Search results for 'double dissociation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Martin Davies (2010). Double Dissociation: Understanding its Role in Cognitive Neuropsychology. Mind and Language 25 (5):500-540.score: 120.0
    The paper makes three points about the role of double dissociation in cognitive neuropsychology. First, arguments from double dissociation to separate modules work by inference to the best, not the only possible, explanation. Second, in the development of computational cognitive neuropsychology, the contribution of connectionist cognitive science has been to broaden the range of potential explanations of double dissociation. As a result, the competition between explanations, and the characteristic features of the assessment of theories (...)
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  2. Richard Double (2002). Double Freedom. The Philosophers' Magazine 18:17-18.score: 120.0
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  3. Ayeesha K. Kamal & Nicholas D. Schiff (2002). Does the Form of Akinetic Mutism Linked to Mesodiencephalic Injuries Bridge the Double Dissociation of Parkinson's Disease and Catatonia? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-587.score: 120.0
    Northoff provides a compelling argument supporting a kind of “double dissociation” of Parkinson's disease and catatonia. We discuss a related form of akinetic mutism linked to mesodiencephalic injuries and suggest an alternative to the proposed “horizontal” versus “vertical” modulation distinction. Rather than a “directional” difference in patterned neuronal activity, we propose that both disorders reflect hypersynchrony within typically interdependent but segregated networks facilitated by a common thalamic gating mechanism.
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  4. Richard Double (1984). Reply to C.A. Field's Double on Searle's Chinese Room. Nature and System 6 (March):55-58.score: 120.0
     
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  5. Juha Silvanto, Nilli Lavie & Vincent Walsh (2005). Double Dissociation of V1 and V5/MT Activity in Visual Awareness. Cerebral Cortex 15 (11):1736-1741.score: 102.0
  6. John A. Bullinaria & Nick Chater (1996). Double Dissociation, Modularity, and Distributed Organization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):632.score: 90.0
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  7. Rolf Verleger (2003). Double Dissociation in the Effects of Brain Damage on Working Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):758-759.score: 90.0
    As revealed by standard neuropsychological testing, patients with damage either to the frontal lobe or to the hippocampus suffer from distinct impairments of working memory. It is unclear how Ruchkin et al.'s model integrates the role played by the hippocampus.
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  8. Lisa Feigenson (2005). A Double-Dissociation in Infants' Representations of Object Arrays. Cognition 95 (3):B37-B48.score: 90.0
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  9. Tallon-Baudry Catherine (2011). A Double Dissociation Between the Neural Bases of Spatial Attention and Visual Awareness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 90.0
  10. A. Haltiner, N. Raz & Ms Seidenberg (1990). Double Dissociation of Selective Interference and Domain-Specific Short-Term-Memory. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):515-515.score: 90.0
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  11. Andreas Kleinschmidt (2011). Double Dissociation of Frequency-Dependent Resonance Properties in Early and Higher Visual Ventral Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 90.0
  12. Bernard Baars (2003). The Double Life of BF Skinner: Inner Conflict, Dissociation and the Scientific Taboo Against Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (1):5-25.score: 72.0
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  13. Vincent Bergeron & Mohan Matthen (2008). Assembling the Emotions. In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press. 185-212.score: 60.0
    In this article, we discuss the modularity of the emotions. In a general methodological section, we discuss the empirical basis for the postulation of modularity. Then we discuss how certain modules -- the emotions in particular -- decompose into distinct anatomical and functional parts.
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  14. Andreas Kalckert & H. Henrik Ehrsson (2012). Moving a Rubber Hand That Feels Like Your Own: A Dissociation of Ownership and Agency. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:40-40.score: 48.0
    During voluntary hand movement, we sense that we generate the movement and that the hand is a part of our body. These feelings of control over bodily actions, or the sense of agency, and the ownership of body parts are two fundamental aspects of the way we consciously experience our bodies. However, little is known about how these processes are functionally linked. Here, we introduce a version of the rubber hand illusion in which participants control the movements of the index (...)
