Search results for 'ecological' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joel Norman (2001). Two Visual Systems and Two Theories of Perception: An Attempt to Reconcile the Constructivist and Ecological Approaches. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):73-96.score: 18.0
    The two contrasting theoretical approaches to visual perception, the constructivist and the ecological, are briefly presented and illustrated through their analyses of space and size perception. Earlier calls for their reconciliation and unification are reviewed. Neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and psychophysical evidence for the existence of two quite distinct visual systems, the ventral and the dorsal, is presented. These two perceptual systems differ in their functions; the ventral system's central function is that of identification, while the dorsal system is mainly engaged (...)
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  2. Bryan G. Norton (2008). Beyond Positivist Ecology: Toward an Integrated Ecological Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):581-592.score: 18.0
    A post-positivist understanding of ecological science and the call for an “ecological ethic” indicate the need for a radically new approach to evaluating environmental change. The positivist view of science cannot capture the essence of environmental sciences because the recent work of “reflexive” ecological modelers shows that this requires a reconceptualization of the way in which values and ecological models interact in scientific process. Reflexive modelers are ecological modelers who believe it is appropriate for ecologists (...)
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  3. John T. Sanders (1996). An Ecological Approach to Cognitive Science. Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy 1996 (Spring).score: 18.0
    Cognitive science is ready for a major reconceptualization. This is not at all because efforts by its practitioners have failed, but rather because so much progress has been made. The need for reconceptualization arises from the fact that this progress has come at greater cost than necessary, largely because of more or less philosophical (at least metatheoretical) straightjackets still worn - whether wittingly or not - by those doing the work. These bonds are extremely hard to break. Even some of (...)
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  4. John T. Sanders, Philosophical Foundations for the Ecological Approach.score: 18.0
    Harry Heft's Ecological Psychology in Context is an important book in many ways. For one thing, it adds considerably to our understanding of the historical background of J.J. Gibson's thought. But more than that, Heft aims to place ecological psychology not just historically, but philosophically. He says "This volume shows that radical empiricism stands at the heart of Gibson's ecological program, and it can usefully be employed as the conceptual centerpiece for ecological psychology more broadly construed" (...)
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  5. Bruce H. Weber, David J. Depew, C. Dyke, Stanley N. Salthe, Eric D. Schneider, Robert E. Ulanowicz & Jeffrey S. Wicken (1989). Evolution in Thermodynamic Perspective: An Ecological Approach. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):373-405.score: 18.0
    Recognition that biological systems are stabilized far from equilibrium by self-organizing, informed, autocatalytic cycles and structures that dissipate unusable energy and matter has led to recent attempts to reformulate evolutionary theory. We hold that such insights are consistent with the broad development of the Darwinian Tradition and with the concept of natural selection. Biological systems are selected that re not only more efficient than competitors but also enhance the integrity of the web of energetic relations in which they are embedded. (...)
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  6. Gerard Ahearne (2013). Towards an Ecological Civilization: A Gramscian Strategy for a New Political Subject. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):317-326.score: 18.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE While much work has been done theorising the concept of an ecological civilization, the actual transition to an ecological civilization is another matter. One possible strategy for transforming our world from a death-rattle industrial civilization to a life affirming ecological civilization may be found in the later work of Antonio Gramsci. It is argued that as Gramsci became increasingly disillusioned with Soviet communism, he diagnosed its failure as due to (...)
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  7. Lynne Andersson, Sridevi Shivarajan & Gary Blau (2005). Enacting Ecological Sustainability in the MNC: A Test of an Adapted Value-Belief-Norm Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (3):295 - 305.score: 18.0
    . Undoubtedly, multinational corporations must play a significant role in the advancement of global ecological ethics. Our research offers a glimpse into the process of how goals of ecological sustainability in one multinational corporation can trickle down through the organization via the sustainability support behaviors of supervisors. We asked the question “How do supervisors in a multinational corporation internalize their corporation’s commitment to ecological sustainability and, in turn, behave in ways that convey this commitment to their subordinates?” (...)
