Search results for 'dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner (2011). Further Thoughts on the Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):73-75.score: 1224.0
    We are gratified at the largely positive comments on our essay on the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS) by these two distinguished commentators from the fields of biological psychiatry (Dr. Tamminga) and the philosophy of psychiatry (Dr. Murphy). There is little that they have said with which we disagree. Rather, we want to expand briefly on their commentaries.We found Dr. Tamminga's reactions to be particularly fascinating because she has been an "insider" to the story of the DHS (...)
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  2. Kenneth S. Kendler & Kenneth F. Schaffner (2011). The Dopamine Hypothesis of Schizophrenia: An Historical and Philosophical Analysis. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):41-63.score: 1221.0
    This essay selectively reviews, from an historical and philosophical perspective, the dopamine (DA) hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS; Table 1 lists the abbreviations used in this essay). Our goal is not to adjudicate the validity of the theory—although we arrive at a generally skeptical conclusion—but to focus on the process whereby the DHS has evolved over time and been evaluated. Since its inception, the DHS has been the most prominent etiologic theory in psychiatry and is still referred to (...)
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  3. Neal R. Swerdlow & George F. Koob (1987). Dopamine, Schizophrenia, Mania, and Depression: Toward a Unified Hypothesis of Cortico-Striatopallido-Thalamic Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (2):197.score: 1086.0
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  4. Michael H. Joseph (1993). The Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia: Beyond the Dopamine Hypothesis to Behavioural Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):203.score: 990.0
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  5. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2012). Intervention, Causal Reasoning, and the Neurobiology of Mental Disorders: Pharmacological Drugs as Experimental Instruments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (2):542-551.score: 684.0
    In psychiatry, pharmacological drugs play an important experimental role in attempts to identify the neurobiological causes of mental disorders. Besides being developed in applied contexts as potential treatments for patients with mental disorders, pharmacological drugs play a crucial role in research contexts as experimental instruments that facilitate the formulation and revision of neurobiological theories of psychopathology. This paper examines the various epistemic functions that pharmacological drugs serve in the discovery, refinement, testing, and elaboration of neurobiological theories of mental disorders. I (...)
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  6. Matthew C. Keller (2008). Problems with the Imprinting Hypothesis of Schizophrenia and Autism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):273-274.score: 519.8
    Crespi & Badcock (C&B) convincingly argue that autism and schizophrenia are diametric malfunctions of the social brain, but their core imprinting hypothesis is less persuasive. Much of the evidence they cite is unrelated to their hypothesis, is selective, or is overstated; their hypothesis lacks a clearly explained mechanism; and it is unclear how their explanation fits in with known aspects of the disorders.
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  7. Jonathan Kenneth Burns (2004). Elaborating the Social Brain Hypothesis of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):868-885.score: 479.3
    I defend the case for an evolutionary theory of schizophrenia and the social brain, arguing that such an exercise necessitates a broader methodology than that familiar to neuroscience. I propose a reworked evolutionary genetic model of schizophrenia, drawing on insights from commentators, buttressing my claim that psychosis is a costly consequence of sophisticated social cognition in humans. Expanded models of social brain anatomy and the spectrum of psychopathologies are presented in terms of upper and lower social brain and (...)
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  8. Matteo Colombo (2014). Deep and Beautiful. The Reward Prediction Error Hypothesis of Dopamine. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 45:57-67.score: 436.5
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  9. Theodore R. Sarbin (forthcoming). Toward the Obsolescence of the Schizophrenia Hypothesis. Journal of Mind and Behavior.score: 414.0
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  10. G. W. Arbuthnott (1982). Support for the Hypothesis That the Actions of Dopamine Are “Not Merely Motor.”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (1):54.score: 405.0
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  11. [deleted]James M. Gold Sarah E. Morris, Clay B. Holroyd, Monica C. Mann-Wrobel (2011). Dissociation of Response and Feedback Negativity in Schizophrenia: Electrophysiological and Computational Evidence for a Deficit in the Representation of Value. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 337.5
    Contrasting theories of schizophrenia propose that the disorder is characterized by a deficit in phasic changes in dopamine activity in response to ongoing events or, alternatively, by a weakness in the representation of the value of responses. Schizophrenia patients have reliably reduced brain activity following incorrect responses but other research suggests that they may have intact feedback-related potentials, indicating that the impairment may be specifically response-related. We used event-related brain potentials and computational modeling to examine this issue (...)
