Search results for 'ecological' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bethany L. Ojalehto, Douglas L. Medin, William S. Horton, Salino G. Garcia & Estefano G. Kays (2015). Seeing Cooperation or Competition: Ecological Interactions in Cultural Perspectives. Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):624-645.
    Do cultural models facilitate particular ways of perceiving interactions in nature? We explore variability in folkecological principles of reasoning about interspecies interactions. In two studies, Indigenous Panamanian Ngöbe and U.S. participants interpreted an illustrated, wordless nonfiction book about the hunting relationship between a coyote and badger. Across both studies, the majority of Ngöbe interpreted the hunting relationship as cooperative and the majority of U.S. participants as competitive. Study 2 showed that this pattern may reflect different beliefs about, and perhaps different (...)
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  2.  12
    Kalevi Kull (2010). Ecosystems Are Made of Semiosic Bonds: Consortia, Umwelten, Biophony and Ecological Codes. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (3):347-357.
    The paper focuses on the semiotic principles of the organisation of ecosystems, attempting to find concepts that point to relations and not to elements. (1) Consortium (the term introduced by Johannes Reinke around 1873) can be defined as a group of organisms connected via (sign) relations, or groups of interspecific semiosic links in biocoenosis. The consortial relations include trophic and topic relations, both implying a recognition (identification) of the object by an organism involved (these, i.e., are sign relations). These relations (...)
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  3. Joel Norman (2001). Two Visual Systems and Two Theories of Perception: An Attempt to Reconcile the Constructivist and Ecological Approaches. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):73-96.
    The two contrasting theoretical approaches to visual perception, the constructivist and the ecological, are briefly presented and illustrated through their analyses of space and size perception. Earlier calls for their reconciliation and unification are reviewed. Neurophysiological, neuropsychological, and psychophysical evidence for the existence of two quite distinct visual systems, the ventral and the dorsal, is presented. These two perceptual systems differ in their functions; the ventral system's central function is that of identification, while the dorsal system is mainly engaged (...)
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  4.  86
    Bryan G. Norton (2008). Beyond Positivist Ecology: Toward an Integrated Ecological Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):581-592.
    A post-positivist understanding of ecological science and the call for an “ecological ethic” indicate the need for a radically new approach to evaluating environmental change. The positivist view of science cannot capture the essence of environmental sciences because the recent work of “reflexive” ecological modelers shows that this requires a reconceptualization of the way in which values and ecological models interact in scientific process. Reflexive modelers are ecological modelers who believe it is appropriate for ecologists (...)
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  5. Gerard Ahearne (2013). Towards an Ecological Civilization: A Gramscian Strategy for a New Political Subject. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):317-326.
    While much work has been done theorising the concept of an ecological civilization, the actual transition to an ecological civilization is another matter. One possible strategy for transforming our world from a death-rattle industrial civilization to a life affirming ecological civilization may be found in the later work of Antonio Gramsci. It is argued that as Gramsci became increasingly disillusioned with Soviet communism, he diagnosed its failure as due to the way opposition movements tend to mirror the (...)
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  6.  83
    Bruce H. Weber, David J. Depew, C. Dyke, Stanley N. Salthe, Eric D. Schneider, Robert E. Ulanowicz & Jeffrey S. Wicken (1989). Evolution in Thermodynamic Perspective: An Ecological Approach. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 4 (4):373-405.
    Recognition that biological systems are stabilized far from equilibrium by self-organizing, informed, autocatalytic cycles and structures that dissipate unusable energy and matter has led to recent attempts to reformulate evolutionary theory. We hold that such insights are consistent with the broad development of the Darwinian Tradition and with the concept of natural selection. Biological systems are selected that re not only more efficient than competitors but also enhance the integrity of the web of energetic relations in which they are embedded. (...)
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  7.  32
    Lynne Andersson, Sridevi Shivarajan & Gary Blau (2005). Enacting Ecological Sustainability in the MNC: A Test of an Adapted Value-Belief-Norm Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (3):295 - 305.
    . Undoubtedly, multinational corporations must play a significant role in the advancement of global ecological ethics. Our research offers a glimpse into the process of how goals of ecological sustainability in one multinational corporation can trickle down through the organization via the sustainability support behaviors of supervisors. We asked the question “How do supervisors in a multinational corporation internalize their corporation’s commitment to ecological sustainability and, in turn, behave in ways that convey this commitment to their subordinates?” (...)
