Search results for 'economic liberties' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jeppe von Platz (2014). Are Economic Liberties Basic Rights? Politics, Philosophy, and Economics 13 (1):23-44.score: 242.0
    In this essay I discuss a powerful challenge to high-liberalism: the challenge presented by neoclassical liberals that the high-liberal assumptions and values imply that the full range of economic liberties are basic rights. If the claim is true, then the high-liberal road from ideals of democracy and democratic citizenship to left-liberal institutions is blocked. Indeed, in that case the high-liberal is committed to an institutional scheme more along the lines of laissez-faire capitalism than property-owning democracy. To present and (...)
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  2. Jeppe von Platz (2013). Are Economic Liberties Basic Rights? Politics, Philosophy and Economics 13 (1):1470594-13483466.score: 182.0
    In this essay I discuss a powerful challenge to high-liberalism: the challenge presented by neoclassical liberals that the high-liberal assumptions and values imply that the full range of economic liberties are basic rights. If the claim is true, then the high-liberal road from ideals of democracy and democratic citizenship to left-liberal institutions is blocked. Indeed, in that case the high-liberal is committed to an institutional scheme more along the lines of laissez-faire capitalism than property-owning democracy. To present and (...)
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  3. Karl-Heinz Ladeur (2000). Discursive Ethics as Constitutional Theory. Neglecting the Creative Role of Economic Liberties? Ratio Juris 13 (1):95-116.score: 150.0
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  4. John Tomasi (2012). Democratic Legitimacy and Economic Liberty. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):50-80.score: 100.0
    Libertarians and classical liberals typically defend private economic liberty as a requirement of self-ownership or on the basis of consequentialist arguments of various sorts. By contrast, this paper defends private economic liberty as a requirement of democratic legitimacy. In recent decades, many philosophers have converged upon a certain view about political justification. If a set of social institutions is to be just and legitimate, those institutions must be acceptable in principle to the citizens who are to lead their (...)
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  5. Martin O'Neill (2008). Three Rawlsian Routes Towards Economic Democracy. Revue de Philosophie Économique 9 (1):29-55.score: 78.0
    This paper addresses ways of arguing fors ome form of economic democracy from within a broadly Rawlsian framework. Firstly, one can argue that a right to participate in economic decision-making should be added to the Rawlsian list of basic liberties, protected by the first principle of justice. Secondly,I argue that a society which institutes forms of economic democracy will be more likely to preserve a stable and just basic structure over time, by virtue of the effects (...)
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  6. Monique Deveaux (2009). Normative Liberal Theory and the Bifurcation of Human Rights. Ethics and Global Politics 2 (3).score: 72.0
    This article argues that liberal arguments for human rights minimalism, such as those of John Rawls and Michael Ignatieff, contain fundamental inconsistencies in their treatment of core rights to life and liberty. Insofar as their versions of minimalism foreground rights to physical security and basic freedom of movement, they cannot coherently exclude certain social and economic protections and liberties that directly support or are even partly constitutive of these rights. Nor do they have good grounds for putting the (...)
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  7. Ana Luiza da Gama E. Souza, Individual Freedom in the Economic Global Market: A Defense of a Liberty to Realize Choices.score: 62.0
    Human life in contemporary society is extremely complex and there are various external factors that directly affect the realization in the individual ends. In this work I analyze the effects of the global market economy, manifested by a mode of production and distribution of goods and services in the form of a global network of economic relations, which involve people, transnational corporations and political and social institutions in moral sphere of people, affecting their choices and the realization of these (...)
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  8. Jason Brennan & John Tomasi (2012). Classical Liberalism. In David Estlund (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press, Usa. 115.score: 60.0
  9. Martin J. De Nys (1987). Political Representation and Economic Liberty. Journal of Philosophy 84 (10):565-566.score: 60.0
  10. C. M. Melenovsky & Justin Bernstein (forthcoming). Why Free Market Rights Are Not Basic Liberties. Journal of Value Inquiry:1-21.score: 60.0
    Most liberals agree that governments should protect certain basic liberties, such as freedom of speech, freedom of religion and freedom of the person. Liberals disagree, however, about whether free market rights should also be protected. By “free market rights,” we mean those rights typically associated with laissez-faire economic systems such as freedom of contract, a right to market returns, and claims to privately own the means of production.We do not use the phrase “economic liberties,” as Tomasi (...)
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  11. Anthony Kenny (2006). Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Utility: Happiness in Philosophical and Economic Thought. Imprint Academic.score: 58.0
    A volume on nature, ingredients, causes and consequences of human happiness by father and son team of Antony and Charles Kenny.
