Search results for 'ecofeminism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Colette Sciberras (2002). Deep Ecology and Ecofeminism: The Self in Environmental Philosophy. Dissertation, Lancasterscore: 24.0
    I consider the issue of the self and its relation to the environment, focusing on the accounts given in ecofeminism and deep ecology. Though both stress the relatedness of the human self to nature, these accounts differ in various ways. Ecofeminism stresses the value of personal relations with particular others, whereas deep ecology argues that we should expand our sense of self to include all natural others and the whole of nature. Deep ecology’s views on the self, which (...)
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  2. Holly L. Wilson (1997). Kant and Ecofeminism. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature.score: 24.0
  3. Grace Y. Kao (2010). The Universal Versus the Particular in Ecofeminist Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):616-637.score: 24.0
    While not a monolithic movement, ecofeminists are united in their conviction that there are important connections between the exploitation of both women and nature. They are internally divided, however, on the propriety of applying their theoretical claims and activist strategies across social contexts. This paper explores three debates within ecofeminism that largely turn on this universalist versus particularist tension: whether ecofeminist theorizing can adequately account for cultural variation; whether its common usage of essentialist rhetoric is productive or troubling; and (...)
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  4. Chaone Mallory (2013). Locating Ecofeminism in Encounters with Food and Place. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):171-189.score: 24.0
    This article explores the relationship between ecofeminism, food, and the philosophy of place. Using as example my own neighborhood in a racially integrated area of Philadelphia with a thriving local foods movement that nonetheless is nearly exclusively white and in which women are the invisible majority of purchasers, farmers, and preparers, the article examines what ecofeminism contributes to the discussion of racial, gendered, classed discrepancies regarding who does and does not participate in practices of locavorism and the local (...)
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  5. Holly L. Wilson (1997). Rethinking Kant From the Perspective of Ecofeminism. In Robin May Schott (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Kant.score: 21.0
    Contrary to what Jeanne Moyer asserts, Kant does not have a normative dualism going in his works on teleological judgment and these can be used to develop a more woman friendly view of human nature.
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  6. Chris Crittenden (2000). Ecofeminism Meets Business: A Comparison of Ecofeminist, Corporate, and Free Market Ideologies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):51 - 63.score: 18.0
    This paper develops a psychological and ethical ecofeminist position and then compares ecofeminism to corporate and free market capitalism in terms of effects along four scales of well-being: democracy/human rights, environmental health, psychological health, and cruelty toward animals. Using aspects of symbolic interactionism and Antony Weston's self-validating reduction model, it is demonstrated that an ecofeminist belief system tends to promote moral and psychological health whereas the discussed forms of capitalistic thinking militate in the other direction. Ecofeminism is not, (...)
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  7. Kelly A. Burns (2008). Warren's Ecofeminist Ethics and Merleau-Ponty's Body-Subject: Intersections. Ethics and the Environment 13 (2):pp. 101-118.score: 18.0
    While Karen Warren offers an ecofeminist ethic that is pluralistic, contextualist, and challenges Cartesian dualism, one area that remains underdeveloped in her theory is embodiment. I will examine Merleau-Ponty’s notion of embodied subjectivity and show that it would fit consistently with her theory. I will also explore some other areas in which the two theories supplement each other.
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  8. Ariel Salleh (1992). The Ecofeminism/Deep Ecology Debate. Environmental Ethics 14 (3):195-216.score: 18.0
    I discuss conceptual confusions shared by deep ecologists over such questions as gender, essentialism, normative dualism, and eco-centrism. I conclude that deep ecologists have failed to grasp both the epistemological challenge offered by ecofeminism and the practical labor involved in bringing about social change. While convergencies between deep ecology and ecofeminism promise to be fruitful, these are celebrated in false consciousness, unless remedial work is done.
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  9. Sherilyn MacGregor (2004). From Care to Citizenship: Calling Ecofeminism Back to Politics. Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):56-84.score: 18.0
    : Although there are important aspects of ecofeminist valuations of women's caring, a greater degree of skepticism than is now found in ecofeminist scholarship is in order. In this article I argue that there are political risks in celebrating women's association with caring, as both an ethic and a practice, and in reducing women's ethico-political life to care. I support this position by drawing on the work of feminist theorists who argue that the positive identification of women with caring ought (...)
