Search results for 'entitlement' (try it on Scholar)

999 found
Sort by:
See also:
Bibliography: Entitlement in Epistemology
  1. Tyler Burge (2003). Perceptual Entitlement. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (3):503-48.score: 24.0
    The paper develops a conception of epistemic warrant as applied to perceptual belief, called "entitlement", that does not require the warranted individual to be capable of understanding the warrant. The conception is situated within an account of animal perception and unsophisticated perceptual belief. It characterizes entitlement as fulfillment of an epistemic norm that is apriori associated with a certain representational function that can be known apriori to be a function of perception. The paper connects anti-individualism, a thesis about (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jon Altschul (2012). Entitlement, Justification, and the Bootstrapping Problem. Acta Analytica 27 (4):345-366.score: 24.0
    According to the bootstrapping problem, any view that allows for basic knowledge (knowledge obtained from a reliable source prior to one’s knowing that that source is reliable) is forced to accept that one can utilize a track-record argument to acquire justification for believing that one’s belief source is reliable; yet, we tend to think that acquiring justification in this way is too easy. In this paper I argue, first, that those who respond to the bootstrapping problem by denying basic knowledge (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Albert Casullo (2007). What is Entitlement? Acta Analytica 22 (4):267 - 279.score: 24.0
    In his seminal paper, Content Preservation, Tyler Burge defends an original account of testimonial knowledge. The originality of the account is due, in part, to the fact that it is cast within a novel epistemic framework. The central feature of that framework is the introduction of the concept of entitlement, which is alleged to be a distinctive type of positive epistemic support or warrant. Entitlement and justification, according to Burge, are sub-species of warrant. Justification is the internalist form (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. C. S. Jenkins (2007). Entitlement and Rationality. Synthese 157 (1):25 - 45.score: 24.0
    This paper takes the form of a critical discussion of Crispin Wright’s notion of entitlement of cognitive project. I examine various strategies for defending the claim that entitlement can make acceptance of a proposition epistemically rational, including one which appeals to epistemic consequentialism. Ultimately, I argue, none of these strategies is successful, but the attempt to isolate points of disagreement with Wright issues in some positive proposals as to how an epistemic consequentialist should characterize epistemic rationality.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen (2009). Entitlement, Value and Rationality. Synthese 171 (3):443-457.score: 24.0
    In this paper I discuss two fundamental challenges concerning Crispin Wright's notion of entitlement of cognitive project: firstly, whether entitlement is an epistemic kind of warrant since, seemingly, it is not underwritten by epistemic reasons, and, secondly, whether, in the absence of such reasons, the kind of rationality associated with entitlement is epistemic in nature. The paper investigates three possible lines of response to these challenges. According to the first line of response, entitlement of cognitive project (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Patrice Philie (2009). Entitlement as a Response to I–Ii–III Scepticism. Synthese 171 (3):459 - 466.score: 24.0
    In this paper, Crispin Wright’s unified strategy against scepticism is put under pressure through an examination of the concept of entitlement. Wright’s characterisation of a generalised form of scepticism is first described, followed by an examination of the concept of entitlement and of the role played by presuppositions in his strategy. This will make manifest the transcendental structure of this response to scepticism. The paper ends with a discussion of the effectiveness of this transcendental strategy in providing a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Yuval Avnur (2012). Mere Faith and Entitlement. Synthese 189 (2):297-315.score: 24.0
    The scandal to philosophy and human reason, wrote Kant, is that we must take the existence of material objects on mere faith . In contrast, the skeptical paradox that has scandalized recent philosophy is not formulated in terms of faith, but rather in terms of justification, warrant, and entitlement. I argue that most contemporary approaches to the paradox (both dogmatist/liberal and default/conservative) do not address the traditional problem that scandalized Kant, and that the status of having a warrant (or (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Mikael Janvid (2009). The Value of Lesser Goods: The Epistemic Value of Entitlement. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 24 (4):263-274.score: 24.0
    The notion of entitlement plays an important role in some influential epistemologies. Often the epistemological motive for introducing the concept is to accommodate certain externalist intuitions within an internalist framework or, conversely, to incorporate internalist traits into an otherwise externalist position. In this paper two prominent philosophers will be used as examples: Tyler Burge as a representative of the first option and Fred Dretske as one of the second. However, even on the assumption that the concept of entitlement (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Duncan MacIntosh (2007). Who Owns Me: Me Or My Mother? How To Escape Okin's Problem For Nozick's And Narveson's Theory Of Entitlement. In Malcolm Murray (ed.), Liberty, Games And Contracts: Jan Narveson And The Defense Of Libertarianism. Ashgate.score: 24.0
