Search results for 'emotional reaction' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John B. Watson & Rosalie Rayner (1920). Conditioned Emotional Reactions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 3 (1):1.score: 130.0
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  2. Scott Ode, Michael D. Robinson & Devin M. Hanson (2011). Cognitive-Emotional Dysfunction Among Noisy Minds: Predictions From Individual Differences in Reaction Time Variability. Cognition and Emotion 25 (2):307-327.score: 122.0
  3. Rachel L. Bannerman, Maarten Milders & Arash Sahraie (2009). Processing Emotional Stimuli: Comparison of Saccadic and Manual Choice-Reaction Times. Cognition and Emotion 23 (5):930-954.score: 122.0
  4. C. Landis (1924). Studies of Emotional Reactions. I. 'A Preliminary Study of Facial Expression.". Journal of Experimental Psychology 7 (5):325.score: 84.0
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  5. Kathie L. Pelletier & Michelle C. Bligh (2008). The Aftermath of Organizational Corruption: Employee Attributions and Emotional Reactions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):823 - 844.score: 76.0
    Employee attributions and emotional reactions to unethical behavior of top leaders in an organization recently involved in a highly publicized ethics scandal were examined. Participants (n = 76) from a large southern California government agency completed an ethical climate assessment. Secondary data analysis was performed on the written commentary to an open-ended question seeking employees' perceptions of the ethical climate. Employees attributed the organization's poor ethical leadership to a number of causes, including: lack of moral reasoning, breaches of trust, (...)
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  6. Christine Clavien (2010). An Affective Approach to Moral Motivation. Journal of Cognitive Science 11 (2):129-160.score: 66.0
    Over the last few years, there has been a surge of work in a new field called “moral psychology”, which uses experimental methods to test the psychological processes underlying human moral activity. In this paper, I shall follow this line of approach with the aim of working out a model of how people form value judgements and how they are motivated to act morally. I call this model an “affective picture”: ‘picture’ because it remains strictly at the descriptive level and (...)
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  7. Jesse J. Prinz (2006). Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. OUP USA.score: 64.0
    Gut Reactions is an interdisciplinary defense of the claim that emotions are perceptions of changes in the body. This thesis, pioneered by William James and resuscitated by Antonio Damasio, has been widely criticized for failing to acknowledge that emotions are meaningful insofar as they represent concerns, not respiratory function and blood pressure. Fear represents danger, sadness represents loss. To explain this fact, many researchers conclude that emotions must involve judgments regarding one's relationship to the environment. Prinz offers a new unified (...)
     
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  8. Thaddeus Metz (2009). Love and Emotional Reactions to Necessary Evils. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan. 28-44.score: 62.0
    This chapter supposes that certain bads are necessary for substantial goods, and poses the question of how one ought to react emotionally to such bads. In recent work, Robert Adams is naturally read as contending that one ought to exhibit positive emotions such as gladness towards certain ‘necessary evils’. A rationale he suggests for this view is that love for a person, which involves viewing the beloved as good, requires being glad about what is necessary for her to exist, even (...)
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  9. Claudia Civai (2013). Rejecting Unfairness: Emotion-Driven Reaction or Cognitive Heuristic? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 60.0
    Rejecting unfairness: emotion-driven reaction or cognitive heuristic?
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  10. Graham Murdock (1971). Differential Reactions to the Regulation of Emotional and Physical Expression Among Third‐Year Pupils in Secondary Schools. Journal of Moral Education 1 (1):53-60.score: 60.0
    (1971). Differential reactions to the regulation of emotional and physical expression among third‐year pupils in secondary schools. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 1, No. 1, pp. 53-60.
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  11. Vittorio Gallese Mariateresa Sestito, Maria Alessandra Umiltà, Giancarlo De Paola, Renata Fortunati, Andrea Raballo, Emanuela Leuci, Simone Maffei, Matteo Tonna, Mario Amore, Carlo Maggini (2013). Facial Reactions in Response to Dynamic Emotional Stimuli in Different Modalities in Patients Suffering From Schizophrenia: A Behavioral and EMG Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 58.0
    Emotional facial expression is an important low-level mechanism contributing to the experience of empathy, thereby lying at the core of social interaction. Schizophrenia is associated with pervasive social cognitive impairments, including emotional processing of facial expressions. In this study we test a novel paradigm in order to investigate the evaluation of the emotional content of perceived emotions presented through dynamic expressive stimuli, facial mimicry evoked by the same stimuli, and their functional relation. Fifteen healthy controls and 15 (...)