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  12. Chittaranjan Andrade, Rajiv Radhakrishnan & Praveen P. Fernandes (2012). Psychopharmacology of Schizophrenia: The Future Looks Bleak. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):4.score: 306.0
    Introduction: More than half a century after the introduction of effective pharmacotherapy for the illness, in most patients schizophrenia remains a chronic, relapsing condition with poor long-term outcomes. Methods: We examine the pharmacological treatment of schizophrenia from different perspectives to understand why there have not been significant advances, and to consider what the future might hold in store. Results: We argue that the treatment of schizophrenia addresses the phenotype and not the cause; that the causes may not (...)
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  13. Jonathan Kenneth Burns (2004). An Evolutionary Theory of Schizophrenia: Cortical Connectivity, Metarepresentation, and the Social Brain. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):831-855.score: 301.5
    Schizophrenia is a worldwide, prevalent disorder with a multifactorial but highly genetic aetiology. A constant prevalence rate in the face of reduced fecundity has caused some to argue that an evolutionary advantage exists in unaffected relatives. Here, I critique this adaptationist approach, and review – and find wanting – Crow's “speciation” hypothesis. In keeping with available biological and psychological evidence, I propose an alternative theory of the origins of this disorder. Schizophrenia is a disorder of the social (...)
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  14. William T. Carpenter Jr (2012). The Future of Schizophrenia Pharmacotherapeutics: Not so Bleak. Mens Sana Monographs 10 (1):13.score: 301.5
    Chlorpromazine efficacy in schizophrenia was observed 60 years ago. Advances in pharmacotherapy of this disorder have been modest with effectiveness still limited to the psychosis psychopathology and mechanism still dependent on dopamine antagonism. While a look backward may generate pessimism, future discovery may be far more robust. The near future will see significant changes in paradigms applied in discovery. Rather than viewing schizophrenia as a disease entity represented by psychosis, the construct will be deconstructed into component psychopathology (...)
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  15. Yue Chen (2003). Spatial Integration in Perception and Cognition: An Empirical Approach to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):86-87.score: 288.0
    Evidence for a dysfunction in cognitive coordination in schizophrenia is emerging, but it is not specific enough to prove (or disprove) this long-standing hypothesis. Many aspects of the external world are spatially mapped in the brain. A comprehensive internal representation relies on integration of information across space. Focus on spatial integration in the perceptual and cognitive processes will generate empirical data that shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
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  16. [deleted]Simon Hong (2013). Dopamine System: Manager of Neural Pathways. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:854.score: 288.0
    There are a growing number of roles that midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons assume, such as, reward, aversion, alerting and vigor. Here I propose a theory that may be able to explain why the suggested functions of DA came about. It has been suggested that largely parallel cortico-basal ganglia-thalamo-cortico loops exist to control different aspects of behavior. I propose that (1) the midbrain DA system is organized in a similar manner, with different groups of DA neurons corresponding to these parallel (...)
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  17. Andreas Brand Michael H. Herzog, Maya Roinishvili, Eka Chkonia (2013). Schizophrenia and Visual Backward Masking: A General Deficit of Target Enhancement. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 283.5
    The obvious symptoms of schizophrenia are of cognitive and psychopathological nature. However, schizophrenia affects also visual processing which becomes particularly evident when stimuli are presented for short durations and are followed by a masking stimulus. Visual deficits are of great interest because they might be related to the genetic variations underlying the disease (endophenotype concept). Visual masking deficits are usually attributed to specific dysfunctions of the visual system such as a hypo- or hyper-active magnocellular system. Here, we propose (...)
