Search results for 'emotional expression' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Norman P. Li & Daniel Balliet (2009). Emotional Expression of Capacity and Trustworthiness in Humor and in Social Dilemmas. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):396-397.score: 180.0
    Humor and social dilemmas are two disparate areas that have been linked to emotions. However, they tend to have been studied apart from considerations of emotion and emotional expression. We provide an overview of how such areas might be illuminated by Vigil's socio-relational framework, and how capacity and trustworthiness are communicated in humor and social dilemmas.
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  2. A. P. Bayliss, A. Frischen, M. J. Fenske & S. P. Tipper (2007). Affective Evaluations of Objects Are Influenced by Observed Gaze Direction and Emotional Expression. Cognition 104 (3):644-653.score: 180.0
    Gaze direction signals another person’s focus of interest. Facial expressions convey information about their mental state. Appropriate responses to these signals should reflect their combined influence, yet current evidence suggests that gaze-cueing effects for objects near an observed face are not modulated by its emotional expression. Here, we extend the investigation of perceived gaze direction and emotional expression by considering their combined influence on affective judgments. While traditional response-time measures revealed equal gaze-cueing effects for happy and (...)
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  3. David J. Elliott (2005). Musical Understanding, Musical Works, and Emotional Expression: Implications for Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (1):93–103.score: 174.0
  4. Klaus R. Scherer, Lucy Schaufer, Bruno Taddia & Christoph Prégardien (2013). The Singer's Paradox: On Authenticity in Emotional Expression on The. In Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. Oup Oxford.score: 174.0
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  5. C. Landis (1924). Studies of Emotional Reactions. I. 'A Preliminary Study of Facial Expression.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 7 (5):325.score: 168.0
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  6. Sue Campbell (1994). Being Dismissed: The Politics of Emotional Expression. Hypatia 9 (3):46 - 65.score: 162.0
    My intent is to bring a key group of critical terms associated with the emotions-bitterness, sentimentality, and emotionality-to greater feminist attention. These terms are used to characterize emoters on the basis of how we express ourselves, and they characterize us in ways that we need no longer be taken seriously. I analyze the ways in which these terms of emotional dismissal can be put to powerful political use.
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  7. [deleted]Tuomas Eerola, Anders Friberg & Roberto Bresin (2013). Emotional Expression in Music: Contribution, Linearity, and Additivity of Primary Musical Cues. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 154.0
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  8. Jessika Golle, Fred W. Mast & Janek S. Lobmaier (2014). Something to Smile About: The Interrelationship Between Attractiveness and Emotional Expression. Cognition and Emotion 28 (2):298-310.score: 152.0
  9. Kathleen C. Burns & Stacy L. Friedman (2012). The Benefits of Emotional Expression for Math Performance. Cognition and Emotion 26 (2):245-251.score: 152.0
  10. A. K. Anderson (2009). Emotional Expression. In David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.), The Oxford Companion to Emotion and the Affective Sciences. Oxford University Press. 165--167.score: 152.0
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  11. Fabrice Clément, Stéphane Bernard, Didier Grandjean & David Sander (2013). Emotional Expression and Vocabulary Learning in Adults and Children. Cognition and Emotion 27 (3):539-548.score: 152.0
  12. Robbie M. Cooper, Jayne E. Bailey, Alison Diaper, Rachel Stirland, Lynne E. Renton, Christopher P. Benton, Ian S. Penton-Voak, David J. Nutt & Marcus R. Munafò (2011). Effects of 7.5% CO2 Inhalation on Allocation of Spatial Attention to Facial Cues of Emotional Expression. Cognition and Emotion 25 (4):626-638.score: 152.0
  13. Paula M. Niedenthal, Markus Brauer, Jamin B. Halberstadt & Åse H. Innes-Ker (2001). When Did Her Smile Drop? Facial Mimicry and the Influences of Emotional State on the Detection of Change in Emotional Expression. Cognition and Emotion 15 (6):853-864.score: 152.0
  14. A. H. Pierce (1906). Emotional Expression and the Doctrine of Mutations. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (21):573-575.score: 150.0
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  15. Anna Wierzbicka (1998). Russian Emotional Expression. Ethos 26 (4):456-483.score: 150.0
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  16. [deleted]Kairi Kreegipuu, Nele Kuldkepp, Oliver Sibolt, Mai Toom, Jüri Allik & Risto Näätänen (2013). vMMN for Schematic Faces: Automatic Detection of Change in Emotional Expression. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 150.0