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  10. Warwick Fox (1989). The Deep Ecology-Ecofeminism Debate and its Parallels. Environmental Ethics 11 (1):5-25.score: 18.0
    There has recently been considerable discussion of the relative merits of deep ecology and ecofeminism, primarily from an ecofeminist perspective. I argue that the essential ecofeminist charge against deep ecology is that deep ecology focuses on the issue of anthropocentrism (i.e., human-centeredness) rather than androcentrism (i.e., malecenteredness). I point out that this charge is not directed at deep ecology’s positive or constructive task of encouraging an attitude of ecocentric egalitarianism, but rather at deep ecology's negative or critical task of (...)
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  11. Christine J. Cuomo (1992). Unravelling the Problems in Ecofeminism. Environmental Ethics 14 (4):351-363.score: 18.0
    Karen Warren has argued that environmental ethics must be feminist and that feminist ethics must be ecological. Hence, she endorses ecofeminism as an environmental ethic with power and promise. Recent ecofeminist theory, however, is not as powerful as one might hope. In fact, I argue, much of this theory is based on values that are potentially damaging to moral agents, and that are not in accord withfeminist goals. My intent is not to dismantle ecofeminism, but to analyze and (...)
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  12. Dorceta E. Taylor (1997). Women of Color, Environmental Justice, and Ecofeminism. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 38--81.score: 18.0
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  13. Greta Gaard (1997). Toward a Queer Ecofeminism. Hypatia 12 (1):114-137.score: 18.0
    Although many ecofeminists acknowledge heterosexism as a problem, a systematic exploration of the potential intersections of ecofeminist and queer theories has yet to be made. By interrogating social constructions of the "natural," the various uses of Christianity as a logic of domination, and the rhetoric of colonialism, this essay finds those theoretical intersections and argues for the importance of developing a queer ecofeminism.
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  14. Carol J. Adams (1991). Ecofeminism and the Eating of Animals. Hypatia 6 (1):125 - 145.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I will argue that contemporary ecofeminist discourse, while potentially adequate to deal with the issue of animals, is now inadequate because it fails to give consistent conceptual place to the domination of animals as a significant aspect of the domination of nature. I will examine six answers ecofeminists could give for not including animals explicitly in ecofeminist analyses and show how a persistent patriarchal ideology regarding animals as instruments has kept the experience of animals from being fully (...)
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  15. Jeanna Moyer (2001). Why Kant and Ecofeminism Don't Mix. Hypatia 16 (3):79-97.score: 18.0
    : This paper consists of two sections. In section one, I explore Val Plumwood's description of the features of normative dualism, and briefly discuss how these features are manifest in Immanuel Kant's view of nature. In section two, I evaluate the claims of Holly L. Wilson, who argues that Kant is not a normative dualist. Against Wilson, I will argue that Kant maintains normative dualisms between humans/nature, humans/animals, humans/culture, and men/women. As such, Kant's philosophy is antithetical to the aims of (...)
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  16. Chaone Mallory (2001). Acts of Objectification and the Repudiation of Dominance: Leopold, Ecofeminism, and the Ecological Narrative. Ethics and the Environment 6 (2):59-89.score: 18.0
    : None dispute that Aldo Leopold has made an invaluable contribution to environmental discourse. However, it is important for those involved in the field of environmental ethics to be aware that his works may unwittingly promote an attitude of domination toward the nonhuman world, due to his frequent and unregenerate hunting. Such an attitude runs counter to most strains of environmental ethics, but most notably ecofeminism. By examining Leopold through the lens of ecofeminism, I establish that the effect (...)
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  17. Whitney A. Bauman (2007). The Eco-Ontology of Social/Ist Ecofeminist Thought. Environmental Ethics 29 (3):279-298.score: 18.0
    The epistemological and ontological claims of social/ist ecofeminist thought (a combination of social and socialist ecofeminism) are moving away from the dichotomy between idealism and materialism (both forms of colonial thinking about humans and the rest of the natural world). The social/ist ecofeminists have constructed a postfoundational “eco-ontology” of nature-cultures (Haraway) in which the ideal and the material are co-agents in the continuing process of creation. Given that contemporary public discourse in the United States on the topic of “environmental (...)
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  18. Josephine Donovan (1996). Ecofeminist Literary Criticism: Reading The Orange. Hypatia 11 (2):161 - 184.score: 18.0
    Ecofeminism, a new vein in feminist theory, critiques the ontology of domination, whereby living beings are reduced to the status of objects, which diminishes their moral significance, enabling their exploitation, abuse, and destruction. This article explores the possibility of an ecofeminist literary and cultural practice, whereby the text is not reduced to an "it" but rather recognized as a "thou," and where new modes of relationship-dialogue, conversation, and meditative attentiveness-are developed.