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  15. Catherine Tallon-Baudry Valentin Wyart, Stanislas Dehaene (2012). Early Dissociation Between Neural Signatures of Endogenous Spatial Attention and Perceptual Awareness During Visual Masking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 48.0
    The relationship between spatial attention and conscious access has often been pictured as a single causal link: spatial attention would provide conscious access to weak stimuli by increasing their effective contrast during early visual processing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed whether the early attentional amplification of visual responses, around 100 ms following stimulus onset, had a decisive impact on conscious detection. We recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals while participants focused their attention toward or away from masked stimuli which were physically (...)
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  16. Robert G. Kunzendorf (2006). Universal Repression From Consciousness Versus Abnormal Dissociation From Self-Consciousness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):523-524.score: 42.0
    Freud attributed uncovered incest, initially, to real abuse dissociated from self-consciousness, and later, to wishes repressed from consciousness. Dissociation is preferred on theoretical and empirical grounds. Whereas dissociation emerges from double-aspect materialism, repression implicates Cartesian dualism. Several studies suggest that abnormal individuals dissociate trauma from self-conscious source-monitoring, thereby convincing themselves that the trauma is imaginary rather than real, and re-experience the trauma as an unbidden image.
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  17. M. Jehkonen, J. Ahonen, P. Dastidar & J. Vilkki (2000). Unawareness of Deficits After Right Hemisphere Stroke: Double-Dissociations of Anosognosias. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 102:378-384.score: 36.0
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  18. James L. McClelland & Gary Lupyan (2002). Double Dissociations Never License Simple Inferences About Underlying Brain Organization, Especially in Developmental Cases. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):763-764.score: 36.0
    Different developmental anomalies produce contrasting deficits in a single, integrated system. In a network that inflects regular and exception verbs correctly, a disproportionate deficit with exceptions occurs if connections are deleted, whereas a disproportionate deficit with regulars occurs when an auditory deficit impairs perception of the regular inflection. In general, contrasting deficits do not license the inference of underlying modularity.
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  19. A. Richardson-Klavehn, A. J. Benjamin Clarke & J. M. Gardiner (1999). Conjoint Dissociations Reveal Involuntary ''Perceptual'' Priming From Generating at Study. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):271-284.score: 36.0
    Incidental perceptual memory tests reveal priming when words are generated orally from a semantic cue at study, and this priming could reflect contamination by voluntary retrieval. We tested this hypothesis using a generate condition and two read conditions that differed in depth of processing (read-phonemic vs read-semantic). An intentional word-stem completion test showed an advantage for the read-semantic over the generate condition and an advantage for the generate over the read-phonemic condition, and completion times were longer than in a control (...)
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  20. Marcus P. Adams (2009). Empirical Evidence and the Knowledge-That/Knowledge-How Distinction. Synthese 170 (1):97 - 114.score: 30.0
    In this article I have two primary goals. First, I present two recent views on the distinction between knowledge-that and knowledge-how (Stanley and Williamson, The Journal of Philosophy 98(8):411–444, 2001; Hetherington, Epistemology futures, 2006). I contend that neither of these provides conclusive arguments against the distinction. Second, I discuss studies from neuroscience and experimental psychology that relate to this distinction. Having examined these studies, I then defend a third view that explains certain relevant data from these studies by positing the (...)
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  21. Ned Block (2013). The Grain of Vision and the Grain of Attention. Thought, A Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):170-184.score: 30.0
    Often when there is no attention to an object, there is no conscious perception of it either, leading some to conclude that conscious perception is an attentional phenomenon. There is a well-known perceptual phenomenon—visuo-spatial crowding, in which objects are too closely packed for attention to single out one of them. This article argues that there is a variant of crowding—what I call ‘‘identity-crowding’’—in which one can consciously see a thing despite failure of attention to it. This conclusion, together with new (...)