     
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  12. Christopher Freiman (2012). Equal Political Liberties. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (2):158-174.score: 54.0
    Formal guarantees of political equality are compatible with inequalities in the value of political liberties, as individuals may convert their socioeconomic advantages into political advantages. Perhaps the predominant strategy for limiting substantive political inequalities recommends limiting inequalities in the means of acquiring political power for private gain – most notably, economic means. I express a worry that measures instituted to restrict economic inequalities may do more to frustrate the cause of political equality than to further it. I (...)
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  13. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). An African Theory of Social Justice. In Camilla Boisen & Matt Murray (eds.), Distributive Justice Debates in the History of Political and Social Thought: Finding A Fair Share. Routledge.score: 54.0
    A comprehensive account of justice grounded on salient Afro-communitarian values, the article attempts to unify views about the distribution of economic resources, the protection of human rights and the provision of social recognition as ultimately being about proper ways to value loving relationships.
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  14. Christopher Toner (2007). Review of Anthony Kenny, Charles Kenny, Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Utility: Happiness in Philosophical and Economic Thought. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (6).score: 50.0
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  15. Steven Wall (2013). Self-Government, Market Democracy, and Economic Liberty. Social Theory and Practice 39 (3):522-534.score: 50.0
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  16. Richard L. G. Deverall (1940). The Moral Foundations of Economic Liberty. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 16:172-177.score: 50.0
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  17. Jp Day (1985). Economic Liberty and Economic Justice. Cogito 3 (4).score: 50.0
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  18. Martin J. De Nys (1987). Political Representation and Economic Liberty. Journal of Philosophy 84 (10):565 - 566.score: 50.0
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  19. Peter Koslowski (ed.) (1987). Individual Liberty and Democratic Decision-Making: The Ethics, Economics, and Politics of Democracy. J.C.B. Mohr.score: 42.0
    Individual Liberty and Democratic Decision-Making Editor's Introduction Individual liberty is the basic value and justification for the political order of ...
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  20. Peter J. Preusse, “The Third Axiom, or A Logic of Liberty: On the Structure of Ethics and Economics as One Unified Aprioristic Science”.score: 42.0
    In this paper, the logical structure of ethics and economics as one unified science is investigated and found to be inhomogeneously represented in Austroliberal literature. This structure is here built from axioms, deductions, and definitions: It is first established in its self-supportive bareness, secondly represented by pivotal passages of libertarian [...].
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  21. Jonathan Wright (2010). Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Utility: Happiness in Philosophical and Economic Thought (St Andrews Studies in Philosophy and Public Affairs, 7). By Anthony Kenny and Charles Kenny. Heythrop Journal 51 (2):353-354.score: 40.0
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  22. Michael McPherson (1983). Review: Efficiency and Liberty in the Productive Enterprise: Recent Work in the Economics of Work Organization. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 12 (4):354 - 368.score: 40.0
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  23. Roman Míčka (2009). Faith and Liberty. The Economic Thought of the Late Scholastics. Studia Neoaristotelica 6 (1):138-153.score: 40.0
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  24. Gary Doherty & Tim Gray (1993). Herbert Spencer and the Relation Between Economic and Political Liberty. History of Political Thought 14 (3):475-490.score: 40.0
  25. Pierre Manent (2012). Machine Generated Contents Note: Introduction / Eve Grace and Christopher Kelly; Part I. Politics and Economics: 1. Rousseau and the Illustrious Montesquieu / Christopher Kelly; 2. Political Economy and Individual Liberty / Ryan Patrick Hanley; Part II. Science and Epistemology: 3. The Presence of Sciences in Rousseau's Trajectory and Works / Bruno Bernardi and Bernadette Bensaud-Vincent; 4. Epistemology and Political Perception in the Case of Rousseau / Terence Marshall; Part III. The Modern or Classical, Theological or Philosophical, Foundations of Rousseau's System: 5. On the Intention of Rousseau / Leo Strauss; 6. On Strauss on Rousseau / Victor Gourevitch; 7. Built on Sand: Moral Law in Rousseau's Second Discourse / Victor Gourevitch; 8. Rousseau and Pascal / Matthew W. Maguire; Part IV. Rousseau as Educator and Legislator: 9. The Measure of the Possible: Imagination in Rousseau's Philosophical Pedagogy / Richard Velkley; 10. Rousseau's French Revolution / Pamela K. Jensen; 11. Ro. [REVIEW] In Eve Grace & Christopher Kelly (eds.), The Challenge of Rousseau. Cambridge University Press.score: 40.0
     
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  26. T. E. Woods (2005). Faith and Liberty: The Economic Thought of the Late Scholastics Alejandro Chafuen. Journal of Libertarian Studies 19 (4).score: 40.0
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  27. Rodney G. Peffer, A Modified Rawlsian Theory of Social Justice: 'Justice as Fair Rights'.score: 36.0
    In my 1990 work – Marxism, Morality, and Social Justice – I argued for four modifications of Rawls’s principles of social justice and rendered a modified version of his theory in four principles, the first of which is the Basic Rights Principle demanding the protection of people’s security and subsistence rights. In both his Political Liberalism (1993) and Justice as Fairness (2001) Rawls explicitly refers to my version of his theory, clearly accepting three of my four proposed modifications but rejecting (...)
