounts provides arguments that fit easily with only one of the possible approaches, which is in line with current attempts to theoretical integration.
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  35.  7
    Arthur L. Rubin & Jean E. Rubin (1993). Weak Forms of the Axiom of Choice and the Generalized Continuum Hypothesis. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 39 (1):7-22.
    In this paper we study some statements similar to the Partition Principle and the Trichotomy. We prove some relationships between these statements, the Axiom of Choice, and the Generalized Continuum Hypothesis. We also prove some independence results. MSC: 03E25, 03E50, 04A25, 04A50.
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  36. Robert D. Rupert (2004). Challenges to the Hypothesis of Extended Cognition. Journal of Philosophy 101 (8):389-428.
  37. Antti Revonsuo (2000). The Reinterpretation of Dreams: An Evolutionary Hypothesis of the Function of Dreaming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):877-901.
    Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content is consistently (...)
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  38.  64
    D. Evans (2002). The Search Hypothesis of Emotions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):497-509.
    Many philosophers and psychologists now argue that emotions play a vital role in reasoning. This paper explores one particular way of elucidating how emotions help reason which may be dubbed ?the search hypothesis of emotion?. After outlining the search hypothesis of emotion and dispensing with a red herring that has marred previous statements of the hypothesis, I discuss two alternative readings of the search hypothesis. It is argued that the search hypothesis must be construed as (...)
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  39.  18
    Christopher Viger (2007). The Acquired Language of Thought Hypothesis. Interaction Studies 8 (1):125-142.
    I present the symbol grounding problem in the larger context of a materialist theory of content and then present two problems for causal, teleo-functional accounts of content. This leads to a distinction between two kinds of mental representations: presentations and symbols; only the latter are cognitive. Based on Milner and Goodale’s dual route model of vision, I posit the existence of precise interfaces between cognitive systems that are activated during object recognition. Interfaces are constructed as a child learns, and is (...)
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  40.  89
    Daniel Howard-Snyder (1994). Theism, the Hypothesis of Indifference, and the Biological Role of Pain and Pleasure. Faith and Philosophy 11 (3):452-466.
    Following Hume’s lead, Paul Draper argues that, given the biological role played by both pain and pleasure in goal-directed organic systems, the observed facts about pain and pleasure in the world are antecedently much more likely on the Hypothesis of Indifference than on theism. I examine one by one Draper’s arguments for this claim and show how they miss the mark.
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  41. Mark Sprevak (2010). Inference to the Hypothesis of Extended Cognition. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (4):353-362.
    This paper examines the justification for the hypothesis of extended cognition (HEC). HEC claims that human cognitive processes can, and often do, extend outside our heads to include objects in the environment. HEC has been justified by inference to the best explanation (IBE). Both advocates and critics of HEC claim that we should infer the truth value of HEC based on whether HEC makes a positive, or negative, explanatory contribution to cognitive science. I argue that IBE cannot play this (...)
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  42.  60
    Christian Beyer (1997). Hussearle's Representationalism and the “Hypothesis of the Background”. Synthese 112 (3):323-352.
    John Searle''s hypothesis of the Background seems to conflict with his initial representationalism according to which each Intentional state contains a particular content that determines its conditions of satisfaction. In Section I of this essay I expose Searle''s initial theory of Intentionality and relate it to Edmund Husserl''s earlier phenomenology. In Section II I make it clear that Searle''s introduction of the notion of Network, though indispensable, does not, by itself, force us to modify that initial theory. However, a (...)
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  43.  2
    Robert F. Williams & Benton J. Underwood (1970). Encoding Variability: Tests of the Martin Hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):317.
  44.  2
    William O. Jenkins & Leta M. Cunningham (1949). The Guessing-Sequence Hypothesis, the 'Spread of Effect' and Number-Guessing Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (2):158.
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  45.  8
    Gabriele Stotz-Ingenlath (2000). Epistemological Aspects of Eugen Bleuler's Conception of Schizophrenia in 1911. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):153-159.
    Eugen Bleuler, in 1911, renamed the group of mental disorders with poor prognosis which Emil Kraepel in had called ``dementia praecox'' ``group of schizophrenias'',because for him the splitting of personality was the main symptom.Biographical, scientific and methodological influences on Bleuler's concept of schizophrenia are shown with special reference to Kraepelin and Freud.Bleuler was a passionate and very experienced clinician. He lived with his patients, taking care of them and writing down his observations. Methodologically he was an empiricist and an (...)
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  46.  1
    David H. Dodd & Lyle E. Bourne Jr (1969). Test of Some Assumptions of a Hypothesis-Testing Model of Concept Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):69.
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  47.  1
    John C. Malone (1974). The Effect of Number of Stimuli on the Steady-State Generalization Gradient: A Test of the Summation Hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):729.
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  48. Jean Gayon & Matthew Cobb (1999). Darwin's Struggle for Survival: Heredity and the Hypothesis of Natural Selection. Journal of the History of Biology 32 (2):413-415.
    In Darwinism's Struggle for Survival Jean Gayon offers a philosophical interpretation of the history of theoretical Darwinism. He begins by examining the different forms taken by the hypothesis of natural selection in the nineteenth century and the major difficulties which it encountered, particularly with regard to its compatibility with the theory of heredity. He then shows how these difficulties were overcome during the seventy years which followed the publication of Darwin's Origin of Species, and he concludes by analysing the (...)
     
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  49.  84
    Shaun Gallagher (2004). Neurocognitive Models of Schizophrenia: A Neurophenomenological Critique. Psychopathology 37 (1):8–19.
    In the past dozen years a number of theoretical models of schizophrenic symptoms have been proposed, often inspired by advances in the cognitive sciences, and especially cognitive neuroscience. Perhaps the most widely cited and influential of these is the neurocognitive model proposed by Christopher Frith (1992). Frith's influence reaches into psychiatry, neuroscience, and even philosophy. The philosopher John Campbell (1999a), for example, has called Frith's model the most parsimonious explanation of how self-ascriptions of thoughts are subject to errors of identification. (...)
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  50.  28
    Lisa Bortolotti (2015). Epistemic Benefits of Elaborated and Systematised Delusions in Schizophrenia. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (3):axv024.
    In this paper I ask whether elaborated and systematised delusions emerging in the context of schizophrenia have the potential for epistemic innocence. I define epistemic innocence as the status of those cognitions that have significant epistemic benefits that could not be attained otherwise. In particular, I propose that a cognition is epistemically innocent if it delivers some significant epistemic benefit to a given agent at a given time; and if alternative cognitions delivering the same epistemic benefit are unavailable to (...)
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