Search results for 'effectiveness of mathematics in natural science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Carlo Cellucci (2013). Philosophy of Mathematics: Making a Fresh Start. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (1):32-42.score: 399.0
    The paper distinguishes between two kinds of mathematics, natural mathematics which is a result of biological evolution and artificial mathematics which is a result of cultural evolution. On this basis, it outlines an approach to the philosophy of mathematics which involves a new treatment of the method of mathematics, the notion of demonstration, the questions of discovery and justification, the nature of mathematical objects, the character of mathematical definition, the role of intuition, the role (...)
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  2. László Tisza (forthcoming). The Reasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.score: 291.0
     
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  3. Eugene Wigner (1960). The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences. Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics 13:1-14.score: 276.0
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  4. David B. Malament (ed.) (2002). Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics. Open Court.score: 252.0
    In this book, 13 leading philosophers of science focus on the work of Professor Howard Stein, best known for his study of the intimate connection between ...
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  5. C. Smeenk (2005). David B. Malament, Editor, Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics, Open Court, Chicago and La Salle, IL (2002) ISBN 0-8126-9506-2 (Pp. 424 US $ 42.95, Hardcover). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 36 (1):194-199.score: 252.0
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  6. M. J. Nye, J. L. Richards, R. H. Stuewer & C. Smith (1995). The Invention of Physical Science. Intersections of Mathematics, Theology and Natural Philosophy Since the Seventeenth Century. Essays in Honor of Erwin N. Hiebert. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 52 (2):209-210.score: 240.0
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  7. Crosbie Smith (1995). The Invention Of Physical Science-Intersections Of Mathematics, Theology And Natural-Philosophy Since The 17th-Century-Essays In Honor Of Hiebert, Erwin, N.-Nye, MJ, Richards, JL, Stuewer, RH. Annals of Science 52 (2):209-211.score: 240.0
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  8. Michael Friedman (2012). Newton and Kant: Quantity of Matter in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):482-503.score: 226.0
    Immanuel Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (1786) provides metaphysical foundations for the application of mathematics to empirically given nature. The application that Kant primarily has in mind is that achieved in Isaac Newton's Principia (1687). Thus, Kant's first chapter, the Phoronomy, concerns the mathematization of speed or velocity, and his fourth chapter, the Phenomenology, concerns the empirical application of the Newtonian notions of true or absolute space, time, and motion. This paper concentrates on Kant's second and (...)
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  9. A. P. (1998). The Scope of Hermeneutics in Natural Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (2):273-298.score: 226.0
    Hermeneutics, or interpretation, is concerned with the generation, transmission, and acceptance of meaning within the lifeworld, and was the original method of the human sciences stemming, from F. Schleiermacher and W. Dilthey. The `hermeneutic philosophy' refers mostly to Heidegger. This paper addresses natural science from the perspective of Heidegger's analysis of meaning and interpretation. Its purpose is to incorporate into the philosophy of science those aspects of historicality, culture, and tradition that are absent from the traditional analysis (...)
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  10. Alberto Artosi (2010). Please Don't Use Science or Mathematics in Arguing for Human Rights or Natural Law. Ratio Juris 23 (3):311-332.score: 222.0
    In the vast literature on human rights and natural law one finds arguments that draw on science or mathematics to support claims to universality and objectivity. Here are two such arguments: 1) Human rights are as universal (i.e., valid independently of their specific historical and cultural Western origin) as the laws and theories of science; and 2) principles of natural law have the same objective (metahistorical) validity as mathematical principles. In what follows I will examine (...)
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  11. Stuart Shanker (ed.) (1996). Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Routledge.score: 220.0
    Volume 9 of the Routledge History of Philosophy surveys ten key topics in the Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Each article is written by one of the world's leading experts in that field. The papers provide a comprehensive introduction to the subject in question, and are written in a way that is accessible to philosophy undergraduates and to those outside of philosophy who are interested in these subjects. Each chapter contains an extensive bibliography (...)
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  12. Christopher Pincock (2011). On Batterman's 'On the Explanatory Role of Mathematics in Empirical Science'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):211 - 217.score: 211.5
    This discussion note of (Batterman [2010]) clarifies the modest aims of my 'mapping account' of applications of mathematics in science. Once these aims are clarified it becomes clear that Batterman's 'completely new approach' (Batterman [2010], p. 24) is not needed to make sense of his cases of idealized mathematical explanations. Instead, a positive proposal for the explanatory power of such cases can be reconciled with the mapping account.
