Search results for 'effectiveness of mathematics in natural science' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. László Tisza (forthcoming). The Reasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.score: 1746.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Eugene Wigner (1960). The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences. Communications in Pure and Applied Mathematics 13:1-14.score: 1494.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David B. Malament (ed.) (2002). Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics. Open Court.score: 1260.0
    In this book, 13 leading philosophers of science focus on the work of Professor Howard Stein, best known for his study of the intimate connection between ...
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. C. Smeenk (2005). David B. Malament, Editor, Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics, Open Court, Chicago and La Salle, IL (2002) ISBN 0-8126-9506-2 (Pp. 424 US $ 42.95, Hardcover). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 36 (1):194-199.score: 1260.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. M. J. Nye, J. L. Richards, R. H. Stuewer & C. Smith (1995). The Invention of Physical Science. Intersections of Mathematics, Theology and Natural Philosophy Since the Seventeenth Century. Essays in Honor of Erwin N. Hiebert. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 52 (2):209-210.score: 1200.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Crosbie Smith (1995). The Invention Of Physical Science-Intersections Of Mathematics, Theology And Natural-Philosophy Since The 17th-Century-Essays In Honor Of Hiebert, Erwin, N.-Nye, MJ, Richards, JL, Stuewer, RH. Annals of Science 52 (2):209-211.score: 1200.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Michael Friedman (2012). Newton and Kant: Quantity of Matter in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):482-503.score: 1130.0
    Immanuel Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (1786) provides metaphysical foundations for the application of mathematics to empirically given nature. The application that Kant primarily has in mind is that achieved in Isaac Newton's Principia (1687). Thus, Kant's first chapter, the Phoronomy, concerns the mathematization of speed or velocity, and his fourth chapter, the Phenomenology, concerns the empirical application of the Newtonian notions of true or absolute space, time, and motion. This paper concentrates on Kant's second and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Alberto Artosi (2010). Please Don't Use Science or Mathematics in Arguing for Human Rights or Natural Law. Ratio Juris 23 (3):311-332.score: 1110.0
    In the vast literature on human rights and natural law one finds arguments that draw on science or mathematics to support claims to universality and objectivity. Here are two such arguments: 1) Human rights are as universal (i.e., valid independently of their specific historical and cultural Western origin) as the laws and theories of science; and 2) principles of natural law have the same objective (metahistorical) validity as mathematical principles. In what follows I will examine (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Mark Colyvan, The Undeniable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Special Sciences.score: 1046.0
    In many of the special sciences, mathematical models are used to provide information about specified target systems. For instance, population models are used in ecology to make predictions about the abundance of real populations of particular organisms. The status of mathematical models, though, is unclear and their use is hotly contested by some practitioners. A common objection levelled against the use of these models is that they ignore all the known, causally-relevant details of the often complex target systems. Indeed, the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Roland Omnès (2011). Wigner's “Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics”, Revisited. Foundations of Physics 41 (11):1729-1739.score: 976.3
    A famous essay by Wigner is reexamined in view of more recent developments around its topic, together with some remarks on the metaphysical character of its main question about mathematics and natural sciences.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Athanassios Tzouvaras (2006). How Effective Indeed is Present-Day Mathematics? Logic and Logical Philosophy 15 (2):131-153.score: 968.0
    We argue that E. Wigner’s well-known claim that mathematics is unreasonably effective in physics (and not in the natural sciences in general, as the title of his article suggests) is only one side of the hill. The other side is the surprising insufficiency of present-day mathematics to capture the uniformities that arise in science outside physics. We describe roughly what the situation is in the areas of (a) everyday reasoning, (b) theory of meaning and (c) vagueness. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Mark Steiner (1989). The Application of Mathematics to Natural Science. Journal of Philosophy 86 (9):449-480.score: 940.8
