Search results for 'education' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Martha Nussbaum (2002). Education for Citizenship in an Era of Global Connection. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (4/5):289-303.score: 21.0
    Higher education makes an importantcontribution to citizenship. In the UnitedStates, the required portion of the ``liberalarts education'' in colleges and universitiescan be reformed so as to equip students for thechallenges of global citizenship. The paperadvocates focusing on three abilities: theSocratic ability to critize one's owntraditions and to carry on an argument on termsof mutual respect for reason; (2) the abilityto think as a citizen of the whole world, notjust some local region or group; and (3) the``narrative imagination,'' the (...)
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  2. Matthew J. Hayden (2012). What Do Philosophers of Education Do? An Empirical Study of Philosophy of Education Journals. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):1-27.score: 21.0
    What is philosophy of education? This question has been answered in as many ways as there are those who self-identify as philosophers of education. However, the questions our field asks and the research conducted to answer them often produce papers, essays, and manuscripts that we can read, evaluate, and ponder. This paper turns to those tangible products of our scholarly activities. The titles, abstracts, and keywords from every article published from 2000 to 2010 in four journals of educational (...)
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  3. Elvira Panaiotidi (2002). What Is Philosophy of Music Education and Do We Really Need It? Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (3):229-252.score: 21.0
    The article deals with the problem of the disciplinary identification of thephilosophy of music education. It explores alternative approaches to thephilosophy of music education and its relation to musical pedagogy. On thebasis of this analysis an account of the philosophy of music education as aphilosophical discipline is suggested and its specific function identified.
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  4. Michael Gard & Jan Wright (2001). Managing Uncertainty: Obesity Discourses and Physical Education in a Risk Society. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (6):535-549.score: 21.0
    This paper considers the role of physicaleducation researchers within current publicconcerns about body shape and weight. UsingUlrich Beck's notion of `risk' it examines howcertainty about children, obesity, exercise andhealth is produced in the contexts of `expert'knowledge and recontextualised in the academicand professional physical education literature.It is argued that the unquestioning acceptanceof the obesity discourses in physical educationhelps to construct anxieties about the body,which are detrimental to students and silencesalternative ways of thinking and doing physicaleducation.
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  5. Michele S. Moses (1997). Multicultural Education as Fostering Individual Autonomy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 16 (4):373-388.score: 21.0
    This article attempts a philosophical defense of an autonomy-based approach to multicultural education. I contend that multicultural education is necessary in order for students to be able to develop personal autonomy. This, in turn, can empower students to effectively formulate their own version of the good life. The development of autonomy need not, as many critics claim, promote atomistic individualism. Rather, contemporary liberal autonomy strives for a balance between the individual and the community. In defending multicultural education, (...)
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  6. M. A. B. Degenhardt (1986). The 'Ethics of Belief and Education in Science and Morals. Journal of Moral Education 15 (2):109-118.score: 21.0
    Educational worries about indoctrination are linked to matters of rationality and of the ethics of belief. These are both threatened by too 'open' approaches to moral education and by too 'closed' approaches to science education. The moral importance of what is involved points to the need to inform the teaching of all disciplines by reflection on their rational foundations.
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  7. Tomas Englund (2002). Higher Education, Democracy and Citizenship €“ the Democratic Potential of the University? Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (4/5):281-287.score: 21.0
    From a historical point of view, theuniversity as an institution has had the roleof educating an elite, rather than any obvioustask of enforcing democracy. But what kind ofexpectations regarding citizenship anddemocracy can we justifiably have when it comesto the role of higher education and ouruniversities today when higher education isundergoing a process of massification. Couldthe university eventually become a place fordeliberative communication, developingdeliberative qualities among its many students?According to the contributions presented here –stemming from a conference on the (...)
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  8. Kurt Seemann (2003). Basic Principles in Holistic Technology Education. Journal of Technology Education 14 (2):15.score: 21.0
    A school that adopts a curriculum, that aims for a holistic understanding of technology, does so because it produces a better educated person than a curriculum which does not. How do we know when we are teaching technology holistically and why must we do so? Increasingly, more is asked of technology educators to be holistic in the understanding conveyed to learners of technology itself in order to make better informed technical and design decisions in a wider range of applied settings. (...)