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  13. Jennifer McRobert, Concept Construction in Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science.score: 211.0
    Kant's reasoning in his special metaphysics of nature is often opaque, and the character of his a priori foundation for Newtonian science is the subject of some controversy. Recent literature on the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science has fallen well short of consensus on the aims and reasoning in the work. Various of the doctrines and even the character of the reasoning in the Metaphysical Foundations have been taken to present insuperable obstacles to accepting Kant's claim to (...)
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  14. Mark Colyvan, The Undeniable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Special Sciences.score: 210.3
    In many of the special sciences, mathematical models are used to provide information about specified target systems. For instance, population models are used in ecology to make predictions about the abundance of real populations of particular organisms. The status of mathematical models, though, is unclear and their use is hotly contested by some practitioners. A common objection levelled against the use of these models is that they ignore all the known, causally-relevant details of the often complex target systems. Indeed, the (...)
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  15. Hans Morten Haugen (2013). Human Rights in Natural Science and Technology Professions' Codes of Ethics? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 32 (1-2):49-76.score: 206.5
    No global professional codes for the natural science and technology professions exist. In light of how the application of new technology can affect individuals and communities, this discrepancy warrants greater scrutiny. This article analyzes the most relevant processes and seeks to explain why these processes have not resulted in global codes. Moreover, based on a human rights approach, the article gives recommendations on the future process and content of codes for science and technology professions. The relevance of (...)
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  16. Aspasia S. Moue, Kyriakos A. Masavetas & Haido Karayianni (2006). Tracing the Development of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Natural Sciences. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (1):61 - 75.score: 205.3
    An overview is provided of how the concept of the thought experiment has developed and changed for the natural sciences in the course of the 20th century. First, we discuss the existing definitions of the term 'thought experiment' and the origin of the thought experimentation method, identifying it in Greek Presocratics epoch. Second, only in the end of the 19th century showed up the first systematic enquiry on thought experiments by Ernst Mach's work. After the Mach's work, a negative (...)
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  17. John P. Burgess (1992). How Foundational Work in Mathematics Can Be Relevant to Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:433 - 441.score: 205.0
    Foundational work in mathematics by some of the other participants in the symposium helps towards answering the question whether a heterodox mathematics could in principle be used as successfully as is orthodox mathematics in scientific applications. This question is turn, it will be argued, is relevant to the question how far current science is the way it is because the world is the way it is, and how far because we are the way we are, which (...)
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  18. Arkady Plotnitsky (2011). On the Reasonable and Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Classical and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (3):466-491.score: 204.5
    The point of departure for this article is Werner Heisenberg’s remark, made in 1929: “It is not surprising that our language [or conceptuality] should be incapable of describing processes occurring within atoms, for … it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consist only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. … Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory [quantum mechanics]—which seems (...)
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  19. Heinrich Rickert (1986). The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science: A Logical Introduction to the Historical Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 204.0
    Heinrich Rickert (1863-1936) was One of the leading neo-Kantian philosophers in Germany and a crucial figure in the discussions of the foundations of the social sciences in the first quarter of the twentieth century. His views were extremely influential, most significantly on Max Weber. The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science is Rickert's most important work, and it is here translated into English for the first time. It presents his systematic theory of knowledge and philosophy of (...), and deals particularly with historical knowledge and the problem of demarcating the natural from the human sciences. The theory Rickert develops is carefully argued and of great intrinsic interest. It departs from both positivism and neo-Hegelian idealism and is worked out by contrast to the views of others, particularly Dilthey and the early phenomenologists. (shrink)
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  20. Richard Yeo (2006). William Whewell, Natural Theology and the Philosophy of Science in Mid Nineteenth Century Britain. Annals of Science 36 (5):493-516.score: 204.0
    (1979). William Whewell, natural theology and the philosophy of science in mid nineteenth century Britain. Annals of Science: Vol. 36, No. 5, pp. 493-516.
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  21. Ian Hacking (1983). Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 202.0
    This is a lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism. It has two parts. 'Representing' deals with the different philosophical accounts of scientific objectivity and the reality of scientific entities. The views of Kuhn, Feyerabend, Lakatos, Putnam, van Fraassen, and others, are all considered. 'Intervening' presents the first sustained treatment of experimental science for many years and uses it to give a new direction to debates (...)
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  22. Robert Batterman (2010). On the Explanatory Role of Mathematics in Empirical Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):1-25.score: 197.5
    This paper examines contemporary attempts to explicate the explanatory role of mathematics in the physical sciences. Most such approaches involve developing so-called mapping accounts of the relationships between the physical world and mathematical structures. The paper argues that the use of idealizations in physical theorizing poses serious difficulties for such mapping accounts. A new approach to the applicability of mathematics is proposed.
