Search results for 'early vision' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gerald Vision (1997). Problems of Vision: Rethinking the Causal Theory of Perception. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 270.0
    In this book Gerald Vision argues for a new causal theory, one that engages provocatively with direct realism and makes no use of a now discredited subjectivism.
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  2. Ko Sakai Nobuhiko Wagatsuma, Megumi Oki (2013). Feature-Based Attention in Early Vision for the Modulation of Figure–Ground Segregation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 216.0
    We investigated psychophysically whether feature-based attention modulates the perception of figure–ground (F–G) segregation and, based on the results, we investigated computationally the neural mechanisms underlying attention modulation. In the psychophysical experiments, the attention of participants was drawn to a specific motion direction and they were then asked to judge the side of figure in an ambiguous figure with surfaces consisting of distinct motion directions. The results of these experiments showed that the surface consisting of the attended direction of motion was (...)
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  3. Athanassios Raftopoulos (2013). The Cognitive Impenetrability of the Content of Early Vision is a Necessary and Sufficient Condition for Purely Nonconceptual Content. Philosophical Psychology (5):1-20.score: 180.0
    I elaborate on Pylyshyn's definition of the cognitive impenetrability (CI) of early vision, and draw on the role of concepts in perceptual processing, which links the problem of the CI or cognitive penetrability (CP) of early vision with the problem of the nonconceptual content (NCC) of perception. I explain, first, the sense in which the content of early vision is CI and I argue that if some content is CI, it is conceptually encapsulated, that (...)
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  4. Josefa Toribio (2014). Nonconceptualism and the Cognitive Impenetrability of Early Vision. Philosophical Psychology 27 (5):621-642.score: 180.0
    (2014). Nonconceptualism and the cognitive impenetrability of early vision. Philosophical Psychology: Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 621-642. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2014.893386.
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  5. Ronald Rensink, An Object Completion Process in Early Vision.score: 180.0
    It has recently been demonstrated that early vision is capable of recovering several properties of the three-dimensional world. We describe a series of visual search experiments showing that such recovery includes a completion process that allows for the interpretation of objects that are partially occluded. Search for easily-detectable line segments is made much more difficult when they can be interpreted as the visible parts of a line that has been occluded by a three-dimensional object. We describe some of (...)
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  6. James A. Schirillo (1999). Color Memory Penetrates Early Vision. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):393-393.score: 180.0
    Pylyshyn's concentration on form perception to demonstrate that early vision is cognitively impenetrable neglects that color perception is also part of early vision. Thus, the finding of Duncker (1939), Bruner et al. (1951), and Delk and Fillenbaum (1965) that the expected color of objects affects how they are perceived challenges Pylyshyn's thesis.
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  7. Cathleen M. Moore (1999). Cognitive Impenetrability of Early Vision Does Not Imply Cognitive Impenetrability of Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):385-386.score: 180.0
    Pylyshyn argues that early vision is cognitively impenetrable, and therefore – contrary to knowledge-based theories of perception – that perception is noncontinuous with cognition. Those processes that are included in “early vision,” however, represent at best only one component of perception, and it is important that it is not the component with which most knowledge-based theories are concerned. Pylyshyn's analysis should be taken as a possible source of refinement of knowledge-based theories of perception, rather than as (...)
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  8. Mary A. Peterson (1999). Knowledge and Intention Can Penetrate Early Vision. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):389-390.score: 180.0
    Although some types of cognition may not affect early vision, there is ample evidence that other types of cognition do. Evidence indicating that early vision is penetrable by direct manipulation of viewers' perceptual intentions and by knowledge of the structure of familiar objects is reviewed, and related to both the Pylyshyn target article and Fodor (1983).
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  9. Richard Montgomery (1989). Discrimination, Reidentification and the Indeterminacy of Early Vision. Noûs 23 (September):413-435.score: 162.0
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  10. Austen Clark (2012). Spatial Organization and the Appearances Thereof in Early Vision. In Gary Hatfield & Sarah Allred (eds.), Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy. Oup Oxford. 135.score: 150.0
    The perception of the lightness of surfaces has been shown to be affected by information about the spatial configuration of those surfaces and their illuminants. For example, two surfaces of equal luminance can appear to be of very different lightness if one of the two appears to lie in a shadow. How are we to understand the character of the processes that integrate such spatial configuration information so as to yield the eventual appearance of lightness? This paper makes some simple (...)