  17. [deleted]Vuilleumier Patrik (2011). Modulation of Face Processing by Emotional Expression During Intracranial Recordings in Right Fusiform Cortex and Amygdala. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
  18. Klaus R. Scherer, W. J. Perrig & A. Grob (2000). Emotional Expression: A Royal Road for the Study of Behavior Control1. In Walter J. Perrig & Alexander Grob (eds.), Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer. Erlbaum. 227--244.score: 150.0
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  19. Viorica Barbu-Iuraşcu (2008). Emotional Expression and Complexity in Music. Linguistic and Philosophical Investigations 7.score: 150.0
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  20. J. D. Eastwood, D. Smilek & P. M. Merikle (2000). Attentional Guidance Based on a Preattentive Analysis of Emotional Expression. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S53 - S53.score: 150.0
     
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  21. Edwin N. Gorsuch (1991). Emotional Expression in a Manuscript of Bede's Historia Ecclesiastica: British Library Cotton Tiberius A XIV. Semiotica 83 (3-4):227-250.score: 150.0
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  22. [deleted]Recio Guillermo (2008). Effect of Face Motion on Emotional Expression Recognition: An ERP Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 150.0
  23. [deleted]Fabiani Marco (2009). Enabling Emotional Expression and Interaction with New Expressive Interfaces. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 150.0
  24. Ann T. Phillips, Henry M. Wellman & Elizabeth S. Spelke (2002). Infants' Ability to Connect Gaze and Emotional Expression to Intentional Action. Cognition 85 (1):53-78.score: 150.0
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  25. Scherer, K. R. & Bänziger, & T. (2010). On the Use of Actor Portrayals in Research on Emotional Expression. In Klaus R. Scherer, Tanja Bänziger & Etienne Roesch (eds.), A Blueprint for Affective Computing: A Sourcebook and Manual. Oup Oxford.score: 150.0
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  26. [deleted]Walentowska W. (2008). Attention and Early Stages of Emotional Expression Processing: Study with ERP and LORETA. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 150.0
  27. Graham Murdock (1971). Differential Reactions to the Regulation of Emotional and Physical Expression Among Third‐Year Pupils in Secondary Schools. Journal of Moral Education 1 (1):53-60.score: 144.0
    (1971). Differential reactions to the regulation of emotional and physical expression among third‐year pupils in secondary schools. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 53-60.
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  28. Michela Balconi & Claudio Lucchiari (2007). Consciousness and Emotional Facial Expression Recognition: Subliminal/Supraliminal Stimulation Effect on N200 and P300 ERPs. [REVIEW] Journal of Psychophysiology 21 (2):100-108.score: 136.0
  29. Tom Cochrane, Bernardino Fantini & Klaus R. Scherer (eds.) (2013). The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control. OUP Oxford.score: 132.0
    How can an abstract sequence of sounds so intensely express emotional states? In the past ten years, research into the topic of music and emotion has flourished. This book explores the relationship between music and emotion, bringing together contributions from psychologists, neuroscientists, musicologists, musicians, and philosophers .
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  30. Geoff Hammond Michelle Marneweck, Andrea Loftus (2013). Psychophysical Measures of Sensitivity to Facial Expression of Emotion. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 132.0
    We report the development of two simple, objective, psychophysical measures of the ability to discriminate facial expressions of emotion that vary in intensity from a neutral facial expression and to discriminate between varying intensities of emotional facial expression. The stimuli were created by morphing photographs of models expressing four basic emotions, anger, disgust, happiness and sadness with neutral expressions. Psychometric functions were obtained for 15 healthy young adults using the Method of Constant Stimuli with a two-interval forced-choice (...)
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  31. Isidora Stojanovic (2012). Emotional Disagreement: The Role of Semantic Content in the Expression of, and Disagreement Over, Emotional Values. Dialogue 51 (1):99-117.score: 126.0
    ABSTRACT: When we describe an event as sad or happy, we attribute to it a certain emotional value. Attributions of emotional value depend essentially on an agent ; and yet, people readily disagree over such values. My aim in this paper is to explain what happens in the case of , and, more generally, to provide some insight into the semantics of value-attributions.