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  8.  12
    Earl D. McCoy & Kristin Berry (2008). Using an Ecological Ethics Framework to Make Decisions About the Relocation of Wildlife. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (4):505-521.
    Relocation is an increasingly prominent conservation tool for a variety of wildlife, but the technique also is controversial, even among conservation practitioners. An organized framework for addressing the moral dilemmas often accompanying conservation actions such as relocation has been lacking. Ecological ethics may provide such a framework and appears to be an important step forward in aiding ecological researchers and biodiversity managers to make difficult moral choices. A specific application of this framework can make the reasoning process more (...)
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  9. John T. Sanders (1996). An Ecological Approach to Cognitive Science. Electronic Journal of Analytic Philosophy 1996 (Spring).
    Cognitive science is ready for a major reconceptualization. This is not at all because efforts by its practitioners have failed, but rather because so much progress has been made. The need for reconceptualization arises from the fact that this progress has come at greater cost than necessary, largely because of more or less philosophical (at least metatheoretical) straightjackets still worn - whether wittingly or not - by those doing the work. These bonds are extremely hard to break. Even some of (...)
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  10.  9
    Ross Feehan (2014). Thinking About Earth, 20 Years Later: Reconsidering Stephen Clark's Ecological Theology. Journal of Animal Ethics 4 (2):93-98,.
    This review commemorates the 20th anniversary of Stephen Clark’s explication of ecological thought. After appraising both philosophical and theological perspectives, Clark argues that society must awaken to Earth’s “Otherness.” I describe Clark’s ecological consciousness and highlight the significance of his book for 21st-century readers.
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  11.  5
    Leslie A. Duram (2000). Agents' Perceptions of Structure: How Illinois Organic Farmers View Political, Economic, Social, and Ecological Factors. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):35-48.
    Various structural factors influenceorganic farmer decision-making. Analyses that combinestructure and agency provide an opportunity forunderstanding farmers' perceptions of the political,economic, and social ``world'' in which they operate.Rich conversational interviews, conducted with twentycertified organic farmers in Illinois and analyzedwith multiple qualitative methods, show how farmersmediate structural concerns. In addition to political,economic, and social structures, a fourth structure isneeded. Indeed these organic farmers emphasize theimportance of ecological factors in theirdecision-making. Within the perceived economic,political, social, and ecological structures, numeroustopics (i.e., marketing, (...)
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  12. John T. Sanders, Philosophical Foundations for the Ecological Approach.
    Harry Heft's Ecological Psychology in Context is an important book in many ways. For one thing, it adds considerably to our understanding of the historical background of J.J. Gibson's thought. But more than that, Heft aims to place ecological psychology not just historically, but philosophically. He says "This volume shows that radical empiricism stands at the heart of Gibson's ecological program, and it can usefully be employed as the conceptual centerpiece for ecological psychology more broadly construed" (...)
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  13.  6
    Md Nazrul Islam & Md Saidul Islam (2015). Human-Animal Relationship: Understanding Animal Rights in the Islamic Ecological Paradigm. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 14 (41):96-126.
    Animals have encountered cruelty and suffering throughout the ages. It is something perpetrated up till this day, particularly, in factory farms, animal laboratories, and even in the name of sports or amusement. However, since the second half of the twentieth century, there has been growing concerns for animal welfare and the protection of animal rights within the discourse of environmentalism, developed mainly in the West. Nevertheless, a recently developed Islamic Ecological Paradigm rooted in the classical Islamic traditions contests the (...)
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  14.  5
    Steven L. Peck (2010). Death and the Ecological Crisis. Agriculture and Human Values 27 (1):105-109.
    In this essay I discuss the ways in which not recognizing that the death of organisms plays a part in our food producing systems, distances us from life’s ecological processes and explore how this plays a role in devaluing the sources of our food. I argue that modern society’s deep separation from our agricultural systems play a part in our current ecological illiteracy.
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  15.  16
    Kim Sterelny (2001). The Reality of Ecological Assemblages: A Palaeo-Ecological Puzzle. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 16 (4):437-461.
