Search results for 'epistemologically different worlds' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gabriel Vacariu (forthcoming). The World Versus Epistemologically Different Worlds. Analele Philosophy Bucharest University.score: 476.0
    In this paper, Gabriel Vacariu presents his Epistemologically Different Worlds (EDWs) perspective. In other works (2005, 2008, 2011, 2012), he tries to illustrate that the greatest illusion of human knowledge surviving from the oldest times is the notion of „world”, of „uni-verse” or as he called it, the „unicorn world”. The main mistake that led to the creation of the unicorn world is that we, the human beings, believed (consciously or not) that we were the only observers (...)
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  2. Gabriel Vacariu (2012). Cognitive Neuroscience Versus Epistemologically Different Worlds. University of Bucharest Press.score: 360.0
    From the “epistemologically different worlds” perspective, I analyze the status of cognitive neuroscience today. I investigate the main actual topics in cognitive neuroscience: localization and the brain imaging, the binding problem (Treisman’s feature integration theory and synchronized oscillations approach), differentiation and integration, optimism versus skepticism approaches, perception and object recognition, space and the mind, crossmodal interactions, and the holistic view against localization. I want to show that these problems are pseudo-problems and this “science” has “No ontology landscape”.
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  3. Gabriel Vacariu (2008). Epistemologically Different Worlds. Bucharest University Press.score: 360.0
    A fundamental error has dominated philosophy and science since ancient times, the assumption of the existence of the 'unicorn-world', that is, the existence of one unique world. In order to avoid this error, it is necessary to replace the unicorn-world with epistemologically different worlds (which presuppose that each class of entities forms a single, unique epistemological world within the same spatio-temporal framework). Within this new framework, we analyze the definition of the “I” in neural (physical) terms and (...)
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  4. Gabriel Vacariu (2005). Mind, Brain, and Epistemologically Different Worlds. Synthese 147 (3):515-548.score: 360.0
    The reason why, since Descartes, nobody has found a solution to the mind–body problem seems to be that the problem itself is a false or pseudo-problem. The discussion has proceeded within a pre-Cartesian conceptual framework which itself is a source of the difficulty. Dualism and all its alternatives have preserved the same pre-Cartesian conceptual framework even while denying Descartes’ dualism. In order to avoid this pseudo-problem, I introduce a new perspective with three elements: the subject, the observed object, and the (...)
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  5. Gabriel Vacariu & Mihai Vacariu (2008). The "I" as an Epistemological World. Annals of Philosophy, Bucharest University 1:47-64.score: 306.0
    The first part of this article contains certain elements of the epistemologically different worlds perspective that focus on the idea that the "I" or human subjectivity is an epistemological world which corresponds to the brain and body. The second part shows that Bechtel's notion of mechanism is, in fact, a more "technical" functionalism that tries to avoid the mind-brain problem. However, by avoiding the mind-brain problem, many cognitive issues remain unsolved. Thus, we consider that Bechtel's solution is (...)
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  6. Gabriel Vacariu & Mihai Vacariu (2010). Mind, Life, and Matter in the Hyperverse. University of Bucharest Publishing Company.score: 270.0
    This book is about the epistemologically different worlds (hyperverse) in relationship with the "I", the mind-body problem (Frith, Llinas), Bechtel's mechanisms, Clark's extended mind, Bickle's molecular and cellular cognition, Kauffman's life, quantum mechanics, gravity, hyperspace vs. hyperverse -/- .
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  7. Gabriel Vacariu (2006). Owing to an Error in the Production Process the E-Mail Address of the Author of the Following Article has Been Incorrectly Reproduced: Synthese (2005) 147: 515–548 Mind, Brain, and Epistemologically Different Worlds. [REVIEW] Synthese 148:257.score: 270.0
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  8. Gabriel Vacariu (2011). The Mind-Body Problem Today. Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):26-34.score: 238.0
    An old philosophical problem, the mind-body problem, has not been yet solved by philosophers or scientists. Even if in cognitive neuroscience has been a stunning development in the last 20 years, the mind-body problem remained unsolved. Even if the majority of researchers in this domain accept the identity theory from an ontological viewpoint, many of them reject this position from an epistemological viewpoint. In this context, I consider that it is quite possible the framework of this problem to be wrong (...)