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  11. Athanassios Raftopoulos (2014). Nonconceptual Content: A Reply to Toribio's “Nonconceptualism and the Cognitive Impenetrability of Early Vision”. Philosophical Psychology 27 (5):643-651.score: 150.0
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  12. Ronald Rensink, Identification of Highlights in Early Vision.score: 150.0
    Methods. Visual search experiments were carried out using simple black and white figures corresponding to shiny objects lit from various directions. These included, for example, depictions of cylinders with highlights positioned at various heights (see figure). Targets and distractors differed only in the arrangement of their constituent regions, allowing them to be distinguished by the position of the highlights on the corresponding objects.
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  13. L. M. Doherty & D. H. Foster (1996). The Effect of Line Segment Length on Oriented-Line-Target Detection in Early Vision. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 1373-1373.score: 150.0
     
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  14. Emma Ferneyhough, Min K. Kim, Elizabeth A. Phelps & Marisa Carrasco (2013). Anxiety Modulates the Effects of Emotion and Attention on Early Vision. Cognition and Emotion 27 (1):166-176.score: 150.0
  15. J. S. Lappin & W. D. Craft (1991). Early Vision Detects Differential Structure Prior to Stereopsis. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):488-488.score: 150.0
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  16. D. Sagi (2004). Is There Learning in Early Vision (Julesz# 16)? In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing. 29-29.score: 150.0
  17. Stuart Clark (2007). Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 138.0
    Species : visions and values -- Fantasies : seeing without what was within -- Prestiges : illusions in magic and art -- Glamours : demons and virtual worlds -- Images : the reformation of the eyes -- Apparitions : the discernment of spirits -- Sights : King Saul and King Macbeth -- Seemings : philosophical scepticism -- Dreams : the epistemology of sleep -- Signs : vision and the new philosophy.
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  18. Stephen L. Macknik & Susana Martinez-Conde (2004). Dichoptic Visual Masking Reveals That Early Binocular Neurons Exhibit Weak Interocular Suppression: Implications for Binocular Vision and Visual Awareness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 16 (6):1049-1059.score: 132.0
  19. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1999). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? The Case for Cognitive Impenetrability of Visual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 120.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to general cognition. This paper sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, Psychophysics, perceptual learning and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, which may be called early (...)
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  20. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2000). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 120.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to cognition. This target article sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, psychophysics, perceptual learning, and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, corresponding to what some people have (...)
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  21. Robert Michael Brain & Kelly Joan Whitmer (2009). Dissecting Vision in Early Science and Medicine. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (3):448-453.score: 120.0
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  22. Costas Pagondiotis (forthcoming). COGNITIVE (IM)PENETRABILITY OF VISION: RESTRICTING VISION Vs. RESTRICTING COGNITION. In J. Zeimbekis & A. Raftopoulos (eds.), Cognitive Penetrability. OUP.score: 120.0
    Pylyshyn restricts cognitively penetrable vision to late vision, whereas he does not make any distinction between different kinds of penetrating cognition. I argue that this approach disconnects early vision content from late vision content and blurs the distinction between the latter and the content of thought. To overcome this problem I suggest that we should not distinguish between different kinds of visual content but instead introduce a restriction on the kind of cognition that can directly (...)
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  23. I. I. Denery (2010). Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 103-104.score: 120.0
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  24. Eric Swanson (2010). Book Review: Cynthea J. Bogel, With A Single Glance: Buddhist Icon and Early Mikkyō Vision. [REVIEW] Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 37:380-383.score: 120.0
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  25. William Tronzo (2013). Marie Tanner, Jerusalem on the Hill: Rome and the Vision of Saint Peter's Basilica in the Renaissance. (Studies in Medieval and Early Renaissance Art History 60.) London: Harvey Miller Publishers; Turnhout: Brepols, 2010. Pp. 288; 113 Black-and-White and 59 Color Figures. ISBN: 9781905375493. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (3):856-857.score: 120.0
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  26. Michael Baxandall (2008). Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture. Common Knowledge 14 (2):319-319.score: 120.0
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  27. Patrick J. Bennett (2002). Vision: Early Psychological Processes. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.score: 120.0
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  28. Piero E. Ariotti (1973). A Little Known Early Seventeenth Century Treatise on Vision: Benedetto Castelli's Discorso Sopra la Vista (1639, 1669). Annals of Science 30 (1):1-30.score: 120.0
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  29. William Beidler (1975). The Vision of Self in Early Vedānta. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 120.0
     
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  30. Dallas G. Denery Ii (2010). Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):103-104.score: 120.0
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  31. M. A. Georgeson (1996). Locus Hocus-Pocus: Towards a Functional Architecture for Early Spatial Vision. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 1369-1369.score: 120.0
     
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  32. S. Neubauer (2010). On Visualized Vision in the Early Photographic Work of Warren Neidich. Theory, Culture and Society 27 (7-8):306-323.score: 120.0
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  33. Ariel S. Cecchi (2014). Cognitive Penetration, Perceptual Learning and Neural Plasticity. Dialectica 68 (1):63-95.score: 90.0
    Cognitive penetration of perception, broadly understood, is the influence that the cognitive system has on a perceptual system (e.g., visual, auditory, haptic). The paper shows a form of cognitive penetration in the visual system (defined as early vision) which I call ‘architectural’. Architectural cognitive penetration is the process whereby the behaviour or the structure of the perceptual system is influenced by the cognitive system, which consequently may have an impact on the content of the perceptual experience. I scrutinize (...)
