Search results for 'emotional expression' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Trip Glazer (forthcoming). Looking Angry and Sounding Sad: The Perceptual Analysis of Emotional Expression. Synthese:1-25.
    According to the Perceptual Analysis of Emotional Expression, behaviors express emotions by making them perceptually manifest. A smile is an expression of joy because an observer who sees a smile can see joy. A pout is an expression of grief because an observer who sees a pout can see grief. And a growl is an expression of anger because an observer who hears a growl can hear anger. The idea is not simply that expressions can (...)
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  2.  6
    A. P. Bayliss, A. Frischen, M. J. Fenske & S. P. Tipper (2007). Affective Evaluations of Objects Are Influenced by Observed Gaze Direction and Emotional Expression. Cognition 104 (3):644-653.
    Gaze direction signals another person’s focus of interest. Facial expressions convey information about their mental state. Appropriate responses to these signals should reflect their combined influence, yet current evidence suggests that gaze-cueing effects for objects near an observed face are not modulated by its emotional expression. Here, we extend the investigation of perceived gaze direction and emotional expression by considering their combined influence on affective judgments. While traditional response-time measures revealed equal gaze-cueing effects for happy and (...)
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  3.  2
    Norman P. Li & Daniel Balliet (2009). Emotional Expression of Capacity and Trustworthiness in Humor and in Social Dilemmas. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):396-397.
    Humor and social dilemmas are two disparate areas that have been linked to emotions. However, they tend to have been studied apart from considerations of emotion and emotional expression. We provide an overview of how such areas might be illuminated by Vigil's socio-relational framework, and how capacity and trustworthiness are communicated in humor and social dilemmas.
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  4. Constantine Cavarnos & American Society of Psychopathology of Expression (2001). Plutarch's Advice on Keeping Well a Lecture Delivered at the International Congress of Psychopathology of Expression and Art Therapy Which Met in September 2000 at Mclean Hospital in Belmont, Massachusetts, Together with an Anthology of Relevant Texts From Plutarch's Works. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  5.  1
    Klaus R. Scherer, Lucy Schaufer, Bruno Taddia & Christoph Prégardien (2013). The Singer's Paradox: On Authenticity in Emotional Expression on The. In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. OUP Oxford
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  6.  16
    C. Landis (1924). Studies of Emotional Reactions. I. 'A Preliminary Study of Facial Expression.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 7 (5):325.
  7.  39
    David J. Elliott (2005). Musical Understanding, Musical Works, and Emotional Expression: Implications for Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (1):93–103.
    What do musicians, critics, and listeners mean when they use emotion‐words to describe a piece of instrumental music? How can ‘pure’ musical sounds ‘express’ emotions such as joyfulness, sadness, anguish, optimism, and anger? Sounds are not living organisms; sounds cannot feel emotions. Yet many people around the world believe they hear emotions in sounds and/or feel the emotions expressed by musical patterns. Is there a reasonable explanation for this dilemma? These issues gain additional importance when we ask them in the (...)
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  8.  29
    Sue Campbell (1994). Being Dismissed: The Politics of Emotional Expression. Hypatia 9 (3):46 - 65.
    My intent is to bring a key group of critical terms associated with the emotions-bitterness, sentimentality, and emotionality-to greater feminist attention. These terms are used to characterize emoters on the basis of how we express ourselves, and they characterize us in ways that we need no longer be taken seriously. I analyze the ways in which these terms of emotional dismissal can be put to powerful political use.
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  9.  13
    Ann T. Phillips, Henry M. Wellman & Elizabeth S. Spelke (2002). Infants' Ability to Connect Gaze and Emotional Expression to Intentional Action. Cognition 85 (1):53-78.
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  10.  13
    Paula M. Niedenthal, Markus Brauer, Jamin B. Halberstadt & Åse H. Innes-Ker (2001). When Did Her Smile Drop? Facial Mimicry and the Influences of Emotional State on the Detection of Change in Emotional Expression. Cognition and Emotion 15 (6):853-864.
  11.  4
    Jessika Golle, Fred W. Mast & Janek S. Lobmaier (2014). Something to Smile About: The Interrelationship Between Attractiveness and Emotional Expression. Cognition and Emotion 28 (2):298-310.
