Search results for 'dystopia' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew Milner (2009). Archaeologies of the Future: Jameson's Utopia or Orwell's Dystopia? Historical Materialism 17 (4):101-119.score: 21.0
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  2. Hugh J. Silverman (1980). Hugh J. Silverman — From Utopia/Dystopia to Heterotopia: An Interpretive Topology. Philosophy and Social Criticism 7 (2):170-182.score: 15.0
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  3. Ian Steers (2008). HR Fables: Schizophrenia, Selling Your Soul in Dystopia, Fuck the Employees, and Sleepless Nights. Business Ethics 17 (4):391-404.score: 15.0
    Aesop's fables are used to gather HR fables and these fables are told mainly in the words of the protagonists of these moral stories, HR practitioners. Leaving the moral meaning of the fables for the reader to interpret so the reader can ethically connect with the morality of HR work, the personal narratives of practitioners and their humanity, the fables conclude with a critical commentary by the author, the promotion of a human virtue and HR moral maxim. The article, itself, (...)
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  4. Paolo A. Bolaños (2008). The Critical Role of Art: Adorno Between Utopia and Dystopia. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 1 (1).score: 15.0
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  5. Leah Hadomi (1991). From Technological Dystopia to Intopia Brave New World and Homo Faber. Utopian Studies 3:110-117.score: 15.0
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  6. Esther D. Reed (2011). Natural Law Reasoning Between Statism and Dystopia: International Law and the Question of Authority. Jurisprudence 1 (2):169-196.score: 15.0
    This essay argues that a restatement of Thomistic natural law reasoning is increasingly necessary in jurisprudential debate about international law. Mindful of Pope John Paul II's call for a renewal of international law, the essay engages with the present-day tension between Morgenthau-type realism (Goldsmith and Posner) and neo-Kantian discourse-oriented cosmopolitanism (Habermas). The essay addresses whether the former is sufficiently realistic in our global 21st century context, and whether the latter is adequately cosmopolitan. Attention is drawn to Aquinas's understanding of the (...)
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  7. Dennis Rohatyn (forthcoming). Hell and Dystopia: A Comparison and Literary Case Study. Utopian Studies.score: 15.0
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  8. Hanan Yoran (2010). Between Utopia and Dystopia: Erasmus, Thomas More, and the Humanist Republic of Letters. Lexington Books, a Division of Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 15.0
    Humanism as form -- The construction of the Erasmian Republic of Letters -- Erasmian humanism : the reform program of the universal intellectual -- The politics of a disembodied humanist -- More's Richard III : the fragility of humanist discourse -- Utopia and the no-place of the Erasmian republic.
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  9. Tomis Kapitan (1984). Castañeda's Dystopia. Philosophical Studies 46 (2):263 - 270.score: 15.0
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  10. Beatriz De Alba-Koch (forthcoming). The Dialogics of Utopia, Dystopia and Arcadia: Political Struggle and Utopian Novels in Nineteenth-Century Mexico. Utopian Studies.score: 15.0
  11. Jon Elster & Hélène Landemore (2008). Ideology and Dystopia. Critical Review 20 (3):273-289.score: 15.0
  12. Samson B. Knoll (1991). Socialism as Dystopia: Political Uses of Utopian Dime Novels In Pre-World War I Germany. Utopian Studies 4:35-41.score: 15.0
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  13. Terrell Carver (2009). Sex, Gender and Heteronormativity: Seeing |[Lsquo]|Some Like It Hot|[Rsquo]| as a Heterosexual Dystopia. Contemporary Political Theory 8 (2):125.score: 15.0
  14. William J. Morgan (1982). Play, Utopia, and Dystopia: Prologue to a Ludic Theory of the State. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 9 (1):30-42.score: 15.0
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  15. Paul Standish (2002). Euphoria, Dystopia and Practice Today. Educational Philosophy and Theory 34 (4):407–412.score: 15.0
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  16. Majorie Suchocki & Marjorie Suchocki (2003). Utopia, Dystopia: The Pragmatic Value of Visions. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 24 (1):53 - 60.score: 15.0
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  17. José Augusto dos Santos Alves (2011). Da Utopia à distopiaFrom Utopia to Dystopia: The Dissolution of the Democratic Public Space. Cultura:153-168.score: 15.0
  18. Joseph C. Bertolini (2013). Utopia/Dystopia: Conditions of Historical Possibility. The European Legacy:1-2.score: 15.0
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  19. Steven Carter (2002). A Do-It-Yourself Dystopia: The Americanization of Big Brother. University Press of America.score: 15.0
    Casting a wary eye on American culture, Carter (California State U.) suggests that Orwell's nightmare has come to fruition in a distinctly American form.