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  22. Philip Gerrans (2003). Nativism and Neuroconstructivism in the Explanation of Williams Syndrome. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):41-52.score: 30.0
    Nativists about syntactic processing have argued that linguisticprocessing, understood as the implementation of a rule-basedcomputational architecture, is spared in Williams syndrome, (WMS)subjects – and hence that it provides evidence for a geneticallyspecified language module. This argument is bolstered by treatingSpecific Language Impairments (SLI) and WMS as a developmental doubledissociation which identifies a syntax module. Neuroconstructivists haveargued that the cognitive deficits of a developmental disorder cannot beadequately distinguished using the standard gross behavioural tests ofneuropsychology and that the linguistic abilities of the (...)
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  23. Mikkel Gerken (2014). Same, Same but Different: The Epistemic Norms of Assertion, Action and Practical Reasoning. Philosophical Studies 168 (3):725-744.score: 30.0
    What is the relationship between the epistemic norms of assertion and the epistemic norms of action/practical reasoning? Brown argues that the epistemic standards for practical reasoning and assertion are distinct (Brown in Philos Phenomenol Res 84(1):123–157, 2012). In contrast, Montminy argues that practical reasoning and assertion must be governed by the same epistemic norm (Montminy in Pac Philos Quart 93(4):57–68, 2012). Likewise, McKinnon has articulated an argument for a unified account from cases of isolated second-hand knowledge (McKinnon in Logos Episteme (...)
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  24. Ferdinand Binkofski, Kathrin Reetz & Annabelle Blangero (2007). Tactile Agnosia and Tactile Apraxia: Cross Talk Between the Action and Perception Streams in the Anterior Intraparietal Area. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):201-202.score: 30.0
    In the haptic domain, a double dissociation can be proposed on the basis of neurological deficits between tactile information for action, represented by tactile apraxia, and tactile information for perception, represented by tactile agnosia. We suggest that this dissociation comes from different networks, both involving the anterior intraparietal area of the posterior parietal cortex.
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  25. Henrik Singmann & Karl Christoph Klauer (2011). Deductive and Inductive Conditional Inferences: Two Modes of Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning 17 (3):247 - 281.score: 30.0
    A number of single- and dual-process theories provide competing explanations as to how reasoners evaluate conditional arguments. Some of these theories are typically linked to different instructions?namely deductive and inductive instructions. To assess whether responses under both instructions can be explained by a single process, or if they reflect two modes of conditional reasoning, we re-analysed four experiments that used both deductive and inductive instructions for conditional inference tasks. Our re-analysis provided evidence consistent with a single process. In two new (...)
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  26. Bhismadev Chakrabarti & Simon Baron-Cohen (2008). Can the Shared Circuits Model (SCM) Explain Joint Attention or Perception of Discrete Emotions? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):24-25.score: 30.0
    The shared circuits model (SCM) is a bold attempt to explain how humans make sense of action, at different levels. In this commentary we single out five concerns: (1) the lack of a developmental account, (2) the absence of double-dissociation evidence, (3) the neglect of joint attention and joint action, (4) the inability to explain discrete emotion perception, and (5) the lack of predictive power or testability of the model. We conclude that Hurley's model requires further work before (...)
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  27. H. V. Curran & M. Hildebrandt (1999). Dissociative Effects of Alcohol on Recollective Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (4):497-509.score: 30.0
    This article reports a study comparing the effects of a single dose of alcohol with a matched placebo drink on recognition memory with and without conscious recollection. A double-blind, cross-over design was used with healthy volunteers who were all social drinkers. Processing depth at study was manipulated using generate versus read instructions. Conscious recollection at test was assessed using the remember-know-guess paradigm (Gardiner, 1988; Tulving, 1985). Alcohol significantly reduced conscious recollection (remember responses) but had no effect on recognition in (...)