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  9. Gabriel Vacariu (2011). Being and the Hyperverse. Bucharest University Press.score: 192.0
    It is about the pure theoretical system of EDWs (almost without applications to any particular sciences - cognitive science, physics or biology). I constructed the conditions of the possibility for any EDWs (that exist or possible to exist) given by 13 propositions that represent the axiomatic-hyperontological framework in 13 parts. In general, these propositions refer to the abstract entities andtheir interactions. Being is the only entity that is an epistemological world. In this short book, I deal with the hyperontology of (...)
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  10. Gabriel Vacariu, Did Markus Gabriel (Bonn University) Plagiarize My Ideas?score: 180.0
    In this paper, I analyze the unbelievable similarities between my ideas from my works (2005, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012) and Markus Gabriel’s ideas (Bonn University) from his book published in 2013 and his TED clip (2013). -/- See also YouTube clip http://youtu.be/WLpzaaSE8L8 In this clip, Gabriel Vacariu (Philosophy, Bucharest University) analyzes the UNBELIEVABLE similarities between the ideas from his works (2005, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012) and Markus Gabriel's ideas (Bonn University) from his book published in 2013 and his TED clip (...)
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  11. Gabriel Vacariu (2014). More Troubles with Cognitive Neuroscience. Einstein's Theory of Relativity and the Hyperverse. University of Bucharest Publishing Company.score: 180.0
    In Part I, Chapter 1, I introduce the EDWs perspective (from my book published in 2012)2. In Part II, I investigate more troubles with cognitive neuroscience. (For other troubles of this “science”, see Vacariu 2012, Vacariu and Vacariu 2013) In Chapter 2, I analyze in detail a particular aspect of human visual perception: spatial cognition. In order to be able to offer more arguments on the idea that cognitive neuroscience is a pseudoscience, I need to investigate spatial cognition, an essential (...)
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  12. Alexandra Bradner (2013). Using Structure to Understand Justice and Care as Different Worlds. Topoi 32 (1):111-122.score: 129.0
    When read as a theory that is supposed to mirror, represent or fit some collection of historical data, critics argue that Kuhn’s theory of paradigm shift in Structure of Scientific Revolutions fails by cherry-picking and underdetermination. When read as the ground for a socio-epistemological conception of rationality, critics argue that Kuhn’s theory fails by either the naturalistic fallacy or underarticulation. This paper suggests that we need not view Structure as a historian’s attempt to accurately depict scientific theory change or a (...)
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  13. Alexandra Bradner (2013). Using Structure to Understand Justice and Care as Different Worlds. Topoi 32 (1):111-122.score: 129.0
    When read as a theory that is supposed to mirror, represent or fit some collection of historical data, critics argue that Kuhn’s theory of paradigm shift in Structure of Scientific Revolutions fails by cherry-picking and underdetermination. When read as the ground for a socio-epistemological conception of rationality, critics argue that Kuhn’s theory fails by either the naturalistic fallacy or underarticulation. This paper suggests that we need not view Structure as a historian’s attempt to accurately depict scientific theory change or a (...)
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  14. Luciano Floridi (2010). Information, Possible Worlds and the Cooptation of Scepticism. Synthese 175 (1):63 - 88.score: 126.0
    The article investigates the sceptical challenge from an informationtheoretic perspective. Its main goal is to articulate and defend the view that either informational scepticism is radical, but then it is epistemologically innocuous because redundant; or it is moderate, but then epistemologically beneficial because useful. In order to pursue this cooptation strategy, the article is divided into seven sections. Section 1 sets up the problem. Section 2 introduces Borei numbers as a convenient way to refer uniformly to (the data (...)
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  15. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Hume's Dictum and the Asymmetry of Counterfactual Dependence. In Alastair Wilson (ed.), Chance and Temporal Asymmetry. Oxford University Press.score: 99.0
    Why believe Hume's Dictum, according to which there are, roughly speaking, no necessary connections between wholly distinct entities? Schaffer ('Quiddistic Knowledge', 2009) suggests that HD, at least as applied to causal or nomological connections, is motivated as required by the best account of (the truth) of counterfactuals---namely, a similarity-based possible worlds account, where the operative notion of similarity requires 'miracles'---more specifically, worlds where entities of the same type that actually exist enter into different laws. The main cited (...)
