Search results for 'ethical epistemology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Andrew H. T. Fergus & Julie I. A. Rowney (2005). Sustainable Development: Epistemological Frameworks & an Ethic of Choice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 57 (2):197 - 207.score: 66.0
    As the second part of a research agenda addressing the idea and meaning of Sustainable Development, this paper responds to the challenges set in the first paper. Using a Foucaudian perspective, we uncover and highlight the importance of discourse in the development of societal context which could lead to the radical change in our epistemological thought necessary for Sustainable Development to reach its potential. By developing an argument for an epistemological change, we suggest that business organizations have an ethical (...)
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  2. Hyemin Han & Changwoo Jeong (2013). Improving Epistemological Beliefs and Moral Judgment Through an STS-Based Science Ethics Education Program. Science and Engineering Ethics (1):1-24.score: 66.0
    This study develops a Science–Technology–Society (STS)-based science ethics education program for high school students majoring in or planning to major in science and engineering. Our education program includes the fields of philosophy, history, sociology and ethics of science and technology, and other STS-related theories. We expected our STS-based science ethics education program to promote students’ epistemological beliefs and moral judgment development. These psychological constructs are needed to properly solve complicated moral and social dilemmas in the fields of science and engineering. (...)
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  3. Timothy J. Golden (2012). From Epistemology to Ethics: Theoretical and Practical Reason in Kant and Douglass. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (4):603-628.score: 66.0
    The aim of this essay is to provide a philosophical discussion of Frederick Douglass's thought in relation to Christianity. I expand upon the work of Bill E. Lawson and Frank M. Kirkland—who both argue that there are Kantian features present in Douglass as it relates to his conception of the individual—by arguing that there are similarities between Douglass and Kant not only concerning the relationship between morality and Christianity, but also concerning the nature of the soul. Specifically, I try to (...)
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  4. Roger Crisp (2010). Virtue Ethics and Virtue Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):22-40.score: 64.0
    The aim of this essay is to test the claim that epistemologists—virtue epistemologists in particular—have much to learn from virtue ethics. The essay begins with an outline of virtue ethics itself. This section concludes that a pure form of virtue ethics is likely to be unattractive, so the virtue epistemologist should examine the "impure" views of real philosophers. Aristotle is usually held up as the paradigm virtue ethicist. His doctrine of the mean is described, and it is explained how that (...)
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  5. Kathrin Ohnsorge & Guy Widdershoven (2011). Monological Versus Dialogical Consciousness – Two Epistemological Views on the Use of Theory in Clinical Ethical Practice. Bioethics 25 (7):361-369.score: 64.0
    In this article, we argue that a critical examination of epistemological and anthropological presuppositions might lead to a more fruitful use of theory in clinical-ethical practice. We differentiate between two views of conceptualizing ethics, referring to Charles Taylors' two epistemological models: ‘monological’ versus ‘dialogical consciousness’. We show that the conception of ethics in the model of ‘dialogical consciousness’ is radically different from the classical understanding of ethics in the model of ‘monological consciousness’. To reach accountable moral judgments, ethics cannot (...)
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  6. Gebhard Geiger (1995). Why Are There No Objective Values? A Critique of Ethical Intuitionism From an Epistemological Point of View. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 26 (1):35 - 62.score: 64.0
    Using the mathematical frameworks of economic preference ranking, subjective probability, and rational learning through empirical evidence, the epistemological implications of teleological ethical intuitionism are pointed out to the extent to which the latter is based on cognitivist and objectivist concepts of value. The notions of objective value and objective norm are critically analysed with reference to epistemological criteria of intersubjectively shared valuative experience. It is concluded that one cannot meaningfully postulate general material theories of morality that could be tested, (...)