    Susan Okin read Robert Nozick as taking it to be fundamental to his Libertarianism that people own themselves, and that they can acquire entitlement to other things by making them. But she thinks that, since mothers make people, all people must then be owned by their mothers, a consequence Okin finds absurd. She sees no way for Nozick to make a principled exception to the idea that people own what they make when what they make is people, concluding that (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Daniele Sgaravatti (2014). Scepticism, Defeasible Evidence and Entitlement. Philosophical Studies 168 (2):439-455.score: 24.0
    The paper starts by describing and clarifying what Williamson calls the consequence fallacy. I show two ways in which one might commit the fallacy. The first, which is rather trivial, involves overlooking background information; the second way, which is the more philosophically interesting, involves overlooking prior probabilities. In the following section, I describe a powerful form of sceptical argument, which is the main topic of the paper, elaborating on previous work by Huemer. The argument attempts to show the impossibility of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Hamid Vahid (2012). Burge on Perceptual Entitlement. Metaphilosophy 43 (3):187-203.score: 24.0
    This article is concerned with the question of the nature of the epistemic liaison between experience and belief. The problem, often known as the problem of nondoxastic justification, is to see how a causal transition between experience and belief could assume a normative dimension, that is, how perceptual experience serves to justify beliefs about the world. Currently a number of theories have been proposed to resolve this problem. The article considers a particular solution offered by Tyler Burge which, among other (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Wally Morrow (1994). Entitlement and Achievement in Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (1):33-47.score: 24.0
    The central claim of this paper is that the culture of entitlement in education is incoherent to the extent to which it rejects: concepts of educational achievement. It gives an account of some of the conceptual features of achievement and educational achievement, and argues that although educational and academic achievement are closely linked with each other they are distinct. It tries to show why academic practices are central in our conceptions of the value of educational achievement. In terms of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jon Altschul, Anthony Brueckner & Christopher Buford (2014). Vahid, Burge, and Perceptual Entitlement. Metaphilosophy 45 (3):325-330.score: 24.0
    Hamid Vahid criticizes Tyler Burge's account of perceptual entitlement. Vahid argues that Burge's account fails to satisfy a criterion of adequacy that any correct account of perceptual warrant must satisfy. According to Vahid, a correct account of perceptual warrant must allow for perceptual beliefs which are produced by a properly functioning perceptual system yet which lack warrant. The present article argues that Vahid's critique of Burge fails. It presents numerous examples of such beliefs that are consistent with Burge's account (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David M. Godden (2014). Teaching Rational Entitlement and Responsibility: A Socratic Exercise. Informal Logic 34 (1):124-151.score: 24.0
    The paper reports on a Socratic exercise that introduces participants to the norm of rational entitlement, as distinct from political entitlement, and the attendant norm of rational responsibility. The exercise demonstrates that, because participants are not willing to exchange their own opinion at random for another differing opinion to which the owner is, by the participants’ own admission, entitled, they treat their entitlement to their own opinion differently, giving it a special status. This gives rise to rational (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Tyler Burge (1996). Our Entitlement to Self-Knowledge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96:91-116.score: 21.0
  16. Susana Nuccetelli (2001). Is Self-Knowledge an Entitlement? And Why Should We Care? Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):143-155.score: 21.0
  17. Sven Rosenkranz (2009). Liberalism, Entitlement, and Verdict Exclusion. Synthese 171 (3):481 - 497.score: 21.0