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  8. Kevin de Laplante (2004). Toward a More Expansive Conception of Ecological Science. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):263-281.score: 18.0
    There are two competing conceptions of the nature and domain of ecological science in the popular and academic literature, an orthodox conception and a more expansive conception. The orthodox conception conceives ecology as a natural biological science distinct from the human social sciences. The more expansive conception views ecology as a science whose domain properly spans both the natural and social sciences. On the more expansive conception, non-traditional ecological disciplines such as ecological psychology, ecological anthropology and (...)
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  9. Kim Sterelny (2001). The Reality of Ecological Assemblages: A Palaeo-Ecological Puzzle. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):437-461.score: 18.0
    Ecological communities, I argue, are objective units of nature if theyhave structure that regulates their membership. Evidence of suchstructure in contemporary ecology is scant, but the palaeoecologicalphenomenon of co-ordinated stasis is a prima facie example ofinternal regulation. I argue that no individualist attempts to explainaway the appearance of internal regulation succeeds. But no internalistmodel is fully satisfactory, either, in explaining the contrast betweenpre and post Pleistocene ecology.
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  10. Kevin de Laplante (2004). Toward a More Expansive Conception of Ecological Science. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):263-281.score: 18.0
    There are two competing conceptions of the nature and domain of ecological science in the popular and academic literature, an orthodox conception and a more expansive conception. The orthodox conception conceives ecology as a natural biological science distinct from the human social sciences. The more expansive conception views ecology as a science whose domain properly spans both the natural and social sciences. On the more expansive conception, non-traditional ecological disciplines such as ecological psychology , ecological anthropology (...)
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  11. Martin Drenthen (2009). Ecological Restoration and Place Attachment; Emplacing Nonplace? Environmental Values 18 (3):285-312.score: 18.0
    The creation of new wetlands along rivers as an instrument to mitigate flood risks in times of climate change seduces us to approach the landscape from a 'managerial' perspective and threatens a more place-oriented approach. How to provide ecological restoration with a broad cultural context that can help prevent these new landscapes from becoming non-places, devoid of meaning and with no real connection to our habitable world. In this paper, I discuss three possible alternative interpretations of the meaning of (...)
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  12. Earl D. McCoy & Kristin Berry (2008). Using an Ecological Ethics Framework to Make Decisions About the Relocation of Wildlife. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):505-521.score: 18.0
    Relocation is an increasingly prominent conservation tool for a variety of wildlife, but the technique also is controversial, even among conservation practitioners. An organized framework for addressing the moral dilemmas often accompanying conservation actions such as relocation has been lacking. Ecological ethics may provide such a framework and appears to be an important step forward in aiding ecological researchers and biodiversity managers to make difficult moral choices. A specific application of this framework can make the reasoning process more (...)
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  13. Wouter Peeters, Jo Dirix & Sigrid Sterckx (forthcoming). Towards an Integration of the Ecological Space Paradigm and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-18.score: 18.0
    In order to develop a model of equitable and sustainable distribution, this paper advocates integrating the ecological space paradigm and the capabilities approach. As the currency of distribution, this account proposes a hybrid of capabilities and ecological space. Although the goal of distributive justice should be to secure and promote people’s capabilities now and in the future, doing so requires acknowledging that these capabilities are dependent on the biophysical preconditions as well as inculcating the ethos of restraint. Both (...)
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  14. David Carpenter (2003). An Investigation Into the Transition From Technological to Ecological Rice Farming Among Resource Poor Farmers From the Philippine Island of Bohol. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):165-176.score: 18.0
    A conceptual framework influenced bythe concept of moral ecology is developed andused to analyze the transition fromtechnological (green revolution) to ecological(organic) rice farming by resource poor farmersfrom the Philippine island of Bohol. This MoralEcology Framework (MEF) focuses on theepistemology of the two farming systems and howthis influences management principles andpractice. The orienting concepts of systemic understanding, exchange betweensociety and the environment, local versusextra-local exchange and scope areintegral to this analysis. The case studydemonstrates how the ostracism of nature underthe green (...)