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  7. Herman Paul (2012). Virtue Ethics and/or Virtue Epistemology: A Response to Anton Froeyman. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (3):432-446.score: 64.0
    In response to Anton Froeyman's paper, “Virtues of Historiography,“ this article argues that philosophers of history interested in why historians cherish such virtues as carefulness, impartiality, and intellectual courage would do wise not to classify these virtues unequivocally as either epistemic or moral virtues. Likewise, in trying to grasp the roles that virtues play in the historian's professional practice, philosophers of history would be best advised to avoid adopting either an epistemological or an ethical perspective. Assuming that the historian's (...)
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  8. Marie-Josée Potvin (2010). Ricoeur's “Petite Éthique”: An Ethical Epistemological Perspective for Clinician–Bioethicists. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (4):311-326.score: 62.0
    The passage from a posture of clinician to that of clinician–bioethicist poses significant challenges for health professionals, most notably with regards to theoretical or epistemological views of complex ethical impasses encountered in clinical settings. Apprehending these situations from the only clinical perspective of the nurse or the doctor, for example, can be very unproductive to help solve this kind of situation and certainly poses great limits to the role of the clinician–bioethicist. Drawing on my own experience as a former (...)
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  9. Michael O'Neil (2006). Ethics and Epistemology: Ecclesial Existence in a Postmodern Era. Journal of Religious Ethics 34 (1):21 - 40.score: 60.0
    This essay endeavors to show that application of a universalist epistemic method in theological ethics results in a construal of God, which is, from a biblical perspective, reductionist, and is a form of ethics in which universality is achieved at the expense of plurality. It argues for the formal possibility of an ecclesial ethics grounded in a tradition-centered rationality. It further argues that such an ethic need not result in a narrow and defensive sectarianism, a rigid and static orthodoxy, or (...)
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  10. Matthew S. Bedke (2010). Intuitional Epistemology in Ethics. Philosophy Compass 5 (12):1069-1083.score: 58.0
    Here I examine the major theories of ethical intuitions, focusing on the epistemic status of this class of intuitions. We cover self-evidence theory, seeming-state theory, and some of the recent contributions from experimental philosophy.
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  11. Christine Swanton (2014). The Notion of the Moral: The Relation Between Virtue Ethics and Virtue Epistemology. Philosophical Studies 171 (1):121-134.score: 58.0
    In this paper I argue that virtue ethics should be understood as a form of ethics which integrates various domains of the practical in relation to which virtues are excellences. To argue this it is necessary to distinguish two senses of the “moral”: the broad sense which integrates the domains of the practical and a narrow classificatory sense. Virtue ethics, understood as above, believes that all genuine virtue should be understood as what I call virtues proper. To possess a virtue (...)
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  12. Piersante Sestini (2010). Epistemology and Ethics of Evidence-Based Medicine: Putting Goal-Setting in the Right Place. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (2):301-305.score: 58.0
    While evidence-based medicine (EBM) is often accused on relying on a paradigm of 'absolute truth', it is in fact highly consistent with Karl Popper's criterion of demarcation through falsification. Even more relevant, the first three steps of the EBM process are closely patterned on Popper's evolutionary approach of objective knowledge: (1) recognition of a problem; (2) generation of solutions; and (3) selection of the best solution. This places the step 1 of the EBM process (building an answerable question) in a (...)
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  13. Alison M. Jaggar (2000). Ethics Naturalized: Feminism's Contribution to Moral Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 31 (5):452-468.score: 56.0
  14. John Bishop (2007). Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.score: 56.0
    Does our available evidence show that some particular religion is correct?
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  15. Joseph Margolis (2005). Replies: Ethics, Metaphysics, Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 36 (5):613-633.score: 56.0
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  16. Anna Luise Kirkengen & Eline Thornquist (2012). The Lived Body as a Medical Topic: An Argument for an Ethically Informed Epistemology. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1095-1101.score: 56.0
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  17. Dalibor Renić (2012). Ethical & Epistemic Normativity: Lonergan & Virtue Epistemology. Marquette University Press.score: 56.0
     
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  18. Mark Timmons, John Greco & Alfred R. Mele (eds.) (2007). Rationality and the Good: Critical Essays on the Ethics and Epistemology of Robert Audi. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    For over thirty years, Robert Audi has produced important work in ethics, epistemology, and the theory of action. This volume features thirteen new critical essays on Audi by a distinguished group of authors: Fred Adams, William Alston, Laurence BonJour, Roger Crisp, Elizabeth Fricker, Bernard Gert, Thomas Hurka, Hugh McCann, Al Mele, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Raimo Tuomela, Candace Vogler, and Timothy Williamson. Audi's introductory essay provides a thematic overview interconnecting his views in ethics, epistemology, and philosophy of action. The volume (...)