    In a series of recent papers, Crispin Wright has developed and defended an epistemic account of borderline cases which he calls ‘Liberalism’. If Verdict Exclusion is the claim that no polar verdict on borderline cases is knowledgeable, then Liberalism implies the view that Verdict Exclusion is itself nothing we are in a position to know. It is a matter of ongoing discussion what more Liberalism implies. In any case, Wright argues that Liberalism affords the means to account for the intuition (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Frank Barel (2012). Perceptual Entitlement, Reliabilism, and Scepticism. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (1):21-43.score: 21.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Agnes Bäker, Werner Güth, Kerstin Pull & Manfred Stadler (2014). Entitlement and the Efficiency-Equality Trade-Off: An Experimental Study. [REVIEW] Theory and Decision 76 (2):225-240.score: 21.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Christopher Peacocke (1996). Entitlement, Self-Knowledge, and Conceptual Redeployment. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Sociey 96:117-58.score: 21.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Christopher Peacocke (1996). Our Entitlement to Self-Knowledge: Entitlement, Self-Knowledge, and Conceptual Redeployment. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 96:117-58.score: 21.0
  22. Nicholas Silins (2012). Explaining Perceptual Entitlement. Erkenntnis 76 (2):243-261.score: 18.0
    This paper evaluates the prospects of harnessing “anti-individualism” about the contents of perceptual states to give an account of the epistemology of perception, making special reference to Tyler Burge’s ( 2003 ) paper, “Perceptual Entitlement”. I start by clarifying what kind of warrant is provided by perceptual experience, and I go on to survey different ways one might explain the warrant provided by perceptual experience in terms of anti-individualist views about the individuation of perceptual states. I close by motivating (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Jon Altschul, Epistemic Entitlement. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    In the early 1990s there emerged a growing interest with the concept of epistemic entitlement. Philosophers who acknowledge the existence of entitlements maintain that there are beliefs or judgments unsupported by evidence available to the subject, but which the subject nonetheless has the epistemic right to hold. Some of these may include beliefs non-inferentially sourced in perception, memory, introspection, testimony, and the a priori. Unlike the traditional notion of justification, entitlement is often characterized as an externalist type of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Martin Smith (2013). Entitlement and Evidence. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 91 (4):735-753.score: 18.0
    Entitlement is conceived as a kind of positive epistemic status, attaching to certain propositions, that involves no cognitive or intellectual accomplishment on the part of the beneficiary — a status that is in place by default. In this paper I will argue that the notion of entitlement — or something very like it — falls out of an idea that may at first blush seem rather disparate: that the evidential support relation can be understood as a kind of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Hamid Vahid (2011). The Concept of Entitlement and its Epistemic Relevance. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):380-399.score: 18.0
    Crispin Wright has recently suggested that, in addition to the notion of justification, we also possess a non-evidential notion of warrant, ‘entitlement’, that can play an important role in responding to various skeptical questions. My concern here is with the question of whether entitlement constitutes an epistemic kind of warrant. I claim Wright's argument for this thesis at most shows that entitlement has a pragmatic character. Having identified the sources of the troubles of this argument in its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Eric Mack (2002). Self-Ownership, Marxism, and Egalitarianism: Part I: Challenges to Historical Entitlement. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):75-108.score: 18.0
    This two-part article offers a defense of a libertarian doctrine that centers on two propositions. The first is the self-ownership thesis according to which each individual possesses original moral rights over her own body, faculties, talents, and energies. The second is the anti-egalitarian conclusion that, through the exercise of these rights of self-ownership, individuals may readily become entitled to substantially unequal extra-personal holdings. The self-ownership thesis remains in the background during Part I of this essay, while the anti-egalitarian conclusion is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Crispin Wright & Martin Davies (2004). On Epistemic Entitlement. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78:167 - 245.score: 18.0
    [Crispin Wright] Two kinds of epistemological sceptical paradox are reviewed and a shared assumption, that warrant to accept a proposition has to be the same thing as having evidence for its truth, is noted. 'Entitlement', as used here, denotes a kind of rational warrant that counter-exemplifies that identification. The paper pursues the thought that there are various kinds of entitlement and explores the possibility that the sceptical paradoxes might receive a uniform solution if entitlement can be made (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Peter J. Graham (2011). Perceptual Entitlement and Basic Beliefs. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 153 (3):467-475.score: 18.0
    Perceptual entitlement and basic beliefs Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11098-010-9603-3 Authors Peter J. Graham, University of California, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA USA Journal Philosophical Studies Online ISSN 1573-0883 Print ISSN 0031-8116.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Huiming Ren (2009). Entitlement to Self-Knowledge and Brute Error. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (4):543 – 562.score: 18.0