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  18. [deleted]Kenneth Hugdahl, Else-Marie Løberg, Karsten Specht, Vidar M. Steen, Heidi van Wageningen & Hugo A. Jørgensen (2007). Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia: The Role of Cognitive, Brain Structural and Genetic Disturbances in the Left Temporal Lobe. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 279.0
    In this article we review research in our laboratory on auditory hallucinations using behavioral and MRI measure. The review consists of both previously published and new data that for the fi rst time is presented together in a cohesive way. Auditory hallucinations are among the most common symptoms in schizophrenia, affecting more than 70% of the patients. We here advance the hypothesis that auditory hallucinations are internally generated speech perceptions that are lateralized to the left temporal lobe, in (...)
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  19. Jakob Linnet (2013). The Iowa Gambling Task and the Three Fallacies of Dopamine in Gambling Disorder. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 279.0
    Gambling disorder sufferers prefer immediately larger rewards despite long term losses on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), and these impairments are associated with dopamine dysfunctions. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter linked with temporal and structural dysfunctions in substance use disorder, which has supported the idea of impaired decision-making and dopamine dysfunctions in gambling disorder. However, evidence from substance use disorders cannot be directly transferred to gambling disorder. This article focuses on three hypotheses of dopamine dysfunctions in gambling (...)
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  20. J. A. Gray, J. Feldon, J. N. P. Rawlins, D. R. Hemsley & A. D. Smith (1991). The Neuropsychology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (1):1-20.score: 274.5
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  21. [deleted]Phillip Grant, Yvonne Kuepper, Eva A. Mueller, Catrin Wielpuetz, Oliver Mason & Juergen Hennig (2013). Dopaminergic Foundations of Schizotypy as Measured by the German Version of the Oxford-Liverpool Inventory of Feelings and Experiences (O-LIFE)—a Suitable Endophenotype of Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 274.5
  22. J. P. Ginsberg (2003). Setting Domain Boundaries for Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):88-89.score: 265.5
    The claim that the disorganized subtype of schizophrenia results from glutamate hypofunction is enhanced by consideration of current subtypology of schizophrenia, symptom definition, interdependence of neurotransmitters, and the nature of the data needed to support the hypothesis. Careful specification clarifies the clinical reality of disorganization as a feature of schizophrenia and increases the utility of the subtype.
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  23. Michael A. Schwartz, Osborne P. Wiggins, Jean Naudin & Manfred Spitzer (2005). Rebuilding Reality: A Phenomenology of Aspects of Chronic Schizophrenia. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):91-115.score: 234.0
    Schizophrenia, like other pathological conditions of mental life, has not been systematically included in the general study of consciousness. By focusing on aspects of chronic schizophrenia, we attempt to remedy this omission. Basic components of Husserl’s phenomenology (intentionality, synthesis, constitution, epoche, and unbuilding) are explicated and then employed in an account of chronic schizophrenia. In schizophrenic experience, basic constituents of reality are lost and the subject must try to explicitly re-constitute them. “Automatic mental life” is weakened such (...)
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  24. Adolfo G. Sadile & Davide Viggiano (2005). Is the Hypodopaminergic Hypothesis Plausible as Neural Bases of ADHD? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):440-441.score: 216.0
    The “dynamic developmental theory” is based on hypofunctioning dopamine systems that follow an early overactivity phase. The theory does not consider recent experimental evidences from different attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) models and the heterogeneity of the disorder. Alternatives are proposed that integrate available information gathered from clinical and experimental studies, with theoretical constructs.
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  25. Yazan Abu Ghazal (2014). Perspectivity in Psychiatric Research: The Psychopathology of Schizophrenia in Postwar Germany. [REVIEW] Medicine Studies 4 (1-4):103-111.score: 213.0
    The reorganization of psychiatric knowledge at the turn of the twentieth century derived from Emil Kraepelin’s clinical classification of psychoses. Surprisingly, within just few years, Kraepelin’s simple dichotomy between dementia praecox and manic-depressive psychosis succeeded in giving psychiatry a new framework that is still used until the present day. Unexpectedly, Kraepelin’s simple clinical scheme based on the dichotomy replaced the significantly more differentiated nosography that dominated psychiatric research in the last three decades of the nineteenth century . Moreover, although all (...)