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  34. Maciej Witek, Contextual Facilitation of Colour Recognition: Penetrating Beliefs or Colour-Shape Associations?score: 90.0
    My aim in this paper is to defend the view that the processes underlying early vision are informationally encapsulated. Following Marr (1982) and Pylyshyn (1999) I take early vision to be a cognitive process that takes sensory information as its input and produces the so-called primal sketches or shallow visual outputs: informational states that represent visual objects in terms of their shape, location, size, colour and luminosity. Recently, some researchers (Schirillo 1999, Macpherson 2012) have attempted to (...)
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  35. George Berkeley (1963/1981). Works on Vision. Greenwood Press.score: 84.0
    A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge -- An essay towards a new theory of vision -- Alciphron, the fourth dialogue (excerpts) -- The theory of vision.
     
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  36. P. Morton (1993). Supervenience and Computational Explanation in Vision Theory. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):86-99.score: 72.0
    According to Marr's theory of vision, computational processes of early vision rely for their success on certain "natural constraints" in the physical environment. I examine the implications of this feature of Marr's theory for the question whether psychological states supervene on neural states. It is reasonable to hold that Marr's theory is nonindividualistic in that, given the role of natural constraints, distinct computational theories of the same neural processes may be justified in different environments. But to avoid (...)
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  37. Ruth Rosenholtz, Jie Huang & Krista A. Ehinger (2012). Rethinking the Role of Top-Down Attention in Vision: Effects Attributable to a Lossy Representation in Peripheral Vision. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 72.0
    Common wisdom in the field of human vision suggests that top-down selective attention is required in order to bind features into objects. Without selective attention, presumably we are unable even to distinguish such simple stimuli as a rotated T vs. a rotated L. Selective attention, in turn, is often described as volitional and involving intentionality, suggesting – implicitly or explicitly – that it requires awareness. The resulting implication that we might need so expensive (and possibly human) a resource as (...)
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  38. Lianne McTavish (2010). Practices of Looking and the Medical Humanities: Imagining the Unborn in France, 1550–1800. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 31 (1):11-26.score: 72.0
    Visuality is a concept used to study vision as an historically and culturally specific activity. Curriculum in the medical humanities could address visuality by stressing how different kinds of practitioners and peoples learn how to see. This paper introduces the visual training promoted by the discipline of art history, analysing early modern French medical images of the unborn as a case study. The goal is to encourage medical practitioners to reflect on their own visual skills, comparing and contrasting (...)
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  39. John McCarthy, The Web--Early Visions, Present Reality, Grander Future.score: 64.0
    Licklider--1960--Man-Computer Symbiosis Roberts--1970--ARPAnet Internet Engelbart--1962-1968--Mouse, linked documents Kay--1970--Dynabook Berners-Lee--late 1980s and early 90s--World Wide Web Brin and Page--1996--Google--first adequate search engine other prophets--Nelson, etc. whom I neglect undeservedly from ignorance.
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  40. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2001). Visual Indexes, Preconceptual Objects, and Situated Vision. Cognition 80 (1-2):127-158.score: 60.0
    This paper argues that a theory of situated vision, suited for the dual purposes of object recognition and the control of action, will have to provide something more than a system that constructs a conceptual representation from visual stimuli: it will also need to provide a special kind of direct (preconceptual, unmediated) connection between elements of a visual representation and certain elements in the world. Like natural language demonstratives (such as `this' or `that') this direct connection allows entities to (...)
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  41. Zenon Pylyshyn (1999). Vision and Cognition: How Do They Connect? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):401-414.score: 60.0
    The target article claimed that although visual apprehension involves all of general cognition, a significant component of vision (referred to as early vision) works independently of cognition and yet is able to provide a surprisingly high level interpretation of visual inputs, roughly up to identifying general shape-classes. The commentators were largely sympathetic, but frequently disagreed on how to draw the boundary, on exactly what early vision delivers, on the role that attention plays, and on how (...)