    The first part of the essay describes how mathematics, in particular mathematical concepts, are applicable to nature. mathematical constructs have turned out to correspond to physical reality. this correlation between the world and mathematical concepts, it is argued, is a true phenomenon. the second part of this essay argues that the applicability of mathematics to nature is mysterious, in that not only is there no known explanation for the correlation between mathematics and physical reality, but there is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. R. Harré (1963). The Concept and Role of the Model in Mathematics and Natural and Social Sciences. History of Science 2:172.score: 930.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Miren Boehm (2013). Hume's Foundational Project in the Treatise. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2).score: 926.7
    In the Introduction to the Treatise Hume very enthusiastically announces his project to provide a secure and solid foundation for the sciences by grounding them on his science of man. And Hume indicates in the Abstract that he carries out this project in the Treatise. But most interpreters do not believe that Hume's project comes to fruition. In this paper, I offer a general reading of what I call Hume's ‘foundational project’ in the Treatise, but I focus especially on (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Jennifer McRobert, Concept Construction in Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science.score: 920.3
    Kant's reasoning in his special metaphysics of nature is often opaque, and the character of his a priori foundation for Newtonian science is the subject of some controversy. Recent literature on the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science has fallen well short of consensus on the aims and reasoning in the work. Various of the doctrines and even the character of the reasoning in the Metaphysical Foundations have been taken to present insuperable obstacles to accepting Kant's claim to (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. A. P. (1998). The Scope of Hermeneutics in Natural Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 29 (2):273-298.score: 904.0
    Hermeneutics, or interpretation, is concerned with the generation, transmission, and acceptance of meaning within the lifeworld, and was the original method of the human sciences stemming, from F. Schleiermacher and W. Dilthey. The `hermeneutic philosophy' refers mostly to Heidegger. This paper addresses natural science from the perspective of Heidegger's analysis of meaning and interpretation. Its purpose is to incorporate into the philosophy of science those aspects of historicality, culture, and tradition that are absent from the traditional analysis (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Hans Morten Haugen (2013). Human Rights in Natural Science and Technology Professions' Codes of Ethics? Business and Professional Ethics Journal 32 (1-2):49-76.score: 900.8
    No global professional codes for the natural science and technology professions exist. In light of how the application of new technology can affect individuals and communities, this discrepancy warrants greater scrutiny. This article analyzes the most relevant processes and seeks to explain why these processes have not resulted in global codes. Moreover, based on a human rights approach, the article gives recommendations on the future process and content of codes for science and technology professions. The relevance of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Stuart Shanker (ed.) (1996). Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Routledge.score: 880.0
    Volume 9 of the Routledge History of Philosophy surveys ten key topics in the Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Each article is written by one of the world's leading experts in that field. The papers provide a comprehensive introduction to the subject in question, and are written in a way that is accessible to philosophy undergraduates and to those outside of philosophy who are interested in these subjects. Each chapter contains an extensive bibliography (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ae Miller & Mg Miller (1994). Central Themes of Kant's Philosophy of Science: Metaphysics and Mathematics as the a Priori Basis for Natural Science. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 159:10-16.score: 870.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Karl Menger (1954). On Variables in Mathematics and in Natural Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 5 (18):134-142.score: 862.5
    Attempting to answer the question "what is a variable?," menger discusses the following topics: (1) numerical variables and variables in the sense of the logicians, (2) variable quantities, (3) scientific variable quantities, (4) functions, And (5) variable quantities and functions in pure and applied analysis. (staff).
