Search results for 'emotional reaction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John B. Watson & Rosalie Rayner (1920). Conditioned Emotional Reactions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 3 (1):1.score: 51.0
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  2. Scott Ode, Michael D. Robinson & Devin M. Hanson (2011). Cognitive-Emotional Dysfunction Among Noisy Minds: Predictions From Individual Differences in Reaction Time Variability. Cognition and Emotion 25 (2):307-327.score: 37.0
  3. Rachel L. Bannerman, Maarten Milders & Arash Sahraie (2009). Processing Emotional Stimuli: Comparison of Saccadic and Manual Choice-Reaction Times. Cognition and Emotion 23 (5):930-954.score: 37.0
  4. C. Landis (1924). Studies of Emotional Reactions. I. 'A Preliminary Study of Facial Expression.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 7 (5):325.score: 35.0
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  5. Christine Clavien (2010). An Affective Approach to Moral Motivation. Journal of Cognitive Science 11 (2):129-160.score: 33.0
    Over the last few years, there has been a surge of work in a new field called “moral psychology”, which uses experimental methods to test the psychological processes underlying human moral activity. In this paper, I shall follow this line of approach with the aim of working out a model of how people form value judgements and how they are motivated to act morally. I call this model an “affective picture”: ‘picture’ because it remains strictly at the descriptive level and (...)
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  6. Kathie L. Pelletier & Michelle C. Bligh (2008). The Aftermath of Organizational Corruption: Employee Attributions and Emotional Reactions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):823 - 844.score: 30.0
    Employee attributions and emotional reactions to unethical behavior of top leaders in an organization recently involved in a highly publicized ethics scandal were examined. Participants (n = 76) from a large southern California government agency completed an ethical climate assessment. Secondary data analysis was performed on the written commentary to an open-ended question seeking employees' perceptions of the ethical climate. Employees attributed the organization's poor ethical leadership to a number of causes, including: lack of moral reasoning, breaches of trust, (...)
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  7. C. L. Hull & L. S. Lugoff (1921). Complex Signs in Diagnostic Free Association. Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (2):111.score: 24.0
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  8. Claudia Civai (2013). Rejecting Unfairness: Emotion-Driven Reaction or Cognitive Heuristic? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Rejecting unfairness: emotion-driven reaction or cognitive heuristic?
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  9. Graham Murdock (1971). Differential Reactions to the Regulation of Emotional and Physical Expression Among Third‐Year Pupils in Secondary Schools. Journal of Moral Education 1 (1):53-60.score: 24.0
    (1971). Differential reactions to the regulation of emotional and physical expression among third‐year pupils in secondary schools. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 53-60.
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  10. Jesse J. Prinz (2006). Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. OUP USA.score: 24.0
    Gut Reactions is an interdisciplinary defense of the claim that emotions are perceptions of changes in the body. This thesis, pioneered by William James and resuscitated by Antonio Damasio, has been widely criticized for failing to acknowledge that emotions are meaningful insofar as they represent concerns, not respiratory function and blood pressure. Fear represents danger, sadness represents loss. To explain this fact, many researchers conclude that emotions must involve judgments regarding one's relationship to the environment. Prinz offers a new unified (...)
     
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  11. Vittorio Gallese Mariateresa Sestito, Maria Alessandra Umiltà, Giancarlo De Paola, Renata Fortunati, Andrea Raballo, Emanuela Leuci, Simone Maffei, Matteo Tonna, Mario Amore, Carlo Maggini (2013). Facial Reactions in Response to Dynamic Emotional Stimuli in Different Modalities in Patients Suffering From Schizophrenia: A Behavioral and EMG Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 23.0
    Emotional facial expression is an important low-level mechanism contributing to the experience of empathy, thereby lying at the core of social interaction. Schizophrenia is associated with pervasive social cognitive impairments, including emotional processing of facial expressions. In this study we test a novel paradigm in order to investigate the evaluation of the emotional content of perceived emotions presented through dynamic expressive stimuli, facial mimicry evoked by the same stimuli, and their functional relation. Fifteen healthy controls and 15 (...)