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  20. Martha Holstein (2013). A Looming Dystopia: Feminism, Aging, and Community-Based Long-Term Care. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (2):6-35.score: 15.0
    Any real society is a caregiving and a care receiving society and we must therefore discover ways of coping with these facts of human neediness and dependency that are compatible with the self-respect of the recipients and do not exploit the caregivers. Remember the old Beatles’ refrain—will you still need me, will you still feed me when I’m 64? But what if I need you when I’m 84? What if I have congestive heart failure and arthritis and can no longer (...)
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  21. Nathaniel Robert Walker (2014). Lost in the City of Light: Dystopia and Utopia in the Wake of Haussmann's Paris. Utopian Studies 25 (1):24-51.score: 15.0
    By the start of the 1860s, architecture and the materials, processes, and cultures of emerging modernity were combining in Paris, above all other cities, with unprecedented consequences. Georges-Éugene Haussmann (1809–1891), Emperor Napoléon III’s Prefect of the Seine, had in 1853 been tasked with modernizing the city. His principle strategy was to demolish entire quarters of ramshackle medieval fabric for the creation of pristine, arrow-straight boulevards and sparkling squares, all of which were lined by luxurious standardized buildings, serviced by underground sewers, (...)
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  22. Langdon Winner (forthcoming). Technology Today: Utopia or Dystopia? Social Research.score: 15.0
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  23. Raffaella Baccolini (forthcoming). Breaking the Boundaries: Gender, Genre, and Dystopia. Minerva.score: 15.0
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  24. Patrick Croskery (2007). Pigs Training Dogs to Exploit Sheep : Animals as a Beast Fable Dystopia. In George A. Reisch (ed.), Pink Floyd and Philosophy: Careful with That Axiom, Eugene! Open Court.score: 15.0
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  25. Radha D'Souza (2013). Review Essay Justice and Governance in Dystopia. Journal of Critical Realism 12 (4):518-537.score: 15.0
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  26. Caroline Edwards (2011). Michael D. Gordin, Helen Tilley and Gyan Prakash, Eds, Utopia/Dystopia: Conditions of Historical Possibility. Radical Philosophy 167:51.score: 15.0
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  27. Mark Featherstone (2010). Tocqueville's Virus : Utopia and Dystopia in Western Social and Political Thought. In Ann Brooks (ed.), Social Theory in Contemporary Asia. Routledge.score: 15.0
     
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  28. Martin Revermann (2008). The Appeal of Dystopia: Latching Onto Greek Drama in the Twentieth Century. Arion 16 (1):97-118.score: 15.0
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  29. Jerome S. Rubin (1996). And Another Thing ... Utopia or Dystopia? Logos 7 (3):242-244.score: 15.0
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  30. Sharon Sutherland & Sarah Swan (2008). “The Alliance Isn't Some Evil Empire”: Dystopia in Joss Whedon's Firefly/Serenity'. In Rhonda V. Wilcox & Tanya Cochran (eds.), Investigating Firefly and Serenity: Science Fiction on the Frontier. I. B. Tauris. 89--100.score: 15.0
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  31. L. Zedner (2002). Dangers of Dystopia in Penal Policy. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (2):339-65.score: 15.0
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  32. Judith A. Little (ed.) (2007). Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Prometheus Books.score: 7.0
     
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  33. Bert Gordijn (2005). Nanoethics: From Utopian Dreams and Apocalyptic Nightmares Towards a More Balanced View. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):521-533.score: 6.0
    Nanotechnology is a swiftly developing field of technology that is believed to have the potential of great upsides and excessive downsides. In the ethical debate there has been a strong tendency to strongly focus on either the first or the latter. As a consequence ethical assessments of nanotechnology tend to radically diverge. Optimistic visionaries predict truly utopian states of affairs. Pessimistic thinkers present all manner of apocalyptic visions. Whereas the utopian views follow from one-sidedly focusing on the potential benefits of (...)