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  12. Jana Holtmann, Maike C. Herbort, Torsten Wüstenberg, Joram Soch, Sylvia Richter, Henrik Walter, Stefan Roepke & Björn H. Schott (2013). Trait Anxiety Modulates Fronto-Limbic Processing of Emotional Interference in Borderline Personality Disorder. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 58.0
    Previous studies of cognitive alterations in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) have yielded conflicting results. Given that a core feature of BPD is affective instability, which is characterized by emotional hyperreactivity and deficits in emotion regulation, it seems conceivable that short-lasting emotional distress might exert temporary detrimental effects on cognitive performance. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate how task-irrelevant emotional stimuli (fearful faces) affect performance and fronto-limbic neural activity patterns during attention-demanding cognitive processing in (...)
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  13. Jayne Morriss, Alexander N. W. Taylor, Etienne B. Roesch & Carien M. van Reekum (2013). Still Feeling It: The Time Course of Emotional Recovery From an Attentional Perspective. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 58.0
    Emotional reactivity and the time taken to recover, particularly from negative, stressful, events, are inextricably linked, and both are crucial for maintaining well-being. It is unclear, however, to what extent emotional reactivity during stimulus onset predicts the time course of recovery after stimulus offset. To address this question, 25 participants viewed arousing (negative and positive) and neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS) followed by task-relevant face targets, which were to be gender categorised. Faces were presented (...)
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  14. Joseph F. X. DeSouza Shima Ovaysikia, Khalid A. Tahir, Jason L. Chan (2010). Word Wins Over Face: Emotional Stroop Effect Activates the Frontal Cortical Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 58.0
    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in higher order cognitive control of behaviour. Sometimes such control is executed through suppression of an unwanted response in order to avoid conflict. Conflict occurs when two simultaneously competing processes lead to different behavioral outcomes, as seen in tasks such as the anti-saccade, go/no-go and the Stroop task. We set out to examine whether different types of stimuli in a modified emotional Stroop task would cause similar interference effects as the original Stroop-colour/word, (...)
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  15. U. Dimberg, M. Thunberg & K. Elmehed (2000). Unconscious Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions. Psychological Science 11 (1):86-89.score: 54.0
  16. Ishtiyaque Haji (2003). The Emotional Depravity of Psychopaths and Culpability. Legal Theory 9 (1):63-82.score: 54.0
    In this paper, I restrict discussion to cases of psychopathy in which it is assumed that psychopaths who satisfy epistemic requirements of responsibility, including the requirement that one is culpable for an action only if one performs it in light of the belief that one is doing wrong, can and do perform actions they take to be immoral or illegal. I argue that in such cases, the well-documented emotional impairment of psychopaths fails to subvert moral culpability. In particular, it (...)
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  17. Holly Watkins (2013). Music Between Reaction and Response. Evental Aesthetics 2 (2):77-97.score: 54.0
    Two Greek myths attest to the power of music to blur distinctions between humans and nonhumans: Orpheus made music that inspired human-like attention in animals, trees, and stones, while the Sirens reduced passing sailors to the level of animals incapable of resisting their song. Recast in terms employed by Lacan, these myths portray music as calling forth a response in creatures thought merely able to react and, contrariwise, stripping away the capacity for response in humans, leaving nothing but reaction (...)
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  18. Jesse J. Prinz (2004). Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of the Emotions. Oxford University Press.score: 52.0
    Gut Reactions is an interdisciplinary defense of the claim that emotions are perceptions of changes in the body.