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  19. Anthony Robert Booth (2008). Deontology in Ethics and Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 39 (4-5):530-545.score: 52.0
    Abstract: In this article, I consider some of the similarities and differences between deontologism in ethics and epistemology. In particular, I highlight two salient differences between them. I aim to show that by highlighting these differences we can see that epistemic deontologism does not imply epistemic internalism and that it is not a thesis primarily about epistemic permissibility . These differences are: (1) deontologism in epistemology has a quasi -teleological feature (not shared with moral deontologism) in that it (...)
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  20. Gisela Striker (ed.) (1974/1996). Essays on Hellenistic Epistemology and Ethics. Cambridge University Press.score: 52.0
    The doctrines of the Hellenistic Schools - Epicureans, Stoics, and Sceptics - are known to have had a formative influence on later thought, but because the primary sources are lost, they have to be reconstructed from later reports. This important collection of essays by one of the foremost interpreters of Hellenistic philosophy focuses on key questions in epistemology and ethics debated by Greek and Roman philosophers of the Hellenistic period. There is currently a new awareness of the great interest (...)
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  21. Guy Axtell (2003). Felix Culpa: Luck in Ethics and Epistemology. Metaphilosophy 34 (3):331--352.score: 52.0
    Luck threatens in similar ways our conceptions of both moral and epistemic evaluation. This essay examines the problem of luck as a metaphilosophical problem spanning the division between subfields in philosophy. I first explore the analogies between ethical and epistemic luck by comparing influential attempts to expunge luck from our conceptions of agency in these two subfields. I then focus upon Duncan Pritchard's challenge to the motivations underlying virtue epistemology, based specifically on its handling of the problem of (...)
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  22. Guy Axtell (2010). Agency Ascriptions in Ethics and Epistemology: Or, Navigating Intersections, Narrow and Broad. Metaphilosophy 41 (1):73-94.score: 52.0
    Abstract: In this article, the logic and functions of character-trait ascriptions in ethics and epistemology is compared, and two major problems, the "generality problem" for virtue epistemologies and the "global trait problem" for virtue ethics, are shown to be far more similar in structure than is commonly acknowledged. I suggest a way to put the generality problem to work by making full and explicit use of a sliding scale--a "narrow-broad spectrum of trait ascription"-- and by accounting for the various (...)
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  23. Susana Nuccetelli (ed.) (2007). Themes From G.E. Moore: New Essays in Epistemology and Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 52.0
    These thirteen original essays, whose authors include some of the world's leading philosophers, examine themes from the work of the Cambridge philosopher G. E. Moore (1873-1958), and demonstrate his considerable continuing influence on philosophical debate. Part I bears on epistemological topics, such as skepticism about the external world, the significance of common sense, and theories of perception. Part II is devoted to themes in ethics, such as Moore's open question argument, his non-naturalism, utilitarianism, and his notion of organic unities.
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  24. Ricardo Crespo (2008). 'The Economic' According to Aristotle: Ethical, Political and Epistemological Implications. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):281-294.score: 52.0
    A renewed concern with Aristotle’s thought about the economic aspects of human life and society can be observed. Aristotle dealt with the economic issues in his practical philosophy. He thus considered ‘the economic’ within an ethical and political frame. This vision is coherent with a specific ontology of ‘the economic’ according to Aristotle. In a recent paper, I analysed this ontology and left its consequences, especially for Ethics and Politics, for another paper. In this article, I firstly summarise the (...)
