Search results for 'essential indexicality' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  24
    Matthew Babb (2016). The Essential Indexicality of Intentional Action. Philosophical Quarterly 66 (264):439-457.
    Cappelen and Dever challenge the widely accepted idea that some key aspect of intentional action is essentially indexical. They argue that the classical arguments for this coming from Perry are in fact arguments for a different phenomenon: the opacity of explanatory contexts. I agree with Cappelen and Dever that what Perry says about the ineliminability of indexical terms from explanations of intentional action fails to amount to an argument for this indexicality being essential. But this should not lead (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Filip Buekens (2001). Essential Indexicality and the Irreducibility of Phenomenal Concepts. Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 34 (1-2):75-97.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Jeremy Morris (2011). An Epistemological Approach to Essential Indexicality. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):47.
    The prevailing notion that the problem of essential indexicals must be solved through the theory of meaning of attitude ascriptions is incorrect. Well-known attempts to solve the problem along those lines, e.g., the proposals of Lewis and Perry , have rested on the overly optimistic assumption that there is no limit in principle to the access one may have to the contents of someone else’s thoughts, including their knowledge. That assumption is challenged in this essay. The hazards associated with (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  74
    Erich Rast (2006). Reference and Indexicality. Dissertation, Roskilde University
    Reference and indexicality are two central topics in the Philosophy of Language that are closely tied together. In the first part of this book, a description theory of reference is developed and contrasted with the prevailing direct reference view with the goal of laying out their advantages and disadvantages. The author defends his version of indirect reference against well-known objections raised by Kripke in Naming and Necessity and his successors, and also addresses linguistic aspects like compositionality. In the second (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5. J. Perry (1979). The Essential Indexical. Noûs 13:3--21.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   24 citations  
  6.  52
    Herman Cappelen & Josh Dever (2013). The Inessential Indexical: On the Philosophical Insignificance of Perspective and the First Person. Oxford University Press.
    Cappelen and Dever present a forceful challenge to the standard view that perspective, and in particular the perspective of the first person, is a philosophically deep aspect of the world. Their goal is not to show that we need to explain indexical and other perspectival phenomena in different ways, but to show that the entire topic is an illusion.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  7. Erich Rast (2012). De Se Puzzles, the Knowledge Argument, and the Formation of Internal Knowledge. Analysis and Metaphysics 11 (December):106-132.
    ABSTRACT. Thought experiments about de se attitudes and Jackson’s original Knowledge Argument are compared with each other and discussed from the perspective of a computational theory of mind. It is argued that internal knowledge, i.e. knowledge formed on the basis of signals that encode aspects of their own processing rather than being intentionally directed towards external objects, suffices for explaining the seminal puzzles without resorting to acquaintance or phenomenal character as primitive notions. Since computationalism is ontologically neutral, the account also (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  17
    T. Martin & W. Hinzen, The Grammar of the Essential Indexical.
    Like proper names, demonstratives, and definite descriptions, pronouns have referential uses. These can be 'essentially indexical' in the sense that they cannot be replaced by non-pronominal forms of reference. Here we show that the grammar of pronouns in such occurrences is systematically different from that of other referential expressions, in a way that illuminates the differences in reference in question. We specifically illustrate, in the domain of Romance clitics and pronouns, a hierarchy of referentiality, as related to the topology of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Erich Rast (2007). Reference and Indexicality. Logos.
    Reference and indexicality are two central topics in the Philosophy of Language that are closely tied together. In the first part of this book, a description theory of reference is developed and contrasted with the prevailing direct reference view with the goal of laying out their advantages and disadvantages. The author defends his version of indirect reference against well-known objections raised by Kripke in Naming and Necessity and his successors, and also addresses linguistic aspects like compositionality. In the second (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  33
    Catherine Legg (2015). The Purpose of the Essential Indexical. The Commens Working Papers.