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Maarten Van Dyck & Albrecht Heeffer (2014). Script and Symbolic Writing in Mathematics and Natural Philosophy. Foundations of Science 19 (1):1-10.score: 860.0
    We introduce the question whether there are specific kinds of writing modalities and practices that facilitated the development of modern science and mathematics. We point out the importance and uniqueness of symbolic writing, which allowed early modern thinkers to formulate a new kind of questions about mathematical structure, rather than to merely exploit this structure for solving particular problems. In a very similar vein, the novel focus on abstract structural relations allowed for creative conceptual extensions in natural (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Christopher Pincock (2011). On Batterman's 'On the Explanatory Role of Mathematics in Empirical Science'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):211 - 217.score: 846.0
    This discussion note of (Batterman [2010]) clarifies the modest aims of my 'mapping account' of applications of mathematics in science. Once these aims are clarified it becomes clear that Batterman's 'completely new approach' (Batterman [2010], p. 24) is not needed to make sense of his cases of idealized mathematical explanations. Instead, a positive proposal for the explanatory power of such cases can be reconciled with the mapping account.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Alexander Paseau (2008). Naturalism in the Philosophy of Mathematics. In Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 845.0
    Contemporary philosophy’s three main naturalisms are methodological, ontological and epistemological. Methodological naturalism states that the only authoritative standards are those of science. Ontological and epistemological naturalism respectively state that all entities and all valid methods of inquiry are in some sense natural. In philosophy of mathematics of the past few decades methodological naturalism has received the lion’s share of the attention, so we concentrate on this. Ontological and epistemological naturalism in the philosophy of mathematics are discussed (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Carlos Montemayor & Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (forthcoming). Review of Space, Time, and Number in the Brain. [REVIEW] Mathematical Intelligencer.score: 822.0
    Albert Einstein once made the following remark about “the world of our sense experiences”: “the fact that it is comprehensible is a miracle.” (1936, p. 351) A few decades later, another physicist, Eugene Wigner, wondered about the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences, concluding his classic article thus: “the miracle of the appropriateness of the language of mathematics for the formulation of the laws of physics is a wonderful gift which we neither understand nor (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Aspasia S. Moue, Kyriakos A. Masavetas & Haido Karayianni (2006). Tracing the Development of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Natural Sciences. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (1):61 - 75.score: 821.3
    An overview is provided of how the concept of the thought experiment has developed and changed for the natural sciences in the course of the 20th century. First, we discuss the existing definitions of the term 'thought experiment' and the origin of the thought experimentation method, identifying it in Greek Presocratics epoch. Second, only in the end of the 19th century showed up the first systematic enquiry on thought experiments by Ernst Mach's work. After the Mach's work, a negative (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. John P. Burgess (1992). How Foundational Work in Mathematics Can Be Relevant to Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:433 - 441.score: 820.0
    Foundational work in mathematics by some of the other participants in the symposium helps towards answering the question whether a heterodox mathematics could in principle be used as successfully as is orthodox mathematics in scientific applications. This question is turn, it will be argued, is relevant to the question how far current science is the way it is because the world is the way it is, and how far because we are the way we are, which (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Arkady Plotnitsky (2011). On the Reasonable and Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in Classical and Quantum Physics. Foundations of Physics 41 (3):466-491.score: 818.0
    The point of departure for this article is Werner Heisenberg’s remark, made in 1929: “It is not surprising that our language [or conceptuality] should be incapable of describing processes occurring within atoms, for … it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consist only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. … Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme—the quantum theory [quantum mechanics]—which seems (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Heinrich Rickert (1986). The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science: A Logical Introduction to the Historical Sciences. Cambridge University Press.score: 816.0
    Heinrich Rickert (1863-1936) was One of the leading neo-Kantian philosophers in Germany and a crucial figure in the discussions of the foundations of the social sciences in the first quarter of the twentieth century. His views were extremely influential, most significantly on Max Weber. The Limits of Concept Formation in Natural Science is Rickert's most important work, and it is here translated into English for the first time. It presents his systematic theory of knowledge and philosophy of (...), and deals particularly with historical knowledge and the problem of demarcating the natural from the human sciences. The theory Rickert develops is carefully argued and of great intrinsic interest. It departs from both positivism and neo-Hegelian idealism and is worked out by contrast to the views of others, particularly Dilthey and the early phenomenologists. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Richard Yeo (2006). William Whewell, Natural Theology and the Philosophy of Science in Mid Nineteenth Century Britain. Annals of Science 36 (5):493-516.score: 816.0