    Ecological communities, I argue, are objective units of nature if theyhave structure that regulates their membership. Evidence of suchstructure in contemporary ecology is scant, but the palaeoecologicalphenomenon of co-ordinated stasis is a prima facie example ofinternal regulation. I argue that no individualist attempts to explainaway the appearance of internal regulation succeeds. But no internalistmodel is fully satisfactory, either, in explaining the contrast betweenpre and post Pleistocene ecology.
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  16.  1
    Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen (forthcoming). Ecological Innovation: Biomimicry as a New Way of Thinking and Acting Ecologically. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-15.
    In this article, we critically reflect on the concept of biomimicry. On the basis of an analysis of the concept of biomimicry in the literature and its philosophical origin, we distinguish between a strong and a weaker concept of biomimicry. The strength of the strong concept of biomimicry is that nature is seen as a measure by which to judge the ethical rightness of our technological innovations, but its weakness is found in questionable presuppositions. These presuppositions are addressed by the (...)
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  17.  2
    Kazuhiko Yokosawa, Karen B. Schloss, Michiko Asano & Stephen E. Palmer (2015). Ecological Effects in Cross‐Cultural Differences Between U.S. And Japanese Color Preferences. Cognitive Science 40 (1):n/a-n/a.
    We investigated cultural differences between U.S. and Japanese color preferences and the ecological factors that might influence them. Japanese and U.S. color preferences have both similarities and differences. Complex gender differences were also evident that did not conform to previously reported effects. Palmer and Schloss's weighted affective valence estimate procedure was used to test the Ecological Valence Theory's prediction that within-culture WAVE-preference correlations should be higher than between-culture WAVE-preference correlations. The results supported several, but not all, predictions. In (...)
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  18.  8
    Patricia Rich (forthcoming). Comparing the Axiomatic and Ecological Approaches to Rationality: Fundamental Agreement Theorems in SCOP. Synthese:1-19.
    There are two prominent viewpoints regarding the nature of rationality and how it should be evaluated in situations of interest: the traditional axiomatic approach and the newer ecological rationality. An obstacle to comparing and evaluating these seemingly opposite approaches is that they employ different language and formalisms, ask different questions, and are at different stages of development. I adapt a formal framework known as SCOP to address this problem by providing a comprehensive common framework in which both approaches may (...)
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  19.  18
    Kevin de Laplante (2004). Toward a More Expansive Conception of Ecological Science. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):263-281.
    There are two competing conceptions of the nature and domain of ecological science in the popular and academic literature, an orthodox conception and a more expansive conception. The orthodox conception conceives ecology as a natural biological science distinct from the human social sciences. The more expansive conception views ecology as a science whose domain properly spans both the natural and social sciences. On the more expansive conception, non-traditional ecological disciplines such as ecological psychology, ecological anthropology and (...)
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  20.  3
    Peter M. Todd & Henry Brighton (forthcoming). Building the Theory of Ecological Rationality. Minds and Machines:1-22.
    While theories of rationality and decision making typically adopt either a single-powertool perspective or a bag-of-tricks mentality, the research program of ecological rationality bridges these with a theoretically-driven account of when different heuristic decision mechanisms will work well. Here we described two ways to study how heuristics match their ecological setting: The bottom-up approach starts with psychologically plausible building blocks that are combined to create simple heuristics that fit specific environments. The top-down approach starts from (...)
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  21.  8
    Kevin de Laplante (2004). Toward a More Expansive Conception of Ecological Science. Biology and Philosophy 19 (2):263-281.
    There are two competing conceptions of the nature and domain of ecological science in the popular and academic literature, an orthodox conception and a more expansive conception. The orthodox conception conceives ecology as a natural biological science distinct from the human social sciences. The more expansive conception views ecology as a science whose domain properly spans both the natural and social sciences. On the more expansive conception, non-traditional ecological disciplines such as ecological psychology , ecological anthropology (...)
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  22.  9
    Wouter Peeters, Jo Dirix & Sigrid Sterckx (2015). Towards an Integration of the Ecological Space Paradigm and the Capabilities Approach. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (3):479-496.