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  28. Gillian Brock (2009). Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    OUP writes: Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skeptic about global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national self-determination. The (...)
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  29. Kevin Vallier (forthcoming). A Moral and Economic Critique of the New Property-Owning Democrats: On Behalf of a Rawlsian Welfare State. Philosophical Studies:1-22.score: 36.0
    Property-owning democracies combine the regulative and redistributive functions of the welfare state with the governmental aim of ensuring that wealth and capital are widely dispersed. John Rawls, political philosophy’s most famous property-owning democrat, argued that property-owning democracy was one of two regime types that best realized his two principles of justice, though he was notoriously vague about how a property-owning democracy’s institutions are meant to realize his principles. To compensate for this deficiency, a number of Rawlsian political philosophers have tried (...)
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  30. Henry Shue (1975). Liberty and Self-Respect. Ethics 85 (3):195-203.score: 34.0
    Although the thesis that equal basic liberties take priority over increases in wealth is one of the two most important theses in the rawlsian theory of justice, The argumentation for it is obscure. This article emphasizes the centrality of self-Respect in rawls' treatment of liberty, Specifies five particular assumptions he makes, And constructs a deductive argument from the rawlsian assumptions to the rawlsian conclusion about liberty. Of special interest are the premises of economic adequacy for the worst-Off man (...)
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  31. David Pearce (1992). Green Economics. Environmental Values 1 (1):3 - 13.score: 34.0
    Economists assume that people are fundamentally greedy, though not exclusively so. If environmental improvement is to be achieved, it will require policies that use selfishness rather than opposing it. Such policies are to be found in the basics of green economics in which market signals are modified by environmental taxes and tradeable pollution certificates to 'decouple' the economic growth process from its environmental impact. Green economic policies avoid the infringements of human liberties implied in ever stronger 'command (...)
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  32. Eyal Zamir & Barak Medina (2010). Law, Economics, and Morality. OUP USA.score: 34.0
    Law, Economics, and Morality examines the possibility of combining economic methodology and deontological morality through explicit and direct incorporation of moral constraints into economic models. Economic analysis of law is a powerful analytical methodology. However, as a purely consequentialist approach, which determines the desirability of acts and rules solely by assessing the goodness of their outcomes, standard cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is normatively objectionable. Moderate deontology prioritizes such values as autonomy, basic liberties, truth-telling, and promise-keeping over the (...)
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  33. Zachary R. Calo (2008). “True Economic Liberalism” and the Development of American Catholic Social Thought, 1920-1940. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 5 (2):285-314.score: 30.0
    This paper considers the maturation of the American Catholic tradition of social and economic thought in the seminal period between 1920 and 1940, particularly as encapsulated in the work of John A. Ryan. While different social ethical models emerged in the American Church during this time, the dominant school of thought was the liberal tradition associated with Ryan. This tradition, which Ryan described as "true economic liberalism," forged American political liberalism and papal critiques of secular modernity into a (...)
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  34. Tim Duvall, Fred Englander, Valerie Englander, Thomas J. Hodson & Mark Marpet (2002). Ethical and Economic Issues in the Use of Zero-Emission Vehicles as a Component of an Air-Pollution Mitigation Strategy. Science and Engineering Ethics 8 (4):561-578.score: 28.0
    The air pollution generated by motor vehicles and by static sources is, in certain geographic areas, a very serious problem, a problem that exists because of a failure of the marketplace. To address this marketplace failure, the State of California has mandated that by 2003, 10% of the Light-Duty Vehicle Fleet (LDV) be composed of Zero-Emission Vehicles (ZEVs). However, the policy-making process that was utilized to generate the ZEV mandate was problematic and the resulting ZEV mandate is economically unsound. Moreover, (...)