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  19. Amy Gentzler & Kathryn Kerns (2006). Adult Attachment and Memory of Emotional Reactions to Negative and Positive Events. Cognition and Emotion 20 (1):20-42.score: 52.0
  20. Shlomo Hareli & Ursula Hess (2010). What Emotional Reactions Can Tell Us About the Nature of Others: An Appraisal Perspective on Person Perception. Cognition and Emotion 24 (1):128-140.score: 52.0
  21. Margaret Marshall & Jonathon Brown (2006). Emotional Reactions to Achievement Outcomes: Is It Really Best to Expect the Worst? Cognition and Emotion 20 (1):43-63.score: 52.0
  22. Patricia M. Rodriguez Mosquera, Antony S. R. Manstead & Agneta H. Fischer (2002). The Role of Honour Concerns in Emotional Reactions to Offences. Cognition and Emotion 16 (1):143-163.score: 52.0
  23. Todd K. Shackelford, Gregory J. LeBlanc & Elizabeth Drass (2000). Emotional Reactions to Infidelity. Cognition and Emotion 14 (5):643-659.score: 52.0
  24. Amy E. Skerry & Elizabeth S. Spelke (2014). Preverbal Infants Identify Emotional Reactions That Are Incongruent with Goal Outcomes. Cognition 130 (2):204-216.score: 50.0
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  25. Eduard Klapwijk (2013). Emotional Reactions of Peers Influence Decisions About Fairness in Adolescence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 50.0
  26. C. L. Hull & L. S. Lugoff (1921). Complex Signs in Diagnostic Free Association. Journal of Experimental Psychology 4 (2):111.score: 48.0
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  27. Andreas G. Rösch, Steven J. Stanton & Oliver C. Schultheiss (2013). Implicit Motives Predict Affective Responses to Emotional Expressions. Frontiers in Psychology 4:985.score: 46.0
    We explored the influence of implicit motives and activity inhibition on subjectively experienced affect in response to the presentation of six different facial expressions of emotion (FEEs; anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise) and neutral faces from the NimStim set of facial expressions (Tottenham et al., 2009). Implicit motives and activity inhibition were assessed using a Picture Story Exercise (Schultheiss et al., 2009b). Ratings of subjectively experienced affect (arousal and valence) were assessed using Self-Assessment Manikins (Bradley and Lang, 1994) (...)
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  28. Hanno Sauer (2012). Psychopaths and Filthy Desks: Are Emotions Necessary and Sufficient for Moral Judgment? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):95-115.score: 44.0
    Philosophical and empirical moral psychologists claim that emotions are both necessary and sufficient for moral judgment. The aim of this paper is to assess the evidence in favor of both claims and to show how a moderate rationalist position about moral judgment can be defended nonetheless. The experimental evidence for both the necessity- and the sufficiency-thesis concerning the connection between emotional reactions and moral judgment is presented. I argue that a rationalist about moral judgment can be happy to accept (...)
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  29. Anne J. Jacobson (2008). Empathy, Primitive Reactions and the Modularity of Emotion. In Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.), The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press. 95-113.score: 42.0
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  30. Shlomo Hareli & Ursula Hess (2008). The Role of Causal Attribution in Hurt Feelings and Related Social Emotions Elicited in Reaction to Other's Feedback About Failure. Cognition and Emotion 22 (5):862-880.score: 42.0
  31. Andrea Paulus & Dirk Wentura (2014). Threatening Joy: Approach and Avoidance Reactions to Emotions Are Influenced by the Group Membership of the Expresser. Cognition and Emotion 28 (4):656-677.score: 42.0
  32. Ursula Hess, Pierre Philippot & Sylvie Blairy (1998). Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions: Affect or Cognition? Cognition and Emotion 12 (4):509-531.score: 42.0
  33. Arvid Kappas (2011). Emotion and Regulation Are One! Emotion Review 3 (1):17-25.score: 42.0
    Emotions are foremost self-regulating processes that permit rapid responses and adaptations to situations of personal concern. They have biological bases and are shaped ontogenetically via learning and experience. Many situations and events of personal concern are social in nature. Thus, social exchanges play an important role in learning about rules and norms that shape regulation processes. I argue that (a) emotions often are actively auto-regulating—the behavior implied by the emotional reaction bias to the eliciting event or situation modifies (...)