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  19. Mary Jo Deegan & Christopher W. Podeschi (2001). The Ecofeminist Pragmatism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):19-36.score: 18.0
    We read the roots of contemporary ecofeminism through the lens of feminist pragmatism. After indicating the general relation between ecofeminism and feminist pragmatism, we provide a detailed analysis of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s saga Herland and With Her in Ourland to document the strong connection between these two traditions. Gilman’s congruencies with ecofeminism make clear that she was a forerunner and perhaps a foundation for contemporary ecofeminism. However, further analyses are needed to reveal the full import of (...)
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  20. Christopher W. Podeschi (2001). The Ecofeminist Pragmatism of Charlotte Perkins Gilman. Environmental Ethics 23 (1):19-36.score: 18.0
    We read the roots of contemporary ecofeminism through the lens of feminist pragmatism. After indicating the general relation between ecofeminism and feminist pragmatism, we provide a detailed analysis of Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s saga Herland and With Her in Ourland to document the strong connection between these two traditions. Gilman’s congruencies with ecofeminism make clear that she was a forerunner and perhaps a foundation for contemporary ecofeminism. However, further analyses are needed to reveal the full import of (...)
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  21. Stephanie Lahar (1991). Ecofeminist Theory and Grassroots Politics. Hypatia 6 (1):28 - 45.score: 18.0
    This essay proposes several guiding parameters for ecofeminism's development as a moral theory. I argue that these provide necessary directives and contexts for ecofeminist analyses and social/ecological projects. In the past these have been very diverse and occasionally contradictory. Most important to the core of ecofeminism's vitality are close links between theory and political activism. I show how these originated in ecofeminism's history and advocate a continued participatory and activist focus in the future.
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  22. Richard T. Twine (2001). Ma(R)King Essence-Ecofeminism and Embodiment. Ethics and the Environment 6 (2):31-58.score: 18.0
    : This paper argues that ecofeminism can consolidate its tradition of elucidating the interconnections between different oppressions by expanding upon its philosophy of the body. By looking at the ways in which particular bodies become 'marked', and so devalued, ecofeminism can point towards various unexpected and creative coalitions. Here I concentrate especially upon two intertwined sets of markings, namely those related to aesthetic discourses and those related to discourses of Western reason. I argue that both of these ultimately (...)
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  23. Chaone Mallory (2010). What is Ecofeminist Political Philosophy? Gender, Nature, and the Political. Environmental Ethics 32 (3):305-322.score: 18.0
    Ecofeminist political philosophy is an area of intellectual inquiry that examines the political status of that which we call “nature” using the insights, theoretical tools, and ethical commitments of ecological feminisms and other liberatory theories such as critical race theory, queer theory, postcolonial theory, environmental philosophy, and feminism. Ecofeminist political philosophy is concerned with questions regarding the possibilities opened by the recognition of agency and subjectivity for the more-than-human world; and it asks how we can respond politically to the more-than-human (...)
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  24. Deborah Slicer (1995). Is There an Ecofeminism–Deep Ecology “Debate”? Environmental Ethics 17 (2):151-169.score: 18.0
    I discuss six problems with Warwick Fox’s “The Deep Ecology–Ecofeminism Debate and Its Parallels” and conclude that until Fox and some other deep ecologists take the time to study feminism and ecofeminist analyses, only disputes—not genuine debate—will occur between these two parties. An understanding of the six issues that I discuss is a precondition for such a debate.
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  25. Sam Mickey & Kimberly Carfore (2012). Planetary Love: Ecofeminist Perspectives on Globalization. World Futures 68 (2):122 - 131.score: 18.0
    This article draws on three ecofeminist theorists (Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Val Plumwood, and Donna Haraway) in order to criticize the dominant model of globalization, which oppresses humans and the natural environment, and propose an alternative globalization grounded in planetary love. Rather than affirming or opposing the globalization, planetary love acknowledges its complicity with the neocolonial tendencies of globalization while aiming toward another globalization, a more just, peaceful, and sustainable globalization. In this context, love is characterized by non-coercive, mutually transformative contact, (...)
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  26. Robert Sessions (1991). Deep Ecology Versus Ecofeminism: Healthy Differences or Incompatible Philosophies? Hypatia 6 (1):90 - 107.score: 18.0
    Deep ecology and ecofeminism are contemporary environmental philosophies that share the desire to supplant the predominant Western anthropocentric environmental frameworks. Recently thinkers from these movements have focused their critiques on each other, and substantial differences have emerged. This essay explores central aspects of this debate to ascertain whether either philosophy has been undermined in the process and whether there are any indications that they are compatible despite their differences.
