Search results for 'ed Korsmeyer, Carolyn' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  3
    Joyce A. Carpenter (1994). Hilde Hein and Carolyn Korsmeyer, Eds., Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 14 (5):329-331.
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  2.  12
    Gerald Bruns (2002). Review of Jorge J.E. Gracia, Carolyn Korsmeyer (Eds.), Literary Philosophers: Borges, Calvino, Eco. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (10).
  3.  8
    Tereza Hadravová (2012). Carolyn Korsmeyer, Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. [REVIEW] Estetika 49 (1):116-121.
    A review of Carolyn Korsmeyer´s Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics (New York: Oxford University Press, 2011, 208 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-975694-0).
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  4.  11
    David Clowney (2012). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics by Korsmeyer, Carolyn. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):233-235.
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  5.  0
    Ralph Hanna (2011). Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Ed., with Carolyn Collette, Maryanne Kowaleski, Linne Mooney, Ad Putter, and David Trotter, Language and Culture in Medieval Britain: The French of England, C. 1100–C. 1500. York: York Medieval Press, in Association with Boydell and Brewer and with the Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York, 2009. Pp. Xxii, 533; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $95. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):567-568.
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  6.  54
    Jenefer Robinson (2013). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and Fair in Aesthetics, by Carolyn Korsmeyer. Mind 122 (486):fzt077.
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  7.  65
    T. J. Diffey (2001). Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy. Carolyn Korsmeyer. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (3):341-343.
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  8.  2
    Karen Green, Review of Engaging with Irigaray Ed. Carolyn Burke, Naomi Shor and Margaret Whitford. [REVIEW]
  9.  3
    Victoria Burke (1997). Carolyn Bailey Gill, Ed., Maurice Blanchot: The Demand of Writing Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (6):409-411.
  10.  11
    Lisa Heldken (2002). Book Review: Carolyn Korsmeyer. Making Sense of Taste. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (3):283-286.
  11.  6
    Sally Markowitz (1996). Book Review: Peggy Zeglin Brand and Carolyn Korsmeyer. Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. University Park, Pa: Pennsylvania University Press, 1995. [REVIEW] Hypatia 11 (3):169-172.
  12. Victoria Burke (1997). Carolyn Bailey Gill, Ed., Maurice Blanchot: The Demand of Writing. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 17:409-411.
  13.  12
    Hilde Sed Hein & ed Korsmeyer, Carolyn (1995). Book Review: Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Literature 19 (1).
  14.  44
    Christopher Williams (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Some Questions in Hume's Aesthetics. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):292-295.
    David Hume's relatively short essay 'Of the Standard of Taste' deals with some of the most difficult issues in aesthetic theory. Apart from giving a few pregnant remarks, near the end of his discussion, on the role of morality in aesthetic evaluation, Hume tries to reconcile the idea that tastes are subjective (in the sense of not being answerable to the facts) with the idea that some objects of taste are better than others. 'Tastes', in this context, are the pleasures (...)
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  15.  42
    Robin James (2009). In but Not of, of but Not In: On Taste, Hipness, and White Embodiment. Contemporary Aesthetics 2 (Aesthetics and Race).
    The status of the body figures paradoxically in the interrelated discourses of whiteness, aesthetic taste, and hipness. While Richard Dyer’s analysis of whiteness argues that white identity is “in but not of the body,” Carolyn Korsmeyer’s and Julia Kristeva’s feminist analyses of aesthetic “taste” demonstrate that this faculty is traditionally conceived as something “of” but not “in” the body. While taste directly distances whiteness from embodiment, hipness negatively affirms this same distance: the hipster proves his elite status within white (...)
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  16.  13
    Filippo Contesi (2015). Korsmeyer on Fiction and Disgust. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):109-116.
    In Savoring Disgust, Carolyn Korsmeyer argues that disgust is peculiar amongst emotions, for it does not need any of the standard solutions to the so-called paradox of fiction. I argue that Korsmeyer’s arguments in support of the peculiarity of disgust with respect to the paradox of fiction are not successful.
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  17.  77
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2004). Gender and Aesthetics: An Introduction. Routledge.