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  16. Karen Ann Watson‐Gegeo (2004). A Different World: Embodied Experience and Linguistic Relativity on the Epistemological Path to Somewhere. Anthropology of Consciousness 15 (2):1-23.score: 87.0
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  17. Andrea Staiti (2010). Different Worlds and Tendency to Concordance. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10:127-143.score: 84.0
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  18. Caroline Joan (2008). Transnationalities, Bodies, and Power: Dancing Across Different Worlds. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (3):191-204.score: 84.0
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  19. Caroline Joan Picart (2008). Transnationalities, Bodies, and Power: Dancing Across Different Worlds. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 22 (3):pp. 191-204.score: 84.0
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  20. Andrea Staiti (2011). Different Worlds and Tendency to Concordance: Towards a New Perspective on Husserl's Phenomenology of Culture. The New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (1):127-143.score: 84.0
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  21. Gertrude M. White (1978). Different Worlds in Verse. The Chesterton Review 4 (2):232-245.score: 84.0
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  22. Apaar Kumar (2013). Kant's Idealism: New Interpretations of a Controversial Doctrine Ed. By Dennis Schulting, Jacco Verburgt (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):492-494.score: 81.0
    The literature on transcendental idealism is vast and controversy-ridden. Some interpreters view this puzzling doctrine as detracting from Kant’s real contribution—his theory of experience. Those who take the doctrine seriously debate whether or not appearances and things-in-themselves constitute two ontologically discrete worlds. Currently, the discussion centers around whether the appearance/thing-in-itself distinction should be read epistemologically, as referring to two different aspects of the same object, or as a metaphysical distinction, since Kant thinks of appearances as non-ultimate reality. (...)
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  23. Robert C. Solomon, Charles Spinosa, Fernando Flores & Hubert Dreyfus (1999). And Now for Something Completely Different: From Heidegger to EntrepreneurshipDisclosing New Worlds: Entrepreneurship, Democratic Action, and the Cultivation of Solidarity. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):169.score: 72.0
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  24. Panos Theodorou (2004). Of the Same in the Different. What is Wrong with Kuhn's Use of ``Seeing'' and ``Seeing As''. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 35 (1):175-200.score: 66.0
    Kuhn uses the distinction between `(simple) seeing', and `seeing as' in order to claim that among competing paradigms there cannot be found any middle (experiential) ground; nothing `same' can be located behind such radically different paradigm-worlds. He claims that scientists do not see a common something as this thing at one time and as that thing at another. Each time scientists simply see what they see. To claim the contrary is to claim that scientists arrive at their paradigmatic (...)
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  25. Alik Pelman (2007). Reference and Modality: A Theory of Intensions. Dissertation, University of London, UCLscore: 57.0
    The study of reference often leads to addressing fundamental issues in semantics, metaphysics and epistemology; this suggests that reference is closely linked to the three realms. The overall purpose of this study is to elucidate the structure of some of these links, through a close examination of the “mechanism” of reference. As in many other enquiries, considering the possible (i.e., the modal,) in addition to the actual proves very helpful in clarifying and explicating insights. The reference of a term with (...)
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  26. Shen-yi Liao (2012). What Are Centered Worlds? Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):294-316.score: 54.0
    David Lewis argues that centered worlds give us a way to capture de se, or self-locating, contents in philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. In recent years, centered worlds have also gained other uses in areas ranging widely from metaphysics to ethics. In this paper, I raise a problem for centered worlds and discuss the costs and benefits of different solutions. My investigation into the nature of centered worlds brings out potentially problematic implicit commitments (...)