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  9. Stefan Hopmann (1999). The Curriculum as a Standard of Public Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (1):89-105.score: 21.0
    This contribution first searches for historical and empirical evidence for whether and how curricula act or acted as a measure of public education. The problem is explicated on account of a short history of curriculum work and distinguished in a analytical, a political, programmatical and practical discourse of curriculum work. Curriculum work always underlies premises of planning, learning and effects. Three models are finally developed and brought in touch with the different discourses. Curriculum work proves to be an attempt (...)
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  10. Philip Higgs (1998). Philosophy of Education in South Africa: A Re-Vision&Quot. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (1):1-16.score: 21.0
    In this article an attempt is made to provide a re-vision of philosophy of education that will redress the legacy of the past in South Africa, and contribute to laying the foundations of a critical civil society with a culture of tolerance, public debate and accommodation of differences and competing interests. This re-vision of philosophy of education, which finds its roots in developments in philosophy in the twentieth century, and especially in the discourse of postmodernism, directs attention to (...)
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  11. Polycarp Ikuenobe (2002). The Meta-Ethical Issue of the Nature of Lying: Implications for Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (1):37-63.score: 21.0
    I argue that lying has many dimensions, hence, some putativecases of lying may not match our intuitions or acceptedmeanings of lying. The moral lesson we should teach must be that lying is not a simple principle or feature, buta cluster of features or spectrum of shades, where anythingin the spectrum or cluster is considered lying. I argue thatthe view regarding lying as a single principle or featurehas problematic meta-ethical implications. I do a meta-ethicalanalysis of the meaning of lying, not only (...)
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  12. Gert J. J. Biesta (1998). Mead, Intersubjectivity, and Education: The Early Writings. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2/3):73-99.score: 21.0
    This article seeks to reconstruct the early writings of George Herbert Mead in order to explore the significance of his work for the development of an intersubjective conception of education. The reconstruction takes its point of departure in Mead's claim that reflective consciousness has a social situation as its precondition. In a mainly chronological account of Mead's writings on psychology and philosophy from the period 1900–1925, it is shown how Mead explains the social origin of conscious reflection and self-consciousness. (...)
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  13. Eammonn Callan (2002). Democratic Patriotism and Multicultural Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 21 (6):465-477.score: 21.0
    Debate about multicultural education in the USAhas been marked by anxieties about thestability of a nation that is both increasinglyculturally diverse and increasingly resistantto coercive assimilative practices. Apolitically and morally persuasivemulticulturalism must seek to dispel ratherthan evade these anxieties. One educationalvenue in which they must be addressed ishistory teaching. The possibility ofcultivating democratic patriotism in theteaching of a genuinely multicultural Americanhistory is discussed.
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  14. Barbara Crossouard & John Pryor (2012). How Theory Matters: Formative Assessment Theory and Practices and Their Different Relations to Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (3):251-263.score: 21.0
    The positioning of theory in relation to educational practice has provoked much recent debate, with some arguing that educational theory constrains thinking in education, while others dismiss ‘theory’ out of hand as belonging to the world of the ‘academic’, abstracted from the ‘realities’ of the classroom. This paper views theory as necessarily implicated in all practices, but argues that depending on the theories embraced, and the understanding of theory itself, education can be understood in very different ways. Resisting (...)
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  15. James Scott Johnston (2006). The Education of the Categorical Imperative. Studies in Philosophy and Education 25 (5-6):385-402.score: 21.0
    In this article, I examine anew the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant and its contributions to educational theory. I make four claims. First, that Kant should be read as having the Categorical Imperative develop out of subjective maxims. Second, that moral self-perfection is the aim of moral education. Third, that moral self-perfection develops by children habituating the results of their moral maxims in scenarios and cases. Fourth, that character and culture, Kant’s highest aims for humanity, are the ultimate beneficiaries (...)