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  26. Carol Tamminga (2011). Posing Hypotheses Responsibly in Psychiatry. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 18 (1):65-67.score: 204.0
    It is easy to say that the analysis by Kendler and Schaffner of the status of the dopamine hypothesis of schizophrenia (DHS) is, at the very least, a scholarly read. It includes an exhaustive review of the DHS literature accompanied by a demanding critique. The authors' bar for hypothesis verification is high, and their conclusion is negative—that scientific support is insufficient to retain the hypothesis as such. They proceed to evaluate the reasons they see for (...)
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  27. Jeffrey A. Gray (1995). The Contents of Consciousness: A Neuropsychological Conjecture. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):659-76.score: 202.5
    Drawing on previous models of anxiety, intermediate memory, the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, and goal-directed behaviour, a neuropsychological hypothesis is proposed for the generation of the contents of consciousness. It is suggested that these correspond to the outputs of a comparator that, on a moment-by-moment basis, compares the current state of the organism's perceptual world with a predicted state. An outline is given of the information-processing functions of the comparator system and of the neural systems which mediate them. (...)
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  28. Yasuhiko Murakami (2013). Affection of Contact and Transcendental Telepathy in Schizophrenia and Autism. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):179-194.score: 195.0
    This paper seeks to demonstrate the structural difference in communication of schizophrenia and autism. For a normal adult, spontaneous communication is nothing but the transmission of phantasía (thought) by means of perceptual objects or language. This transmission is first observed in a make-believe play of child. Husserl named this function “perceptual phantasía,” and this function presupposes as its basis the “internalized affection of contact” (which functions empirically in eye contact, body contact, or voice calling me). Regarding autism, because of (...)
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  29. Emmanuel Stip Peter Scherzer, Edith Leveillé, André Achim, Emilie Boisseau (2012). A Study of Theory of Mind in Paranoid Schizophrenia: A Theory or Many Theories? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 195.0
    Social cognitive psychologists (Frith, 1992; Hardy-Baylé et al, 2003) sought to explain the social problems and clarify the clinical picture of schizophrenia by proposing a model that relates many of the symptoms to a problem of metarepresentation i.e. theory of mind (ToM). Given the differences in clinical samples and results between studies, and considering the wide range of what is considered to constitute ToM, the question is, is there a core function, or is ToM multifaceted with dissociable facets? If (...)
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  30. Jean-Rémy Martin (2013). Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.score: 195.0
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such deficits may, in addition, lead to an (...)
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  31. Martin Jean-Rémy (2013). Experiences of Activity and Causality in Schizophrenia: When Predictive Deficits Lead to a Retrospective Over-Binding. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1361-1374.score: 195.0
    In this paper I discuss an intriguing and relatively little studied symptomatic expression of schizophrenia known as experiences of activity in which patients form the delusion that they can control some external events by the sole means of their mind. I argue that experiences of activity result from patients being prone to aberrantly infer causal relations between unrelated events in a retrospective way owing to widespread predictive deficits. Moreover, I suggest that such deficits may, in addition, lead to an (...)
     
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  32. Murat Aydede, Language of Thought Hypothesis: State of the Art.score: 192.0
    The Language of Thought Hypothesis (LOTH) is an empirical thesis about thought and thinking. For their explication, it postulates a physically realized system of representations that have a combinatorial syntax (and semantics) such that operations on representations are causally sensitive only to the syntactic properties of representations. According to LOTH, thought is, roughly, the tokening of a representation that has a syntactic (constituent) structure with an appropriate semantics. Thinking thus consists in syntactic operations defined over representations. Most of the (...)
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  33. Mario Bacelar Valente, Time in the Theory of Relativity: On Natural Clocks, Proper Time, the Clock Hypothesis, and All That.score: 192.0
    When addressing the notion of proper time in the theory of relativity, it is usually taken for granted that the time read by an accelerated clock is given by the Minkowski proper time. However, there are authors like Harvey Brown that consider necessary an extra assumption to arrive at this result, the so-called clock hypothesis. In opposition to Brown, Richard TW Arthur takes the clock hypothesis to be already implicit in the theory. In this paper I will present (...)
