Search results for 'effective procedure' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  10
    Tim Button (2009). Hyperloops Do Not Threaten the Notion of an Effective Procedure. Lecture Notes in Computer Science 5635:68-78.
    This paper develops my (BJPS 2009) criticisms of the philosophical significance of a certain sort of infinitary computational process, a hyperloop. I start by considering whether hyperloops suggest that "effectively computable" is vague (in some sense). I then consider and criticise two arguments by Hogarth, who maintains that hyperloops undermine the very idea of effective computability. I conclude that hyperloops, on their own, cannot threaten the notion of an effective procedure.
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  2.  11
    Abraham Robinson (1988). Abraham Robinson's Notes: On a Relatively Effective Procedure Getting All Quasi-Integer Solutions of Diophantine Equations with Positive Genus. Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 7 (3):111-115.
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  3.  3
    Henna Kosonen & Matti Tolvanen (2010). Balancing Between Effective Realisation of Criminal Liability and Effective Defence Rights: The Tasks and the Roles of Prosecutor and Defence Lawyer in Finnish Criminal Procedure. Jurisprudence 120 (2):233-256.
    Prior to the extensive reform of the Finnish criminal procedure in 1997, the roles of the prosecutor and the defence attorney were passive compared to the role of the judge. The main task of the prosecutor was to read the written indictment and to help the judge to find the truth. The judge could procure evidence ex officio, although it may have been detrimental to the suspect. The roles of the judge, the attorneys and the prosecutor changed dramatically when (...)
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  4.  11
    Silvia Cervo, Jane Rovina, Renato Talamini, Tiziana Perin, Vincenzo Canzonieri, Paolo De Paoli & Agostino Steffan (2013). An Effective Multisource Informed Consent Procedure for Research and Clinical Practice: An Observational Study of Patient Understanding and Awareness of Their Roles as Research Stakeholders in a Cancer Biobank. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):30.
    Efforts to improve patients’ understanding of their own medical treatments or research in which they are involved are progressing, especially with regard to informed consent procedures. We aimed to design a multisource informed consent procedure that is easily adaptable to both clinical and research applications, and to evaluate its effectiveness in terms of understanding and awareness, even in less educated patients.
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  5.  50
    Carol E. Cleland (2002). On Effective Procedures. Minds and Machines 12 (2):159-179.
    Since the mid-twentieth century, the concept of the Turing machine has dominated thought about effective procedures. This paper presents an alternative to Turing's analysis; it unifies, refines, and extends my earlier work on this topic. I show that Turing machines cannot live up to their billing as paragons of effective procedure; at best, they may be said to provide us with mere procedure schemas. I argue that the concept of an effective procedure crucially depends (...)
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  6. H. C. M. de Swart (1980). Gentzen-Type Systems for C, K and Several Extensions of C and K; Constructive Completeness Proofs and Effective Decision Procedure for These Systems. Logique Et Analyse 90 (91):263-284.
     
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  7.  32
    Jeremy Seligman (2002). The Scope of Turing's Analysis of Effective Procedures. Minds and Machines 12 (2):203-220.
    Turing's (1936) analysis of effective symbolic procedures is a model of conceptual clarity that plays an essential role in the philosophy of mathematics. Yet appeal is often made to the effectiveness of human procedures in other areas of philosophy. This paper addresses the question of whether Turing's analysis can be applied to a broader class of effective human procedures. We use Sieg's (1994) presentation of Turing's Thesis to argue against Cleland's (1995) objections to Turing machines and we evaluate (...)
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  8.  23
    Pavel Materna (2009). Concepts and Recipes. Acta Analytica 24 (1):69-90.
    If concepts are explicated as abstract procedures, then we can easily show that each empirical concept is a not an effective procedure. Some, but not all empirical concepts are shown to be of a special kind: they cannot in principle guarantee that the object they identify satisfies the intended conditions.
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  9. Andrew Ashworth & Lucia Zedner (2008). Defending the Criminal Law: Reflections on the Changing Character of Crime, Procedure, and Sanctions. Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (1):21-51.