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  35. Annabelle Lever (2008). 'A Liberal Defence of Compulsory Voting': Some Reasons for Scepticism. POLITICS 28 (1):61-64.score: 28.0
    Liberal egalitarians such as Rawls and Dworkin, insist that a just society must try to make sure that socio-economic inequalities do not undercut the value of the vote, and of other political liberties. They insist on this not just for instrumental reasons, but because they assume that democratic forms of political participation can be desirable ends in themselves. However, compulsory voting laws seem to conflict with respect for reasonable differences of belief and value, essential to liberal egalitarians. Nor (...)
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  36. Natalie Gold, Briony Pulford & Andrew Colman (2013). Your Money Or Your Life: Comparing Judgements In Trolley Problems Involving Economic And Emotional Harms, Injury And Death. Economics and Philosophy 29 (02):213-233.score: 25.0
    There is a long-standing debate in philosophy about whether it is morally permissible to harm one person in order to prevent a greater harm to others and, if not, what is the moral principle underlying the prohibition. Hypothetical moral dilemmas are used in order to probe moral intuitions. Philosophers use them to achieve a reflective equilibrium between intuitions and principles, psychologists to investigate moral decision-making processes. In the dilemmas, the harms that are traded off are almost always deaths. However, the (...)
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  37. Richard J. Arneson (1999). Against Rawlsian Equality of Opportunity. Philosophical Studies 93 (1):77-112.score: 24.0
    According to John Rawls, "Justice is the first virtue of social institutions."1 Like Gaul, justice is tripartite. Rawls affirms an Equal Liberty Principle that guarantees equal basic or constitutional liberties for all citizens and a Difference Principle that requires inequalities in the distribution of certain social and economic benefits, the primary social goods, to be set so that the long-term holdings of primary social goods are maximized for the citizens whose holdings are least. Sandwiched between these two principles (...)
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  38. Rivka Amado & Nevin M. Gewertz (2004). Intellectual Property and the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Moral Crossroads Between Health and Property. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 55 (3):295 - 308.score: 24.0
    The moral justification of intellectual property is often called into question when placed in the context of pharmaceutical patents and global health concerns. The theoretical accounts of both John Rawls and Robert Nozick provide an excellent ethical framework from which such questions can be clarified. While Nozick upholds an individuals right to intellectual property, based upon its conformation with Lockean notions of property and Nozicks ideas of just acquisition and transfer, Rawls emphasizes the importance of basic liberties, such as (...)
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  39. Samuel Freeman (2006). The Law of Peoples, Social Cooperation, Human Rights, and Distributive Justice. Social Philosophy and Policy 23 (1):29-68.score: 24.0
    Cosmopolitans argue that the account of human rights and distributive justice in John Rawls's The Law of Peoples is incompatible with his argument for liberal justice. Rawls should extend his account of liberal basic liberties and the guarantees of distributive justice to apply to the world at large. This essay defends Rawls's grounding of political justice in social cooperation. The Law of Peoples is drawn up to provide principles of foreign policy for liberal peoples. Human rights are among the (...)
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  40. David O. Brink (2001). Millian Principles, Freedom of Expression, and Hate Speech. Legal Theory 7 (2):119-157.score: 24.0
    Hate speech employs discriminatory epithets to insult and stigmatize others on the basis of their race, gender, sexual orientation, or other forms of group membership. The regulation of hate speech is deservedly controversial, in part because debates over hate speech seem to have teased apart libertarian and egalitarian strands within the liberal tradition. In the civil rights movements of the 1960s, libertarian concerns with freedom of movement and association and equal opportunity pointed in the same direction as egalitarian concerns with (...)
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  41. Brian P. Simpson (2009). Wealth and Income Inequality: An Economic and Ethical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):525 - 538.score: 24.0
    I perform an economic and ethical analysis on wealth and income inequality. Economists have performed many statistical studies that reveal a number of, often contradictory, findings in connection with the distribution of wealth and income. Hence, the statistical findings leave us with no better knowledge of the effects that inequality has on economic progress. At the same time, the existing theoretical results have not provided us with a definitive answer concerning the effects of inequality on progress. By gaining (...)
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  42. Lucas Stanczyk, From Each: Essays in the Theory of Productive Justice.score: 24.0
    A just society must provide a range of goods: police protection, education, medical care, legal representation, to name only a few. But how should a just society organize production of these goods? To ask this question is to broach the topic of productive justice. We need a theory of this topic in order to explain the content of the ideal of social justice. A certain theory of productive justice is now widely taken for granted. It has the following commitments. Every (...)