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  34. J. P. M. A. Maes & A. R. Van Gool (2008). Misattribution of Agency in Schizophrenia: An Exploration of Historical First-Person Accounts. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):191-202.score: 192.0
    This paper provides a concise description and discussion of bottom–up and top–down approaches to misattribution of agency in schizophrenia. It explores if first-person accounts of passivity phenomena can provide support for one of these approaches. The focus is on excerpts in which the writers specifically examine their experiences of external influence. None of the accounts provides arguments that fit easily with only one of the possible approaches, which is in line with current attempts to theoretical integration.
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  35. David Kyle Johnson (forthcoming). The Failure of the Multiverse Hypothesis as a Solution to the Problem of No Best World. Sophia:1-19.score: 192.0
    The multiverse hypothesis is growing in popularity among theistic philosophers because some view it as the preferable way to solve certain difficulties presented by theistic belief. In this paper, I am concerned specifically with its application to Rowe’s problem of no best world, which suggests that God’s existence is impossible given the fact that the world God actualizes must be unsurpassable, yet for any given possible world, there is one greater. I will argue that, as a solution to the (...)
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  36. [deleted]B. G. Bara, A. Ciaramidaro, H. Walter & M. Adenzato (2010). Intentional Minds: A Philosophical Analysis of Intention Tested Through fMRI Experiments Involving People with Schizophrenia, People with Autism, and Healthy Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:7-7.score: 192.0
    In this paper we show how we empirically tested one of the most relevant topics in philosophy of mind through a series of fMRI experiments: the classification of different types of intention. To this aim, firstly we trace a theoretical distinction among private, prospective and communicative intentions. Second, we propose a set of predictions concerning the recognition of these three types of intention in healthy individuals, and we report the experimental results corroborating our theoretical model of intention. Third, we derive (...)
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  37. Paul H. Lysaker Giancarlo Dimaggio, Raffaele Popolo, Giampaolo Salvatore (2013). Mentalizing in Schizophrenia is More Than Just Solving Theory of Mind Tasks. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 192.0
    Mentalizing in schizophrenia is more than just solving theory of mind tasks.
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  38. D. Evans (2002). The Search Hypothesis of Emotions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):497-509.score: 180.0
    Many philosophers and psychologists now argue that emotions play a vital role in reasoning. This paper explores one particular way of elucidating how emotions help reason which may be dubbed ?the search hypothesis of emotion?. After outlining the search hypothesis of emotion and dispensing with a red herring that has marred previous statements of the hypothesis, I discuss two alternative readings of the search hypothesis. It is argued that the search hypothesis must be construed as (...)
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  39. Antti Revonsuo (2000). The Reinterpretation of Dreams: An Evolutionary Hypothesis of the Function of Dreaming. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):877-901.score: 174.0
    Several theories claim that dreaming is a random by-product of REM sleep physiology and that it does not serve any natural function. Phenomenal dream content, however, is not as disorganized as such views imply. The form and content of dreams is not random but organized and selective: during dreaming, the brain constructs a complex model of the world in which certain types of elements, when compared to waking life, are underrepresented whereas others are over represented. Furthermore, dream content is consistently (...)
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  40. Daniel Howard-Snyder (1994). Theism, the Hypothesis of Indifference, and the Biological Role of Pain and Pleasure. Faith and Philosophy 11 (3):452-466.score: 174.0
    Following Hume’s lead, Paul Draper argues that, given the biological role played by both pain and pleasure in goal-directed organic systems, the observed facts about pain and pleasure in the world are antecedently much more likely on the Hypothesis of Indifference than on theism. I examine one by one Draper’s arguments for this claim and show how they miss the mark.
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  41. Christopher Viger (2007). The Acquired Language of Thought Hypothesis. Interaction Studies 8 (1):125-142.score: 174.0
    I present the symbol grounding problem in the larger context of a materialist theory of content and then present two problems for causal, teleo-functional accounts of content. This leads to a distinction between two kinds of mental representations: presentations and symbols; only the latter are cognitive. Based on Milner and Goodale’s dual route model of vision, I posit the existence of precise interfaces between cognitive systems that are activated during object recognition. Interfaces are constructed as a child learns, and is (...)