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  25. Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.) (2007). Themes From G.E. Moore: New Essays in Epistemology and Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 52.0
    These thirteen original essays, whose authors include some of the world's leading philosophers, examine themes from the work of the Cambridge philosopher G. E. Moore (1873-1958), and demonstrate his considerable continuing influence on philosophical debate. Part I bears on epistemological topics, such as skepticism about the external world, the significance of common sense, and theories of perception. Part II is devoted to themes in ethics, such as Moore's open question argument, his non-naturalism, utilitarianism, and his notion of organic unities.
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  26. Robyn Bluhm (2010). The Epistemology and Ethics of Chronic Disease Research: Further Lessons From Ecmo. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 31 (2):107-122.score: 52.0
    Robert Truog describes the controversial randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy in newborns. Because early results with ECMO indicated that it might be a great advance, saving many lives, Truog argues that ECMO should not have been tested using RCTs, but that a long-term, large-scale observational study of actual clinical practice should have been conducted instead. Central to Truog’s argument, however, is the idea that ECMO is an unusual case. Thus, it is an open question whether (...)
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  27. Norm Friesen (2010). Mind and Machine: Ethical and Epistemological Implications for Research. [REVIEW] AI and Society 25 (1):83-92.score: 52.0
    Technologies are significant in research not only as instruments for gathering data and analyzing information; they also provide a valuable resource for the development of theory—in terms of what has been called the “tools to theory heuristic.” Focusing on the specific example of the fields of educational psychology and instructional technology and design, this paper begins by describing how the workings of the “tools to theory heuristic” are evident in the metaphors and descriptions of behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. In each (...)
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  28. Jim Cheney & Anthony Weston (1999). Environmental Ethics as Environmental Etiquette: Toward an Ethics-Based Epistemology. Environmental Ethics 21 (2):115-134.score: 50.0
    An ethics-based epistemology is necessary for environmental philosophy—a sharply different approach from the epistemology-based ethics that the field has inherited, mostly implicitly, from mainstream ethics. In this paper, we try to uncover this inherited epistemology and point toward an alternative. In section two, we outline a general contrast between an ethics-based epistemology and an epistemology-based ethics. In section three, we examine the relationship between ethics and epistemology in an ethics-based epistemology, drawing extensively on (...)
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  29. Alain-Marc Rieu (ed.) (2012). Chinese & French Views on Knowledge & Society Today: Philosophy, Ethics, Epistemology. Archives Contemporaines.score: 50.0
    In this age of globalization, societies and people across the world are asking themselves the same questions about modernity: where are we going ?
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  30. Owain Jones (2001). 'Before the Dark of Reason': Some Ethical and Epistemological Considerations on the Otherness of Children. Ethics, Place and Environment 4 (2):173 – 178.score: 50.0
    This paper focuses on the 'otherness' of childhood. I argue that this otherness has to be acknowledged and respected within the various, welcome attempts in social science study, and society more widely, to somehow bring children into various practices, to listen to their voices and to see things through their eyes. Some ethical and methodological considerations of this are considered, particularly the notion of ethical space, epistemological limits and developments in theory and methodology.
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  31. Bob Jickling & Paul C. Paquet (2005). Wolf Stories: Reflections on Science, Ethics, and Epistemology. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):115-134.score: 50.0
    Wolf stories, including the systematic and government-sponsored killing of Yukon wolves, provide a context for the examination of assumptions about Western epistemology, and particularly science, in light of the “ethics-based epistemology” presented by Jim Cheney and Anthony Weston, with implications for research, responsibility, and animal welfare. Working from a premise of universal consideration, andminding the ethical basis of knowledge claims, enables richer conceptions of environmental ethics and creates new possibilities for animal welfare and managing for wildlife.