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  15. Leslie A. Duram (2000). Agents' Perceptions of Structure: How Illinois Organic Farmers View Political, Economic, Social, and Ecological Factors. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):35-48.score: 18.0
    Various structural factors influenceorganic farmer decision-making. Analyses that combinestructure and agency provide an opportunity forunderstanding farmers' perceptions of the political,economic, and social ``world'' in which they operate.Rich conversational interviews, conducted with twentycertified organic farmers in Illinois and analyzedwith multiple qualitative methods, show how farmersmediate structural concerns. In addition to political,economic, and social structures, a fourth structure isneeded. Indeed these organic farmers emphasize theimportance of ecological factors in theirdecision-making. Within the perceived economic,political, social, and ecological structures, numeroustopics (i.e., marketing, (...)
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  16. Ulrich J. Frey & Hannes Rusch (2014). Modeling Ecological Success of Common Pool Resource Systems Using Large Datasets. World Development 59:93-103.score: 18.0
    The influence of many factors on ecological success in common pool resource management is still unclear. This may be due to methodological issues. These include causal complexity, a lack of large-N-studies and nonlinear relationships between factors. We address all three issues with a new methodological approach, artificial neural networks, which is discussed in detail. It allows us to develop a model with comparably high predictive power. In addition, two success factors are analyzed: legal security and institutional fairness. Both factors (...)
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  17. Thomas A. James (2013). Gordon Kaufman, Flat Ontology, and Value: Toward an Ecological Theocentrism. Zygon 48 (3):565-577.score: 18.0
    Gordon Kaufman's theology is characterized by a heightened tension between transcendence, expressed as theocentrism, and immanence, expressed as theological naturalism. The interplay between these two motifs leads to a contradiction between an austerity created by the conjunction of naturalism and theocentrism, on the one hand, and a humanized cosmos which is characterized by a pivotal and unique role for human moral agency, on the other. This paper tracks some of the influences behind Kaufman's program (primarily H. Richard Niebuhr and Henry (...)
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  18. Kalevi Kull (2010). Ecosystems Are Made of Semiosic Bonds: Consortia, Umwelten, Biophony and Ecological Codes. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (3):347-357.score: 18.0
    The paper focuses on the semiotic principles of the organisation of ecosystems, attempting to find concepts that point to relations and not to elements. (1) Consortium (the term introduced by Johannes Reinke around 1873) can be defined as a group of organisms connected via (sign) relations, or groups of interspecific semiosic links in biocoenosis. The consortial relations include trophic and topic relations, both implying a recognition (identification) of the object by an organism involved (these, i.e., are sign relations). These relations (...)
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  19. Thomas Ditye Claus-Christian Carbon (2012). Face Adaptation Effects Show Strong and Long-Lasting Transfer From Lab to More Ecological Contexts. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    A review on recent experiments on figural face aftereffects reveals that adaptation effects in famous faces can be quite sustainable, lasting for hours up to days. Such adaptations also seem to be highly reliable regarding test-retest designs as well as regarding the generalizability of adaptation across different adaptation routines and adaptations towards different kinds of facial properties. However, in adaptation studies conducted so far, the adaptation as well as the subsequent test phase was carried out in typical laboratory environments. Under (...)
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  20. P. Fortis, R. Ronchi, E. Calzolari, M. Gallucci & G. Vallar (2012). Exploring the Effects of Ecological Activities During Exposure to Optical Prisms in Healthy Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:29-29.score: 18.0
    Prism adaptation improves a wide range of manifestations of left spatial neglect in right-brain-damaged patients. The typical paradigm consists of repeated pointing movements to visual targets, while patients wear prism goggles that displace the visual scene rightwards. Recently, we demonstrated the efficacy of a novel adaptation procedure, involving a variety of every-day visuo-motor activities. This “ecological” procedure proved to be as effective as the repetitive pointing adaptation task in ameliorating symptoms of spatial neglect, and was better tolerated by patients. (...)
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  21. Steven L. Peck (2010). Death and the Ecological Crisis. Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):105-109.score: 18.0
    In this essay I discuss the ways in which not recognizing that the death of organisms plays a part in our food producing systems, distances us from life’s ecological processes and explore how this plays a role in devaluing the sources of our food. I argue that modern society’s deep separation from our agricultural systems play a part in our current ecological illiteracy.