    Recent years have seen mounting challenge to the model of the criminal trial on the grounds it is not cost-effective, not preventive, not necessary, not appropriate, or not effective. These challenges have led to changes in the scope of the criminal law, in criminal procedure, and in the nature and use of criminal trials. These changes include greater use of diversion, of fixed penalties, of summary trials, of hybrid civil–criminal processes, of strict liability, of incentives to plead (...)
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  10.  60
    B. Jack Copeland (2002). Accelerating Turing Machines. Minds and Machines 12 (2):281-300.
    Accelerating Turing machines are Turing machines of a sort able to perform tasks that are commonly regarded as impossible for Turing machines. For example, they can determine whether or not the decimal representation of contains n consecutive 7s, for any n; solve the Turing-machine halting problem; and decide the predicate calculus. Are accelerating Turing machines, then, logically impossible devices? I argue that they are not. There are implications concerning the nature of effective procedures and the theoretical limits of computability. (...)
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  11.  8
    Vytautas Nekrošius (2012). Protection of Public Interest in Civil Procedure and the Doctrine of the Constitutional Court. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1101-1110.
    On 21 June 2011 the Parliament of the Republic of Lithuania adopted extensive and important amendments of the Code of Civil Procedure of the Republic of Lithuania. Most of them came into force on 1 October 2011.One of the important tasks that have been mentioned for the preparation of amendments was to ensure the implementation of the Constitutional Court’s doctrine of matters of civil procedure. This article analyses one of the changed aspect - the system of defence of (...)
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  12.  1
    Virgilijus Valančius & Aurimas Brazdeikis (2011). Different Approach to Losses Caused by the Abuse of Civil Procedure. Jurisprudence 18 (4):1467-1484.
    Recent major amendments of the Code of Civil Procedure of the Republic of Lithuania have added new and improved older procedural instruments that may be used for reimbursement of losses inflicted by the abuse of process. The law now clearly states that the court may take into account improper conduct of the participants when deciding on distribution of litigation costs. A fine in favour of the party aggrieved by the abuse may also be imposed. Therefore, in this article the (...)
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  13. Gualtiero Piccinini (2003). Alan Turing and the Mathematical Objection. Minds and Machines 13 (1):23-48.
    This paper concerns Alan Turing’s ideas about machines, mathematical methods of proof, and intelligence. By the late 1930s, Kurt Gödel and other logicians, including Turing himself, had shown that no finite set of rules could be used to generate all true mathematical statements. Yet according to Turing, there was no upper bound to the number of mathematical truths provable by intelligent human beings, for they could invent new rules and methods of proof. So, the output of a human mathematician, for (...)
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  14.  45
    Carol E. Cleland (1995). Effective Procedures and Computable Functions. Minds and Machines 5 (1):9-23.
    Horsten and Roelants have raised a number of important questions about my analysis of effective procedures and my evaluation of the Church-Turing thesis. They suggest that, on my account, effective procedures cannot enter the mathematical world because they have a built-in component of causality, and, hence, that my arguments against the Church-Turing thesis miss the mark. Unfortunately, however, their reasoning is based upon a number of misunderstandings. Effective mundane procedures do not, on my view, provide an analysis (...)
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  15.  14
    Benjamin Wells (2002). Is There a Nonrecursive Decidable Equational Theory? Minds and Machines 12 (2):301-324.
    The Church-Turing Thesis (CTT) is often paraphrased as ``every computable function is computable by means of a Turing machine.'' The author has constructed a family of equational theories that are not Turing-decidable, that is, given one of the theories, no Turing machine can recognize whether an arbitrary equation is in the theory or not. But the theory is called pseudorecursive because it has the additional property that when attention is limited to equations with a bounded number of variables, one obtains, (...)
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  16.  4
    Natàlia Cugueró-Escofet, Marion Fortin & Miguel-Angel Canela (2013). Righting the Wrong for Third Parties: How Monetary Compensation, Procedure Changes and Apologies Can Restore Justice for Observers of Injustice. Journal of Business Ethics 122 (2):1-16.