  12. Robbie M. Cooper, Jayne E. Bailey, Alison Diaper, Rachel Stirland, Lynne E. Renton, Christopher P. Benton, Ian S. Penton-Voak, David J. Nutt & Marcus R. Munafò (2011). Effects of 7.5% CO2 Inhalation on Allocation of Spatial Attention to Facial Cues of Emotional Expression. Cognition and Emotion 25 (4):626-638.
  13.  3
    Anna Wierzbicka (1998). Russian Emotional Expression. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 26 (4):456-483.
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  14.  4
    Viorica Barbu-Iuraşcu (2008). Emotional Expression and Complexity in Music. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 7.
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  15.  4
    Kathleen C. Burns & Stacy L. Friedman (2012). The Benefits of Emotional Expression for Math Performance. Cognition and Emotion 26 (2):245-251.
  16.  8
    A. H. Pierce (1906). Emotional Expression and the Doctrine of Mutations. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (21):573-575.
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  17.  1
    Fabrice Clément, Stéphane Bernard, Didier Grandjean & David Sander (2013). Emotional Expression and Vocabulary Learning in Adults and Children. Cognition and Emotion 27 (3):539-548.
  18.  1
    Klaus R. Scherer, W. J. Perrig & A. Grob (2000). Emotional Expression: A Royal Road for the Study of Behavior Control1. In Walter J. Perrig & Alexander Grob (eds.), Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer. Erlbaum 227--244.
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  19. A. K. Anderson (2009). Emotional Expression. In David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences. Oxford University Press 165--167.
     
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  20. J. M. Baldwin (1895). The Origin of Emotional Expression. Philosophical Review 4:208.
     
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  21. J. D. Eastwood, D. Smilek & P. M. Merikle (2000). Attentional Guidance Based on a Preattentive Analysis of Emotional Expression. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S53 - S53.
     
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  22. Edwin N. Gorsuch (1991). Emotional Expression in a Manuscript of Bede’s Historia Ecclesiastica: British Library Cotton Tiberius A XIV. Semiotica 83 (3-4):227-250.
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  23. Scherer, K. R. & Bänziger, & T. (2010). On the Use of Actor Portrayals in Research on Emotional Expression. In Klaus R. Scherer, Tanja Bänziger & Etienne Roesch (eds.), A Blueprint for Affective Computing: A Sourcebook and Manual. OUP Oxford
     
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  24. Anna Wierzbicka (1998). Russian Emotional Expression. Ethos 26 (4):456-483.
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  25.  1
    Graham Murdock (1971). Differential Reactions to the Regulation of Emotional and Physical Expression Among Third‐Year Pupils in Secondary Schools. Journal of Moral Education 1 (1):53-60.
    (1971). Differential reactions to the regulation of emotional and physical expression among third‐year pupils in secondary schools. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 53-60.
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  26.  28
    Isidora Stojanovic (2012). Emotional Disagreement: The Role of Semantic Content in the Expression of, and Disagreement Over, Emotional Values. Dialogue 51 (1):99-117.
    ABSTRACT: When we describe an event as sad or happy, we attribute to it a certain emotional value. Attributions of emotional value depend essentially on an agent ; and yet, people readily disagree over such values. My aim in this paper is to explain what happens in the case of, and, more generally, to provide some insight into the semantics of value-attributions.
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  27.  14
    Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.) (2013). The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. OUP Oxford.
    How can an abstract sequence of sounds so intensely express emotional states? In the past ten years, research into the topic of music and emotion has flourished. This book explores the relationship between music and emotion, bringing together contributions from psychologists, neuroscientists, musicologists, musicians, and philosophers .
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  28. Daniel D. Hutto (2006). Unprincipled Engagement: Emotional Experience, Expression and Response. In Richard Menary (ed.), Radical Enactivism: Intentionality, Phenomenology and Narrative: Focus on the Philosophy of Daniel D. Hutto.
  29. Michela Balconi & Claudio Lucchiari (2007). Consciousness and Emotional Facial Expression Recognition: Subliminal/Supraliminal Stimulation Effect on N200 and P300 ERPs. [REVIEW] Journal of Psychophysiology 21 (2):100-108.
  30. Krzysztof Guczalski (2012). Henryk Elzenberg as a Forerunner of Anglo-American Concepts of Expression; Emotional Colouring as an Aesthetic Phenomenon. Estetika:191-231.