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  12. Jana Holtmann, Maike C. Herbort, Torsten Wüstenberg, Joram Soch, Sylvia Richter, Henrik Walter, Stefan Roepke & Björn H. Schott (2013). Trait Anxiety Modulates Fronto-Limbic Processing of Emotional Interference in Borderline Personality Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 23.0
    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in (...)
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  13. Jayne Morriss, Alexander N. W. Taylor, Etienne B. Roesch & Carien M. van Reekum (2013). Still Feeling It: The Time Course of Emotional Recovery From an Attentional Perspective. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 23.0
    Emotional reactivity and the time taken to recover, particularly from negative, stressful, events, are inextricably linked, and both are crucial for maintaining well-being. It is unclear, however, to what extent emotional reactivity during stimulus onset predicts the time course of recovery after stimulus offset. To address this question, 25 participants viewed arousing (negative and positive) and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) followed by task-relevant face targets, which were to be gender categorised. Faces were presented (...)
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  14. Joseph F. X. DeSouza Shima Ovaysikia, Khalid A. Tahir, Jason L. Chan (2010). Word Wins Over Face: Emotional Stroop Effect Activates the Frontal Cortical Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 23.0
    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in higher order cognitive control of behaviour. Sometimes such control is executed through suppression of an unwanted response in order to avoid conflict. Conflict occurs when two simultaneously competing processes lead to different behavioral outcomes, as seen in tasks such as the anti-saccade, go/no-go and the Stroop task. We set out to examine whether different types of stimuli in a modified emotional Stroop task would cause similar interference effects as the original Stroop-colour/word, (...)
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  15. Thaddeus Metz (2009). Love and Emotional Reactions to Necessary Evils. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan. 28-44.score: 22.0
    This chapter supposes that certain bads are necessary for substantial goods, and poses the question of how one ought to react emotionally to such bads. In recent work, Robert Adams is naturally read as contending that one ought to exhibit positive emotions such as gladness towards certain ‘necessary evils’. A rationale he suggests for this view is that love for a person, which involves viewing the beloved as good, requires being glad about what is necessary for her to exist, even (...)
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  16. Ishtiyaque Haji (2003). The Emotional Depravity of Psychopaths and Culpability. Legal Theory 9 (1):63-82.score: 21.0
    In this paper, I restrict discussion to cases of psychopathy in which it is assumed that psychopaths who satisfy epistemic requirements of responsibility, including the requirement that one is culpable for an action only if one performs it in light of the belief that one is doing wrong, can and do perform actions they take to be immoral or illegal. I argue that in such cases, the well-documented emotional impairment of psychopaths fails to subvert moral culpability. In particular, it (...)
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  17. William M. Marston (1920). Reaction-Time Symptoms of Deception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 3 (1):72.score: 21.0
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  18. Holly Watkins (2013). Music Between Reaction and Response. Evental Aesthetics 2 (2):77-97.score: 21.0
    Two Greek myths attest to the power of music to blur distinctions between humans and nonhumans: Orpheus made music that inspired human-like attention in animals, trees, and stones, while the Sirens reduced passing sailors to the level of animals incapable of resisting their song. Recast in terms employed by Lacan, these myths portray music as calling forth a response in creatures thought merely able to react and, contrariwise, stripping away the capacity for response in humans, leaving nothing but reaction (...)
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  19. U. Dimberg, M. Thunberg & K. Elmehed (2000). Unconscious Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions. Psychological Science 11 (1):86-89.score: 20.0
  20. Hanno Sauer (2012). Psychopaths and Filthy Desks: Are Emotions Necessary and Sufficient for Moral Judgment? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):95-115.score: 20.0
    Philosophical and empirical moral psychologists claim that emotions are both necessary and sufficient for moral judgment. The aim of this paper is to assess the evidence in favor of both claims and to show how a moderate rationalist position about moral judgment can be defended nonetheless. The experimental evidence for both the necessity- and the sufficiency-thesis concerning the connection between emotional reactions and moral judgment is presented. I argue that a rationalist about moral judgment can be happy to accept (...)
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  21. Thomas C. Dalton (2000). The Developmental Roots of Consciousness and Emotional Experience. Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):55-89.score: 19.0
    Charles Darwin is generally credited with having formulated the first systematic attempt to explain the evolutionary origins and function of the expression of emotions in animals and humans. His ingenious theory, however, was burdened with popular misconceptions about human phylogenetic heritage and bore the philosophical and theoretical deficiencies of the brain science of his era that his successors strove to overcome. In their attempts to rectify Darwin?s errors, William James, James Mark Baldwin and John Dewey each made important contributions to (...)