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  27. Gabriel Abend (2006). Styles of Sociological Thought: Sociologies, Epistemologies, and the Mexican and U.S. Quests for Truth. Sociological Theory 24 (1):1 - 41.score: 54.0
    Both U.S. and Mexican sociologies allege that they are in the business of making true scientific knowledge claims about the social world. Conventional conceptions of science notwithstanding, I demonstrate that their claims to truth and scientificity are based on alternative epistemological grounds. Drawing a random sample of nonquantitative articles from four leading journals, I show that, first, they assign a different role to theories, and indeed they have dissimilar understandings of what a theory should consist of. Second, whereas U.S. (...)
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  28. Jiri Benovsky (2006). Persistence Through Time and Across Possible Worlds. Ontos Verlag.score: 54.0
    How do ordinary objects persist through time and across possible worlds ? How do they manage to have their temporal and modal properties ? These are the questions adressed in this book which is a "guided tour of theories of persistence". The book is divided in two parts. In the first, the two traditional accounts of persistence through time (endurantism and perdurantism) are combined with presentism and eternalism to yield four different views, and their variants. The resulting views (...)
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  29. Phillip Bricker (1996). Isolation and Unification: The Realist Analysis of Possible Worlds. Philosophical Studies 84 (2-3):225 - 238.score: 54.0
    If realism about possible worlds is to succeed in eliminating primitive modality, it must provide an 'analysis' of possible world: nonmodal criteria for demarcating one world from another. This David Lewis has done. Lewis holds, roughly, that worlds are maximal unified regions of logical space. So far, so good. But what Lewis means by 'unification' is too narrow, I think, in two different ways. First, for Lewis, all worlds are (almost) 'globally' unified: at any world, (almost) (...)
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  30. Stig Brorson & Hanne Andersen (2001). Stabilizing and Changing Phenomenal Worlds: Ludwik Fleck and Thomas Kuhn on Scientific Literature. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 32 (1):109-129.score: 54.0
    In the work of both Ludwik Fleck and Thomas Kuhn the scientific literature plays important roles for stability and change of scientific phenomenal worlds. In this article we shall introduce the analyses of scientific literature provided by Fleck and Kuhn, respectively. From this background we shall discuss the problem of how divergent thinking can emerge in a dogmatic atmosphere. We shall argue that in their accounts of the factors inducing changes of scientific phenomenal worlds Fleck and Kuhn offer (...)
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  31. Charles Pigden & Rebecca E. B. Entwisle (2012). Spread Worlds, Plenitude and Modal Realism: A Problem for David Lewis. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor.score: 54.0
    In his metaphysical summa of 1986, The Plurality of Worlds, David Lewis famously defends a doctrine he calls ‘modal realism’, the idea that to account for the fact that some things are possible and some things are necessary we must postulate an infinity possible worlds, concrete entities like our own universe, but cut off from us in space and time. Possible worlds are required to account for the facts of modality without assuming that modality is primitive – (...)
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  32. Philip Percival (2013). Branching of Possible Worlds. Synthese 190 (18):4261-4291.score: 54.0
    The question as to whether some objects are possible worlds that have an initial segment in common, i.e. so that their fusion is a temporal tree whose branches are possible worlds, arises both for those who hold that our universe has the structure of a temporal tree and for those who hold that what there is includes concrete universes of every possible variety. The notion of “possible world” employed in the question is seen to be the notion of (...)
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  33. Jiri Benovsky (2005). Branching Versus Divergent Possible Worlds. Kriterion 19:12-20.score: 54.0
    David Lewis' modal counterpart theory falls prey to the famous Saul Kripke's objection, and this is mostly due to his 'static' ontology (divergence) of possible worlds. This paper examines a genuinely realist but different, branching ontology of possible worlds and a new definition of the counterpart relation, which attempts to provide us with a better account of de re modality, and to meet satisfactorily Kripke's claim, while being also ontologically more 'parsimonious'.
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  34. Douglas W. Yacek (2014). Learning to See with Different Eyes: A Nietzschean Challenge to Multicultural Dialogue. Educational Theory 64 (2):99-121.score: 52.0
    Empathy is a necessity in our multicultural world. Modern democratic societies are home to communities with the most diverse religious, political, and moral convictions, and these convictions often directly, even perilously, contradict one another. Educational theorists differ on how empathy can be taught in the face of these contradictions. Does proper pedagogical action entail an attempt to teach students to understand the other, to see their world through the eyes of the other? Or is such an attempt doomed to fail, (...)