    In order to develop a model of equitable and sustainable distribution, this paper advocates integrating the ecological space paradigm and the capabilities approach. As the currency of distribution, this account proposes a hybrid of capabilities and ecological space. Although the goal of distributive justice should be to secure and promote people’s capabilities now and in the future, doing so requires acknowledging that these capabilities are dependent on the biophysical preconditions as well as inculcating the ethos of restraint. Both (...)
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  23.  11
    Thomas A. James (2013). Gordon Kaufman, Flat Ontology, and Value: Toward an Ecological Theocentrism. Zygon 48 (3):565-577.
    Gordon Kaufman's theology is characterized by a heightened tension between transcendence, expressed as theocentrism, and immanence, expressed as theological naturalism. The interplay between these two motifs leads to a contradiction between an austerity created by the conjunction of naturalism and theocentrism, on the one hand, and a humanized cosmos which is characterized by a pivotal and unique role for human moral agency, on the other. This paper tracks some of the influences behind Kaufman's program (primarily H. Richard Niebuhr and Henry (...)
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  24.  7
    Martin Drenthen (2009). Ecological Restoration and Place Attachment; Emplacing Nonplace? Environmental Values 18 (3):285-312.
    The creation of new wetlands along rivers as an instrument to mitigate flood risks in times of climate change seduces us to approach the landscape from a 'managerial' perspective and threatens a more place-oriented approach. How to provide ecological restoration with a broad cultural context that can help prevent these new landscapes from becoming non-places, devoid of meaning and with no real connection to our habitable world. In this paper, I discuss three possible alternative interpretations of the meaning of (...)
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  25.  1
    Vincent Blok (2015). The Human Glance, the Experience of Environmental Distress and the “Affordance” of Nature: Toward a Phenomenology of the Ecological Crisis. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):925-938.
    The problem we face today is that there is a huge gap between our ethical judgments about the ecological crisis on the one hand and our ethical behavior according to these judgments on the other. In this article, we ask to what extent a phenomenology of the ecological crisis enables us to bridge this gap and display more ethical or pro-environmental behavior. To answer this question, our point of departure is the affordance theory of the American psychologist and (...)
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  26.  8
    Ulrich J. Frey & Hannes Rusch (2014). Modeling Ecological Success of Common Pool Resource Systems Using Large Datasets. World Development 59:93-103.
    The influence of many factors on ecological success in common pool resource management is still unclear. This may be due to methodological issues. These include causal complexity, a lack of large-N-studies and nonlinear relationships between factors. We address all three issues with a new methodological approach, artificial neural networks, which is discussed in detail. It allows us to develop a model with comparably high predictive power. In addition, two success factors are analyzed: legal security and institutional fairness. Both factors (...)
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  27.  3
    David Carpenter (2003). An Investigation Into the Transition From Technological to Ecological Rice Farming Among Resource Poor Farmers From the Philippine Island of Bohol. Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):165-176.
    A conceptual framework influenced bythe concept of moral ecology is developed andused to analyze the transition fromtechnological (green revolution) to ecological(organic) rice farming by resource poor farmersfrom the Philippine island of Bohol. This MoralEcology Framework (MEF) focuses on theepistemology of the two farming systems and howthis influences management principles andpractice. The orienting concepts of systemic understanding, exchange betweensociety and the environment, local versusextra-local exchange and scope areintegral to this analysis. The case studydemonstrates how the ostracism of nature underthe green (...)
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  28.  2
    Jelena Vasiljevic (2012). Political Space of Ecological Citizenship. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (1):102-111.
    This paper examines the concept of ecological citizenship by looking at two sets of arguments. Those justifying the concept itself, and those criticizing the need to devise a new concept of citizenship and political community in relation to ecological problems. The paper argues for a shift in focus: instead of searching for a new concept of citizenship, we should adopt a different perspective capable of capturing the explanatory potentials of citizenship-related notions - especially citizenship action and political space (...)
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  29. Jason Dana & Clintin P. Davis-Stober (forthcoming). Rational Foundations of Fast and Frugal Heuristics: The Ecological Rationality of Strategy Selection Via Improper Linear Models. Minds and Machines:1-26.