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  22. Rainer Reisenzein (2009). Emotional Experience in the Computational Belief-Desire Theory of Emotion. Emotion Review 1 (3):214-222.score: 19.0
    Based on the belief that computational modeling (thinking in terms of representation and computations) can help to clarify controversial issues in emotion theory, this article examines emotional experience from the perspective of the Computational Belief–Desire Theory of Emotion (CBDTE), a computational explication of the belief–desire theory of emotion. It is argued that CBDTE provides plausible answers to central explanatory challenges posed by emotional experience, including: the phenomenal quality,intensity and object-directedness of emotional experience, the function of emotional (...)
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  23. Arvid Kappas (2011). Emotion and Regulation Are One! Emotion Review 3 (1):17-25.score: 19.0
    Emotions are foremost self-regulating processes that permit rapid responses and adaptations to situations of personal concern. They have biological bases and are shaped ontogenetically via learning and experience. Many situations and events of personal concern are social in nature. Thus, social exchanges play an important role in learning about rules and norms that shape regulation processes. I argue that (a) emotions often are actively auto-regulating—the behavior implied by the emotional reaction bias to the eliciting event or situation modifies (...)
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  24. Jesse J. Prinz (2004). Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of the Emotions. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Gut Reactions is an interdisciplinary defense of the claim that emotions are perceptions of changes in the body.
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  25. Satish P. Deshpande & Jacob Joseph (2009). Impact of Emotional Intelligence, Ethical Climate, and Behavior of Peers on Ethical Behavior of Nurses. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):403 - 410.score: 18.0
    This study examines factors impacting ethical behavior of 103 hospital nurses. The level of emotional intelligence and ethical behavior of peers had a significant impact on ethical behavior of nurses. Independence climate had a significant impact on ethical behavior of nurses. Other ethical climate types such as professional, caring, rules, instrumental, and efficiency did not impact ethical behavior of respondents. Implications of this study for researchers and practitioners are discussed.
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  26. Massimo Pigliucci, Carl Schlichting, Cynthia Jones & Kurt Schwenk (1996). Developmental Reaction Norms: The Interactions Among Allometry, Ontogeny and Plasticity. Plant Species Biology 11:69-85.score: 18.0
    The concept of Developmental Norm of Reaction is explored as a nexus between allometry, ontogeny, and phenotypic plasticity.
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  27. Jacob Joseph, Kevin Berry & Satish P. Deshpande (2009). Impact of Emotional Intelligence and Other Factors on Perception of Ethical Behavior of Peers. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):539 - 546.score: 18.0
    This study investigates factors impacting perceptions of ethical conduct of peers of 293 students in four US universities. Self-reported ethical behavior and recognition of emotions in others (a dimension of emotional intelligence) impacted perception of ethical behavior of peers. None of the other dimensions of emotional intelligence were significant. Age, Race, Sex, GPA, or type of major (business versus nonbusiness) did not impact perception of ethical behavior of peers. Implications of the results of the study for business schools (...)
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  28. David Carr (2002). Feelings in Moral Conflict and the Hazards of Emotional Intelligence. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):3-21.score: 18.0
    From some perspectives, it seems obvious that emotions and feelings must be both reasonable and morally significant: from others, it may seem as obvious that they cannot be. This paper seeks to advance discussion of ethical implications of the currently contested issue of the relationship of reason to feeling and emotion via reflection upon various examples of affectively charged moral dilemma. This discussion also proceeds by way of critical consideration of recent empirical enquiry into these issues in the literature of (...)
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  29. Claudia Welz (2010). Identity as Self-Transformation: Emotional Conflicts and Their Metamorphosis in Memory. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 43 (2):267-285.score: 18.0
    This paper develops the thesis that personal identity is neither to be taken in terms of an unchanging self-sufficient ‘substance’ nor in terms of selfhood ‘without substance,’ i.e. as fluctuating processes of pure relationality and subject-less activity. Instead, identity is taken as self-transformation that is bound to particular embodied individuals and surpasses them as individuated entities. The paper is structured in three parts. Part I describes the experiential givenness of conflicts that support our sense of self-transformation. While the first part (...)