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  32. Mohammed Y. A. Rawwas, Surendra Arjoon & Yusuf Sidani (2013). An Introduction of Epistemology to Business Ethics: A Study of Marketing Middle-Managers. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):525-539.score: 50.0
    A vast majority of marketing theory and research has focused on relativism and idealism in order to understand ethical behavior. However, making ethical assessments that in turn influence behavior is much more complicated than it appears. One of the most important developments in contemporary philosophy has been the renewed interest in epistemic virtue. Epistemologists contend that belief is an ethical process that is susceptible to the intellectual virtue or vice of one’s own life and personal experiences. Open-mindedness, (...)
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  33. Warren Midgley, Patrick Alan Danaher & Margaret Baguley (eds.) (2012). The Role of Participants in Education Research: Ethics, Epistemologies, and Methods. Routledge.score: 50.0
    This book explores different perspectives on the role, influence and importance of participants in education research.
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  34. Gordon Tait, Clare D. O'Farrell, Sarah Davey Chesters, Joanne M. Brownlee, Rebecca S. Spooner-Lane & Elizabeth M. Curtis (2012). " Are There Any Right or Wrong Answers in Teaching Philosophy": Ethics, Epistemology, and Philosophy in the Classroom. Teaching Philosophy 35 (4).score: 50.0
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  35. Gert Biesta (2008). Heesoon Bai is Associate Professor at Simon Fraser University in Canada. She Teaches Philosophy of Education, and Her Research Interests Are in Ethics, Epistemology, Ecology, and Asian Philosophies. Recent Publications Include Co-Authored Article,“'To See a World in a Grain of Sand': Complexity and Moral Education,” in Complicity: An International Journal of Complex. [REVIEW] In Denise Egéa-Kuehne (ed.), Levinas and Education: At the Intersection of Faith and Reason. Routledge. 287.score: 50.0
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  36. Hallvard Lillehammer (2011). The Epistemology of Ethical Intuitions. Philosophy 86 (336):175-200.score: 48.0
    Intuitions are widely assumed to play an important evidential role in ethical inquiry. In this paper I critically discuss a recently influential claim that the epistemological credentials of ethical intuitions are undermined by their causal pedigree and functional role. I argue that this claim is exaggerated. In the course of doing so I argue that the challenge to ethical intuitions embodied in this claim should be understood not only as a narrowly epistemological challenge, but also as a (...)
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  37. Stephen R. Brown (2004). Naturalized Virtue Ethics and the Epistemological Gap. Journal of Moral Philosophy 1 (2):197-209.score: 48.0
    The proponent of the epistemological gap maintains that value claims are justified in a different way than are nonvalue claims. I show that a neo-Aristotelian naturalized virtue ethics does not fall prey to this gap. There are ethical claims concerning human beings that are epistemically justified in a way logically identical to the way in which are justified certain nonethical claims about human and nonhuman organisms. This demonstration (1) lends credibility to naturalized virtue ethics, (2) calls into question the (...)
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  38. David Copp (2013). Four Epistemological Challenges to Ethical Naturalism: Naturalized Epistemology and the First-Person Perspective. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (sup1):30-74.score: 48.0
    (2000). Four Epistemological Challenges to Ethical Naturalism: Naturalized Epistemology and the First-Person Perspective. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 30, Supplementary Volume 26: Moral Epistemology Naturalized, pp. 30-74.
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  39. Lee S. Weinberg & Richard E. Vatz (1982). The Insanity Plea: Szaszian Ethics and Epistemology. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (3):417-433.score: 48.0
    The traditional legal verdict of not guilty by reason of insanity as well as the more recent verdict of guilty but mentally ill rest on often unquestioned epistemological assumptions about human behavior and its causes, unjustified reliance on forensic psychiatrists, and questionable, if not deplorable ethical standards. This paper offers a critique of legal perspectives on insanity, historical and current, based on the altermative epistemological and ethical assumptions of Thomas S. Szasz. In addition, we examine Szasz''s unique rhetorical (...)