    Research on “improper” linear models has shown that predetermined weighting schemes for the linear model, such as equally weighting all predictors, can be surprisingly accurate on cross-validation. We review recent advances that can characterize the optimal choice of an improper linear model. We extend this research to the understanding of fast and frugal heuristics, particularly to the ecologically rational goal of understanding in which task environments given heuristics are optimal. We demonstrate how to test this model using the Recognition Heuristic (...)
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  30. Tom Burke (2004). Ecological Psychology in Context: James Gibson, Roger Barker, and the Legacy of William James's Radical Empiricism. [REVIEW] Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 32 (99):54-57.
  31.  10
    John Odling-Smee & Kevin N. Laland (2011). Ecological Inheritance and Cultural Inheritance: What Are They and How Do They Differ? Biological Theory 6 (3):220-230.
  32. Ecological Laws, Ecological Laws.
    The question of whether there are laws in ecology is important for a number of reasons. If, as some have suggested, there are no ecological laws, this would seem to distinguish ecology from other branches of science, such as physics. It could also make a difference to the methodology of ecology. If there are no laws to be discovered, ecologists would seem to be in the business of merely supplying a suite of useful models. These models would need to (...)
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  33.  6
    Kim Cuddington (2011). Legacy Effects: The Persistent Impact of Ecological Interactions. Biological Theory 6 (3):203-210.
  34.  14
    Barry Smith (2003). The Ecological Approach to Information Processing. In Kristóf Nyíri (ed.), Mobile Learning: Essays on Philosophy, Psychology and Education. Passagen Verlag
    Imagine a 5-stone weakling whose brain has been loaded with all the knowledge of a champion tennis player. He goes to serve in his first match – Wham! – His arm falls off. The 5-stone weakling just doesn’t have the bone structure or muscular development to serve that hard. There are, clearly, different types of knowledge/ability/skill, only some of which are a matter of what can be transferred simply by passing signals down a wire from one brain (or computer) to (...)
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  35.  4
    Gordon D. Kaufman (2001). Re-Conceiving God and Humanity in Light of Today's Evolutionary-Ecological Consciousness. Zygon 36 (2):335-348.
  36.  66
    Will Adams (2007). The Primacy of Interrelating: Practicing Ecological Psychology with Buber, Levinas, and Merleau-Ponty. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 38 (1):24-61.
    This study explores the primacy of interrelating and its ecopsychological significance. Grounded in evidence from everyday experience, and in dialogue with the phenomenology of Martin Buber, Emmanuel Levinas, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, we discover that humans are inherently relational beings, not separate egoic subjects. When experienced intimately , this realization may transform our interrelationship with the beings and presences in the community of nature. Specifically, interrelating is primary in three ways: 1) interrelating is always already here, transpiring from the beginning of (...)
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  37.  11
    David Waltner-Toews (1991). One Ecosystem, One Food System: The Social and Ecological Context of Food Safety Strategies. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (1):49-59.
    Eating is the most intimate relationship people can have with their environment. As people have migrated, in very large numbers, from various parts of the globe, as well as from the countryside to the city, they have brought to their new homes not only their intimate familial relationships, but also their intimate environmental relationships. Intraand international trade in human foods and animal feeds amounting to billions of dollars annually support these transplanted eating habits. Infectious disease agents, toxins and environmental contaminants (...)
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  38.  27
    Melinda Hogan (1992). Natural Kinds and Ecological Niches — Response to Johnson's Paper. Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):203-208.
  39.  2
    Donald Beggs (1999). Liberating Ecological Reason Through Interdisciplinarity. Metaphilosophy 30 (3):186-208.
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  40.  10
    Yrjö Haila (1986). On the Semiotic Dimension of Ecological Theory: The Case of Island Biogeography. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 1 (4):377-387.
    The Macarthur-Wilson equilibrium theory of island biogeography has had a contradictory role in ecology. As a lasting contribution, the theory has created a new way of viewing insular environments as dynamical systems. On the other hand, many of the applications of the theory have reduced to mere unimaginative curve-fitting. I analyze this paradox in semiotic terms: the theory was mainly equated with the simple species-area relationship which became a signifier of interesting island ecology. The theory is, however, better viewed as (...)