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  30. Jennifer Greenwood (2011). Contingent Transcranialism and Deep Functional Cognitive Integration: The Case of Human Emotional Ontogenesis. Philosophical Psychology 26 (3):420-436.score: 18.0
    Contingent transcranialists claim that the physical mechanisms of mind are not exclusively intracranial and that genuine cognitive systems can extend into cognizers' physical and socio-cultural environments. They further claim that extended cognitive systems must include the deep functional integration of external environmental resources with internal neural resources. They have found it difficult, however, to explicate the precise nature of such deep functional integration and provide compelling examples of it. Contingent intracranialists deny that extracranial resources can be components of genuine extended (...)
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  31. J. L. Jiménez, J. A. E. Roa-Neri & P. Vargas (2007). A Mechanical Model for Analyzing the Runaway Solutions in the Radiation Reaction Problem. Foundations of Physics 37 (3):410-426.score: 18.0
    In order to understand the rise of runaway solutions in the radiation reaction problem a mechanical model is used. An alternative demonstration of Daboul’s theorem, through Hurwitz’s criterion, is given. The origin of runaway solutions in electrodynamics is discussed. They arise when the particle has a negative mechanical mass or when approximations are used in the equation of motion. In the 1-dimensional mechanical model an exact and linear equation of motion for the particle is obtained, the corresponding exact solution (...)
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  32. Matt J. Rossano (2011). Cognitive Control: Social Evolution and Emotional Regulation. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):238-241.score: 18.0
    This commentary argues that theories of cognitive control risk being incomplete unless they incorporate social/emotional factors. Social factors very likely played a critical role in the evolution of human cognitive control abilities, and emotional states are the primary regulatory mechanisms of cognitive control.
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  33. András Szigeti (2012). No Need to Get Emotional? Emotions and Heuristics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):845-862.score: 18.0
    Many believe that values are crucially dependent on emotions. This paper focuses on epistemic aspects of the putative link between emotions and value by asking two related questions. First, how exactly are emotions supposed to latch onto or track values? And second, how well suited are emotions to detecting or learning about values? To answer the first question, the paper develops the heuristics-model of emotions. This approach models emotions as sui generis heuristics of value. The empirical plausibility of the heuristics-model (...)
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  34. W. Scott Dunbar (2005). Emotional Engagement in Professional Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 11 (4):535-551.score: 18.0
    Recent results from two different studies show evidence of strong emotional engagement in moral dilemmas that require personal involvement or ethical problems that involve significant inter-personal issues. This empirical evidence for a connection between emotional engagement and moral or ethical choices is interesting because it is related to a fundamental survival mechanism rooted in human evolution. The results lead one to question when and how emotional engagement might occur in a professional ethical situation. However, the studies employed (...)
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  35. John Angelidis & Nabil A. Ibrahim (2011). The Impact of Emotional Intelligence on the Ethical Judgment of Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (S1):111-119.score: 18.0
    In recent years there has been a substantial amount of research on emotional intelligence (EI) across a wide range of disciplines. Also, this term has been receiving increasing attention in the popular business press. This article extends previous research by seeking to determine whether there is a relationship between emotional intelligence and ethical judgment among practicing managers with respect to questions of ethical nature that can arise in their professional activity. It analyzes the results of a survey of (...)
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  36. Knut Berner (2001). Local Anaesthesia, the Increase of the Evil Through Emotional Impoverishment. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 4 (2):161-169.score: 18.0
    Evil should be characterised as a specific constellation, which results from destructive connections between individual activities and systemic influences. The article shows some important aspects of the structure of evil and prefers the terms of wickedness and obscene coincidences to describe its own character. Therefore, also the division between rationality and affectivity appears as inadequate, because evil has on the one side an intrinsic attractiveness for individuals and is on the other side in modern societies more and more a product (...)