    This paper takes indexicality as a case-study for critical examination of the distinction between semantics and pragmatics as currently conceived in mainstream philosophy of language. Both a ‘pre-indexical’ and ‘post-indexical’ analytic formal semantics are examined and found wanting, and instead an argument is mounted for a ‘properly pragmatist pragmatics’, according to which we do not work out what signs mean in some abstract overall sense and then work out to what use they are being put; rather, we must understand (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  16
    Troy Thomas Catterson (2015). Indexicality, Phenomenality and the Trinity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (2):167-182.
    I utilize recent work in analytic epistemology on the notion of essentially indexical knowledge, as well as Marion’s notion of saturated phenomenality, to ground the psychological model of the Trinity. I argue that classical theism implies that God is essentially omniscient. This omniscience entails complete self-knowledge on God’s part. There are, however, truths about God’s consciousness that are reducible neither to concepts nor to 1st person experience. These are the truths about how God’s presence is perceived from a 2nd person (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  39
    Philip Atkins (2016). The Inessential Indexical: On the Philosophical Insignificance of Perspective and the First Person By Herman Cappelen and Josh Dever. [REVIEW] Analysis 76 (1):99-102.
    Due largely to the influence of Perry (1979) and Lewis (1979), many philosophers now believe that certain attitudes are ‘essentially indexical’, and that this fact is philosophically significant. Going against the conventional wisdom, Cappelen and Dever (2013) (henceforth ‘C&D’) have two goals. The modest goal is to show that Perry, Lewis and their followers have failed to establish any clear ‘essential indexicality’ thesis. The ambitious goal is to show that indexicality is ‘shallow’, in that it does not (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  37
    Vasilis Tsompanidis (2010). Smart and Tensed Beliefs. Philosophia 38 (2):313-325.
    The aim of this paper is to defend a prototype B-theory answer to McTaggart’s Puzzle about Time. Smart hopes to solve the issue by pointing to the “anthropocentricity” of temporal A-notions. There is one important problem: explaining Prior cases (for instance being relieved that a painful experience is over ) in B-theoretic terms. First, it is argued that the problem is how to explain the nature of the subject’s tensed belief in Prior cases; the essential indexicality of the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  42
    Maria Bittner, NASSLLI 2016 Dynamic Semantics (3): Indexicality.
    Featured course on "Dynamic Semantics" at NASSLLI 2016. Day 3: Indexicality. Abstract: Cross-linguistic evidence shows that indexicality, too, crucially involves context change. Speaking up focuses attention on that event and thereby makes it available for discourse reference (by "i", "you", etc). In Kalaallisut, this explains parallel grammatical marking of indexical reference and topic-oriented anaphora. Moreover, shiftable indexicals in Slavey show that certain expressions, e.g. attitude verbs, may update the top perspectival discourse referent from the speech event to an (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Michael Gorman (2005). The Essential and the Accidental. Ratio 18 (3):276–289.
    The distinction between the essential and the accidental characteristics of a thing should be understood not in modal terms (the received view) nor in definitional terms (Fine’s recent proposal) but as follows: an essential characteristic of a thing is one that is not explained by any other of that thing’s characteristics, and an accidental characteristic of a thing is one that is so explained. Various versions of this proposal can be formulated.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  16.  39
    Eros Corazza (2004). Reflecting the Mind: Indexicality and Quasi-Indexicality. Oxford University Press.
    Eros Corazza presents a fascinating investigation of the role that indexicals (e.g. 'I', 'she', 'this', 'today', 'here') play in our thought. Indexicality is crucial to the understanding of such puzzling issues as the nature of the self, the nature of perception, social interaction, psychological pathologies, and psychological development. Corazza draws on work from philosophy, linguistics, and psychology to illuminate this key aspect of the relation between mind and world. By highlighting how indexical thoughts are irreducible and intrinsically perspectival, Corazza (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  17.  78
    Ross Inman (2012). Essential Dependence, Truthmaking, and Mereology: Then and Now. In Lukas Novak, Daniel D. Novotny, Prokop Sousedik & David Svoboda (eds.), Metaphysics: Aristotelian, Scholastic, Analytic. Ontos Verlag 73-90.