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  16. Cris Mayo (2011). Philosophy of Education is Bent. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):471-476.score: 21.0
    Troubled times in education means that philosophers of education, who seem to never stop making defenses of our field, have to do so with more flexibility and a greater understanding of how peripheral we may have become. The only thing worse than a defensive philosopher is a confident and certain philosopher, so it may be that our very marginality will give us renewed energies for problematizing education. Occupying our marginal position carefully and in concert with other marginal (...)
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  17. Thaddeus Metz (2009). Higher Education, Knowledge For Its Own Sake, and an African Moral Theory. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (6):517-536.score: 21.0
    I seek to answer the question of whether publicly funded higher education ought to aim intrinsically to promote certain kinds of ‘‘blue-sky’’ knowledge, knowledge that is unlikely to result in ‘‘tangible’’ or ‘‘concrete’’ social benefits such as health, wealth and liberty. I approach this question in light of an African moral theory, which contrasts with dominant Western philosophies and has not yet been applied to pedagogical issues. According to this communitarian theory, grounded on salient sub-Saharan beliefs and practices, actions (...)
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  18. Jennifer M. Morton (2011). The Non-Cognitive Challenge to a Liberal Egalitarian Education. Theory and Research in Education 9 (3):233-250.score: 21.0
    Political liberalism, conceived of as a response to the diversity of conceptions of the good in multicultural societies, aims to put forward a proposal for how to organize political institutions that is acceptable to a wide range of citizens. It does so by remaining neutral between reasonable conceptions of the good while giving all citizens a fair opportunity to access the offices and positions which enable them to pursue their own conception of the good. Public educational institutions are at the (...)
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  19. Robert Keith Shaw (1979). New Zealand's Recent Concern with Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 9 (1):23-35.score: 21.0
    References to moral education in New Zealand over the last fifteen years are traced through official and semi-official government reports, teachers’ publications, and other sources. It is argued that since 1962 there has been an increasing awareness of and concern with moral education. -/- The significance of the Commission on Education in New Zealand in 1962 stressed that New Zealand schools’ prime responsibility was for intellectual education, although they should also be concerned with physical, emotional, and (...)
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  20. Jon Fennell (1999). Bloom and His Critics: Nietzsche, Nihilism, and the Aims of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (6):405-434.score: 21.0
    The central questions raised by Allan Bloom's The Closing of theAmerican Mind are often overlooked. Among the most important ofBloom's themes is the impact of nihilism upon education. Bloom condemnsnihilism. Interestingly, we find among his critics two alternativejudgments. Richard Schacht, citing Nietzsche, asserts that nihilism,while fruitless in and of itself, is a necessary prerequisite tosomething higher. Harry Neumann, affirming the accuracy of nihilism,declares that both Bloom and Nietzsche reject nihilism out of ignoranceborn of weakness. All three philosophers understand that (...)
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  21. Michael Uljens (2001). On General Education as a Discipline. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (4):291-301.score: 21.0
    The article highlights what is referred to by the concept of generaleducation (Allgemeine Pädagogik). It is seen as a foundational part ofeducation as a discipline dealing with Bildung and Erziehung philosophicallyand it has traditionally constituted the kernel of the discipline ofeducation. Today it seems as if the interest towards the philosophyand theory of education (i.e. general education) is increasing.
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  22. Randall R. Curren (1994). Justice, Instruction, and the Good: The Case for Public Education in Aristotle and Plato'sLaws. Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (1):1-31.score: 21.0
    This paper develops an interpretation and analysis of the arguments for public education which open Book VIII of Aristotle's Politics , drawing on both the wider Aristotelian corpus and on examination of continuities with Plato's Laws . Part III : Sections VIII-XI examine the two arguments which Aristotle adduces in support of the claim that education should be provided through a public system. The first of these arguments concerns the need to unify society through education for friendship (...)