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  41.  5
    Sarah Zwickle, Robyn Wilson & Doug Doohan (2014). Identifying the Challenges of Promoting Ecological Weed Management in Organic Agroecosystems Through the Lens of Behavioral Decision Making. Agriculture and Human Values 31 (3):355-370.
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  42.  6
    Jeff Buechner (2013). Trust and Ecological Rationality in a Computing Context. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 43 (1):47-68.
  43.  3
    Enrico Maestri (forthcoming). Political Liberalism and Ecological Responsibility. Is Conceptually Sustainable the “Green Liberalism”? Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.
    What is the theoretical and applied responsibility of practical legal policies against environmental degradation? Which political-philosophical attitude is implicit in the International and European environmental legislation for reducing and preventing the environmental degradation? The concepts and means, developed to compare us with the environmental issue, are adequate to capture the reality of these emergencies? The basic thesis, I intend to discuss and defend, argues that there is a “question incompatibility” between political liberalism and environmental protection.
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  44.  2
    Alba González Jácome (2004). The Ecological Basis of the Indigenous Nahua Agriculture in the Sixteenth Century. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (2/3):221-231.
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  45. James J. Gibson (1979). The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Houghton Mifflin.
    And in the end I came to believe that the whole theory of depth perception was false. I suggested a new theory in a book on what I called the visual world ...
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  46.  30
    Lorraine Code (2006). Ecological Thinking: The Politics of Epistemic Location. OUP Usa.
    How could ecological thinking animate an epistemology capable of addressing feminist, multicultural, and other post-colonial concerns? Starting from an epistemological approach implicit in Rachel Carson's scientific practice, Lorraine Code elaborates the creative, restructuring resources of ecology for a theory of knowledge. She critiques the instrumental rationality, abstract individualism, and exploitation of people and places that western epistemologies of mastery have legitimated, to propose a politics of epistemic location, sensitive to the interplay of particularity and diversity, and focused on responsible (...)
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  47. Harry Heft (1989). Affordances and the Body: An Intentional Analysis of Gibson's Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 19 (1):1–30.
    In his ecological approach to perception, james gibson introduced the concept of affordance to refer to the perceived meaning of environmental objects and events. this paper examines the relational and causal character of affordances, as well as the grounds for extending affordances beyond environmental features with transcultural meaning to include those features with culturally-specific meaning. such an extension is seen as warranted once affordances are grounded in an intentional analysis of perception. toward this end, aspects of merleau-ponty's treatment (...)
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  48. Jonathan Hughes (1995). Development of the Productive Forces: An Ecological Analysis. Studies in Marxism 2:179-198.
    Marxism has long been subject to criticism from the theorists of Political Ecology, and in recent years, as the concerns of Green thinkers have become harder to ignore, Marxists have begun to respond to this challenge, defending and sometimes amending Marxist theory in response to Green criticisms. This paper addresses one issue within this debate: the controversy over Marx’s commitment to the growth, or development, of the productive forces. My aim is to dispute the contention of Marx’s Green critics, that (...)
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  49.  13
    Vincent Blok (2014). Being-in-the-World as Being-in-Nature: An Ecological Perspective on Being and Time. Studia Phaenomenologica 14:215-235.
    Because the status of nature is ambiguous in Being and Time, we explore an ecological perspective on Heidegger’s early main work in this article. Our hypothesis is that the affordance theory of James Gibson enables us to a) to understand being-in-the-world as being-in-nature, b) reconnect man and nature and c) understand the twofold sense of nature in Being and Time. After exploring Heidegger’s concept of being-in-the-world and Gibson’s concept of being-in-nature, we confront Heidegger’s and Gibson’s conception of being-in-the-world and (...)
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  50. Mark Reybrouck (2005). A Biosemiotic and Ecological Approach to Music Cognition: Event Perception Between Auditory Listening and Cognitive Economy. [REVIEW] Axiomathes. An International Journal in Ontology and Cognitive Systems. 15 (2):229-266.
    This paper addresses the question whether we can conceive of music cognition in ecosemiotic terms. It claims that music knowledge must be generated as a tool for adaptation to the sonic world and calls forth a shift from a structural description of music as an artifact to a process-like approach to dealing with music. As listeners, we are observers who construct and organize our knowledge and bring with us our observational tools. What matters is not merely the sonic world in (...)
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