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  23. Kenneth R. Westphal (1995). Does Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science Fill a Gap in the Critique of Pure Reason? Synthese 103 (1):43 - 86.score: 196.0
    In 1792 and 1798 Kant noticed two basic problems with hisMetaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (MAdN) which opened a crucial gap in the Critical system as a whole. Why is theMAdN so important? I show that the Analogies of Experience form an integrated proof of transeunt causality. This is central to Kant's answer to Hume. This proof requires explicating the empirical concept of matter as the moveable in space, it requires the specifically metaphysical principle that every physical event (...)
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  24. Yvon Gauthier (1985). Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science Ian Hacking Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983. 287 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 24 (01):162-.score: 196.0
    This is a lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism. It has two parts. 'Representing' deals with the different philosophical accounts of scientific objectivity and the reality of scientific entities. The views of Kuhn, Feyerabend, Lakatos, Putnam, van Fraassen, and others, are all considered. 'Intervening' presents the first sustained treatment of experimental science for many years and uses it to give a new direction to debates (...)
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  25. Jack Zupco (1997). What is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297-334.score: 196.0
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody''s characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms of (...)
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  26. Jack Zupko (1997). What Is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297 - 334.score: 196.0
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody's characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms (...)
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  27. Neal C. Gillespie (1990). The Interface of Natural Theology and Science in the Ethology of W. H. Thorpe. Journal of the History of Biology 23 (1):1 - 38.score: 196.0
    It should be clear by now the extent to which many features of Thorpe's interpretation of animal behavior and of the animal mind rested, at bottom, not simply on conventional scientific proofs but on interpretive inferences, which in turn rested on a willingress to make extensions of human experience to animals. This, in turn, rested on his view of evolution and his view of reality. And these were governed by his natural theology, which was the fundamental stratum of his (...)
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  28. Dirk Schlimm, Axiomatics and Progress in the Light of 20th Century Philosophy of Science and Mathematics.score: 193.0
    This paper is a contribution to the question of how aspects of science have been perceived through history. In particular, I will discuss how the contribution of axiomatics to the development of science and mathematics was viewed in 20th century philosophy of science and philosophy of mathematics. It will turn out that in connection with scientific methodology, in particular regarding its use in the context of discovery, axiomatics has received only very little attention. This is (...)
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  29. S. G. Shanker (ed.) (2003). Routledge History of Philosophy Volume Ix: Philosophy of the English-Speaking World in the Twentieth Century 1: Science, Logic and Mathematics. Routledge.score: 193.0
    Volume 9 of the Routledge History of Philosophy surveys ten key topics in the philosophy of science, logic and mathematics in the twentieth century. Each of the essays is written by one of the world's leading experts in that field. Among the topics covered are the philosophy of logic, of mathematics and of Gottlob Frege; Ludwig Wittgenstein's Tractatus ; a survey of logical positivism; the philosophy of physics and of science; probability theory, cybernetics and an essay (...)
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  30. Penelope A. Rush (2013). Book Reviews: Richard L. Epstein, “Reasoning in Science and Mathematics: Essays on Logic as The Art of Reasoning Well”. Logic and Logical Philosophy 22 (3):365-371.score: 192.0
    Richard L. Epstein, Reasoning in Science and Mathematics: Essayson Logic as The Art of Reasoning Well, Advanced Reasoning Forum,2011, 134 pp., ISBN-13: 978-0983452126, ISBN-10: 0983452121.
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  31. Juha Saatsi (2011). The Enhanced Indispensability Argument: Representational Versus Explanatory Role of Mathematics in Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):143-154.score: 188.5
    The Enhanced Indispensability Argument (Baker [ 2009 ]) exemplifies the new wave of the indispensability argument for mathematical Platonism. The new wave capitalizes on mathematics' role in scientific explanations. I will criticize some analyses of mathematics' explanatory function. In turn, I will emphasize the representational role of mathematics, and argue that the debate would significantly benefit from acknowledging this alternative viewpoint to mathematics' contribution to scientific explanations and knowledge.
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  32. Mark Steiner (1989). The Application of Mathematics to Natural Science. Journal of Philosophy 86 (9):449-480.score: 188.2
    The first part of the essay describes how mathematics, in particular mathematical concepts, are applicable to nature. mathematical constructs have turned out to correspond to physical reality. this correlation between the world and mathematical concepts, it is argued, is a true phenomenon. the second part of this essay argues that the applicability of mathematics to nature is mysterious, in that not only is there no known explanation for the correlation between mathematics and physical reality, but there is (...)
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  33. William L. Ascher (2004). Scientific Information and Uncertainty: Challenges for the Use of Science in Policymaking. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (3):437-455.score: 187.0
    Science can reinforce the healthy aspects of the politics of the policy process, to identify and further the public interest by discrediting policy options serving only special interests and helping to select among “science-confident” and “hedging” options. To do so, scientists must learn how to manage and communicate the degree of uncertainty in scientific understanding and prediction, lest uncertainty be manipulated to discredit science or to justify inaction. For natural resource and environmental policy, the institutional interests (...)