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  23. Jeff Frank (2012). The Significance of the Poetic in Early Childhood Education: Stanley Cavell and Lucy Sprague Mitchell on Language Learning. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (4):327-338.score: 21.0
    This paper begins with a discussion of Stanley Cavell’s philosophy of language learning. Young people learn more than the meaning of words when acquiring language: they learn about (the quality of) our form of life. If we—as early childhood educators—see language teaching as something like handing some inert thing to a child, then we unduly limit the possibilities of education for that child. Cavell argues that we must become poets if we are to be the type of representatives of (...)
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  24. Brent Gregory, Sue Gregory, Bogdanovych A., Jacobson Michael, Newstead Anne & Simeon Simoff and Many Others (2011). How Are Australian Higher Education Institutions Contributing to Innovative Teaching and Learning Through Virtual Worlds? In Gregory Sue (ed.), Proceedings of Ascilite 2011 (Australian Society of Computers in Tertiary Education). Ascilite.score: 21.0
    Over the past decade, teaching and learning in virtual worlds has been at the forefront of many higher education institutions around the world. The DEHub Virtual Worlds Working Group (VWWG) consisting of Australian and New Zealand higher education academics was formed in 2009. These educators are investigating the role that virtual worlds play in the future of education and actively changing the direction of their own teaching practice and curricula. 47 academics reporting on 28 Australian higher (...) institutions present an overview of how they have changed directions through the effective use of virtual worlds for diverse teaching and learning activities such as business scenarios and virtual excursions, role-play simulations, experimentation and language development. The case studies offer insights into the ways in which institutions are continuing to change directions in their teaching to meet changing demands for innovative teaching, learning and research in virtual worlds. This paper highlights the ways in which the authors are using virtual worlds to create opportunities for rich, immersive and authentic activities that would be difficult or not possible to achieve through more traditional approaches. (shrink)
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  25. Alexander M. Sidorkin (2011). On the Essence of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):521-527.score: 21.0
    Educational reforms in developed countries are not successful, because we do not have a clear understanding of what is education. The essence of education is the limits of its improvement. Education is understood as the artificial extension of human ability to learn, as the product of learner's own efforts, and finally, as a series of historic forms of labor arrangements.
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  26. Maria Olson (2012). The European 'We': From Citizenship Policy to the Role of Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (1):77-89.score: 21.0
    This article sheds light on the European Union’s policy on citizenship; on the collective dimension of this policy, its ‘we’. It is argued that the inclusive, identity-constituting forces prominent in EU policy on European citizenship serve as a basis for the exclusion of people, which is illustrated by the recent expulsion of Romani from France. Based on a reading of Derrida, the twofold aim of this article is to reformulate the concept of a European citizenship ‘we’ and secondly, to outline (...)
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  27. Herner Sæverot (2011). Kierkegaard, Seduction, and Existential Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):557-572.score: 21.0
    This article aims at making a case for the role of seduction in existential education, that is, education that focuses on the pupil’s life choices. First, the article attempts to show that the relationship between the teacher and the pupil can be understood as a form of seduction. Secondly, the article examines how such a relationship functions in practice. Thirdly, the article warns against dangerous aspects related to seduction, and lastly, the article offers five conditions for how seduction (...)
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  28. Gert J. J. Biesta (1999). Radical Intersubjectivity: Reflections on the €œDifferent” Foundation of Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (4):203-220.score: 21.0
    This article addresses the question how educational theory can overcome the assumptions of the tradition of the philosophy of consciousness, a tradition which can be seen as the foundation of the modern project of education. While twentieth century philosophy has seen several attempts to make a shift from consciousness to intersubjectivity (Dewey, Wittgenstein, Habermas) it is argued that this shift still remains within the humanistic tradition of modern thought in that it still tries to define, still tries to develop (...)
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  29. Yusef Waghid (2003). Peters' Non-Instrumental Justification of Education View Revisited: Contesting the Philosophy of Outcomes-Based Education in South Africa. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):245-265.score: 21.0
    In this article I argue that Outcomes-basedEducation is conceptually trapped in aninstrumentally justifiable view of education. Icontend that the notion of Outcomes-basedEducation is incommensurable with anon-instrumental justification of educationview as explained by RS Peters (1998). Theprocess of specifying outcomes in educationaldiscourse lends itself to manipulation andcontrol and thereby makes the idea ofOutcomes-based Education educationallyimpoverished. In this article an argument ismade for education through rational reflectionand imagination which can complement anOutcomes-based Education system for the reasonthat it finds (...)