    People react negatively not only to injustices they personally endure but also to injustices that they observe as bystanders at work—and typically, people observe more injustices than they personally experience. It is therefore important to understand how organizations can restore observers’ perceptions of justice after an injustice has occurred. In our paper, we employ a policy capturing design to test and compare the restorative power of monetary compensation, procedure changes and apologies, alone and in combination, from the perspective of (...)
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  17.  14
    Dieter Spreen (2010). Effectivity and Effective Continuity of Multifunctions. Journal of Symbolic Logic 75 (2):602-640.
    If one wants to compute with infinite objects like real numbers or data streams, continuity is a necessary requirement: better and better (finite) approximations of the input are transformed into better and better (finite) approximations of the output. In case the objects are constructively generated, they can be represented by a finite description of the generating procedure. By effectively transforming such descriptions for the generation of the input (respectively, their codes) into (the code of) a description for the generation (...)
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  18. Carol E. Cleland (1993). Is the Church-Turing Thesis True? Minds and Machines 3 (3):283-312.
    The Church-Turing thesis makes a bold claim about the theoretical limits to computation. It is based upon independent analyses of the general notion of an effective procedure proposed by Alan Turing and Alonzo Church in the 1930''s. As originally construed, the thesis applied only to the number theoretic functions; it amounted to the claim that there were no number theoretic functions which couldn''t be computed by a Turing machine but could be computed by means of some other kind (...)
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  19.  33
    Selmer Bringsjord & Michael Zenzen (2002). Toward a Formal Philosophy of Hypercomputation. Minds and Machines 12 (2):241-258.
    Does what guides a pastry chef stand on par, from the standpoint of contemporary computer science, with what guides a supercomputer? Did Betty Crocker, when telling us how to bake a cake, provide an effective procedure, in the sense of `effective' used in computer science? According to Cleland, the answer in both cases is ``Yes''. One consequence of Cleland's affirmative answer is supposed to be that hypercomputation is, to use her phrase, ``theoretically viable''. Unfortunately, though we applaud (...)
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  20.  36
    Nick Huggett & Robert Weingard (1995). The Renormalisation Group and Effective Field Theories. Synthese 102 (1):171 - 194.
    Much apprehension has been expressed by philosophers about the method of renormalisation in quantum field theory, as it apparently requires illegitimate procedure of infinite cancellation. This has lead to various speculations, in particular in Teller (1989). We examine Teller's discussion of perturbative renormalisation of quantum fields, and show why it is inadequate. To really approach the matter one needs to understand the ideas and results of the renormalisation group, so we give a simple but comprehensive account of this topic. (...)
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  21.  4
    Ulrich Kohlenbach & Pavol Safarik (2014). Fluctuations, Effective Learnability and Metastability in Analysis. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 165 (1):266-304.
    This paper discusses what kind of quantitative information one can extract under which circumstances from proofs of convergence statements in analysis. We show that from proofs using only a limited amount of the law-of-excluded-middle, one can extract functionals , where L is a learning procedure for a rate of convergence which succeeds after at most B-many mind changes. This -learnability provides quantitative information strictly in between a full rate of convergence and a rate of metastability in the sense of (...)
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  22.  2
    Ulrich Witt (2013). Competition as an Ambiguous Discovery Procedure: A Reappraisal of F. A. Hayek's Epistemic Market Liberalism. Economics and Philosophy 29 (1):121-138.
    Epistemic arguments play a significant role in the foundations of market liberalism as exemplified, in particular, by the work of F. A. Hayek. Competition in free markets is claimed to be the most effective device both to utilize the knowledge dispersed throughout society as well as create new knowledge through innovation competition. The fast pace with which new economic opportunities are discovered and costs are reduced is considered proof of the benefits of free markets to the common good. However, (...)
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  23. Laura Gumuliauskienė & Vigintas Višinskis (2012). Procedural Actions Taken by Bailiffs Electronically: Opportunities and Problems. Jurisprudence 19 (2):507-524.