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  22. Yrjö Haila (1986). On the Semiotic Dimension of Ecological Theory: The Case of Island Biogeography. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 1 (4):377-387.score: 16.0
    The Macarthur-Wilson equilibrium theory of island biogeography has had a contradictory role in ecology. As a lasting contribution, the theory has created a new way of viewing insular environments as dynamical systems. On the other hand, many of the applications of the theory have reduced to mere unimaginative curve-fitting. I analyze this paradox in semiotic terms: the theory was mainly equated with the simple species-area relationship which became a signifier of interesting island ecology. The theory is, however, better viewed as (...)
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  23. David Waltner-Toews (1991). One Ecosystem, One Food System: The Social and Ecological Context of Food Safety Strategies. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (1):49-59.score: 16.0
    Eating is the most intimate relationship people can have with their environment. As people have migrated, in very large numbers, from various parts of the globe, as well as from the countryside to the city, they have brought to their new homes not only their intimate familial relationships, but also their intimate environmental relationships. Intraand international trade in human foods and animal feeds amounting to billions of dollars annually support these transplanted eating habits. Infectious disease agents, toxins and environmental contaminants (...)
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  24. Tom Burke (2004). Ecological Psychology in Context: James Gibson, Roger Barker, and the Legacy of William James's Radical Empiricism. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (99):54-57.score: 15.0
  25. Will Adams (2007). The Primacy of Interrelating: Practicing Ecological Psychology with Buber, Levinas, and Merleau-Ponty. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 38 (1):24-61.score: 15.0
  26. Ecological Laws, Ecological Laws.score: 15.0
    The question of whether there are laws in ecology is important for a number of reasons. If, as some have suggested, there are no ecological laws, this would seem to distinguish ecology from other branches of science, such as physics. It could also make a difference to the methodology of ecology. If there are no laws to be discovered, ecologists would seem to be in the business of merely supplying a suite of useful models. These models would need to (...)
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  27. Melinda Hogan (1992). Natural Kinds and Ecological Niches — Response to Johnson's Paper. Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):203-208.score: 15.0
  28. John Odling-Smee & Kevin N. Laland (2011). Ecological Inheritance and Cultural Inheritance: What Are They and How Do They Differ? Biological Theory 6 (3):220-230.score: 15.0
  29. Jeff Buechner (2013). Trust and Ecological Rationality in a Computing Context. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 43 (1):47-68.score: 15.0
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  30. Wolfgang Schlicht, Ulrich W. Ebner-Priemer & Martina Kanning (2013). Ecological Momentary Assessment and Intervention in Physical Activity and Well-Being: Affective Reactions, Social-Cognitive Factors, and Behaviors as Determinants of Physical Activity and Exercise. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 15.0
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  31. Kim Cuddington (2011). Legacy Effects: The Persistent Impact of Ecological Interactions. Biological Theory 6 (3):203-210.score: 15.0
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  32. Enrico Maestri (forthcoming). Political Liberalism and Ecological Responsibility. Is Conceptually Sustainable the “Green Liberalism”? Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.score: 15.0
    What is the theoretical and applied responsibility of practical legal policies against environmental degradation? Which political-philosophical attitude is implicit in the International and European environmental legislation for reducing and preventing the environmental degradation? The concepts and means, developed to compare us with the environmental issue, are adequate to capture the reality of these emergencies? The basic thesis, I intend to discuss and defend, argues that there is a “question incompatibility” between political liberalism and environmental protection.
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  33. Gorka Navarrete (2011). Ecological Rationality and Evolution: The Mind Really Works That Way? Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 15.0
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  34. Alba González Jácome (2004). The Ecological Basis of the Indigenous Nahua Agriculture in the Sixteenth Century. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (2/3):221-231.score: 15.0
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  35. Barry Smith (2003). The Ecological Approach to Information Processing. In Kristóf Nyíri (ed.), Mobile Learning: Essays on Philosophy, Psychology and Education. Passagen Verlag.score: 15.0
    Imagine a 5-stone weakling whose brain has been loaded with all the knowledge of a champion tennis player. He goes to serve in his first match – Wham! – His arm falls off. The 5-stone weakling just doesn’t have the bone structure or muscular development to serve that hard. There are, clearly, different types of knowledge/ability/skill, only some of which are a matter of what can be transferred simply by passing signals down a wire from one brain (or computer) to (...)