    One notable area in analytic metaphysics that has seen a revival of Aristotelian and scho- lastic inspired metaphysics is the return to a more robust construal of the notion of essence, what some have labelled “real” or “serious” essentialism. However, it is only recently that this more robust notion of essence has been implemented into the debate on truthmaking, mainly by the work of E. J. Lowe. The first part of the paper sets out to explore the scholastic roots of (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18. Pekka Väyrynen (2014). Essential Contestability and Evaluation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy (3):1-18.
    Evaluative and normative terms and concepts are often said to be ?essentially contestable?. This notion has been used in political and legal theory and applied ethics to analyse disputes concerning the proper usage of terms like democracy, freedom, genocide, rape, coercion, and the rule of law. Many philosophers have also thought that essential contestability tells us something important about the evaluative in particular. Gallie (who coined the term), for instance, argues that the central structural features of essentially contestable concepts (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  18
    Wayne A. Davis (2013). Minimizing Indexicality. Philosophical Studies 168 (1):1-20.
    I critically examine Cappelen and Lepore’s definition of and tests for indexicality, and refine them to improve their adequacy. Indexicals cannot be defined as expressions with different referents in different contexts unless linguistic meaning and circumstances of evaluation are held constant. I show that despite Cappelen and Lepore’s claim that there are only a handful of indexical expressions, their “basic set” includes a number of large and open classes, and generates an infinity of indexical phrases. And while the tests (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  70
    Delia Belleri (2014). Why Semantic Unspecificity is Not Indexicality. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 10 (1):56-69.
    In this paper, I address the idea that certain sentences suffer from what is generally called semantic unspecificity: their meaning is determinate, but their truth conditions are not. While there tends to be agreement on the idea that semantic unspecificity differs from phenomena such as ambiguity and vagueness, some theorists have defended an account which traces it to indexicality, broadly construed. Some authors have tried to vindicate the distinction between unspecificity and indexicality and, in this paper, I pursue (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  41
    Marc Champagne (2014). Referring to the Qualitative Dimension of Consciousness: Iconicity Instead of Indexicality. Dialogue 53 (1):135-182.
    This paper suggests that reference to phenomenal qualities is best understood as involving iconicity, that is, a passage from sign-vehicle to object that exploits a similarity between the two. This contrasts with a version of the ‘phenomenal concept strategy’ that takes indexicality to be central. However, since it is doubtful that phenomenal qualities are capable of causally interacting with anything, indexical reference seems inappropriate. While a theorist like David Papineau is independently coming to something akin to iconicity, I think (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  22
    Simon Prosser (2015). XII—Why Are Indexicals Essential? Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (3 pt 3):211-233.
    Despite recent challenges, it is commonly held that certain indexical terms such as ‘I', ‘here’ and ‘now’ have a necessary or ‘essential’ role in certain kinds of action. I argue that this is correct, and I offer an explanation. A use of an indexical term of the kind in question connotes a specific relation between the thinking subject and the reference of the indexical. The mental representation of this relation has an epistemic feature that I call first-person redundancy. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  20
    Alexander R. Galloway (2013). Laruelle and Art. Continent 2 (4):230-236.
    In the early 1990s François Laruelle wrote an essay on James Turrell, the American artist known for his use of light and space. 1 While it briefly mentions Turrell's Roden Crater and is cognizant of his other work, the essay focuses on a series of twenty aquatint etchings made by Turrell called First Light (1989-1990). Designed to stand alone as prints, First Light nevertheless acts as a kind of backward glance revisiting and meditating on earlier corner light projections made by (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  90
    Eros Corazza (2004). Essential Indexicals and Quasi-Indicators. Journal of Semantics 21 (4):341-374.
    In this paper I shall focus on Castaneda's notion of quasi-indicators and I shall defend the following theses: (i) Essential indexicals (‘I’, ‘here’ and ‘now’) are intrinsically perspectival mechanisms of reference and, as such, they are not reducible to any other mechanism reference...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  25.  54
    Erich Rast (2008). A Remark About Essential Indexicals. The Reasoner 2 (10):5-6.