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  32. Daniel D. Hutto (2006). Unprincipled Engagement: Emotional Experience, Expression and Response. In Richard Menary (ed.), Radical Enactivism: Intentionality, Phenomenology and Narrative: Focus on the Philosophy of Daniel D. Hutto.score: 124.0
  33. Krzysztof Guczalski (2012). Henryk Elzenberg as a Forerunner of Anglo-American Concepts of Expression; Emotional Colouring as an Aesthetic Phenomenon. Estetika:191-231.score: 120.0
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  34. [deleted]Astikainen Piia (2011). Face-Sensitive N170 Responses Are Modulated by the Emotional Congruency Between Facial Expression and Preceding Affective Picture. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
  35. Machiel Keestra (2014). Mirrors of the Soul and Mirrors of the Brain? The Expression of Emotions as the Subject of Art and Science. In Gary Schwartz (ed.), Emotions. Pain and pleasure in Dutch painting of the Golden Age. nai010 publishers. 81-92.score: 110.0
    Is it not surprising that we look with so much pleasure and emotion at works of art that were made thousands of years ago? Works depicting people we do not know, people whose backgrounds are usually a mystery to us, who lived in a very different society and time and who, moreover, have been ‘frozen’ by the artist in a very deliberate pose. It was the Classical Greek philosopher Aristotle who observed in his Poetics that people could apparently be moved (...)
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  36. [deleted]Jeesun Kim Bronson Harry, Mark A. Williams, Chris Davis (2013). Emotional Expressions Evoke a Differential Response in the Fusiform Face Area. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 100.0
    It is widely assumed that the fusiform face area (FFA), a brain region specialised for face perception, is not involved in processing emotional expressions. This assumption is based on the proposition that the FFA is involved in face identification and only processes features that are invariant across changes due to head movements, speaking and expressing emotions. The present study tested this proposition by examining whether the response in the human FFA varies across emotional expressions with functional magnetic resonance (...)
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  37. James E. Swain (2009). Brain-Based Sex Differences in Parenting Propagate Emotion Expression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):401-402.score: 100.0
    Parent-infant emotional expressions vary according to parent and infant gender. Such parent-infant interactions critically affect infant development. Neuroimaging research is exploring emotion-related brain function that varies according to gender, and regulates parenting thoughts and behaviors in the early postpartum. Through specific brain functions, parenting serves to program the infant brain for the next generation of sex-specific emotional expression.
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  38. Christian von Scheve (2012). The Social Calibration of Emotion Expression: An Affective Basic of Micro-Social Order. Sociological Theory 30 (1):1 - 14.score: 94.0
    This article analyzes the role of emotions in social interaction and their effects on social structuration and the emergence of micro-social order. It argues that facial expressions of emotion are key in generating robust patterns of social interaction. First, the article shows that actors' encoding of facial expressions combines hardwired physiological principles on the one hand and socially learned aspects on the other hand, leading to fine-grained and socially differentiated dialects of expression. Second, it is argued that decoding facial (...)
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  39. Piotr Winkielman (2010). Embodied and Disembodied Processing of Emotional Expressions: Insights From Autism Spectrum Disorders. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):463 - 464.score: 94.0
    Processing of facial expressions goes beyond simple pattern recognition. To elucidate this problem, Niedenthal et al. offer a model that identifies multiple embodied and disembodied routes for expression processing, and spell out conditions triggering use of different routes. I elaborate on this model by discussing recent research on emotional recognition in individuals with autism, who can use multiple routes of emotion processing, and consequently can show atypical and typical patterns of embodied simulation and mimicry.
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  40. Patrik N. Juslin (2013). What Does Music Express? Basic Emotions and Beyond. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 92.0
    Numerous studies have investigated whether music can reliably convey emotions to listeners, and - if so - what musical parameters might carry this information. Far less attention has been devoted to the actual contents of the communicative process. The goal of this article is thus to consider what types of emotional content are possible to convey in music. I will argue that the content is mainly constrained by the type of coding involved, and that distinct types of content are (...)
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  41. Silvia Rigato & Teresa Farroni (2013). The Role of Gaze in the Processing of Emotional Facial Expressions. Emotion Review 5 (1):36-40.score: 92.0
    Gaze plays a fundamental role in the processing of facial expressions from birth. Gaze direction is a crucial part of the social signal encoded in and decoded from faces. The ability to discriminate gaze direction, already evident early in life, is essential for the development of more complex socially relevant tasks, such as joint and shared attention. At the same time, facial expressions play a fundamental role in the encoding of gaze direction and, when combined, expression and gaze communicate (...)