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  36. Sarah Zwickle, Robyn Wilson & Doug Doohan (forthcoming). Identifying the Challenges of Promoting Ecological Weed Management (EWM) in Organic Agroecosystems Through the Lens of Behavioral Decision Making. Agriculture and Human Values.score: 15.0
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  37. Alan Kingstone Evan F. Risko, Kaitlin E. W. Laidlaw, Megan Freeth, Tom Foulsham (2012). Social Attention with Real Versus Reel Stimuli: Toward an Empirical Approach to Concerns About Ecological Validity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 15.0
    Cognitive neuroscientists often study social cognition by using simple but socially relevant stimuli, such as schematic faces or images of other people. Whilst this research is valuable, important aspects of genuine social encounters are absent from these studies, a fact that has recently drawn criticism. In the present review we argue for an empirical approach to the determination of the equivalence of different social stimuli. This approach involves the systematic comparison of different types of social stimuli ranging in their approximation (...)
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  38. Evan F. Risko, Kaitlin Ew Laidlaw, Megan Freeth, Tom Foulsham & Alan Kingstone (2012). Social Attention with Real Versus Reel Stimuli: Toward an Empirical Approach to Concerns About Ecological Validity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 15.0
    Cognitive neuroscientists often study social cognition by using simple but socially relevant stimuli, such as schematic faces or images of other people. Whilst this research is valuable, important aspects of genuine social encounters are absent from these studies, a fact that has recently drawn criticism. In the present review we argue for an empirical approach to the determination of the equivalence of different social stimuli. This approach involves the systematic comparison of different types of social stimuli ranging in their approximation (...)
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  39. Jelena Vasiljevic (2012). Political Space of Ecological Citizenship. Filozofija I Drustvo 23 (1):102-111.score: 15.0
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  40. Harry Heft (1989). Affordances and the Body: An Intentional Analysis of Gibson's Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (1):1–30.score: 14.0
    In his ecological approach to perception, james gibson introduced the concept of affordance to refer to the perceived meaning of environmental objects and events. this paper examines the relational and causal character of affordances, as well as the grounds for extending affordances beyond environmental features with transcultural meaning to include those features with culturally-specific meaning. such an extension is seen as warranted once affordances are grounded in an intentional analysis of perception. toward this end, aspects of merleau-ponty's treatment of (...)
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  41. Jonathan Hughes (1995). Development of the Productive Forces: An Ecological Analysis. Studies in Marxism 2:179-198.score: 14.0
    Marxism has long been subject to criticism from the theorists of Political Ecology, and in recent years, as the concerns of Green thinkers have become harder to ignore, Marxists have begun to respond to this challenge, defending and sometimes amending Marxist theory in response to Green criticisms. This paper addresses one issue within this debate: the controversy over Marx’s commitment to the growth, or development, of the productive forces. My aim is to dispute the contention of Marx’s Green critics, that (...)
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  42. Mark Rowlands (1995). Against Methodological Solipsism: The Ecological Approach. Philosophical Psychology 8 (1):5-24.score: 14.0
    This paper argues that an ecological approach to psychology of the sort advanced by J. J. Gibson provides a coherent and powerful alternative to the computational, information-processing, paradigm. The paper argues for two principles. Firstly, one cannot begin to understand what internal information processing an organism must accomplish until one understands what information is available to the organism in its environment. Secondly, an organism can process information by acting on or manipulating physical structures in its environment. An attempt is (...)
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  43. Ben A. Minteer & James P. Collins (2008). From Environmental to Ecological Ethics: Toward a Practical Ethics for Ecologists and Conservationists. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):483-501.score: 14.0
    Ecological research and conservation practice frequently raise difficult and varied ethical questions for scientific investigators and managers, including duties to public welfare, nonhuman individuals (i.e., animals and plants), populations, and ecosystems. The field of environmental ethics has contributed much to the understanding of general duties and values to nature, but it has not developed the resources to address the diverse and often unique practical concerns of ecological researchers and managers in the field, lab, and conservation facility. The emerging (...)