    I discuss Burge's argument that our entitlement to self-knowledge consists in the constitutive relation between the second-order review of thoughts and the thoughts reviewed, and defend it against Peacocke's criticism. I then argue that though our entitlement to self-knowledge is neutral to different environments, as Burge claims, the consideration of Burge's own notion of brute error shows that Burge's effort to reconcile externalism and self-knowledge is not successful.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Sandy Goldberg (2014). Epistemic Entitlement and Luck. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 89 (2).score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to defend a novel characterization of epistemic luck. Helping myself to the notions of epistemic entitlement and adequate explanation, I propose that a true belief suffers from epistemic luck iff an adequate explanation of the fact that the belief acquired is true must appeal to propositions to which the subject herself is not epistemically entitled (in a sense to be made clear below). The burden of the argument is to show that there is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. S. Stewart Braun (2010). Historical Entitlement and the Practice of Bequest: Is There a Moral Right of Bequest? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 29 (6):695-715.score: 18.0
    Entitlement theorists claim that bequest is a moral right. The aim of this essay is to determine whether entitlement theorists can, on their own grounds, consistently defend that claim. I argue that even if there is a moral right to self-appropriated property and to engage in inter vivos transfers, it is a mistake to contend that there exists an equivalent moral right to make a bequest. Taxing or regulating bequest does not violate an individual’s moral rights because, regardless (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Greg Restall, A S s E Rt I O N, Denial, Commitment, Entitlement, and Incompatibility (and Some Consequence).score: 18.0
    In this short paper, I compare and contrast the kind of symmetric treatment of negation favoured in different ways by Huw Price (in “Why ‘Not’?”) and by me (in “Multiple Conclusions”) with Robert Brandom’s analysis of scorekeeping in terms of commitment, entitlement and incompatibility. Both kinds of account are what Brandom calls a normative pragmatics. They are both semantic anti-realist accounts of meaning in the significance of vocabulary is explained in terms of our rule-governed (normative) practice (pragmatics). These accounts (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. B. M. Kious (2010). Genetic Nondiscrimination and Health Care as an Entitlement. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):86-100.score: 18.0
    The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 prohibits most forms of discrimination on the basis of genetic information in health insurance and employment. The findings cited as justification for the act, the almost universal political support for it, and much of the scholarly literature about genetic discrimination, all betray a confusion about what is really at issue. They imply that genetic discrimination is wrong mainly because of genetic exceptionalism: because some special feature of genetic information makes discrimination on the basis (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Abraham Sesshu Roth (2013). Prediction, Authority, and Entitlement in Shared Activity. Noûs 48 (3).score: 18.0
    Shared activity is often simply willed into existence by individuals. This poses a problem. Philosophical reflection suggests that shared activity involves a distinctive, interlocking structure of intentions. But it is not obvious how one can form the intention necessary for shared activity without settling what fellow participants will do and thereby compromising their agency and autonomy. One response to this problem suggests that an individual can have the requisite intention if she makes the appropriate predictions about fellow participants. I argue (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David Henderson (2013). Entitlement in Gutting's Epistemology of Philosophy: Comments on What Philosophers Know. Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):121-132.score: 18.0
    In What Philosophers Know, Gary Gutting provides an epistemology of philosophical reflection. This paper focuses on the roles that various intuitive inputs are said to play in philosophical thought. Gutting argues that philosophers are defeasibly entitled to believe some of these, prior to the outcome of the philosophical reflection, and that they then rightly serve as significant (again defeasible) anchors on reflection. This paper develops a view of epistemic entitlement and applies it to argue that many prephilosophical convictions of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen, Entitlement in Mathematics.score: 18.0
    Crispin Wright has recently introduced a non-evidential notion of warrant – entitlement of cognitive project – as a promising response to certain sceptical arguments, which have been subject to extensive discussion within mainstream epistemology. The central idea is that, for a given class of cognitive projects, there are certain basic propositions – entitlements – which one is warranted in trusting provided there is no sufficient reason to think them false. (See Wrigh [2].) The aim of this paper is to (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. J. Boyle (1996). Catholic Social Justice and Health Care Entitlement Packages. Christian Bioethics 2 (3):280-292.score: 18.0