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  42. Gabriele Stotz-Ingenlath (2000). Epistemological Aspects of Eugen Bleuler's Conception of Schizophrenia in 1911. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (2):153-159.score: 174.0
    Eugen Bleuler, in 1911, renamed the group of mental disorders with poor prognosis which Emil Kraepel in had called ``dementia praecox'' ``group of schizophrenias'',because for him the splitting of personality was the main symptom.Biographical, scientific and methodological influences on Bleuler's concept of schizophrenia are shown with special reference to Kraepelin and Freud.Bleuler was a passionate and very experienced clinician. He lived with his patients, taking care of them and writing down his observations. Methodologically he was an empiricist and an (...)
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  43. [deleted]Honghui Yang, Jingyu Liu, Jing Sui, Godfrey Pearlson & Vince D. Calhoun (2010). A Hybrid Machine Learning Method for Fusing fMRI and Genetic Data: Combining Both Improves Classification of Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:192.score: 174.0
    We demonstrate a hybrid machine learning method to classify schizophrenia patients and healthy controls, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. The method consists of four stages: (1) SNPs with the most discriminating information between the healthy controls and schizophrenia patients are selected to construct a support vector machine ensemble (SNP-SVME). (2) Voxels in the fMRI map contributing to classification are selected to build another SVME (Voxel-SVME). (3) Components of fMRI activation obtained with (...)
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  44. [deleted]Anthony I. Jack Benjamin Kubit (2013). Rethinking the Role of the rTPJ in Attention and Social Cognition in Light of the Opposing Domains Hypothesis: Findings From an ALE-Based Meta-Analysis and Resting-State Functional Connectivity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 174.0
    The right temporo-parietal junction (rTPJ) has been associated with two apparently disparate functional roles: in attention and in social cognition. According to one account, the rTPJ initiates a “circuit-breaking” signal that interrupts ongoing attentional processes, effectively reorienting attention. It is argued this primary function of the rTPJ has been extended beyond attention, through a process of evolutionarily cooption, to play a role in social cognition. We propose an alternative account, according to which the capacity for social cognition depends on a (...)
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  45. [deleted]Matcheri S. Keshavan, Shreedhar R. Kulkarni, Tejas Bhojraj, Alan Francis, Vaibhav Diwadkar, Debra M. Montrose, Larry Seidman & John Sweeney (2010). Premorbid Cognitive Deficits in Young Relatives of Schizophrenia Patients. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 174.0
    Neurocognitive deficits in schizophrenia are thought to be stable trait markers that predate the illness and manifest in relatives of patients. Adolescence is the age of maximum vulnerability to the onset of schizophrenia and may be an opportune “window” to observe neurocognitive impairments close to but prior to the onset of psychosis. We reviewed the extant studies assessing neurocognitive deficits in young relatives at high risk (HR) for schizophrenia and their relation to brain structural alterations. We also (...)
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  46. David H. Dodd & Lyle E. Bourne Jr (1969). Test of Some Assumptions of a Hypothesis-Testing Model of Concept Identification. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (1):69.score: 174.0
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  47. William O. Jenkins & Leta M. Cunningham (1949). The Guessing-Sequence Hypothesis, the 'Spread of Effect' and Number-Guessing Habits. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (2):158.score: 174.0
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  48. John C. Malone (1974). The Effect of Number of Stimuli on the Steady-State Generalization Gradient: A Test of the Summation Hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):729.score: 174.0
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  49. Robert F. Williams & Benton J. Underwood (1970). Encoding Variability: Tests of the Martin Hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):317.score: 174.0
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  50. Vitor G. Haase Annelise Júlio-Costa, Andressa M. Antunes, Júlia B. Lopes-Silva, Bárbara C. Moreira, Gabrielle S. Vianna, Guilherme Wood, Maria R. S. Carvalho (2013). Count on Dopamine: Influences of COMT Polymorphisms on Numerical Cognition. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 171.0
    Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) is an enzyme that is particularly important for the metabolism of dopamine. Functional polymorphisms of COMT have been implicated in working memory and numerical cognition. This is an exploratory study that aims at investigating associations between COMT polymorphisms, working memory and numerical cognition. Elementary school children from 2th to 6th grades were divided into two groups according to their COMT val158met polymorphism (homozygous for valine allele [n= 61] versus heterozygous plus methionine homozygous children or met+ group [n=94]). (...)
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