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  30. Helen E. Lees (2013). Is R.S. Peters' Way of Mentioning Women in His Texts Detrimental to Philosophy of Education? Some Considerations and Questions. Ethics and Education 7 (3):291 - 302.score: 21.0
    (2012). Is R.S. Peters' way of mentioning women in his texts detrimental to philosophy of education? Some considerations and questions. Ethics and Education: Vol. 7, Creating spaces, pp. 291-302. doi: 10.1080/17449642.2013.767002.
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  31. Michalinos Zembylas (2012). Citizenship Education and Human Rights in Sites of Ethnic Conflict: Toward Critical Pedagogies of Compassion and Shared Fate. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (6):553-567.score: 21.0
    The present essay discusses the value of citizenship as shared fate in sites of ethnic conflict and analyzes its implications for citizenship education in light of three issues: first, the requirements of affective relationality in the notion of citizenship-as-shared fate; second, the tensions between the values of human rights and shared fate in sites of ethnic conflict; and third, the ways in which citizenship education might overcome these tensions without falling into the trap of psychologization and instrumentalization, but (...)
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  32. Ruth Irwin (2003). Heidegger and Nietzsche; the Question of Value and Nihilism in Relation to Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):227-244.score: 21.0
    This paper is a philosophical analysis ofHeidegger and Nietzsche's approach tometaphysics and the associated problem ofnihilism. Heidegger sums up the history ofWestern metaphysics in a way which challengescommon sense approaches to values education.Through close attention to language, Heideggerargues that Nietzsche inverts thePlatonic-Christian tradition but retains theanthropocentric imposition of ‘values’. Ihave used Nietzsche's theory to suggest aslightly different definition of metaphysicsand nihilism which draws attention to theontological parameters of human truths as astruggle between competing sets of conflictingor contradictory values (perspectives) (...)
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  33. Gonzalo Jover (2001). What Does the Right to Education Mean? A Look at an International Debate From Legal, Ethical, and Pedagogical Points of View. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):213-223.score: 21.0
    Working from a concept of politics of education that encompasses legal,ethical and pedagogical levels of analysis, this paper presents theresults of a field work project on the meaning and current state of theright to education with a larger philosophical discourse. Talk ofeducation as a human right presupposes taking part in a horizon ofinterpretation. Projected is a view of person as a subject, i.e., assomeone not only placed in a specific context, but also as someone whois capable of distancing (...)
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  34. Jürgen Oelkers (1994). Influence and Development: Two Basic Paradigms of Education. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (2):91-109.score: 21.0
    The article discusses two basic paradigms of western educational theory, namely the concept of “influence” and the concept of “development”. Two historical contextes are analyzed, John Locke's theory of human learning and Jean-Jacques Rousseau's theory of natural development. Both theories are rejected in favour of a position beyond “influence” and “development”. This position of a theory of education ( Erziehung ) is marked with the term “moral communication”.
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  35. Barbara Satina & Francine Hultgren (2001). The Absent Body of Girls Made Visible: Embodiment as the Focus in Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (6):521-534.score: 21.0
    The purpose of this article is to show the waysin which education can be centered on the bodyas the subject of experience, rather thanas an object or an absent entity. Pedagogicalpractices that emphasize a conscious awarenessof embodiment provide opportunities forstudents to learn in a holistic manner. Sincethe body is the way in which we experience theworld, mediating all processes of learning, allexperience is therefore embodied (Levin, 1985). Recognizing the body as subject of being ratherthan as object acknowledges that beneath (...)