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  37. Tomasz M. Rutkowski, Andrzej Cichocki, Danilo P. Mandic & Toyoaki Nishida (2011). Emotional Empathy Transition Patterns From Human Brain Responses in Interactive Communication Situations. AI and Society 26 (3):301-315.score: 18.0
    The paper reports our research aiming at utilization of human interactive communication modeling principles in application to a novel interaction paradigm designed for brain–computer/machine-interfacing (BCI/BMI) technologies as well as for socially aware intelligent environments or communication support systems. Automatic procedures for human affective responses or emotional states estimation are still a hot topic of contemporary research. We propose to utilize human brain and bodily physiological responses for affective/emotional as well as communicative interactivity estimation, which potentially could be used (...)
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  38. Michalinos Zembylas (2007). Emotional Capital and Education: Theoretical Insights From Bourdieu. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (4):443 - 463.score: 18.0
    This article seeks to explore existing conceptualisations of emotional capital in educational research, and to undertake a critical analysis of these conceptualisations, including a reflection on my own explorations of teachers' and students' emotional practices. Drawing from Bourdieu's work, I offer a theoretical discussion of how emotional capital as a conceptual tool suggests a historically situated analysis of the often unrecognised mechanisms and emotion norms serving to maintain certain 'affective economies'. This point is made in reference to (...)
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  39. Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Henry P. Stapp & Mario Beauregard (2004). The Volitional Influence of the Mind on the Brain, with Special Reference to Emotional Self-Regulation. In Mario Beauregard (ed.), Consciousness, Emotional Self-Regulation and the Brain. John Benjamins. 195-238.score: 18.0
  40. Philip R. Johnson & B. L. Hu (2005). Uniformly Accelerated Charge in a Quantum Field: From Radiation Reaction to Unruh Effect. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 35 (7):1117-1147.score: 18.0
    We present a stochastic theory for the nonequilibriurn dynamics of charges moving in a quantum scalar field based on the worldline influence functional and the close-time-path (CTP or in-in) coarse-grained effective action method. We summarize (1) the steps leading to a derivation of a modified Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac equation whose solutions describe a causal semiclassical theory free of runaway solutions and without pre-acceleration patholigies, and (2) the transformation to a stochastic effective action, which generates Abraham-Lorentz-Dirac-Langevin equations depicting the fluctuations of a particle’s (...)
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  41. Doug Roberts-Wolfe, Matthew Sacchet, Elizabeth Hastings, Harold Roth & Willoughby Britton (2012). Mindfulness Training Alters Emotional Memory Recall Compared to Active Controls: Support for an Emotional Information Processing Model of Mindfulness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:15.score: 18.0
    Objectives: While mindfulness-based interventions have received widespread application in both clinical and non-clinical populations, the mechanism by which mindfulness meditation improves well-being remains elusive. One possibility is that mindfulness training alters the processing of emotional information, similar to prevailing cognitive models of depression and anxiety. The aim of this study was to investigating the effects of mindfulness training on emotional information processing (i.e. memory) biases in relation to both clinical symptomatology and well-being in comparison to active control conditions. (...)
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  42. Lotte Veenstra Agneta H. Fischer, Daniela Becker (2012). Emotional Mimicry in Social Context: The Case of Disgust and Pride. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    A recent review on facial mimicry concludes that emotional mimicry is less ubiquitous than has been suggested, and only occurs in interactions that are potentially affiliative (see Hess & Fischer, 2012). We hypothesize that individuals do not mimic facial expressions that can be perceived as offensive, such as disgust, and mimic positive emotion displays, but only when the context is affiliative (i.e. with intimates). Second, we expect that in spontaneous interactions not mimicry, but empathic feelings with the other predict (...)
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  43. Alexander Brink (2009). Hirschman's Rhetoric of Reaction: U.S. And German Insights in Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):109 - 122.score: 18.0
    In recent times, representatives of American management science have been arguing increasingly for a functionalization of ethics to change economic thinking: what they are seeking is the systematic integration of ethics into the economic paradigm. Using the insights developed by Hirschman, I would like to show how one must first expose the rhetoric of those critics of change (referred to below as conservatives or reactionaries) in order then to implement that which is new (representatives of this approach are referred to (...)
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  44. Linda Carozza (2007). Dissent in the Midst of Emotional Territory. Informal Logic 27 (2):197-210.score: 18.0
    This paper focuses on disagreement spaces fused with emotion. Following Gilbert’s emotional mode of argumentation (1997), further expansions of the mode are made here, specifically for the purposes of being able to classify different types of emotional arguments. First, general concerns with arguments that stray from the traditional approach are addressed. Then a classification system for different types of emotional arguments is developed. Some of the criteria that help determine emotional arguments include dialogue types, arguers involved, (...)