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  28. Guy C. Orden, Bruce F. Pennington & Gregory O. Stone (2001). What Do Double Dissociations Prove? Cognitive Science 25 (1):111-172.score: 30.0
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  29. Isabella Fuchs & Ulrich Ansorge (2012). Inhibition of Return is No Hallmark of Exogenous Capture by Unconscious Cues. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 30.0
    Inhibition of irrelevant information and response tendencies is a central characteristic of conscious control and executive functions. However, recent theories in vision considered Inhibition of Return (IOR: slower responses to attended than unattended positions) to be a hallmark of automatic exogenous capture of visual attention by unconscious cues. In the present study, we show that an unconscious cue that exogenously captures attention does not lead to IOR. First of all, subliminal cues with a contrast different from a searched-for target contrast (...)
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  30. Ulrich Ansorge Isabella Fuchs (2012). Inhibition of Return is No Hallmark of Exogenous Capture by Unconscious Cues. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 30.0
    Inhibition of irrelevant information and response tendencies is a central characteristic of conscious control and executive functions. However, recent theories in vision considered Inhibition of Return (IOR: slower responses to attended than unattended positions) to be a hallmark of automatic exogenous capture of visual attention by unconscious cues. In the present study, we show that an unconscious cue that exogenously captures attention does not lead to IOR. First of all, subliminal cues with a contrast different from a searched-for target contrast (...)
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  31. Apt P. (2010). Modelling the Meaning of Words: Neural Correlates of Abstract and Concrete Noun Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 30.0
    We present a model relating analysis of abstract and concrete word meaning in terms of semantic features and contextual frames within a general framework of neurocognitive information processing. The approach taken here assumes concrete noun meanings to be intimately related to sensory feature constellations. These features are processed by posterior sensory regions of the brain, e.g. the occipital lobe, which handles visual information. The interpretation of abstract nouns, however, is likely to be more dependent on semantic frames and linguistic context. (...)
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  32. G. Van Orden (2001). What Do Double Dissociations Prove? Cognitive Science 25 (1):111-172.score: 30.0
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  33. A. Açık, A. Sarwary, R. Schultze-Kraft, S. Onat & P. König (2009). Developmental Changes in Natural Viewing Behavior: Bottom-Up and Top-Down Differences Between Children, Young Adults and Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 1:207-207.score: 30.0
    Despite the growing interest in fixation selection under natural conditions, there is a major gap in the literature concerning its developmental aspects. Early in life, bottom-up processes, such as local image feature – color, luminance contrast etc. - guided viewing, might be more prominent but later overshadowed by more top-down processing. Moreover, with decline in visual functioning in old age, the bottom-up processing is known to suffer. Here we recorded the eye-movements of 7-9 year-old children, 19-27 year-old adults and older (...)
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  34. Susanne Graef, Guido Biele, Lea K. Krugel, Frank Marzinzik, Michael Wahl, Johann Wotka, Fabian Klostermann & Hauke R. Heekeren (2010). Differential Influence of Levodopa on Reward-Based Learning in Parkinson's Disease. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 30.0
    The mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system linking the dopaminergic midbrain to the prefrontal cortex and subcortical striatum has been shown to be sensitive to reinforcement in animals and humans. Within this system, coexistent segregated striato-frontal circuits have been linked to different functions. In the present study, we tested patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder characterised by dopaminergic cell loss, on two reward-based learning tasks assumed to differentially involve dorsal and ventral striato-frontal circuits. 15 non-depressed and non-demented PD patients on (...)
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  35. Charan Ranganath & Robert S. Blumenfeld (2005). Doubts About Double Dissociations Between Short- and Long-Term Memory. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):374-380.score: 30.0
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  36. Giosuè Baggio Andrea Pavan, Māris Skujevskis (2013). Motion Words Selectively Modulate Direction Discrimination Sensitivity for Threshold Motion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 30.0
    Can speech selectively modulate the sensitivity of a sensory system so that, in the presence of a suitable linguistic context, the discrimination of certain perceptual features becomes more or less likely? In this study, participants heard upward or downward motion words followed by a single visual field of random dots moving upwards or downwards. The time interval between the onsets of the auditory and the visual stimuli was varied parametrically. Motion direction could be either discriminable (suprathreshold motion) or non-discriminable (threshold (...)