    Feminist approaches to art are extremely influential and widely studied across a variety of disciplines, including art theory, cultural and visual studies, and philosophy. Gender and Aesthetics is an introduction to the major theories and thinkers within art and aesthetics from a philosophical perspective, carefully introducing and examining the role that gender plays in forming ideas about art. It is ideal for anyone coming to the topic for the first time. Organized thematically, the book introduces in clear language the most (...)
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  18.  5
    Kathleen Ashley (2005). Carolyn Dinshaw and David Wallace, Eds., The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Women's Writing. Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Pp. Xix, 289; Black-and-White Frontispiece. $60 (Cloth); $22 (Paper). [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (1):212-214.
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  19.  1
    Alessandro Vettori (2014). Carolyn Muessig, George Ferzoco, and Beverly M. Kienzle, Eds., A Companion to Catherine of Siena. (Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition 32.) Leiden: Brill, 2012. Pp. Xvi, 395; Black-and-White Figures and Tables. $209. ISBN: 9789004205550. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (1):223-225.
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  20.  14
    Paul B. Thompson (2001). Carolyn Raffensperger and Joel Tickner, Eds., Protecting Public Health and the Environment: Implementing the Precautionary Principle. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 14 (3):351-354.
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  21. C. L. Dews (1995). Barney and Carolyn Leste Law, Eds. In C. L. Barney Dewes & Carolyn Leste Law (eds.), This Fine Place so Far From Home: Voices of Academics From the Working Class. Temple University Press
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  22. J. McCarthy (2003). Carolyn L. Deere and Daniel C. Esty (Eds), Greening the Americas: NAFTA's Lessons for Hemispheric Trade. Ethics, Policy and Environment 6:183-185.
     
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  23.  15
    Carolyn Richardson (2007). Philosophical Writing: An Introduction A. P. Martinich 3rd Ed., Fully Revised and Updated Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2005, Vii + 202 Pp., $19.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 46 (02):396-.
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  24.  3
    Carolyn Burke (1982). Gertrude Stein, the Cone Sisters, and the Puzzle of Female Friendship. Critical Inquiry 8 (3):543.
    For ten years, between 1903 and 1913, Gertrude Stein saw human relationships as painful mathematical puzzles in need of solutions. Again and again, she converted the predicaments of her personal life into literary material, the better to solve and to exorcise them. The revelation that relationships had a structural quality came to her during the composition of Q.E.D. , when she grasped the almost mathematical nature of her characters' emotional impasse. Stein's persona in the novel comments on their triangular affair, (...)
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  25.  77
    Carolyn Korsmeyer & Barry Smith (2004). Visceral Values: Aurel Kolnai on Disgust. In Aurel Kolnai, On Disgust. 1-23.
    In 1929 when Aurel Kolnai published his essay “On Disgust” in Husserl's ]ahrbuch he could truly assert that disgust was a "sorely neglected" topic. Now, however, this situation is changing as philosophers, psychologists, and historians of culture are turning their attention not only to emotions in general but more specifically to the large and disturbing set of aversive emotions, including disgust. We here provide an account of Kolnai’s contribution to the study of the phenomenon of disgust, of his general theory (...)
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  26.  19
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2010). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. Oxford University Press.
    What is disgust? -- Attractive aversions -- Delightful, delicious, disgusting -- Varieties of aesthetic disgust -- The magnetism of disgust -- Hearts -- The foul and the fair.
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  27.  56
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2002). Delightful, Delicious, Disgusting. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (3):217–225.
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  28.  1
    Hilde Hein & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.) (1993). Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective. Indiana University Press.
  29. Carolyn Korsmeyer (1999). Making Sense of Taste: Food & Philosophy. Cornell University Press.
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  30.  11
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2014). The Meaning of Disgust, by Colin McGinn. Mind 123 (491):937-940.
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  31.  66
    Carolyn W. Korsmeyer (1976). Hume and the Foundations of Taste. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):201-215.
  32.  0
    Peggy Z. Brand & Carolyn Korsmeyer (eds.) (1994). Feminism and Tradition in Aesthetics. Penn State University Press.
  33.  7
    Aurel Kolnai, Barry Smith & Carolyn Korsmeyer (2004). On Disgust. Open Court.