    This paper explores the implications of Roman Catholic teachings on social justice and rights to health care. It argues that contemporary societies, such as those in North America and Western Europe, have an obligation to provide health care to their citizens as a matter of right. Moral considerations provide a basis for evaluating concerns about the role of equality when determining health care entitlements and giving some precision to the widespread belief that the right to health care requires equal (...) to health care benefits. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Rachel Brown (2004). Righting Ecofeminist Ethics: The Scope and Use of Moral Entitlement. Environmental Ethics 26 (3):247-265.score: 18.0
    Rights have been criticized as incorporating features that are antithetical to ecofeminism: rights are allegedly inherently adversarial; they are based on a conception of the person that fails to reflect women’s experience, biased in an illegitimate way toward humans rather than nonhumans, overly formal, and incapable of admitting the importance of emotion in ethics. Such criticisms are founded in misunderstandings of the ways in which rights operate and may be met by an adequate theory of rights. The notions of (...) and immunity that flow from a conception of rights have great use and potential in environmental ethics. Nonetheless, our understanding of moral rights must be revised in order to realize this potential. The usual attribution of moral rights is structurally arbitrary because obligations arising from others’ rights are unjustifiably distinguished from other sorts of obligations for which the same sorts of justificatory bases obtain. Once this arbitrariness is recognized, there remains little reason not to extend a continuous framework of entitlement toward nonhuman animals and nature more generally. Reassessing moral rights according to a basic principle of respect delivers an integrated account of our moral obligations toward one another, and a satisfactory basis from which to account for our diverse obligations toward nonhuman animals and the environment. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Irene Mcmullin (2011). Love and Entitlement: Sartre and Beauvoir on the Nature of Jealousy. Hypatia 26 (1):102-122.score: 16.0
    This paper argues that an essential and often overlooked feature of jealousy is the sense that one is entitled to the affirmation provided by the love relationship. By turning to Sartre's and Beauvoir's analyses of love and its distortions, I will show how the public nature of identity can inhibit the possibility of genuine love. Since we must depend on the freedom of others to show us who we are, the uncertainty this introduces into one's sense of self can trigger (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Allan Hazlett (2013). Entitlement and Mutually Recognized Reasonable Disagreement. Episteme:1-25.score: 15.0
    Most people not only think that it is possible for reasonable people to disagree, but that it is possible for people to recognize that they are parties to a reasonable disagreement. The aim of this paper is to explain how such mutually recognized reasonable disagreements are possible. I appeal to an which implies a form of relativism about reasonable belief, based on the idea that whether a belief is reasonable for a person can depend on the fact that she has (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Fred Dretske (2000). Entitlement: Epistemic Rights Without Epistemic Duties? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):591-606.score: 15.0
  42. Alan H. Goldman (1976). The Entitlement Theory of Distributive Justice. Journal of Philosophy 73 (21):823-835.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Martin Davies (2004). Epistemic Entitlement, Warrant Transmission and Easy Knowledge. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 78 (1):213–245.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Crispin Wright (2004). Intuition, Entitlement and the Epistemology of Logical Laws. Dialectica 58 (1):155–175.score: 15.0
  45. Peter J. Graham (2012). Epistemic Entitlement. Noûs 46 (3):449-482.score: 15.0
  46. Christopher Peacocke (2004). Explaining Perceptual Entitlement. In Richard Schantz (ed.), The Externalist Challenge. De Gruyter. 441--80.score: 15.0
    material that was later incorporated into The Realm of Reason (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004), and into a paper of the same title in The Challenge of Externalism, ed. R. Schantz (Berlin: de Gruyter, 2004).
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Kenneth J. Arrow (1978). Nozick's Entitlement Theory of Justice. Philosophia 7 (2):265-279.score: 15.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Lawrence Davis (1976). Comments on Nozick's Entitlement Theory. Journal of Philosophy 73 (21):836-844.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Peter J. Graham (2010). Testimonial Entitlement and the Function of Comprehension. In Duncan Pritchard, Alan Millar & Adrian Haddock (eds.), Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press. 148--174.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 999