    (1979). William Whewell, natural theology and the philosophy of science in mid nineteenth century Britain. Annals of Science: Vol. 36, No. 5, pp. 493-516.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Steven French (2000). The Reasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics: Partial Structures and the Application of Group Theory to Physics. Synthese 125 (1-2):103 - 120.score: 812.5
    Wigner famously referred to the `unreasonable effectiveness' of mathematics in its application to science. Using Wigner's own application of group theory to nuclear physics, I hope to indicate that this effectiveness can be seen to be not so unreasonable if attention is paid to the various idealising moves undertaken. The overall framework for analysing this relationship between mathematics and physics is that of da Costa's partial structures programme.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stojan Obradović & Slobodan Ninković (2009). The Heuristic Function of Mathematics in Physics and Astronomy. Foundations of Science 14 (4):351-360.score: 810.0
    This paper considers the role of mathematics in the process of acquiring new knowledge in physics and astronomy. The defining of the notions of continuum and discreteness in mathematics and the natural sciences is examined. The basic forms of representing the heuristic function of mathematics at theoretical and empirical levels of knowledge are studied: deducing consequences from the axiomatic system of theory, the method of generating mathematical hypotheses, “pure” proofs for the existence of objects and processes, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ian Hacking (1983). Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science. Cambridge University Press.score: 808.0
    This is a lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism. It has two parts. 'Representing' deals with the different philosophical accounts of scientific objectivity and the reality of scientific entities. The views of Kuhn, Feyerabend, Lakatos, Putnam, van Fraassen, and others, are all considered. 'Intervening' presents the first sustained treatment of experimental science for many years and uses it to give a new direction to debates (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. S. Rebsdorf & H. Kragh (2002). Edward Arthur Milne-the Relations of Mathematics to Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (1):51-64.score: 800.0
    This is a transcript of Milne's manuscript notes for a talk which he gave to fellow members of the Cambridge University Natural Science Club in his rooms at Trinity College, Cambridge, on February 6, 1922. The notes are deposited in the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford, Special Collections and Western Manuscripts. The background and essential points of Milne's talk are analysed in the article preceding this one. As far as is known, the text has not hitherto been published. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Eric Schliesser, Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being.score: 799.2
    This chapter argues that the standard conception of Spinoza as a fellow-travelling mechanical philosopher and proto-scientific naturalist is misleading. It argues, first, that Spinoza’s account of the proper method for the study of nature presented in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) points away from the one commonly associated with the mechanical philosophy. Moreover, throughout his works Spinoza’s views on the very possibility of knowledge of nature are decidedly sceptical (as specified below). Third, in the seventeenth-century debates over proper methods in the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. John Cornwell (ed.) (2004). Explanations: Styles of Explanation in Science. Oxford University Press.score: 796.7
    Our lives, states of health, relationships, behavior, experiences of the natural world, and the technologies that shape our contemporary existence are subject to a superfluity of competing, multi-faceted and sometimes incompatible explanations. Widespread confusion about the nature of "explanation" and its scope and limits pervades popular exposition of the natural sciences, popular history and philosophy of science. This fascinating book explores the way explanations work, why they vary between disciplines, periods, and cultures, and whether they have any (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Joshua Barlaz (1955). Review: D. Shulz, Mathematics, its Nature and Methods; D. Shoulz, The New Mathematics; D. Schultz, Ways of Thinking in Natural Sciences. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 20 (3):288-288.score: 794.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. I. A. Akchurin, M. F. Vedenov & Iu V. Sachkov (1966). Methodological Problems of Mathematical Modeling in Natural Science. Russian Studies in Philosophy 5 (2):23-34.score: 791.5
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Robert Batterman (2010). On the Explanatory Role of Mathematics in Empirical Science. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (1):1-25.score: 790.0
    This paper examines contemporary attempts to explicate the explanatory role of mathematics in the physical sciences. Most such approaches involve developing so-called mapping accounts of the relationships between the physical world and mathematical structures. The paper argues that the use of idealizations in physical theorizing poses serious difficulties for such mapping accounts. A new approach to the applicability of mathematics is proposed.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Dale Jacquette (2006). Applied Mathematics in the Sciences. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):237-267.score: 788.3