    There are two ways of interpreting the argument for the existence of essential indexicals; one of them is too strong, the other one is compatible with reductionist positions.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  19
    Andrew Ward & Pamela Jo Johnson (2013). Necessary Health Care and Basic Needs: Health Insurance Plans and Essential Benefits. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (4):355-371.
    According to HealthCare.gov, by improving access to quality health for all Americans, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will reduce disparities in health insurance coverage. One way this will happen under the provisions of the ACA is by creating a new health insurance marketplace (a health insurance exchange) by 2014 in which “all people will have a choice for quality, affordable health insurance even if a job loss, job switch, move or illness occurs”. This does not mean that everyone will have (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  3
    Alessandra Bernardi & Renzo Pegoraro (2003). Italian Drug Policy: Ethical Aims of Essential Assistance Levels. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 11 (4):279-286.
    In 2001 the Italian Government defined Essential Assistance Levels (LEA), which can be considered as an important step forward in the health care system. The Italian health care system would provide payment of essential and uniform aid services in order to safeguard many values such as human dignity, personal health, equal assistance and good health practices. The Ministry of Health has worked to rationalize the National Formulary and to define evaluation methods for drugs in order to choose what (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Michael Blome-Tillmann (2008). The Indexicality of 'Knowledge'. Philosophical Studies 138 (1):29 - 53.
    Epistemic contextualism—the view that the content of the predicate ‘know’ can change with the context of utterance—has fallen into considerable disrepute recently. Many theorists have raised doubts as to whether ‘know’ is context-sensitive, typically basing their arguments on data suggesting that ‘know’ behaves semantically and syntactically in a way quite different from recognised indexicals such as ‘I’ and ‘here’ or ‘flat’ and ‘empty’. This paper takes a closer look at three pertinent objections of this kind, viz. at what I call (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  29. David J. Chalmers (2004). Imagination, Indexicality, and Intensions. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):182-90.
    John Perry's book Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness is a lucid and engaging defense of a physicalist view of consciousness against various anti-physicalist arguments. In what follows, I will address Perry's responses to the three main anti-physicalist arguments he discusses: the zombie argument , the knowledge argument , and the modal argument.
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  30.  63
    Derek Ball (2014). Indexicality, Transparency, and Mental Files. Inquiry 58 (4):353-367.
    Francois Recanati’s Mental Files presents a picture of the mind on which mental representations are indexical and transparent. I dispute this picture: there is no clear case for regarding mental representations as indexical, and there are counterexamples to transparency.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  17
    Drora Karotkin, Samuel Nitzal & Jacob Paroush (1988). The Essential Ranking of Decision Rules in Small Panels of Experts. Theory and Decision 24 (3):253-268.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  32.  82
    Ilhan Inan (2008). Rigid General Terms and Essential Predicates. Philosophical Studies 140 (2):213 - 228.
    What does it mean for a general term to be rigid? It is argued by some that if we take general terms to designate their extensions, then almost no empirical general term will turn out to be rigid; and if we take them to designate some abstract entity, such as a kind, then it turns out that almost all general terms will be rigid. Various authors who pursue this line of reasoning have attempted to capture Kripke’s intent by defining a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  61
    Tomis Kapitan (2006). Indexicality and Self-Awareness. In Uriah Kriegel & Kenneth Williford (eds.), Self-Representational Approaches to Consciousness. MIT Press 379--408.
    Self-awareness is commonly expressed by means of indexical expressions, primarily, first- person pronouns like.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Joseph Owens (2003). Anti-Individualism, Indexicality, and Character. In Martin Hahn & B. Ramberg (eds.), Reflections and Replies: Essays on the Philosophy of Tyler Burge. MIT Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. John Perry (1979). The Problem of the Essential Indexical. Noûs 13 (December):3-21.
    This collection deals with various problems related to "self-locating beliefs": the sorts of beliefs one expresses with indexicals and demonstratives, like "I" and "this." He includes such well-known essays as "Frege on Demonstratives," "The Problem of the Essential Indexical," and "The Prince and the Phone Booth.".