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  34. Mariano Vázquez Espí (2003). Construcciones utópicas: tres tesis y una regla práctica. Polis 6.score: 6.0
    El presente ensayo se propone poner en duda la oportunidad de guiarnos por sueños y utopías, y construir en cambio “proyectos autónomos” que permitan avanzar hacia un sueño común que nos movilice, partiendo de la convicción de que ya estamos movilizados y articulados, pues existe una utopía que, aunque irrealizable, nos hace ilusionarnos con la libertad. Esta noción es la del progreso, y es de esta utopía invisible de la que debemos librarnos. En su desarrollo expone tres tesis sobre la (...)
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  35. Corey Abel (2003). Love and Friendship in Utopia: Brave New World and 1984. In Eduardo Velasquez (ed.), Love and Friendship: Rethinking Politics and Affection in Modern Times.score: 6.0
    Contrary to many "political" interpretations, of "Brave New World" and "1984" this paper stresses that the evil of totalitarian government is not simply in the presence of great and arbitrary power, but in the particular ways that such power erodes love and friendship, the bases of social life. The crisis represented by the destruction of all possibility of love and friendship is placed in the context of Dostoevsky's meditations on "The Grand Inquisitor," and reflections by noted political theorists on the (...)
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  36. Francisco Martorell Campos (2012). Notas sobre dominación y temporalidad en el contexto postmoderno a propósito de la distopía. Astrolabio: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 13:274-286.score: 6.0
    Este artículo se inscribe en el cruce de la crítica de la cultura, la filosofía política y el pensamiento utópico, y se propone tres objetivos muy concretos: 1º) Mostrar cómo el ejercicio de la dominación implica el control de la temporalidad. 2º) Dar a conocer el diagnóstico efectuado al respecto por la distopía (o utopía negativa, o utopía satírica), subgénero de la ciencia ficción especializado en esbozar representaciones de sistemas políticos explícita o implícitamente totalitarios sitos en el futuro. 3º) Valorar (...)
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  37. Ildney Cavalcanti (2000). Utopias of/F Language in Contemporary Feminist Literary Dystopias. Utopian Studies 11 (2):152 - 180.score: 5.0
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  38. Libby Falk Jones (1991). Breaking Silences in Feminist Dystopias. Utopian Studies 3:7-11.score: 5.0
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  39. L. Zedner (2002). Dangers of Dystopias in Penal Theory. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (2):341-366.score: 5.0
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  40. William M. Curtis (2011). Rorty's Liberal Utopia and Huxley's Island. Philosophy and Literature 35 (1):91-103.score: 3.0
    Eschewing conventional candidates, like Plato's Republic or Machiavelli's Prince, Richard Rorty praises Aldous Huxley's Brave New World as "the best introduction to political philosophy," because it shows us "what sort of human future would be produced by a naturalism untempered by historicist Romanticism, and by a politics aimed merely at alleviating mammalian pain."1 Huxley's celebrated dystopia is thus a poignant warning to our modern utilitarian political projects. Yet Rorty also suggests that utopian literature can play a positive and inspirational (...)
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  41. Mitch Parsell & Cynthia Townley, Refereed Articles.score: 3.0
    In response to those who have argued the Internet is amoral at best, and an instrument for immorality at worst, we show that the net can provide a forum for genuine ethical engagement and distinctive forms of wrongdoing. Without deriving the moral value of the Internet from its interface with the non-virtual world and in contrast to presentations of the net as an anarchic utopia or as an unethical or amoral dystopia, we apply a substantive moral test to a (...)
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  42. Christopher Bertram (forthcoming). Jean Jacques Rousseau. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 3.0
    Jean-Jacques Rousseau remains an important figure in the history of philosophy, both because of his contributions to political philosophy and moral psychology and because of his influence on later thinkers. Rousseau's own view of philosophy and philosophers was firmly negative, seeing philosophers as the post-hoc rationalizers of self-interest, as apologists for various forms of tyranny, and as playing a role in the alienation of the modern individual from humanity's natural impulse to compassion. The concern that dominates Rousseau's work is to (...)