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  37. Claudia Lorena García (2009). Disociaciones Cognoscitivas y la Evolucionabilidad de la Mente. Análisis Filosófico 29 (1):73-103.score: 30.0
    En las ciencias cognoscitivas, existe una teoría con respecto a la arquitectura computacional de la mente conocida como el modularismo masivo. Esta teoría sostiene que la mente está en su mayoría constituida por mecanismos que son cognoscitivamente modulares. Algunos de los defensores de esta teoría proponen un argumento cuya conclusión es que es muy probable que mecanismos que son cognoscitivamente muy modulares sean más evolucionables que aquellos mecanismos que no son cognoscitivamente modulares (o que son modulares en un grado menor). (...)
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  38. Jeremy R. Gray (2001). Emotional Modulation of Cognitive Control: Approach–Withdrawal States Double-Dissociate Spatial From Verbal Two-Back Task Performance. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (3):436.score: 30.0
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  39. Will D. Penny Sara L. Bengtsson (2013). Self-Associations Influence Task-Performance Through Bayesian Inference. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 30.0
    The way we think about ourselves impacts greatly on our behaviour. This paper describes a behavioural study and a computational model that sheds new light on this important area. Participants were primed 'clever' and 'stupid' using a scrambled sentence task, and we measured the effect on response time and error-rate on a rule-association task. First, we observed a confirmation bias effect in that associations to being 'stupid' led to a gradual decrease in performance, whereas associations to being 'clever' did not. (...)
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  40. Christopher T. Kello, Daragh E. Sibley & David C. Plaut (2005). Dissociations in Performance on Novel Versus Irregular Items: Single‐Route Demonstrations With Input Gain in Localist and Distributed Models. Cognitive Science 29 (4):627-654.score: 26.0
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  41. Marc Hauser, Fiery Cushman, Liane Young, J. I. N. Kang-Xing & John Mikhail (2007). A Dissociation Between Moral Judgments and Justifications. Mind and Language 22 (1):1–21.score: 24.0
    To what extent do moral judgments depend on conscious reasoning from explicitly understood principles? We address this question by investigating one particular moral principle, the principle of the double effect. Using web-based technology, we collected a large data set on individuals' responses to a series of moral dilemmas, asking when harm to innocent others is permissible. Each moral dilemma presented a choice between action and inaction, both resulting in lives saved and lives lost. Results showed that: (1) patterns of (...)
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  42. Stéphane Genet, Robert Costalat & Jacques Burger (2000). A Few Comments on Electrostatic Interactions in Cell Physiology. Acta Biotheoretica 48 (3-4).score: 24.0
    The role of fixed charges present at the surface of biological membranes is usually described by the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame theory of the electric double-layer where the Grahame equation is applied independently on each side of the membrane and where the capacitive charges (linked to the transmembrane ionic currents) are disregarded. In this article, we generalize the Gouy-Chapman-Grahame theory by taking into account both intrinsic charges (resulting from the dissociation of membrane constituents) and capacitive charges, in the density value of (...)
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  43. Cristián Simonetti (2013). Between the Vertical and the Horizontal Time and Space in Archaeology. History of the Human Sciences 26 (1):90-110.score: 24.0
    Archaeology, like most sciences that rely on stratigraphic excavation for studying the past, tends to conceptualize this past as lying deep underneath the ground. Accordingly, chronologies tend to be depicted as a movement from bottom to top, which contrast with sciences that illustrate the passage of time horizontally. By paying attention to the development of the visual language of disciplines that follow stratigraphy, I show how chronologies get entangled with other temporalities, particularly those of writing. Relying on recent ethnographic work (...)