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  35. Ernst von Glasersfeld (2007). A Constructivist Speculation About Parmenides. Constructivist Foundations 3 (1):27-29.score: 49.0
    Purpose: An attempt to interpret the fragments of Parmenides as a first suggestion of a constructivist epistemology. Today, two and a half millennia later, no one can be sure of what exactly Parmenides had in mind. Method: Reviewing the varying translations of acknowledged experts and paying attention to what Plato said in his Parmenides dialog. Findings: We cannot be certain of any interpretation, but an epistemologically unbiased review of the translations shows that Parmenides may well have believed that experience (...)
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  36. Andrea Sauchelli (2010). Concrete Possible Worlds and Counterfactual Conditionals: Lewis Versus Williamson on Modal Knowledge. Synthese 176 (3):345-359.score: 48.0
    The epistemology of modality is gradually coming to play a central role in general discussions about modality. This paper is a contribution in this direction, in particular I draw a comparison between Lewis’s Modal realism and Timothy Williamson’s recent account of modality in terms of counterfactual thinking. In order to have criteria of evaluation, I also formulate four requirements which are supposed to be met by any theory of modality to be epistemologically adequate.
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  37. Jorge Ferrer (1998). Beyond Absolutism and Relativism in Transpersonal Evolutionary Theory. World Futures 52 (3):239-280.score: 48.0
    This paper critically examines Ken Wilber's transpersonal evolutionary theory in the context of the philosophical discourse of postmodernity. The critique focuses on Wilber's refutation of non?absolutist and non?universalist approaches to rationality, truth, and morality?such as cultural relativism, pluralism, constructivism or perspectivism?under the charges of being epistemologically self?refuting and morally pernicious. First, it is suggested that Wilber offers a faulty dichotomy between his absolutist?universalist metanarrative and a self?contradictory and pernicious vulgar relativism. Second, it is shown that Wilber's arguments for the (...)
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  38. S. Brier (2009). Cybersemiotic Pragmaticism and Constructivism. Constructivist Foundations 5 (1):19 - 39.score: 47.7
    Context: Radical constructivism claims that we have no final truth criteria for establishing one ontology over another. This leaves us with the question of how we can come to know anything in a viable manner. According to von Glasersfeld, radical constructivism is a theory of knowledge rather than a philosophy of the world in itself because we do not have access to a human-independent world. He considers knowledge as the ordering of experience to cope with situations in a satisfactory way. (...)
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  39. Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). Philosophy of Nature, Realism, and the Postulated Ontology of Scientific Theories. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Philosophy of Nature Today, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa. 59–80.score: 47.7
    The first part of the paper is a metatheoretical consideration of such philosophy of nature which allows for using scientific results in philosophical analyses. An epistemological 'judgment' of those results becomes a preliminary task of this discipline: this involves taking a position in the controversy between realistic and antirealistic accounts of science. It is shown that a philosopher of nature has to be a realist, if his task to build true ontology of reality is to be achieved. At the same (...)
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  40. Alessandro Giordani & Damiano Costa (2013). From Times to Worlds and Back Again: A Transcendentist Theory of Persistence. Thought 2 (1):210-220.score: 46.0
    Until recently, an almost perfect parallelism seemed to hold between theories of identity through time and across possible worlds,as every account in the temporal case(endurantism,perdurantism, exdurantism) was mirrored by a twin account in the modal case (trans-world identity, identity-via-parts, identity-via-counterparts). Nevertheless, in the recent literature, this parallelism has been broken because of the implementation in the debate of the relation of location. In particular, endurantism has been subject to a more in-depth analysis, and different versions of it, corresponding (...)
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  41. Gunnar Björnsson (2004). A Naturalist's Approach to Modal Intuitions. In Erik Weber Tim De Mey (ed.), Modal Epistemology.score: 46.0
    Modal inquiry is plagued by methodological problems. The best-developed views on modal semantics and modal ontology take modalstatements to be true in virtue of relations between possible worlds. Unfortunately, such views turn modal epistemology into a mystery, and this paper is about ways to avoid that problem. It looks at different remedies suggested by Quine, Blackburn and Peacocke and finds them all wanting. But although Peacocke’s version of the popular conceptualist approach fails to give a normative account of (...)