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  27. Julie Cook (1998). The Philosophical Colonization of Ecofeminism. Environmental Ethics 20 (3):227-246.score: 18.0
    There is general agreement among ecofeminists regarding the desirability of a variety of expressions of ecofeminism, but this pluralism is under threat with the emergence of an approach that emphasizes the primacy of a philosophical ecofeminism which claims the authority to prescribe what ecofeminism should be. The recent anthology Ecological Feminism is symptomatic of this trend, with contributors who affirm the philosophical significance of ecological feminism by privileging philosophers’ voices over those of other ecofeminists, rather than by (...)
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  28. Colette R. Palamar (2006). Restorashyn: Ecofeminist Restoration. Environmental Ethics 28 (3):285-301.score: 18.0
    Most restoration projects are designed to approximate the species composition and ecotypes ecologists and historians determine were present in an area at some point in the historical past. In most cases, although somewhat arbitrary, the specific time chosen (usually immediately before European settlement) is based on an understanding of historic species composition and anthropogenic disturbances.Although restoring an area to the estimated, historical vegetation types is widely accepted, the exclusory nature of the restoration process often actively eliminates not just invasive species, (...)
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  29. Katherine Pettus (1997). Ecofeminist Citizenship. Hypatia 12 (4):132-155.score: 18.0
    In this article I discuss how some women activists experience their citizenship locally and around the world through their work for the environment and resistance to systems which threaten world existence. By looking at the oikos-polis distinction in Aristotle as the genesis of environmental pathologies which give rise to newly complementary categories of citizenship and ecofeminism, I consider moral pluralism and agonistic liberalism as non-hierarchical theoretical frameworks for thinking about citizenship.
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  30. Greta Gaard (1997). Ecofeminism and Wilderness. Environmental Ethics 19 (1):5-24.score: 18.0
    I argue that ecofeminism must be concerned with the preservation and expansion of wilderness on the grounds that wilderness is an Other to the Self of Western culture and the master identity and that ecofeminism is concerned with the liberation of all subordinated Others. I suggest replacing the master identity with an ecofeminist ecological self, an identity defined through interdependence with Others, and I argue for the necessity of restoring and valuing human relationships with the Other of wilderness (...)
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  31. Ariel Salleh (1993). Class, Race, and Gender Discourse in the Ecofeminism/Deep Ecology Debate. Environmental Ethics 15 (3):225-244.score: 18.0
    While both ecofeminism and deep ecology share a commitment to overcoming the conventional division between humanity and nature, a major difference between the two is that deep ecology brings little social analysis to its environmental ethic. I argue that there are ideological reasons for this difference. Applying a sociology of knowledge and discourse analysis to deep ecological texts to uncover these reasons, I conclude that deep ecology is constrained by political attitudes meaningful to white-male, middle-class professionals whose thought is (...)
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  32. Vrinda Dalmiya (2002). Cows and Others: Toward Constructing Ecofeminist Selves. Environmental Ethics 24 (2):149-168.score: 18.0
    I examine the kind of alliances and ironic crossing of borders that constitute an ecofeminist subjectivity by appeal to a postcolonial literary imagination and ahistorical philosophical argumentation. I link the theoretical insights of a modern short story “Bestiality” with a concept of “congenital debt” found in the ancient Vedic corpus to suggest a notion of ecological selfhood that transforms into the idea of a “gift community” to encompass nonhumans as well as people on the fringes of society, but without the (...)
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  33. Susan Griffin (1997). Ecofeminism and Meaning. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 213--26.score: 18.0
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  34. L. Houde (1999). Ecofeminist Pedagogy: An Exploratory Case. Ethics and the Environment 4 (2):143-174.score: 18.0
    For ecofeminists within academic contexts, the classroom is another "contested terrain "where transformative eco-cultural work should be integrated. In our case, we are a part of communication studies and try to adopt ecofeminist insight as a position for questioning dominant discourses and practices. To do this, we "incorporate popular culture as a serious object of politics and analysis" (Giroux 1997, 148). It is our hope that popular culture can be used as an ecofeminist tool for interrupting hegemonic power relations and (...)
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  35. Patrick D. Murphy (1991). Ground, Pivot, Motion: Ecofeminist Theory, Dialogics, and Literary Practice. Hypatia 6 (1):146 - 161.score: 18.0
    Ecofeminist philosophy and literary theory need mutually to enhance each other's critical praxis. Ecofeminism provides the grounding necessary to turn the Bakhtinian dialogic method into a critical theory applicable to all of one's lived experience, while dialogics provides a method for advancing the application of ecofeminist thought in terms of literature, the other as speaking subject, and the interanimation of human and nonhuman aspects of nature. In the first part of this paper the benefits of dialogics to feminism and (...)