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  34. R. Harré (1963). The Concept and Role of the Model in Mathematics and Natural and Social Sciences. History of Science 2:172.score: 186.0
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  35. Miren Boehm (2013). Hume's Foundational Project in the Treatise. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (1).score: 185.3
    In the Introduction to the Treatise Hume very enthusiastically announces his project to provide a secure and solid foundation for the sciences by grounding them on his science of man. And Hume indicates in the Abstract that he carries out this project in the Treatise. But most interpreters do not believe that Hume's project comes to fruition. In this paper, I offer a general reading of what I call Hume's ‘foundational project’ in the Treatise, but I focus especially on (...)
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  36. Nicholas Maxwell (2002). The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (2):381-408.score: 184.0
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the direction (...)
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  37. Douglas S. Robertson (2003). Phase Change: The Computer Revolution in Science and Mathematics. Oxford University Press.score: 184.0
    Robertson's earlier work, The New Renaissance projected the likely future impact of computers in changing our culture. Phase Change builds on and deepens his assessment of the role of the computer as a tool driving profound change by examining the role of computers in changing the face of the sciences and mathematics. He shows that paradigm shifts in understanding in science have generally been triggered by the availability of new tools, allowing the investigator a new way of seeing (...)
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  38. Kenneth W. Kemp (1998). The Virtue of Faith in Theology, Natural Science, and Philosophy. Faith and Philosophy 15 (4):462-477.score: 181.3
    In this paper, I attempt to develop the account of intellectual virtues offered by Aristotle and St. Thomas in a way which recognizes faith as a good intellectual habit. I go on to argue that, as a practical matter, this virtue is needed not only in theology, where it provides the basis of further intellectual work, but also in the natural sciences, where it is required given the complexity of the subject matter and the cooperative nature of the enterprise.
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  39. Roland Omnès (2011). Wigner's “Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics”, Revisited. Foundations of Physics 41 (11):1729-1739.score: 180.7
    A famous essay by Wigner is reexamined in view of more recent developments around its topic, together with some remarks on the metaphysical character of its main question about mathematics and natural sciences.
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  40. Joshua Barlaz (1955). Review: D. Shulz, Mathematics, its Nature and Methods; D. Shoulz, The New Mathematics; D. Schultz, Ways of Thinking in Natural Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (3):288-288.score: 179.0
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  41. I. A. Akchurin, M. F. Vedenov & Iu V. Sachkov (1966). Methodological Problems of Mathematical Modeling in Natural Science. Russian Studies in Philosophy 5 (2):23-34.score: 178.5
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  42. Patrick A. Heelan (1998). The Scope of Hermeneutics in Natural Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (2):273-298.score: 177.0
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  43. A. E. Black & E. L. Deci (2000). The Effects of Student Self-Regulation and Instructor Autonomy Support on Learning in a College-Level Natural Science Course: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective. Science Education 84 (6):740-756.score: 177.0
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  44. R. D. P. (1962). The Concept and the Role of the Model in Mathematics and Natural and Social Sciences. Review of Metaphysics 15 (4):682-682.score: 177.0
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  45. A. Charles Catania (2000). Metaphors, Models, and Mathematics in the Science of Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):94-95.score: 176.5
    Metaphors and models involve correspondences between events in separate domains. They differ in the form and precision of how the correspondences are expressed. Examples include correspondences between phylogenic and ontogenic selection, and wave and particle metaphors of the mathematics of quantum physics. An implication is that the target article's metaphors of resistance to change may have heuristic advantages over those of momentum.
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  46. Mark Wilson (2000). The Unreasonable Uncooperativeness of Mathematics in The Natural Sciences. The Monist 83 (2):296-314.score: 175.5
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  47. Thomas A. C. Reydon (2006). Generalizations and Kinds in Natural Science: The Case of Species. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 37 (2):230-255.score: 175.5
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  48. Penelope Rush (2013). The Applicability of Mathematics in Science: Indispensability and Ontology. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (2):219-222.score: 175.5
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  49. José Ferreirós (2009). C.K. Raju. Cultural Foundations of Mathematics: The Nature of Mathematical Proof and the Transmission of the Calculus From India to Europe in the 16th C. Ce. History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 17 (3):nkn028.score: 174.5
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  50. Hermann Weyl (1949). Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. Princeton University Press.score: 174.0
    This is a book that no one but Weyl could have written--and, indeed, no one has written anything quite like it since.
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