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  31. Vladimir J. Konečni (2015). Cochrane, Tom, Bernardino Fantini, and Klaus R. Scherer, Eds. The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. Oxford University Press, 2013, X + 381 Pp., 22 B&W Illustrations, $99.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (2):214-218.
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  32.  65
    Jonathan Cole (2009). Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome. People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed after spinal cord injury struggle (...)
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  33.  3
    J. G. Lynn (1940). An Apparatus and Method for Stimulating, Recording and Measuring Facial Expression. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (1):81.
  34. Edoardo Zamuner (2011). A Theory of Affect Perception. Mind and Language 26 (4):436-451.
    What do we see when we look at someone's expression of fear? I argue that one of the things that we see is fear itself. I support this view by developing a theory of affect perception. The theory involves two claims. One is that expressions are patterns of facial changes that carry information about affects. The other is that the visual system extracts and processes such information. In particular, I argue that the visual system functions to detect the affects (...)
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  35.  50
    Machiel Keestra (2014). Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science. In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. Nai010 Publishers 81-92.
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  36.  4
    Angeliki Kerasidou & Ruth Horn (2016). Making Space for Empathy: Supporting Doctors in the Emotional Labour of Clinical Care. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundThe academic and medical literature highlights the positive effects of empathy for patient care. Yet, very little attention has been given to the impact of the requirement for empathy on the physicians themselves and on their emotional wellbeing.DiscussionThe medical profession requires doctors to be both clinically competent and empathetic towards the patients. In practice, accommodating both requirements can be difficult for physicians. The image of the technically skilful, rational, and emotionally detached doctor dominates the profession, and inhibits physicians (...)
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  37.  47
    Thomas C. Dalton (2000). The Developmental Roots of Consciousness and Emotional Experience. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):55-89.
    Charles Darwin is generally credited with having formulated the first systematic attempt to explain the evolutionary origins and function of the expression of emotions in animals and humans. His ingenious theory, however, was burdened with popular misconceptions about human phylogenetic heritage and bore the philosophical and theoretical deficiencies of the brain science of his era that his successors strove to overcome. In their attempts to rectify Darwin?s errors, William James, James Mark Baldwin and John Dewey each made important (...)
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  38.  24
    Christy Mag Uidhir (2012). Getting Emotional Over Contours: Response to Seeley. Essays in Philosophy 13 (2):518-521.
    Bill Seeley suggests that what follows from research into crossmodal perception for expression and emotion in the arts is that there is an emotional contour (i.e., a contour constitutive of the content of an emotion and potentially realizable across a range of media). As a response of sorts, I speculate as to what this might hold for philosophical and empirical enquiry into expression and emotion across the arts as well as into the nature of the emotions themselves.
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  39.  9
    Linda A. Camras & Jennifer M. Shutter (2010). Emotional Facial Expressions in Infancy. Emotion Review 2 (2):120-129.
    In this article, we review empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expression and emotion during infancy. We focus on differential emotions theory’s view of this relationship because of its theoretical and methodological prominence. We conclude that current evidence fails to support its proposal regarding a set of pre-specified facial expressions that invariably reflect a corresponding set of discrete emotions in infants. Instead, the relationship between facial expression and emotion appears to (...)
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  40.  6
    Robert P. Abelson & Vello Sermat (1962). Multidimensional Scaling of Facial Expressions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (6):546.
  41.  10
    Lisa Kretz (2014). Emotional Responsibility and Teaching Ethics: Student Empowerment. Ethics and Education 9 (3):340-355.
    ‘This class is so [insert expletive] depressing.’ I overheard a student communicating this to a friend upon exiting one of my ethics courses and I wondered how my classes could generate a sense of empowerment rather than depression, a sense of hope rather than despair. Drawing from David Hume's and Martin Hoffman's work on the psychology of empathy and sympathy, I contend that dominant Western philosophical pedagogy is inadequate for facilitating morally empowered students. Moreover, I stipulate that an adequate analysis (...)
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  42.  9
    Silvia Rigato & Teresa Farroni (2013). The Role of Gaze in the Processing of Emotional Facial Expressions. Emotion Review 5 (1):36-40.