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  36. Sharon Rowe & James D. Sellman (2003). An Uncommon Alliance: Ecofeminism and Classical Daoist Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 25 (2):129-148.score: 18.0
    Classical philosophical Daoism and ecofeminism converge on key points. Ecofeminism’s critique of Western dualistic metaphysics finds support in Daoism’s nondualistic, particularist, cosmological framework, which distinguishes pairs of complementary opposites within a process of dynamic transformation without committing itself to a binary, essentialist position as regards sex and gender. Daoism’s epistemological implications suggest a link to ecofeminism’s alignment with a situational and provisional model of knowledge. As a transformative philosophy, the cluster of concepts that give specificity to the (...)
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  37. Rachel Brown (2004). Righting Ecofeminist Ethics: The Scope and Use of Moral Entitlement. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):247-265.score: 18.0
    Rights have been criticized as incorporating features that are antithetical to ecofeminism: rights are allegedly inherently adversarial; they are based on a conception of the person that fails to reflect women’s experience, biased in an illegitimate way toward humans rather than nonhumans, overly formal, and incapable of admitting the importance of emotion in ethics. Such criticisms are founded in misunderstandings of the ways in which rights operate and may be met by an adequate theory of rights. The notions of (...)
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  38. Gretchen T. Legler (1997). Ecofeminist Literary Criticism. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 227--238.score: 18.0
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  39. Joseph R. Loer (1997). Ecofeminism in Kenya: A Chemical Engineer's Perspective. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 279--289.score: 18.0
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  40. Charlene Spretnak & Karen J. Warren (1997). Radical Nonduality in Ecofeminist Philosophy. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 425--436.score: 18.0
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  41. Victoria Davion (2002). Anthropocentrism, Artificial Intelligence, and Moral Network Theory: An Ecofeminist Perspective. Environmental Values 11 (2):163 - 176.score: 18.0
    This paper critiques a conception of intelligence central in AI, and a related concept of reason central in moral philosophy, from an ecological feminist perspective. I argue that ecofeminist critique of human/nature dualisms offers insight into the durability of both problematic conceptions, and into the direction of research programmes. I conclude by arguing for the importance of keeping political analysis in the forefront of science and environmental ethics.
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  42. Carolyn Sachs (1992). Reconsidering Diversity in Agriculture and Food Systems: An Ecofeminist Approach. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 9 (3):4-10.score: 18.0
    The concept of diversity is at the center of environmental and social movements. This paper discusses four aspects of diversity related to agriculture: biological, social, cultural, and product and suggests that viewing diversity solely as difference skirts the issues of redistribution of power and shifting social relations. Ecofeminist conceptions of diversity are discussed with a focus on seeds, forests, and sustainable agriculture. Women's activities at the grassroots level provides new insights and pathways to diversity that combine social, agricultural, and biological (...)
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  43. Andy Smith (1997). Ecofeminism Through an Anticolonial Framework. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 21--37.score: 18.0
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  44. Holyn Wilson (1997). Kant and Ecofeminism.”. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 390--411.score: 18.0
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  45. Douglas Buege (1997). Epistemic Responsibility and the Inuit of Canada's Eastern Arctic: An Ecofeminist Appraisal. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 99--111.score: 18.0
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  46. Jaci de Fátima Souza Candiotto (2012). A Teologia Ecofeminista E Sua Perspectiva Simbólico/Cultural (Ecofeminist Theology and its Symbolic/Cultural Perspective)-DOI: 10.5752/P. 2175-5841.2012 V10n28p1395. [REVIEW] Horizonte 10 (28):1395-1413.score: 18.0
    Resumo O artigo analisa a pertinência da mediação do ecofeminismo simbólico/cultural para a teologia feminista, especialmente no contexto da América Latina. Argumenta-se que o ecofeminismo teológico não pode ser compreendido de modo homogêneo. Pelo menos dois desdobramentos podem ser identificados na sua constituição: essencialista e construcionista. A conclusão é que ambos proporcionam contribuições significativas para a teologia feminista, porém correm o risco de se afastar do cristianismo e pulverizar as lutas emancipatórias das mulheres. Palavras-chave : Teologia ecofeminista; Igreja; Gênero; Mulheres; (...)
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  47. Karen‘Leisure Fox (1997). Celebration and Resistance in the Ecofeminist Quilt'. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 155--175.score: 18.0
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  48. Ruthanne Kurth-Schai (1997). Ecofeminism and Children. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 193--211.score: 18.0
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