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  44. Val Plumwood (2002). Environmental Culture: The Ecological Crisis of Reason. Routledge.score: 14.0
    This is a much-needed and clearly argued account of what has gone wrong in our thinking about the environment. Written by one of our leading environmental thinkers, it is a compelling exploration of the contemporary ecological crisis, its origins, and the cultural illusions that lie behind it. Val Plumwood argues that historically-traceable distortions of reason and culture have resulted in dangerous forms of ecological denial. They have had a widespread effect in areas as diverse as economics, politics, science, (...)
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  45. Virgil Whitmyer (1999). Ecological Color. Philosophical Psychology 12 (2):197-214.score: 14.0
    In his 1995 book Colour vision (New York: Routledge), Evan Thompson proposes a new approach to the ontology of color according to which it is tied to the ecological dispositions-affordances described by J.J. Gibson and his followers. Thompson claims that a relational account of color is necessary in order to avoid the problems that go along with the dispute between subjectivists and objectivists about color, but he claims that the received view of perception does not allow a satisfactory relational (...)
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  46. Mark Sagoff (2003). The Plaza and the Pendulum: Two Concepts of Ecological Science. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (4):529-552.score: 14.0
    This essay explores two strategies of inquiryin ecological science. Ecologists may regardthe sites they study either as contingentcollections of plants and animals, therelations of which are place-specific andidiosyncratic, or as structured systems andcommunites that are governed by general rules,forces, or principles. Ecologists who take thefirst approach rely on observation, induction,and experiment – a case-study or historicalmethod – to determine the causes of particularevents. Ecologists who take the secondapproach, seeking to explain by inferringevents from general patterns or principles,confront four conceptual (...)
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  47. Mathew Humphrey (2007). Ecological Politics and Democratic Theory: The Challenge to the Deliberative Ideal. Routledge.score: 14.0
    This book examines the relationship between environmental and democratic thought and the apparent compatibility of ecology and democracy. Although environmental politics is quite rightly seen as a progressive force, it has also featured a strand of extreme right "eco-authoritarianism" and its proponents have sometimes developed controversial positions on such issues as population policy. There have also been a number of situations where radical environmental activists have broken the laws of democratic societies in pursuit of ecological objectives and the book (...)
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  48. Philippe Gagnon (2014). "Diversité et historique des mouvements écologiques en Amérique du Nord" [Diversity and origins of the ecological movements in North America]. Connaître: Cahiers de l'Association Foi Et Culture Scientifique 40:76-89.score: 14.0
    The development of ecological thinking in North America has been conditioned by the imperative aiming at a valuation of the biotic community. Since the end of WWII, the US population was warned against the dangerous and violent alterations of nature. Many then found in theology an unforeseen ally. I review the roots of the tension which led to debates between radical ecologism or its denial, and I aim at analyzing it philosophically.
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  49. Cees van Leeuwen & John Stins (1994). Perceivable Information Or: The Happy Marriage Between Ecological Psychology and Gestalt. Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):267-285.score: 14.0
    The ecological realist concept of information as environmental specification is discussed. It is argued that affordances in ecological realism could, in principle, rest on a notion of partial specification of environmental circumstances. For this aim, a notion of Gestalt quality as a hierarchical structure of affordances would have to be adopted. It is claimed that such an account could provide a promising way to deal with problems of intentionality in perception and action, awareness and problem solving.
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  50. Fikret Berkes, Carl Folke & Johan Colding (eds.) (1998). Linking Social and Ecological Systems: Management Practices and Social Mechanisms for Building Resilience. Cambridge University Press.score: 14.0
    It is usually the case that scientists examine either ecological systems or social systems, yet the need for an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of environmental management and sustainable development is becoming increasingly obvious. Developed under the auspices of the Beijer Institute in Stockholm, this new book analyses social and ecological linkages in selected ecosystems using an international and interdisciplinary case study approach. The chapters provide detailed information on a variety of management practices for dealing with environmental change. (...)
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