    The Article presents a study of opportunities and problems related to the procedural actions taken by bailiffs electronically. In the opinion of the authors, the digitalisation of the enforcement procedure seeks to ensure the maximum use of electronic documents: enforcement and procedural documents should function only in the electronic format and thereby should create an effective, transparent and easily accessible information system of electronic enforcement files, which will not only increase the effectiveness of performance of bailiffs and save (...)
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  24. Carol E. Cleland (2001). Recipes, Algorithms, and Programs. Minds and Machines 11 (2):219-237.
    In the technical literature of computer science, the concept of an effective procedure is closely associated with the notion of an instruction that precisely specifies an action. Turing machine instructions are held up as providing paragons of instructions that "precisely describe" or "well define" the actions they prescribe. Numerical algorithms and computer programs are judged effective just insofar as they are thought to be translatable into Turing machine programs. Nontechnical procedures (e.g., recipes, methods) are summarily dismissed as (...)
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  25. Kenneth Aizawa (2010). Computation in Cognitive Science: It is Not All About Turing-Equivalent Computation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (3):227-236.
    One account of the history of computation might begin in the 1930's with some of the work of Alonzo Church, Alan Turing, and Emil Post. One might say that this is where something like the core concept of computation was first formally articulated. Here were the first attempts to formalize an informal notion of an algorithm or effective procedure by which a mathematician might decide one or another logico-mathematical question. As each of these formalisms was shown to compute (...)
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  26.  33
    Patrick Grim (1997). The Undecidability of the Spatialized Prisoner's Dilemma. Theory and Decision 42 (1):53-80.
    In the spatialized Prisoner's Dilemma, players compete against their immediate neighbors and adopt a neighbor's strategy should it prove locally superior. Fields of strategies evolve in the manner of cellular automata (Nowak and May, 1993; Mar and St. Denis, 1993a,b; Grim 1995, 1996). Often a question arises as to what the eventual outcome of an initial spatial configuration of strategies will be: Will a single strategy prove triumphant in the sense of progressively conquering more and more territory without opposition, or (...)
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  27.  7
    Robert Constable & Mark Bickford (2014). Intuitionistic Completeness of First-Order Logic. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 165 (1):164-198.
    We constructively prove completeness for intuitionistic first-order logic, iFOL, showing that a formula is provable in iFOL if and only if it is uniformly valid in intuitionistic evidence semantics as defined in intuitionistic type theory extended with an intersection operator.Our completeness proof provides an effective procedure that converts any uniform evidence into a formal iFOL proof. Uniform evidence can involve arbitrary concepts from type theory such as ordinals, topological structures, algebras and so forth. We have implemented that (...) in the Nuprl proof assistant.Our result demonstrates the value of uniform validity as a semantic notion for studying logical theories, and it provides new techniques for showing that formulas are not intuitionistically provable. Here we demonstrate its value for minimal and intuitionistic first-order logic. (shrink)
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  28.  14
    Andrei S. Morozov & Margarita V. Korovina (2008). On Σ‐Definability Without Equality Over the Real Numbers. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 54 (5):535-544.
    In [5] it has been shown that for first-order definability over the reals there exists an effective procedure which by a finite formula with equality defining an open set produces a finite formula without equality that defines the same set. In this paper we prove that there exists no such procedure for Σ-definability over the reals. We also show that there exists even no uniform effective transformation of the definitions of Σ-definable sets into new definitions of (...)
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  29.  4
    Luigi Santocanale & Yde Venema (2010). Completeness for Flat Modal Fixpoint Logics. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 162 (1):55-82.
    This paper exhibits a general and uniform method to prove axiomatic completeness for certain modal fixpoint logics. Given a set Γ of modal formulas of the form γ, where x occurs only positively in γ, we obtain the flat modal fixpoint language by adding to the language of polymodal logic a connective γ for each γΓ. The term γ is meant to be interpreted as the least fixed point of the functional interpretation of the term γ. We consider the following (...)
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  30.  17
    René Lavendhomme & Thierry Lucas (2000). Sequent Calculi and Decision Procedures for Weak Modal Systems. Studia Logica 66 (1):121-145.