    The problem of disgust has until recently been neglected in the scientific literature. In comparison to the scientific (psychological and metaphysical) interest that has been applied to hatred, anxiety, and similar phenomena, disgust — although a common and important factor in our emotional life — has been unexplored, or it has been viewed as a “higher degree of dislike,” as “nausea,” or as a phenomenon of the “repression of urges.” We here show how the feeling of disgust possesses a unique (...)
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  34.  77
    Carolyn W. Korsmeyer (1975). On the "Aesthetic Senses" and the Development of Fine Arts. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (1):67-71.
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  35.  9
    Carolyn Korsmeyer & Barry Smith (2014). Comment: Kolnai's Disgust. Emotion Review 6 (3):219-220.
    In The Meaning of Disgust, Colin McGinn employs elements of the phenomenological theory of disgust advanced by Aurel Kolnai in 1929. Kolnai’s treatment of what he calls “material” disgust and of its primary elicitors—putrefying organic matter, bodily wastes and secretions, sticky contaminants, vermin—anticipates more recent scientific treatments of this emotion as a mode of protective recoil. While Nina Strohminger charges McGinn with neglecting such scientific studies, we here attempt to show how Kolnai goes beyond experimental findings in his careful description (...)
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  36.  58
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (1989). The Eclipse of Truth in the Rise of Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4):293-302.
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  37.  59
    Peggy Zeglin Brand & Carolyn Korsmeyer (1990). Introduction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 48 (4):277-280.
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  38.  42
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2010). What Beauty Promises:: Reflections on Alexander Nehamas, Only a Promise of Happiness: The Place of Beauty in a World of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (2):193-198.
    Alexander Nehamas calls beauty a ‘promise of happiness’ and claims that it is an object of love. While this approach appealingly places beauty at the center of both artistic passion and everyday life, it also renders it riskily personal. This discussion raises two main questions to Nehamas. The first question regards the role of happiness in the concept of beauty, for many beautiful artworks seem to acknowledge the inevitability of sorrow rather than its opposite. The second question concerns how beauty (...)
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  39.  7
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2007). The Bodily Turn. The Philosophers' Magazine 39:53-55.
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  40.  3
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2014). The Triumph of Time: Romanticism Redux. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (4):429-435.
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  41.  1
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2001). Making Sense of Taste: Food and Philosophy. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 59 (4):421-423.
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  42.  1
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (1977). On Distinguishing "Aesthetic" From "Artistic". Journal of Aesthetic Education 11 (4):45.
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  43.  30
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2008). Aesthetic Deception: On Encounters with the Past. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):117–127.
  44.  17
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (1997). Taste as Sense and as Sensibility. Philosophical Topics 25 (1):201-230.
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  45.  28
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (1993). Pleasure: Reflections on Aesthetics and Feminism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (2):199-206.
  46.  16
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2010). The Turn to the Body. The Philosophers' Magazine 50 (50):74-75.
    The sense of taste falls low on the hierarchy of the senses because it seems a poor conduit for knowledge of the external world; it directs attention inward rather than outward; its pleasures are sensuous and bodily, prone to overindulgence that distracts from higher human endeavours; and its objects are at best merely pleasant, not of the highest aesthetic value. Such is the traditional assessment; now let us analyse its justice.
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  47.  21
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (1999). Rosalind W. Picard, Affective Computing. Minds and Machines 9 (3):443-447.
  48.  9
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2012). Disgust and Aesthetics. Philosophy Compass 7 (11):753-761.
    Disgust is an emotion that is visceral, reactive, and uncomfortable. It is also purposively aroused by art in ways that contribute substantially to the meaning of a work. In such cases “aesthetic disgust” is a component of understanding and appreciation. Disgust comes in many varieties, including the humorous, the horrid, and the tragic. The responses it elicits can be strong or subtle, but few are actually pleasant. Therefore aesthetic disgust raises an ancient question: how is it that emotions aroused in (...)
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  49.  6
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (2011). Q & A. The Philosophers' Magazine 55 (55):114-115.
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  50.  9
    Carolyn Korsmeyer (1977). Is Pangloss Leibniz? Philosophy and Literature 1 (2):201-208.
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