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   157 citations  
  36. John Perry (1993). The Problem of the Essential Indexical: And Other Essays. Oxford University Press.
    A collection of twelve essays by John Perry and two essays he co-authored, this book deals with various problems related to "self-locating beliefs": the sorts of beliefs one expresses with indexicals and demonstratives, like "I" and "this." Postscripts have been added to a number of the essays discussing criticisms by authors such as Gareth Evans and Robert Stalnaker. Included with such well-known essays as "Frege on Demonstratives," "The Problem of the Essential Indexical," "From Worlds to Situations," and "The Prince (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   68 citations  
  37. Penelope Mackie (2006). How Things Might Have Been: Individuals, Kinds, and Essential Properties. Published in the United States by Oxford University Press.
    Penelope Mackie's book is a novel treatment of an issue central to much current work in metaphysics: the distinction between the essential and accidental properties of individuals. Mackie challenges widely held views, and arrives at what she calls "minimalist essentialism," an unorthodox theory according to which ordinary individuals have relatively few interesting essential properties. Mackie's clear and accessible discussions of issues surrounding necessity and essentialism mean that the book will appeal as much to graduate students as it will (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  38. Margaret Scotford Archer (ed.) (1998). Critical Realism: Essential Readings. Routledge.
    Since the publication of Roy Bhaskar's A Realist Theory of Science in 1975, critical realism has emerged as one of the most powerful new directions in the philosophy of science and social science, offering a real alternative to both positivism and postmodernism. This reader makes accessible in one volume key readings to stimulate debate about and within critical realism, including: the transcendental realist philosophy of science elaborated in A Realist Theory of Science ; Bhaskar's critical naturalist philosophy of social science; (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   32 citations  
  39. Sonia Roca-Royes (2011). Essential Properties and Individual Essences. Philosophy Compass 6 (1):65-77.
    According to Essentialism, an object’s properties divide into those that are essential and those that are accidental. While being human is commonly thought to be essential to Socrates, being a philosopher plausibly is not. We can motivate the distinction by appealing—as we just did—to examples. However, it is not obvious how best to characterize the notion of essential property, nor is it easy to give conclusive arguments for the essentiality of a given property. In this paper, I (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  40. Virginia Held (ed.) (1995). Justice and Care: Essential Readings in Feminist Ethics. Westview Press.
    When feminist philosophers first turned their attention to traditional ethical theory, its almost exclusive emphasis upon justice, rights, abstract rationality, and individual autonomy came under special criticism. Women’s experiences seemed to suggest the need for a focus on care, empathetic relations, and the interdependence of persons.The most influential readings of what has become an extremely lively and fruitful debate are reproduced here along with important new contributions by Alison Jaggar and Sara Ruddick. As this volume testifies, there is no agreement (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  41. Teresa Robertson & Philip Atkins (2013). Essential Vs. Accidental Properties. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    The distinction between essential versus accidental properties has been characterized in various ways, but it is currently most commonly understood in modal terms: an essential property of an object is a property that it must have, while an accidental property of an object is one that it happens to have but that it could lack. Let’s call this the basic modal characterization, where a modal characterization of a notion is one that explains the notion in terms of necessity/possibility. (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  42.  32
    Ann Cavoukian, Scott Taylor & Martin E. Abrams (2010). Privacy by Design: Essential for Organizational Accountability and Strong Business Practices. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):405-413.
    An accountability-based privacy governance model is one where organizations are charged with societal objectives, such as using personal information in a manner that maintains individual autonomy and which protects individuals from social, financial and physical harms, while leaving the actual mechanisms for achieving those objectives to the organization. This paper discusses the essential elements of accountability identified by the Galway Accountability Project, with scholarship from the Centre for Information Policy Leadership at Hunton & Williams LLP. Conceptual Privacy by Design (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  43.  41
    Michael Ravvin (2008). Incentivizing Access and Innovation for Essential Medicines: A Survey of the Problem and Proposed Solutions. Public Health Ethics 1 (2):110-123.