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  42. Linda A. Camras & Jennifer M. Shutter (2010). Emotional Facial Expressions in Infancy. Emotion Review 2 (2):120-129.score: 92.0
    In this article, we review empirical evidence regarding the relationship between facial expression and emotion during infancy. We focus on differential emotions theory’s view of this relationship because of its theoretical and methodological prominence. We conclude that current evidence fails to support its proposal regarding a set of pre-specified facial expressions that invariably reflect a corresponding set of discrete emotions in infants. Instead, the relationship between facial expression and emotion appears to be more complex. Some facial expressions may (...)
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  43. Rebecca Jürgens, Kurt Hammerschmidt & Julia Fischer (2011). Authentic and Play-Acted Vocal Emotion Expressions Reveal Acoustic Differences. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 92.0
    Play-acted emotional expressions are a frequent aspect in our life, ranging from deception to theatre, film and radio drama, to emotion research. To date, however, it remained unclear whether play-acted emotions correspond to spontaneous emotion expressions. To test whether acting influences the vocal expression of emotion, we compared radio sequences of naturally occurring emotions to actors’ portrayals. It was hypothesized that play-acted expressions were performed in a more stereotyped and aroused fashion. Our results demonstrate that speech segments extracted (...)
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  44. Michael Lewis (2011). Inside and Outside: The Relation Between Emotional States and Expressions. Emotion Review 3 (2):189-196.score: 92.0
    The association between emotional expression and physiological emotional states is at best, modest. Using data from the autonomic nervous system (ANS), central nervous system (CNS), and hormonal systems there appears to be an association which accounts for approximately 10—20% of the variance between them. Excluding measurement error, it is proposed that the need for action and regulation accounts for the low levels of synchrony. Understanding system responses allows for the study of individual differences as a way of (...)
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  45. Jonathan Cole (2009). Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.score: 90.0
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome (the congenital absence of facial expression). People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. (...)
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  46. Robert R. Provine (2008). Notation and Expression of Emotion in Operatic Laughter. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):591-592.score: 90.0
    The emotional expression of laughter in opera scores and performance was evaluated by converting notation to temporal data and contrasting it with the conversational laughter it emulates. The potency of scored and sung laughter was assayed by its ability to trigger contagion in audiences.
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  47. [deleted]Susan M. Letourneau & Teresa V. Mitchell (2013). Visual Field Bias in Hearing and Deaf Adults During Judgments of Facial Expression and Identity. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
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  48. [deleted]Isabelle Jalenques Martial Mermillod, Damien Devaux, Philippe Derost, Isabelle Rieu, Patrick Chambres, Catherine Auxiette, Guillaume Legrand, Fabienne Galland, Hélène Dalens, Louise Marie Coulangeon, Emmanuel Broussolle, Franck Durif (2013). Rapid Presentation of Emotional Expressions Reveals New Emotional Impairments in Tourette's Syndrome. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Objective: Based on a variety of empirical evidence obtained within the theoretical framework of embodiment theory, we considered it likely that motor disorders in Tourette’s syndrome (TS) would have emotional consequences for TS patients. However, previous research using emotional facial categorization tasks suggests that these consequences are limited to TS patients with obsessive-compulsive behaviors(OCB). Method: These studies used long stimulus presentations which allowed the participants to categorize the different emotional facial expressions (EFEs) on the basis of a (...)
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  49. Pascal Vrticka, Samanta Simioni, Eleonora Fornari, Myriam Schluep, Patrik Vuilleumier & David Sander (2013). Neural Substrates of Social Emotion Regulation: A fMRI Study on Imitation and Expressive Suppression to Dynamic Facial Signals. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    Emotion regulation is crucial for successfully engaging in social interactions. Yet, little is known about the neural mechanisms controlling behavioral responses to emotional expressions perceived in the face of other people, which constitute a key element of interpersonal communication. Here, we investigated brain systems involved in social emotion perception and regulation, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 20 healthy participants who saw dynamic facial expressions of either happiness or sadness, and were asked to either imitate the expression (...)
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  50. Ai Mizokawa (2013). Relationships Between Maternal Emotional Expressiveness and Children's Sensitivity to Teacher Criticism. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 88.0
    Caregivers’ emotional responses to children influence children’s social and emotional development. This study investigated the association between maternal emotional expressiveness in the context of mother–child interactions and young children’s sensitivity to teacher criticism. Sensitivity to teacher criticism was assessed among 53 Japanese preschoolers using hypothetical scenarios in which a puppet child representing the participant made a small error, and a puppet teacher pointed out the error. Self-report questionnaires were used to measure maternal expressiveness. The results demonstrated that (...)
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