    We investigate sequent calculi for the weak modal (propositional) system reduced to the equivalence rule and extensions of it up to the full Kripke system containing monotonicity, conjunction and necessitation rules. The calculi have cut elimination and we concentrate on the inversion of rules to give in each case an effective procedure which for every sequent either furnishes a proof or a finite countermodel of it. Applications to the cardinality of countermodels, the inversion of rules and the derivability (...)
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  31.  7
    J. C. E. Dekker (1981). Twilight Graphs. Journal of Symbolic Logic 46 (3):539-571.
    This paper deals primarily with countable, simple, connected graphs and the following two conditions which are trivially satisfied if the graphs are finite: (a) there is an edge-recognition algorithm, i.e., an effective procedure which enables us, given two distinct vertices, to decide whether they are adjacent, (b) there is a shortest path algorithm, i.e., an effective procedure which enables us, given two distinct vertices, to find a minimal path joining them. A graph $G = \langle\eta, \eta\rangle$ (...)
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  32.  18
    Walid S. Saba & Jean-Pierre Corriveau (2001). Plausible Reasoning and the Resolution of Quantifier Scope Ambiguities. Studia Logica 67 (2):271-289.
    Despite overwhelming evidence suggesting that quantifier scope is a phenomenon that must be treated at the pragmatic level, most computational treatments of scope ambiguities have thus far been a collection of syntactically motivated preference rules. This might be in part due to the prevailing wisdom that a commonsense inferencing strategy would require the storage of and reasoning with a vast amount of background knowledge. In this paper we hope to demonstrate that the challenge in developing a commonsense inferencing strategy is (...)
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  33.  2
    J. W. Swanson (1965). On the Calculus Ratiocinator. Inquiry 8 (1-4):315 – 331.
    The project, entertained by Leibniz and others, of creating an ideal language to facilitate ratiocination, is investigated in detail. Six possible relations between the ideal language (IL) and the natural language (NL) it replaces are studied. (1) IL says exactly what NL says, but says it much more clearly. (2) IL says exactly what NL says, but does so more economically. (3) IL says exactly what NL says, but does so more succinctly. (4) IL says part of what NL says, (...)
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  34. Anthony Skelton (2016). The Ethical Principles of Effective Altruism. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2).
    This paper is an examination of the ethical principles of effective altruism as they are articulated by Peter Singer in his book The Most Good You Can Do. It discusses the nature and the plausibility of the principles that he thinks both guide and ought to guide effective altruists. It argues in § II pace Singer that it is unclear that in charitable giving one ought always to aim to produce the most surplus benefit possible and in § (...)
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  35.  83
    J. Harris (2007). NICE Rejoinder. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (8):467-467.
    The bottom line is that Claxton and Culyer believe, and are on record as saying, that a therapy or procedure is not cost effective if “the health benefits that it is estimated could be gained from the technology are less than those estimated to be forgone by other patients as other procedures are necessarily curtailed or not undertaken. It is this comparison of health gained and health forgone that is at the heart of the rationale of cost-effectiveness analysis”. (...)
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  36. J. Anandan (1999). Are There Dynamical Laws? Foundations of Physics 29 (11):1647-1672.
    The nature of a physical law is examined, and it is suggested that there may not be any fundamental dynamical laws. This explains the intrinsic indeterminism of quantum theory. The probabilities for transition from a given initial state to a final state then depends on the quantum geometry that is determined by symmetries, which may exist as relations between states in the absence of dynamical laws. This enables the experimentally well-confirmed quantum probabilities to be derived from the geometry of Hilbert (...)
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  37.  76
    Jonathan Bain (2013). Emergence in Effective Field Theories. European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (3):257-273.
    This essay considers the extent to which a concept of emergence can be associated with Effective Field Theories (EFTs). I suggest that such a concept can be characterized by microphysicalism and novelty underwritten by the elimination of degrees of freedom from a high-energy theory, and argue that this makes emergence in EFTs distinct from other concepts of emergence in physics that have appeared in the recent philosophical literature.