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  42. Adrian Kent (2012). Real World Interpretations of Quantum Theory. Foundations of Physics 42 (3):421-435.score: 46.0
    I propose a new class of interpretations, real world interpretations, of the quantum theory of closed systems. These interpretations postulate a preferred factorization of Hilbert space and preferred projective measurements on one factor. They give a mathematical characterisation of the different possible worlds arising in an evolving closed quantum system, in which each possible world corresponds to a (generally mixed) evolving quantum state. In a realistic model, the states corresponding to different worlds should be expected to (...)
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  43. Robert Stalnaker (2001). On Considering a Possible World as Actual. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 75 (75):141-156.score: 45.0
    [Robert Stalnaker] Saul Kripke made a convincing case that there are necessary truths that are knowable only a posteriori as well as contingent truths that are knowable a priori. A number of philosophers have used a two-dimensional model semantic apparatus to represent and clarify the phenomena that Kripke pointed to. According to this analysis, statements have truth-conditions in two different ways depending on whether one considers a possible world 'as actual' or 'as counterfactual' in determining the truth-value of the (...)
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  44. Matthew Sharpe (2012). Changing Aristotle's Mind and World : Critical Notes on McDowell's Aristotle. Philosophy Study 2 (11):804-821.score: 45.0
    Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is central to John McDowell’s classic Mind and World. In Lectures IV and V of that work, McDowell makes three claims concerning Aristotle’s ethics: first, that Aristotle did not base his ethics on an externalist, naturalistic basis (including a theory of human nature); second, that attempts to read him as an ethical naturalist are a modern anachronism, generated by the supposed need to ground all viable philosophical claims on claims analogous to the natural sciences; and third, that (...)
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  45. Olga Zvonareva, Nora Engel, Eleanor Ross, Ron Berghmans, Ames Dhai & Anja Krumeich (2013). Engaging Diverse Social and Cultural Worlds: Perspectives on Benefits in International Clinical Research From South African Communities. Developing World Bioethics 14 (1).score: 44.0
    The issue of benefits in international clinical research is highly controversial. Against the background of wide recognition of the need to share benefits of research, the nature of benefits remains strongly contested. Little is known about the perspectives of research populations on this issue and the extent to which research ethics discourses and guidelines are salient to the expectations and aspirations existing on the ground. This exploratory study contributes to filling this void by examining perspectives of people in low-income South (...)
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  46. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2010). More Experiments in Ethics. Neuroethics 3 (3):233-242.score: 43.0
    This paper responds to the four critiques of my book Experiments in Ethics published in this issue. The main theme I take up is how we should understand the relation between psychology and philosophy. Young and Saxe believe that “bottom line” evaluative judgments don’t depend on facts. I argue for a different view, according to which our evaluative and non-evaluative judgments must cohere in a way that makes it rational, sometimes, to abandon even what looks like a basic evaluative (...)
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  47. Julian Dodd (2009). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Musical Works: Ontology and Meta-Ontology. Philosophy Compass 4 (6):1044-1048.score: 43.0
    A work of music is repeatable in the following sense: it can be multiply performed or played in different places at the same time, and each such datable, locatable performance or playing is an occurrence of it: an item in which the work itself is somehow present, and which thereby makes the work manifest to an audience. As I see it, the central challenge in the ontology of musical works is to come up with an ontological proposal (i.e. an (...)
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  48. Peter J. Lewis (2007). Quantum Sleeping Beauty. Analysis 67 (293):59-65.score: 43.0
    The Sleeping Beauty paradox in epistemology and the many-worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics both raise problems concerning subjective probability assignments. Furthermore, there are striking parallels between the two cases; in both cases personal experience has a branching structure, and in both cases the agent loses herself among the branches. However, the treatment of probability is very different in the two cases, for no good reason that I can see. Suppose, then, that we adopt the same treatment of probability (...)
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  49. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 43.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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