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  36. Patricia White (1999). Gratitude, Citizenship and Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (1):43-52.score: 21.0
    Citizenship education is a complex matter, and not least the place of civic virtues in it. This is illustrated by a consideration of the civic virtue of gratitude. Two conceptions of gratitude are explored. Gratitude seen as a debt is examined and Kant’s exposition of it, including his objections to a person’s getting himself into the position where he has to show gratitude as a beneficiary, is explored. An alternative conception of gratitude as recognition is developed. This, it is (...)
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  37. Ted Fleming (2012). Fromm and Habermas: Allies for Adult Education and Democracy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (2):123-136.score: 21.0
    The legacy of the Frankfurt Institute for Social Research has been a powerful force for critically understanding social reality. Erich Fromm was one of the early and best known members of the Institute. Fromm emphasised the centrality of culture and interpersonal relations in the contruction of the psyche. The unconscious was not only the location for buried repressed matter but also for the imaginative potential of the human person. He is a forgotten and neglected contributor to the story of the (...)
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  38. Paul Hager (1998). Lifelong Education: From Conflict to Consensus? [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):323-332.score: 21.0
    The concept of lifelong education received wide criticism and rejection in many educational circles in the 1970s. Recent developments in educational research and the increasing influence of postmodernist thought, the paper argues, are major factors in the return to favour of lifelong education. While a postmodern society is one characterised more by conflict than by consensus, the paper suggests that consensus on the importance of lifelong education might be one precondition for such a society.
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  39. Janez Krek (forthcoming). Two Principles of Early Moral Education: A Condition for the Law, Reflection and Autonomy. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-21.score: 21.0
    We establish the thesis that in moral education, particularly in the first years of the child’s development, unreflexive acts or unreflexiveness in certain behaviours of adults is a condition for the development of the personality structure and virtues that enable autonomous ethical reflection and a relation to the Other. With the notion of unreflexiveness we refer to resolvedness in the response of adults when it is necessary to establish a limit, or cut, in the child’s demand for pleasure, as (...)
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  40. Michael Bonnett (2004). Lost in Space? Education and the Concept of Nature. Studies in Philosophy and Education 23 (2/3):117-130.score: 21.0
    Although the idea of nature has allbut disappeared from recent discussion ofeducation, it remains highly relevant to thephilosophy and practice of education, sincetacit notions of human nature and whatconstitutes underlying reality – the `natural'order of things – necessarily orientateseducation in fundamental ways. It is arguedthat underlying our various senses of nature isthe idea of nature as the `self-arising' whoseintrinsic integrity, mystery and valueimplicitly condition our understanding ofourselves and of the reality in which we live.I argue that the acknowledgement of (...)
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  41. Gonzalo Jover (2001). Philosophy of Education in Spain at the Threshold of the 21st Century €“ Origins, Political Contexts, and Prospects. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (4):361-385.score: 21.0
    This article analyzes the evolution of Philosophy of Educationin Spain and its situation at the dawn of the 21st century. Spain'speculiar socio-historical circumstances have largely conditioned thedirection this discipline has taken over the last several decades. So,although during a period there was some approximation towards themethods of analytic philosophy, Philosophy of Education has never fullyrelinquished its normative vocation. To do so would have meant spurningthe hopes and fears that had filled Spanish society by the mid 1970supon the reinstatement of (...)
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  42. Paul Andrew Moran (2013). Deleuze and the Queer Ethics of an Empirical Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (2):155-169.score: 21.0
    Axiomatic and problematic approaches to ontology are discussed, at first in relation to the work of Badiou and Deleuze in mathematics. This discussion is then broadened focussing on problematics in Deleuze and Guattari’s critiques of capitalism and psychoanalysis which results in an analysis of the implications of this discussion for education. From this, education as being already there, which is an assumption in some strands of philosophy of education, following Deleuze’s critique of axiomatic presentations of ontological identities, (...)