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  38.  10
    Vasco Brattka (2005). Effective Borel Measurability and Reducibility of Functions. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 51 (1):19-44.
    The investigation of computational properties of discontinuous functions is an important concern in computable analysis. One method to deal with this subject is to consider effective variants of Borel measurable functions. We introduce such a notion of Borel computability for single-valued as well as for multi-valued functions by a direct effectivization of the classical definition. On Baire space the finite levels of the resulting hierarchy of functions can be characterized using a notion of reducibility for functions and corresponding complete (...)
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  39.  63
    Margaret Monahan Hogan (2013). Elective Abortion: Archetype of Contemporary Culture. Christian Bioethics 19 (2):185-197.
    Next SectionIn just forty years, the United States has witnessed the transition in the understanding of the practice of elective abortion from that of a heinous act to that of the most common surgical procedure performed on young women. That transition was facilitated first by a set of ideas which became practices which became habitual and determinative of character and, when taken together, contributed to a tectonic shift in culture. The ideas are to be found in a set of (...)
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  40.  23
    Carlos Cabral-Cardoso (2004). Ethical Misconduct in the Business School: A Case of Plagiarism That Turned Bitter. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 49 (1):75-89.
    As a result of the public demand for higher ethical standards, business schools are increasingly taking ethical matters seriously. But their effort has concentrated on teaching business ethics and on students' ethical behavior. Business faculty, in contrast, has attracted much less attention. This paper explores the context and the implications of an alleged case of plagiarism in a master's dissertation submitted to a university lacking both an ethical code of conduct and a formalized procedure to deal with academic misconduct. (...)
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  41.  34
    Geoffrey Hinton (2014). Where Do Features Come From? Cognitive Science 38 (6):1078-1101.
    It is possible to learn multiple layers of non-linear features by backpropagating error derivatives through a feedforward neural network. This is a very effective learning procedure when there is a huge amount of labeled training data, but for many learning tasks very few labeled examples are available. In an effort to overcome the need for labeled data, several different generative models were developed that learned interesting features by modeling the higher order statistical structure of a set of input (...)
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  42.  88
    J. Harris (2005). It's Not NICE to Discriminate. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):373-375.
    NICE must not say people are not worth treatingThe National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence has proposed that drugs for the treatment of dementia be banned to National Health Service patients on the grounds that their cost is too high and “outside the range of cost effectiveness that might be considered appropriate for the NHS”i.1This is despite NICE’s admission that these drugs are effective in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and despite NICE having approved even more expensive treatments. (...)
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  43.  78
    Moti Mizrahi (2012). A Decision Procedure for Evaluating Natural Language Arguments. APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy 12 (1):11-12.
    In this paper, I present a decision procedure for evaluating arguments expressed in natural language. I think that other instructors of informal logic and critical thinking might find this decision procedure to be a useful addition to their teaching resources.
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  44.  92
    Nick Zangwill (1992). Unkantian Notions of Disinterest. British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (2):149-152.
    Many recent aestheticians have criticized the notion of disinterest. The aestheticians in question take the notion to have a vaguely Kantian pedigree. And in attacking this notion, they think of themselves as attempting to remove a cornerstone of Kant’s aesthetics. This procedure is hardly likely to be effective if what they attack bears little resemblance to Kant’s original notion. In this brief note, I want to show how far these anti-Kantian aestheticians have missed their mark.
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  45. Michael Dummett (2005). The Justificationist's Response to a Realist. Mind 114 (455):671-688.
    Justificationism differs from realism about how linguistic meaning is given, and hence in its associated conception of truth, and in particular in rejecting bivalence. Empirical discourse differs from mathematical primarily in that an effective decision-procedure for an empirical statement may cease to be available at a later time. The contrast is not that empirical knowledge is derived from what is mind-dependent, namely perception, whereas mathematical knowledge is not so derived. Mathematical knowledge does not accrue simply because a proof (...)
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  46.  36
    Surendra Arjoon (2006). Striking a Balance Between Rules and Principles-Based Approaches for Effective Governance: A Risks-Based Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):53 - 82.