    Michael Ravvin, Department of Political Science, Columbia University, 420 W. 118th Street, New York, NY 10027 Email: mer2133{at}columbia.edu ' + u + '@' + d + ' '//--> Abstract The existing intellectual property regime discourages the innovation of, and access to, essential medicines for the poor in developing countries. A successful proposal to reform the existing system must address these challenges of access and innovation. This essay will survey the problems in the existing pharmaceutical patent system and offer critical (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  44.  18
    Carolyn Ells, Matthew R. Hunt & Jane Chambers-Evans (2011). Relational Autonomy as an Essential Component of Patient-Centered Care. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (2):79-101.
    Over the past decade, patient-centered care has become increasingly prominent in discussions of health-care practice, policy, and organization. Patient-centered care is a holistic concept whereby health professionals individualize their encounters with each patient (Stewart 2001). Decision-making strategies, recommendations, and plans of care are all devised and acted upon in relation to the particular patient. The patient is assumed to have a unique configuration of elements comprising her identity, illness experience, and physical, social, and environmental context. While partnership is understood as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  66
    Tim Thornton (2007). Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry is a concise introduction to the growing field of philosophy of psychiatry. Divided into three main aspects of psychiatric clinical judgement, values, meanings and facts, it examines the key debates about mental health care, and the philosophical ideas and tools needed to assess those debates, in six chapters. In addition to outlining the state of play, Essential Philosophy of Psychiatry presents a coherent and unified approach across the different debates, characterized by a rejection of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  46.  41
    Eric Hochstein (2013). Intentional Models as Essential Scientific Tools. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (2):199-217.
    In this article, I argue that the use of scientific models that attribute intentional content to complex systems bears a striking similarity to the way in which statistical descriptions are used. To demonstrate this, I compare and contrast an intentional model with a statistical model, and argue that key similarities between the two give us compelling reasons to consider both as a type of phenomenological model. I then demonstrate how intentional descriptions play an important role in scientific methodology as a (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  54
    Kai Vogeley, M. Moskopp Kurthen, P. Falkai & W. Maier (1999). Essential Functions of the Human Self Model Are Implemented in the Prefrontal Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (3):343-363.
    The human self model comprises essential features such as the experiences of ownership, of body-centered spatial perspectivity, and of a long-term unity of beliefs and attitudes. In the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, it is suggested that clinical subsyndromes like cognitive disorganization and derealization syndromes reflect disorders of this self model. These features are neurobiologically instantiated as an episodically active complex neural activation pattern and can be mapped to the brain, given adequate operationalizations of self model features. In its unique capability (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  48. Maxine Sheets-Johnstone (2009). Animation: The Fundamental, Essential, and Properly Descriptive Concept. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):375-400.
    As its title indicates, this article shows animation to be the fundamental, essential, and properly descriptive concept to understandings of animate life. A critical and constructive path is taken toward an illumination of these threefold dimensions of animation. The article is critical in its attention to a central linguistic formulation in cognitive neuroscience, namely, enaction ; it is constructive in setting forth an analysis of affectivity as exemplar of a staple of animate life, elucidating its biological and existential foundations (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  49.  35
    Udo Schüklenk & Richard E. Ashcroft (2002). Affordable Access to Essential Medication in Developing Countries: Conflicts Between Ethical and Economic Imperatives. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 27 (2):179 – 195.
    Recent economic and political advances in developing countries on the African continent and South East Asia are threatened by the rising death and morbidity rates of HIV/AIDS. In the first part of this paper we explain the reasons for the absence of affordable access to essential AIDS medication. In the second part we take a closer look at some of the pivotal frameworks relevant for this situation and undertake an ethical analysis of these frameworks. In the third part we (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  50.  10
    Marie Guillot (2016). Thinking of Oneself as the Thinker: The Concept of Self and the Phenomenology of Intellection. Philosophical Explorations 19 (2):138-160.
    The indexical word “I” has traditionally been assumed to be an overt analogue to the concept of self, and the best model for understanding it. This approach, I argue, overlooks the essential role of cognitive phenomenology in the mastery of the concept of self. I suggest that a better model is to be found in a different kind of representation: phenomenal concepts or more generally phenomenally grounded concepts. I start with what I take to be the defining feature of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000