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  43. Anna Strhan (2010). The Obliteration of Truth by Management: Badiou, St. Paul and the Question of Economic Managerialism in Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (2):230-250.score: 24.0
    This paper considers the questions that Badiou's theory poses to the culture of economic managerialism within education. His argument that radical change is possible, for people and the situations they inhabit, provides a stark challenge to the stifling nature of much current educational debate. In Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism , Badiou describes the current universalism of capitalism, monetary homogeneity and the rule of the count. Badiou argues that the politics of identity are all too easily subsumed by (...)
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  44. Matt Ferkany (2009). Recognition, Attachment, and the Social Bases of Self-Worth. Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (3):263-283.score: 24.0
    Recognition theorists have claimed that a culturally egalitarian societal environment is a crucial social basis of a sense of self-worth. In doing so they have often drawn on noncogntivist social-psychological theorizing. This paper argues that this theorizing does not support the recognition theorist's position. It is argued that attachment theory, together with recent empirical evidence, support a more limited vision of self-worth's social bases according to which associational ties, basic rights and liberties, and economic and educational opportunity are (...)
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  45. Rajib Sanyal (2005). Determinants of Bribery in International Business: The Cultural and Economic Factors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):139 - 145.score: 24.0
    Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) scores for 47 countries reported by Transparency International were used to ascertain determinants of bribe taking in international business. Two sets of independent variables – economic and cultural – were used in a multiple regression analysis. Results indicate that bribe taking was more likely to be prevalent in countries with low per capita income and lower disparities in income distribution. Cultural factors such as high power distance and high masculinity in a country were also likely (...)
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  46. Spencer J. Pack (2008). Aristotle's Difficult Relationship With Modern Economic Theory. Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):265-280.score: 24.0
    This paper reviews Aristotle’s problematic relationship with modern economic theory. It argues that in terms of value and income distribution theory, Aristotle should probably be seen as a precursor to neither classical nor neoclassical economic thought. Indeed, there are strong arguments to be made that Aristotle’s views are completely at odds with all modern economic theory, since, among other things, he was not necessarily concerned with flexible market prices, opposed the use of money to acquire more money, (...)
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  47. Colin Farrelly, Dualism, Incentives and the Demands of Rawlsian Justice.score: 24.0
    In “Institutions and the Demands of Justice,” Liam Murphy ~1999! makes a distinction between two approaches to normative political theory. He labels these two positions “dualism” and “monism.” The former maintains that “the two practical problems of institutional design and personal conduct require, at the fundamental level, two different kinds of practical principle” ~1999: 254!. The most influential proponent of dualism is John Rawls. In A Theory of Justice Rawls defends his theory of “justice as fairness,” which recognizes a division (...)
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  48. Symphorien Ntibagirirwa (2009). Cultural Values, Economic Growth and Development. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):297 - 311.score: 24.0
    Neo-liberal economics is built upon the claim that the freedom to pursue one's self-interest and rational choice leads to economic growth and development. Against this background neo-liberal economists and policymakers endeavoured to universalise this claim, and insistently argue that appropriate economic policies produce the same results regardless of cultural values. Accordingly, developing countries are often advised to embrace the neo-liberal economic credo for them to escape from the trap of underdevelopment. However, the economic success of South (...)
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  49. Adolfo García de la Sienra (2010). The Economic Sphere. Axiomathes 20 (1):81-94.score: 24.0
    Herman Dooyeweerd ( 1985 ) argued that among the modalities making up the fabric of reality a specifically economic one is to be found. The aim of the present paper is to discuss the texture of such a modality and how it both differentiates and intertwines with others. For an updated brief, albeit cogent and analytically lucid presentation of the Law Framework ontology, see Clouser ( 2009 ). Dooyeweerd’s view entails that the proper object of economics is irreducible to (...)
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  50. Ulrich Diehl (2005). On the Art of Intercultural Dialogue. Some Forms, Conditions and Structures. In P. N. Liechtenstein & Ch M. Gueye (eds.), Peace and Intercultural Dialogue. Universitätsverlag Winter.score: 24.0
    This essay begins with the claim that intercultural dialogue is an art rather than a science or technique and it attempts to point out what it takes to learn the art of intercultural dialogue. In PART ONE some basic forms of intercultural dialogue are presented which correlate to some basic forms of human life, such as family, politics, economy, science, art and religion. Also a few common traits about how intercultural dialogue is practised today are specified. PART TWO is pointing (...)
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