    Several recent studies and initiatives have emphasized the importance of a strong ethical organizational DNA (ODNA) to create and promote an effective corporate governance culture of trust, integrity and intellectual honesty. This paper highlights the drawbacks of an excessively heavy reliance on rules-based approaches that increase the cost of doing business, overshadow essential elements of good corporate governance, create a culture of dependency, and can result in legal absolutism. The paper makes the case that the way forward for (...) corporate governance is to strike an optimal balance between rules-based and principles-based approaches. The recent corporate scandals have demonstrated that the ethical ODNA is critical to the driving force and basis of legal and regulatory requirements. Effective governance means adhering to ethical principles, not merely complying with rules, and is a crucial guardian of a firm’s reputation and integrity. It is through an effective corporate governance program (that is, one that optimally captures and integrates the appropriate aspects of rules-based and principles-based approaches, and identifies and assesses the related risks) that an organization can reconfigure its ODNA for improved performance. Focusing on the ethical ODNA as the basis of new governance measures provides an opportunity to develop a competitive advantage as it represents a potential source of differentiation, strengthens the relationship with all stakeholders of the organization by building a culture of trust and integrity, and re-instills investor confidence. This paper employs dialectical reasoning that links the ODNA through principles-driven rules in developing a risks-based approach. A comparison from a risk assessment perspective between rules-based and principles-based approaches is presented. Although there have been few applications employing dialectical reasoning in business research, this methodology can be extremely useful in isolating ethical issues and integrating them into the business process. The risks-based approach captures the benefits of both rules-based and principles-based approaches, and incorporates trust-based principles such␣as solidarity, subsidiarity and covenantal relationships. (shrink)
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  47.  56
    Oron Shagrir (2002). Effective Computation by Humans and Machines. Minds and Machines 12 (2):221-240.
    There is an intensive discussion nowadays about the meaning of effective computability, with implications to the status and provability of the Church–Turing Thesis (CTT). I begin by reviewing what has become the dominant account of the way Turing and Church viewed, in 1936, effective computability. According to this account, to which I refer as the Gandy–Sieg account, Turing and Church aimed to characterize the functions that can be computed by a human computer. In addition, Turing provided a highly (...)
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  48.  7
    F. M. Hodges (2002). Prophylactic Interventions on Children: Balancing Human Rights with Public Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (1):10-16.
    Bioethics committees have issued guidelines that medical interventions should be permissible only in cases of clinically verifiable disease, deformity, or injury. Furthermore, once the existence of one or more of these requirements has been proven, the proposed therapeutic procedure must reasonably be expected to result in a net benefit to the patient. As an exception to this rule, some prophylactic interventions might be performed on individuals “in their best interests” or with the aim of averting an urgent and potentially (...)
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  49.  5
    Jonathan Stephenson (2016). Controlling Effective Packing Dimension of $Delta^{0}_{2}$ Degrees. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 57 (1):73-93.
    This paper presents a refinement of a result by Conidis, who proved that there is a real $X$ of effective packing dimension $0\lt \alpha\lt 1$ which cannot compute any real of effective packing dimension $1$. The original construction was carried out below $\emptyset''$, and this paper’s result is an improvement in the effectiveness of the argument, constructing such an $X$ by a limit-computable approximation to get $X\leq_{T}\emptyset'$.
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  50.  1
    Tyler J. Mulhearn, Logan M. Steele, Logan L. Watts, Kelsey E. Medeiros, Michael D. Mumford & Shane Connelly (forthcoming). Review of Instructional Approaches in Ethics Education. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics:1-30.
    Increased investment in ethics education has prompted a variety of instructional objectives and frameworks. Yet, no systematic procedure to classify these varying instructional approaches has been attempted. In the present study, a quantitative clustering procedure was conducted to derive a typology of instruction in ethics education. In total, 330 ethics training programs were included in the cluster analysis. The training programs were appraised with respect to four instructional categories including instructional content, processes, delivery methods, and activities. Eight instructional (...)
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