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  44. Annette Sterr Christopher Hope, Ellen Seiss, Philip J. A. Dean, Katie E. M. Williams (2013). Consumption of Glucose Drinks Slows Sensorimotor Processing: Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Studies with the Eriksen Flanker Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 22.0
    Modulations of blood glucose concentration (BGC) in the normal range are known to facilitate performance in memory and other cognitive tasks but few studies have investigated the effects of BGC variations on complex sensorimotor task so far. The present study aimed to examine glucose effects with the Eriksen flanker task. This task was chosen because it can dissociate between the effects of BGC on sensorimotor processing and cognitive control by assessing congruency effects. In two linked double-blind placebo controlled experiments (...)
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  45. David Bourget, A General Reply to the Arguments From Blur, Double Vision, Perspective, and Other Kinds of Perceptual Distortion Against Representationalism.score: 18.0
    This paper offers a general reply to arguments from perceptual distortion (e.g. blur, perspective, double vision) against the representationalist thesis that the phenomenal characters of experiences supervene on their intentional contents. It has been argued that distorted and undistorted experiences are counterexamples to this thesis because they can share contents without sharing phenomenal characters. In reply, I suggest that cases of perceptual distortion do not constitute counterexamples to the representationalist thesis because the contents of distorted experiences are always impoverished (...)
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  46. Nicholas Stang (forthcoming). Who's Afraid of Double Affection? Philosophers' Imprint.score: 18.0
    There is substantial textual evidence that Kant held the doctrine of double affection: subjects are causally affected both by things in themselves and by appearances. However, Kant commentators have been loath to attribute this view to him, for the doctrine of double affection is widely thought to face insuperable problems. I begin by explaining what I take to be the most serious problem faced by the doctrine of double affection: appearances cannot cause the very experience in virtue (...)
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  47. Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum (2009). Double Prevention and Powers. Journal of Critical Realism 8 (3):277-293.score: 18.0
    Does A cause B simply if A prevents what would have prevented B? Such a case is known as double prevention: where we have the prevention of a prevention. One theory of causation is that A causes B when B counterfactually depends on A and, as there is such a dependence, proponents of the view must rule that double prevention is causation.<br><br>However, if double prevention is causation, it means that causation can be an extrinsic matter, that the (...)
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  48. Peter Allmark, Mark Cobb, B. Jane Liddle & Angela Mary Tod (2010). Is the Doctrine of Double Effect Irrelevant in End-of-Life Decision Making? Nursing Philosophy 11 (3):170-177.score: 18.0
    In this paper, we consider three arguments for the irrelevance of the doctrine of double effect in end-of-life decision making. The third argument is our own and, to that extent, we seek to defend it. The first argument is that end-of-life decisions do not in fact shorten lives and that therefore there is no need for the doctrine in justification of these decisions. We reject this argument; some end-of-life decisions clearly shorten lives. The second is that the doctrine of (...)
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  49. T. A. Cavanaugh (2006). Double-Effect Reasoning: Doing Good and Avoiding Evil. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    T. A. Cavanaugh defends double-effect reasoning (DER), also known as the principle of double effect. DER plays a role in anti-consequentialist ethics (such as deontology), in hard cases in which one cannot realize a good without also causing a foreseen, but not intended, bad effect (for example, killing non-combatants when bombing a military target). This study is the first book-length account of the history and issues surrounding this controversial approach to hard cases. It will be indispensable in theoretical (...)
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  50. Ezio Di Nucci (2013). Double Effect and Terror Bombing. In T. Spitzley, M. Hoeltje & W. Spohn (eds.), GAP.8 Proceedings. GAP.score: 18.0
    I argue against the Doctrine of Double Effect’s explanation of the moral difference between terror bombing and strategic bombing. I show that the standard thought-experiment of Terror Bomber and Strategic Bomber which dominates this debate is underdetermined in three crucial respects: (1) the non-psychological worlds of Terror Bomber and Strategic Bomber; (2) the psychologies of Terror Bomber and Strategic Bomber; and (3) the structure of the thought-experiment, especially in relation to its similarity with the Trolley Problem. (1) If the (...)
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