    Gaze plays a fundamental role in the processing of facial expressions from birth. Gaze direction is a crucial part of the social signal encoded in and decoded from faces. The ability to discriminate gaze direction, already evident early in life, is essential for the development of more complex socially relevant tasks, such as joint and shared attention. At the same time, facial expressions play a fundamental role in the encoding of gaze direction and, when combined, (...) and gaze communicate behavioural motivation to approach or avoid. However, the investigation of how gaze direction and emotional expression interact during the processing of a face has been relatively neglected, and is the key question of this review. (shrink)
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  43.  12
    Robert R. Provine (2008). Notation and Expression of Emotion in Operatic Laughter. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):591-592.
    The emotional expression of laughter in opera scores and performance was evaluated by converting notation to temporal data and contrasting it with the conversational laughter it emulates. The potency of scored and sung laughter was assayed by its ability to trigger contagion in audiences.
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  44.  12
    Edmund Keogh & Anita Holdcroft (2002). Sex Differences in Pain: Evolutionary Links to Facial Pain Expression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (4):465-465.
    Women typically report more pain than men, as well as exhibit specific sex differences in the perception and emotional expression of pain. We present evidence that sex is a significant variable in the evolution of facial expression of pain.
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  45.  1
    James E. Swain (2009). Brain-Based Sex Differences in Parenting Propagate Emotion Expression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):401-402.
    Parent-infant emotional expressions vary according to parent and infant gender. Such parent-infant interactions critically affect infant development. Neuroimaging research is exploring emotion-related brain function that varies according to gender, and regulates parenting thoughts and behaviors in the early postpartum. Through specific brain functions, parenting serves to program the infant brain for the next generation of sex-specific emotional expression.
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  46.  2
    Lital Ruderman & Dominique Lamy (2012). Emotional Context Influences Access of Visual Stimuli to Anxious Individuals' Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):900-914.
    Anxiety has been associated with enhanced unconscious processing of threat and attentional biases towards threat. Here, we focused on the phenomenology of perception in anxiety and examined whether threat-related material more readily enters anxious than non-anxious individuals’ awareness. In six experiments, we compared the stimulus exposures required for each anxiety group to become objectively or subjectively aware of masked facial stimuli varying in emotional expression. Crucially, target emotion was task irrelevant. We found that high trait-anxiety individuals required less (...)
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  47.  2
    Michael Lewis (2011). Inside and Outside: The Relation Between Emotional States and Expressions. Emotion Review 3 (2):189-196.
    The association between emotional expression and physiological emotional states is at best, modest. Using data from the autonomic nervous system (ANS), central nervous system (CNS), and hormonal systems there appears to be an association which accounts for approximately 10—20% of the variance between them. Excluding measurement error, it is proposed that the need for action and regulation accounts for the low levels of synchrony. Understanding system responses allows for the study of individual differences as a way of (...)
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  48. Stephen Davies (2006). Artistic Expression and the Hard Case of Pure Music. In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary debates in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. Blackwell Publishing
    In its narrative, dramatic, and representational genres, art regularly depicts contexts for human emotions and their expressions. It is not surprising, then, that these artforms are often about emotional experiences and displays, and that they are also concerned with the expression of emotion. What is more interesting is that abstract art genres may also include examples that are highly expressive of human emotion. Pure music – that is, stand-alone music played on musical instruments excluding the human voice, and (...)
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  49.  13
    Debi Roberson, Ljubica Damjanovic & Mariko Kikutani (2010). Show and Tell: The Role of Language in Categorizing Facial Expression of Emotion. Emotion Review 2 (3):255-260.
    We review evidence that language is involved in the establishment and maintenance of adult categories of facial expressions of emotion. We argue that individual and group differences in facial expression interpretation are too great for a fully specified system of categories to be universal and hardwired. Variations in expression categorization, across individuals and groups, favor a model in which an initial “core” system recognizes only the grouping of positive versus negative emotional expressions. The subsequent development of a (...)
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  50.  60
    Christian von Scheve (2012). The Social Calibration of Emotion Expression: An Affective Basic of Micro-Social Order. Sociological Theory 30 (1):1 - 14.
    This article analyzes the role of emotions in social interaction and their effects on social structuration and the emergence of micro-social order. It argues that facial expressions of emotion are key in generating robust patterns of social interaction. First, the article shows that actors' encoding of facial expressions combines hardwired physiological principles on the one hand and socially learned aspects on the other hand, leading to fine-grained and socially differentiated dialects of expression. Second, it is argued that decoding facial (...)
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