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  43. Danièle Tosato-Rigo (2012). In the Shadow of Emile: Pedagogues, Pediatricians, Physical Education, 1686–1762. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (5):449-463.score: 21.0
    This article takes as its starting point the commonplace that Rousseau’s Emile enabled his contemporaries to discover not only childhood but physical education. Focused on what the pedestal erected for Jean-Jacques somewhat overshadows, a brief historiographic overview and a survey of some major writings on education before Rousseau (by the Abbot Fleury, John Locke, Jean-Pierre de Crousaz and Charles Rollin) will show that the ideas defended by the writer were not innovative in the slightest. But also, and this (...)
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  44. Johan Dahlbeck (forthcoming). On Following Commands: A Philosophical Inquiry Into the Governing Values of Swedish Early Childhood Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education:1-18.score: 21.0
    In this article I will investigate a perceived tension in Swedish early childhood education (ECE) policy between reevaluating certain foundational claims on the one hand and following universal moral commands on the other. I ask the question; how is it that certain commonly held assumptions are being debunked and others left undisturbed in this particular context? To this end, I look at some of the preconditions of framing the educational practice by universal moral commands so as to make visible (...)
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  45. Karen François, Kathleen Coessens & Jean Paul Van Bendegem (2012). The Interplay of Psychology and Mathematics Education: From the Attraction of Psychology to the Discovery of the Social. Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):370-385.score: 21.0
    It is a rather safe statement to claim that the social dimensions of the scientific process are accepted in a fair share of studies in the philosophy of science. It is a somewhat safe statement to claim that the social dimensions are now seen as an essential element in the understanding of what human cognition is and how it functions. But it would be a rather unsafe statement to claim that the social is fully accepted in the philosophy of mathematics. (...)
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  46. Ilan Gu-Ze'ev, Jan Masschelein & Nigel Blake (2001). Reflectivity, Reflection, and Counter-Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (2):93-106.score: 21.0
    This article sets forward a new concept of reflection, to be contrasted with more usual reading of the concept for which we use the term `reflectivity'. The contrast is related to a distinction between normalizing education and counter-education. We claim that within the framework of normalizing education there is no room for reflection, but only for reflectivity. In contrast to reflectivity, reflection manifests a struggle of the subject against the effects of power which govern the constitution of (...)
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  47. Robert D. Heslep (2012). Education for Computers. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (4):357-364.score: 21.0
    The computer engineers who refer to the education of computers do not have a definite idea of education and do not bother to justify the fuzzy ones to which they allude. Hence, they logically cannot specify the features a computer must have in order to be educable. This paper puts forth a non-standard, but not arbitrary, concept of education that determines such traits. The proposed concept is derived from the idea of education embedded in modern standard-English (...)
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  48. Stefano Oliverio (2014). The New Alliance Between Science and Education: Otto Neurath's Modernity Beyond Descartes' 'Adamitic' Science. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (1):41-59.score: 21.0
    Starting from a suggestion of Stephen Toulmin and through an interpretation of the criticism to which Neurath, one of the founders of the Vienna Circle, submits Descartes’ views on science, the paper attempts to outline a pattern of modernity opposed to the Cartesian one, that has been obtaining over the last four centuries. In particular, it is argued that a new alliance has to be established between science and education, overcoming Descartes’ banishment against education. In a Neurathian perspective (...)
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  49. Alan Thomas & Harriet Pattison (2013). Informal Home Education: Philosophical Aspirations Put Into Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (2):141-154.score: 21.0
    Informal home education occurs without much that is generally considered essential for formal education—including curriculum, learning plans, assessments, age related targets or planned and deliberate teaching. Our research into families conducting this kind of education enables us to consider learning away from such imposed structures and to explore how children go about learning for themselves within the context of their own socio-cultural setting. In this paper we consider what and how children learn when no educational agenda is (...)
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  50. Tony DeCesare (2014). Theorizing Democratic Education From a Senian Perspective. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (2):149-170.score: 21.0
    Despite the growing body of literature and general interest in the intersection between the capabilities approach (CA) and education, little work has been done so far to theorize democratic education from a CA perspective. This essay attempts to do so by, first, getting clear about the theory of democracy that has emerged from Amartya Sen’s recent work and understanding how it informs his CA; and, second, by carefully drawing out the implications of these aspects of Sen’s thinking for (...)
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