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  42. Zenon Pylyshyn, The Role of Visual Indexes in Spatial Vision and Imagery∗∗.score: 60.0
    This paper describes a programmatic theory of a process in early vision called indexing. The theory hypothesizes that a small number of primitive indexes are available for individuating, tracking and providing direct access to salient visual objects. We discuss some empirical and theoretical arguments in favor of the proposed index as a resource-limited link between an internal visual representation and objects in the visual world. We argue that this link is needed to explain a large range of properties (...)
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  43. Su-Ling Yeh & I.-Ping Chen (1999). Is Early Visual Processing Attention Impenetrable? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):400-400.score: 60.0
    Pylyshyn's effort in establishing the cognitive impenetrability of early vision is welcome. However, his view about the role of attention in early vision seems to be oversimplified. The allocation of focal attention manifests its effect among multiple stages in the early vision system, it is not just confined to the input and the output levels.
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  44. Shimon Edelman, No Reconstruction, No Impenetrability (at Least Not Much) A Commentary on ``Is Vision Continuous with Cognition?'' by Z. Pylyshyn.score: 60.0
    Two of the premises of the target paper -- surface reconstruction as the goal of early vision, and inaccessibility of intermediate stages in the process presumably leading to such reconstruction -- are questioned and found wanting.
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  45. Thomas Sanocki (1999). The Future of Vision Needs More Bridges and Fewer Walls. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):392-393.score: 60.0
    The commentator agrees with Pylyshyn's most general claims but sees problems with the more specific proposals about where the boundary between early vision and later processing might lie. The boundary cuts across current models of identification. Limitations in current research on scenic context effects preclude firm conclusions. High-level vision will benefit more from integrative work than from premature analysis.
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  46. Thomas J. J. Altizer (2009). The Revolutionary Vision of William Blake. Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (1):33-38.score: 54.0
    It was William Blake's insight that the Christian churches, by inverting the Incarnation and the dialectical vision of Paul, have repressed the body, divided God from creation, substituted judgment for grace, and repudiated imagination, compassion, and the original apocalyptic faith of early Christianity. Blake's prophetic poetry thus contributes to the renewal of Christian ethics by a process of subversion and negation of Christian moral, ecclesiastical, and theological traditions, which are recognized precisely as inversions of Jesus, and therefore as (...)
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  47. Sylvia Berryman (1998). Euclid and the Sceptic: A Paper on Vision, Doubt, Geometry, Light and Drunkenness. Phronesis 43 (2):176-196.score: 54.0
    Philosophy in the period immediately after Aristotle is sometimes thought to be marked by the decline of natural philosophy and philosophical disinterest in contemporary achievements in the sciences. But in one area at least, the early third century B.C.E. was a time of productive interaction between such disparate fields as epistemology, physics and geometry. Debates between the sceptics and the dogmatic philosophical schools focus on epistemological problems about the possibility of self-evident appearances, but there is evidence from Euclid's day (...)
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  48. S. Berryman (1998). Euclid and the Sceptic: A Paper on Vision, Doubt, Geometry, Light and Drunkenness. Phronesis 43 (2):176 - 196.score: 54.0
    Philosophy in the period immediately after Aristotle is sometimes thought to be marked by the decline of natural philosophy and philosophical disinterest in contemporary achievements in the sciences. But in one area at least, the early third century B.C.E. was a time of productive interaction between such disparate fields as epistemology, physics and geometry. Debates between the sceptics and the dogmatic philosophical schools focus on epistemological problems about the possibility of self-evident appearances, but there is evidence from Euclid's day (...)
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  49. Steve Garlick (2009). Given Time: Biology, Nature and Photographic Vision. History of the Human Sciences 22 (5):81-101.score: 54.0
    The invention of photography in the early 19th century changed the way that we see the world, and has played an important role in the development of western science. Notably, photographic vision is implicated in the definition of a new temporal relation to the natural world at the same time as modern biological science emerges as a disciplinary formation. It is this coincidence in birth that is central to this study. I suggest that by examining the relationship of (...)
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  50. Andrew Hollingworth & John M. Henderson (1999). Vision and Cognition: Drawing the Line. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):380-381.score: 54.0
    Pylyshyn defends a distinction between early visual perception and cognitive processing. But exactly where should the line between vision and cognition be drawn? Our research on object identification suggests that the construction of an object's visual description is isolated from contextually derived expectations. Moreover, the matching of constructed descriptions to stored descriptions appears to be similarly isolated.
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