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  43. Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert, Urban Light and Color.score: 3.0
    In Colour for Architecture, published in 1976, the editors, Tom Porter and Byron Mikellides, explain that their book was “produced out of an awareness that colour, as a basic and vital force, is lacking from the built environment and that our knowledge of it is isolated and limited.”1 Lack of urban color was then especially salient in Britain—where the book was published—which had just begun to recoil at the Brutalist legacy of angular stained gray concrete strewn across the postwar landscape. (...)
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  44. Hilge Landweer & Gertrudetr Postl (2005). Anthropological, Social, and Moral Limitations of a Multiplicity of Genders. Hypatia 20 (2):27-47.score: 3.0
    : This work argues from a social-theoretical perspective for the view that every concept of 'gender' remains bound to reproduction. As every culture is interested in its continuity, it distinguishes individuals according to their assumed possible contribution to reproduction and so develops a fundamental dual classification. Subsequent gender categories are necessarily derived from this one. The conceptual and empirical arguments for this thesis are illustrated through an imagined dystopia. There I envision under what conditions a complete dissociation of the (...)
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  45. Mats Carlsson (2013). The Osmotic Subject of the Digital. International Journal of Žižek Studies 7.score: 3.0
    In this article it is suggested that the discourse entailing the realization of a dystopia of totalitarian surveillance, far from being a grounded fact, on the contrary, works as a screen sheltering us from the fact that we are reaching a point where we are nothing more than depersonalized, emptied forms of interest neither to corporations nor to each other; instead, we are moving towards the liquification of subjectivity as such. When our user data is “taken hostage” we are (...)
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  46. Michael S. Roth (2011). Memory, Trauma, and History: Essays on Living with the Past. Columbia University Press.score: 3.0
    Remembering forgetting : Maladies de la Mémoire in nineteenth-century France -- Dying of the past : medical studies of nostalgia in nineteenth-century France -- Hysterical remembering -- Trauma, representation, and historical consciousness -- Trauma : a dystopia of the spirit -- Falling into history : Freud's case of 'Frau Emmy von N.' -- Why Freud haunts us -- Why Warburg now? -- Classic postmodernism : Keith Jenkins -- Ebb tide : Frank Ankersmit -- The art of losing oneself : (...)
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  47. Thomas Osborne (2003). Utopia, Counter-Utopia. History of the Human Sciences 16 (1):123-136.score: 3.0
    This article addresses the question of utopia through some reflections on the work of the Russian writer Andrei Platonov (1899-1951). Platonov's work represents an inspirational series of investigations into the circumstances of utopia: not so much utopia as fantasy, nor utopia as actualized in failure, nor even dystopia, but what is here termed `actually existing utopia'. As such his work captures aspects of utopianism that may have been largely opaque to the investigations of either literary versions of the utopian (...)
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  48. Ansgar Allen (2011). Michael Young's the Rise of the Meritocracy: A Philosophical Critique. British Journal of Educational Studies 59 (4):367 - 382.score: 3.0
    This paper examines Michael Young's 1958 dystopia, The Rise of the Meritocracy. In this book, the word 'meritocracy' was coined and used in a pejorative sense. Today, however, meritocracy represents a positive ideal against which we measure the justice of our institutions. This paper argues that, when read in the twenty-first century, Young's dystopia does little to dislodge the implicit appeal of a meritocratic society. It examines the principles of education and administrative justice upon which meritocracy is based, (...)
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  49. Philip Goodchild (2006). Truth and Utopia. Telos 2006 (134):64-82.score: 3.0
    What have truth and utopia to do with each other? Should we not speak rather only of the truth of dystopia—even and especially in the context of the highest levels of prosperity and freedom ever achieved? For if dystopia is invisible to many, it is not, for all that, any less real, whether in the present or the immediate future. For once the Malthusian predicament of economic globalization is demonstrated in the clash between economic growth and ecological finitude, (...)
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  50. Hilge Landweer & Gertrude Postl (2005). Anthropological, Social, and Moral Limitations of a Multiplicity of Genders. Hypatia 20 (2):27 - 47.score: 3.0
    This work argues from a social-theoretical perspective for the view that every concept of 'gender' remains bound to reproduction. As every culture is interested in its continuity, it distinguishes individuals according to their assumed possible contribution to reproduction and so develops a fundamental dual classification. Subsequent gender categories are necessarily derived from this one. The conceptual and empirical arguments for this thesis are illustrated through an imagined dystopia. There I envision under what conditions a complete dissociation of the concepts (...)
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