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  34. Ulf Dimberg, Monika Thunberg & Sara Grunedal (2002). Facial Reactions to Emotional Stimuli: Automatically Controlled Emotional Responses. Cognition and Emotion 16 (4):449-471.score: 42.0
  35. Susan M. Labott, Randall B. Martin, Patricia S. Eason & Elayne Y. Berkey (1991). Social Reactions to the Expression of Emotion. Cognition and Emotion 5 (5-6):397-417.score: 42.0
  36. S. J. Murgatroydand & E. J. Robinson (1997). Children's and Adults' Attributions of Emotion to a Wrongdoer: The Influence of the Onlooker's Reaction. Cognition and Emotion 11 (1):83-101.score: 42.0
  37. Mark Meerum Terwot, Hema H. Kremer & Hedy Stegge (1991). Effects of Children's Emotional State on Their Reactions to Emotional Expressions: A Search for Congruency Effects. Cognition and Emotion 5 (2):109-121.score: 42.0
  38. Paul E. Griffiths (2008). Jesse Prinz Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3):559-567.score: 40.0
  39. Craig DeLancey (2005). Review of Jesse J. Prinz, Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).score: 40.0
  40. P. Goldie (2006). Review: Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (458):453-457.score: 40.0
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  41. J. Robinson (2006). Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (2):206-208.score: 40.0
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  42. William M. Marston (1920). Reaction-Time Symptoms of Deception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 3 (1):72.score: 40.0
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  43. Beverley Fehr, James A. Russell & Lawrence M. Ward (1982). Prototypicality of Emotions: A Reaction Time Study. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (5):253-254.score: 40.0
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  44. Claudia Civai, Corrado Corradi-Dell’Acqua, Matthias Gamer & Raffaella I. Rumiati (2010). Are Irrational Reactions to Unfairness Truly Emotionally-Driven? Dissociated Behavioural and Emotional Responses in the Ultimatum Game Task. Cognition 114 (1):89-95.score: 40.0
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  45. Chris F. Westbury, Cyrus Shaoul, Geoff Hollis, Lisa Smithson, Benny B. Briesemeister, Markus J. Hofmann & Arthur M. Jacobs (2013). Now You See It, Now You Don't: On Emotion, Context, & the Algorithmic Prediction of Human Imageability Judgments. Frontiers in Psychology 4:991.score: 38.0
    Many studies have shown that behavioral measures are affected by manipulating the imageability of words. Though imageability is usually measured by human judgment, little is known about what factors underlie those judgments. We demonstrate that imageability judgments can be largely or entirely accounted for by two computable measures that have previously been associated with imageability, the size and density of a word’s context and the emotional associations of the word. We outline an algorithmic method for predicting imageability judgments using (...)
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  46. Christopher Ciocchetti (2009). Emotions, Retribution, and Punishment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):160-173.score: 36.0
    I examine emotional reactions to wrongdoing to determine whether they offer support for retributivism. It is often thought that victims desire to see their victimizer suffer and that this reaction offers support for retributivism. After rejecting several attempts to use different theories of emotion and different approaches to using emotions to justify retributivism, I find that, assuming a cognitive theory of emotion is correct, emotions can be used as heuristic guides much as suggested by Michael Moore. Applying this (...)
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  47. András Szigeti (2012). No Need to Get Emotional? Emotions and Heuristics. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 16 (4):845-862.score: 36.0
    Many believe that values are crucially dependent on emotions. This paper focuses on epistemic aspects of the putative link between emotions and value by asking two related questions. First, how exactly are emotions supposed to latch onto or track values? And second, how well suited are emotions to detecting or learning about values? To answer the first question, the paper develops the heuristics-model of emotions. This approach models emotions as sui generis heuristics of value. The empirical plausibility of the heuristics-model (...)
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  48. Guido P. H. Band Henk van Steenbergen (2013). Pupil Dilation in the Simon Task as a Marker of Conflict Processing. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 36.0
    Cognitive demands in response conflict paradigms trigger negative affect and avoidance behavior. However, not all response conflict studies show increases in physiological indices of emotional arousal, such as pupil diameter. In contrast to earlier null-results, this study shows for the first time that small (about 0.02 mm) conflict-related pupil dilation can be observed in a Simon task when stimuli do not introduce a light reflex. Results show that response-conflict in Simon trials induces both pupil dilation and reaction-time costs. (...)
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  49. Beatrice de Gelder Mariska E. Kret, Jeroen J. Stekelenburg, Karin Roelofs (2013). Perception of Face and Body Expressions Using Electromyography, Pupillometry and Gaze Measures. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 36.0
    Traditional emotion theories stress the importance of the face in the expression of emotions but bodily expressions are becoming increasingly important. Here we tested the hypothesis that similar physiological responses can be evoked by observing emotional face and body signals and that the reaction to angry signals is amplified in anxious individuals. We designed three experiments in which participants categorized emotional expressions from isolated facial and bodily expressions and from emotionally congruent and incongruent face-body compounds. Participants’ fixations (...)
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  50. Florian Cova, Maxime Bertoux, Sacha Bourgeois-Gironde & Bruno Dubois (2012). Judgments About Moral Responsibility and Determinism in Patients with Behavioural Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia: Still Compatibilists. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):851-864.score: 34.0
    Do laypeople think that moral responsibility is compatible with determinism? Recently, philosophers and psychologists trying to answer this question have found contradictory results: while some experiments reveal people to have compatibilist intuitions, others suggest that people could in fact be incompatibilist. To account for this contradictory answers, Nichols and Knobe (2007) have advanced a ‘performance error model’ according to which people are genuine incompatibilist that are sometimes biased to give compatibilist answers by emotional reactions. To test for this hypothesis, (...)
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