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  45. Ferdinand Fellmann (2013). Emotional Selection and Human Personality. Biological Theory 8 (1):64-73.score: 18.0
    This article addresses the emergence of human personality in evolution. The mechanisms of natural and sexual selection developed by Darwin are not sufficient to explain the sense of self. Therefore we attempt to trace the evolutionary process back to a form of selection termed “emotional selection.” This involves reconstructing selection out of subjective qualities and showing how emotions enable human forms of life that are relevant for the cultural level of cooperation that marks our species. We see a paradigm (...)
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  46. F. Dolcos A. D. Iordan, S. Dolcos (2013). Neural Signatures of the Response to Emotional Distraction: A Review of Evidence From Brain Imaging Investigations. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Prompt responses to emotional, potentially threatening, stimuli are supported by neural mechanisms that allow for privileged access of emotional information to processing resources. The existence of these mechanisms can also make emotional stimuli potent distracters, particularly when task-irrelevant. The ability to deploy cognitive control in order to cope with emotional distraction is essential for adaptive behavior, while reduced control may lead to enhanced emotional distractibility, which is often a hallmark of affective disorders. Evidence suggests that (...)
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  47. Moritz de Greck, Annette F. Bölter, Lisa Lehmann, Cornelia Ulrich, Eva Stockum, Björn Enzi, Thilo Hoffmann, Claus Tempelmann, Manfred Beutel, Jörg Frommer & Georg Northoff (2013). Changes in Brain Activity of Somatoform Disorder Patients During Emotional Empathy After Multimodal Psychodynamic Psychotherapy. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Somatoform disorder patients show a variety of emotional disturbances including impaired emotion recognition and increased empathic distress. In a previous paper, our group showed that several brain regions involved in emotional processing, such as the parahippocampal gyrus and other regions, were less activated in pre-treatment somatoform disorder patients (compared to healthy controls) during an empathy task. Since the parahippocampal gyrus is involved in emotional memory, its decreased activation might reflect the repression of emotional memories (which - (...)
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  48. Stephanie Goldfarb, KongFatt Wong-Lin, Michael Schwemmer, Naomi Ehrich Leonard & Philip Holmes (2012). Can Post-Error Dynamics Explain Sequential Reaction Time Patterns? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 18.0
    We investigate human error dynamics in sequential two-alternative choice tasks. When subjects repeatedly discriminate between two stimuli, their error rates and mean reaction times (RTs) systematically depend on prior sequences of stimuli. We analyze these sequential effects on RTs, separating error and correct responses, and identify a sequential RT tradeoff: a sequence of stimuli which yields a relatively fast RT on error trials will produce a relatively slow RT on correct trials and vice versa. We reanalyze previous data and (...)
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  49. Hinne Hettema (2012). The Unity of Chemistry and Physics: Absolute Reaction Rate Theory. Hyle 18 (2):145 - 173.score: 18.0
    Henry Eyring's absolute rate theory explains the size of chemical reaction rate constants in terms of thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and quantum chemistry. In addition it uses a number of unique concepts such as the 'transition state'. A key feature of the theory is that the explanation it provides relies on the comparison of reaction rate constant expressions derived from these individual theories. In this paper, the example is used to develop a naturalized notion of reduction and the unity (...)
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  50. P. I. Newcombe, C. Campbell, P. D. Siakaluk & P. M. Pexman (2011). Effects of Emotional and Sensorimotor Knowledge in Semantic Processing of Concrete and Abstract Nouns. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:275-275.score: 18.0
    There is much empirical evidence that words' relative imageability and body-object interaction (BOI) facilitate lexical processing for concrete nouns (e.g., Bennett et al., 2011). These findings are consistent with a grounded cognition framework (e.g., Barsalou, 2008), in which sensorimotor knowledge is integral to lexical processing. In the present study, we examined whether lexical processing is also sensitive to the dimension of emotional experience (i.e., the ease with which words evoke emotional experience), which is also derived from a grounded (...)
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