    A complete philosophy of mathematics must address Paul Benacerraf’s dilemma. The requirements of a general semantics for the truth of mathematical theorems that coheres also with the meaning and truth conditions for non-mathematical sentences, according to Benacerraf, should ideally be coupled with an adequate epistemology for the discovery of mathematical knowledge. Standard approaches to the philosophy of mathematics are criticized against their own merits and against the background of Benacerraf’s dilemma, particularly with respect to the problem of understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. A. Malet (2001). The Power of Images: Mathematics and Metaphysics in Hobbes's Optics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (2):303-333.score: 787.5
    This paper deals with Hobbes's theory of optical images, developed in his optical magnum opus, 'A Minute or First Draught of the Optiques' (1646), and published in abridged version in De homine (1658). The paper suggests that Hobbes's theory of vision and images serves him to ground his philosophy of man on his philosophy of body. Furthermore, since this part of Hobbes's work on optics is the most thoroughly geometrical, it reveals a good deal about the role of mathematics (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Mario Livio (2009). Is God a Mathematician? Simon & Schuster.score: 786.0
    Nobel Laureate Eugene Wigner once wondered about "the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics" in the formulation of the laws of nature. Is God a Mathematician? investigates why mathematics is as powerful as it is. From ancient times to the present, scientists and philosophers have marveled at how such a seemingly abstract discipline could so perfectly explain the natural world. More than that -- mathematics has often made predictions, for example, about subatomic particles or cosmic phenomena that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Lisa Downing (2005). Berkeley's Natural Philosophy and Philosophy of Science. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. 230--265.score: 785.0
    Although George Berkeley himself made no major scientific discoveries, nor formulated any novel theories, he was nonetheless actively concerned with the rapidly evolving science of the early eighteenth century. Berkeley's works display his keen interest in natural philosophy and mathematics from his earliest writings (Arithmetica, 1707) to his latest (Siris, 1744). Moreover, much of his philosophy is fundamentally shaped by his engagement with the science of his time. In Berkeley's best-known philosophical works, the Principles and Dialogues, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. R. D. P. (1962). The Concept and the Role of the Model in Mathematics and Natural and Social Sciences. Review of Metaphysics 15 (4):682-682.score: 785.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. A. E. Black & E. L. Deci (2000). The Effects of Student Self-Regulation and Instructor Autonomy Support on Learning in a College-Level Natural Science Course: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective. Science Education 84 (6):740-756.score: 785.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Kenneth R. Westphal (1995). Does Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science Fill a Gap in the Critique of Pure Reason? Synthese 103 (1):43 - 86.score: 784.0
    In 1792 and 1798 Kant noticed two basic problems with hisMetaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (MAdN) which opened a crucial gap in the Critical system as a whole. Why is theMAdN so important? I show that the Analogies of Experience form an integrated proof of transeunt causality. This is central to Kant's answer to Hume. This proof requires explicating the empirical concept of matter as the moveable in space, it requires the specifically metaphysical principle that every physical event (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Yvon Gauthier (1985). Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science Ian Hacking Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983. 287 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 24 (01):162-.score: 784.0
    This is a lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism. It has two parts. 'Representing' deals with the different philosophical accounts of scientific objectivity and the reality of scientific entities. The views of Kuhn, Feyerabend, Lakatos, Putnam, van Fraassen, and others, are all considered. 'Intervening' presents the first sustained treatment of experimental science for many years and uses it to give a new direction to debates (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jack Zupco (1997). What is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297-334.score: 784.0
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody''s characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jack Zupko (1997). What Is the Science of the Soul? A Case Study in the Evolution of Late Medieval Natural Philosophy. Synthese 110 (2):297 - 334.score: 784.0
    This paper aims at a partial rehabilitation of E. A. Moody's characterization of the 14th century as an age of rising empiricism, specifically by contrasting the conception of the natural science of psychology found in the writings of a prominent 13th-century philosopher (Thomas Aquinas) with those of two 14th-century philosophers (John Buridan and Nicole Oresme). What emerges is that if the meaning of empiricism can be disengaged from modern and contemporary paradigms, and understood more broadly in terms (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Neal C. Gillespie (1990). The Interface of Natural Theology and Science in the Ethology of W. H. Thorpe. Journal of the History of Biology 23 (1):1 - 38.score: 784.0
    It should be clear by now the extent to which many features of Thorpe's interpretation of animal behavior and of the animal mind rested, at bottom, not simply on conventional scientific proofs but on interpretive inferences, which in turn rested on a willingress to make extensions of human experience to animals. This, in turn, rested on his view of evolution and his view of reality. And these were governed by his natural theology, which was the fundamental stratum of his (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Mark Wilson (2000). The Unreasonable Uncooperativeness of Mathematics in The Natural Sciences. The Monist 83 (2):296-314.score: 778.5
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000