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  40. Margaret Urban Walker (1989). Moral Understandings: Alternative "Epistemology" for a Feminist Ethics. Hypatia 4 (2):15 - 28.score: 48.0
    Work on representing women's voices in ethics has produced a vision of moral understanding profoundly subversive of the traditional philosophical conception of moral knowledge. I explicate this alternative moral "epistemology," identify how it challenges the prevailing view, and indicate some of its resources for a liberatory feminist critique of philosophical ethics.
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  41. John Elliott & Dominik Luke (2008). Epistemology as Ethics in Research and Policy: The Use of Case Studies. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (s1):87-119.score: 48.0
    This article examines the ethnographic case study in education in the context of policy making with particular emphasis on the practice of research and policy making. The central claim of the article is that it is impossible to establish a transcendental epistemology of the case study on instrumental rationality. Instead it argues for the notion of situated judgement that needs to be made by practitioners in context, practitioners being both researchers and policy makers. In other words, questions about the (...)
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  42. Jennifer Lackey (2004). Review of Michael DePaul (Ed.), Linda Zagzebski (Ed.), Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (8).score: 48.0
    While there is a vast amount of writing on the concept of a virtue and its role in various areas of philosophy, this literature is fairly fragmented, with historians, ethicists, and epistemologists rarely engaged in direction conversation with one another. In light of this, Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives from Ethics and Epistemology is a most welcome collection of essays in which virtue epistemologists and virtue ethicists—including ethicists grounded in the history of philosophy—for the first time take up various issues in (...)
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  43. Tatjana Schonwalder-Kuntze (2012). Sartrean Authenticity: The Epistemological and Ontological Bases of Sartrean Ethics. Sartre Studies International 17 (2):60-80.score: 48.0
    In general, the Sartrean concept of the subject as "being-for-self" and "being-for-others" is read as if Sartre had sketched these structures as given "a priori" and therefore as unalterable . One of the consequences of this interpretation lies in calling Sartre's theory contradictory, especially with regard to his ethics, because of the assumption that, based on this concept, changing the inauthentic structures of the subject into authentic ones would be impossible. Contrary to this interpretation, I argue that Sartre's philosophical theory (...)
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  44. Rosemarie Tong (1991). The Epistemology and Ethics of Consensus: Uses and Misuses of 'Ethical' Expertise. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 16 (4):409-426.score: 48.0
    In this paper I examine the epistemology and ethics of consensus, focusing on the ways in which decision makers use/misuse ethical expertise. The major questions I raise and tentative answers I give are the following: First, are the ‘experts’ really experts? My tentative answer is that they are bona fide experts who often represent specific interest groups. Second, is the experts' authority merely epistemological or is it also ethical? My tentative answer is that the experts' authority consists (...)
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  45. Bruce Maxwell & Eric Racine (2012). Does the Neuroscience Research on Early Stress Justify Responsive Childcare? Examining Interwoven Epistemological and Ethical Challenges. Neuroethics 5 (2):159-172.score: 48.0
    This paper examines interwoven ethical and epistemological issues raised by attempts to promote responsive childcare practices based on neuroscience evidence on the developmental effects of early stress. The first section presents this “neuroscience argument for responsive early childcare”. The second section introduces some evidential challenges posed by the use of evidence from developmental neuroscience as grounds for parental practice recommendations and then advances a set of observations about the limitations of the evidence typically cited. Section three highlights the (...) implications of the neuroscience argument for responsive early childcare. It argues that the neuroscience argument, first, fuels unwarranted parental anxiety by unduly raising the stakes of families’ early childcare choices and, second, threatens public confidence in developmental science’s potential to inform childcare practices and policy that enhance children’s health and well being. (shrink)
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  46. Harun Tepe (2007). Epistemological Dilemmas of Contemporary Ethics. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:25-30.score: 48.0
    Contemporary ethics has often faced questions concerning its epistemological foundations. Thus epistemological problems of ethics have become a main interest in ethics, and ethics has begun to be considered mainly as meta-ethics or analytical ethics, mainly dealing with the foundation of ethical propositions or norms. However questions raised about the foundation of ethics have mostly ended in dilemmas. Today, moral dilemmas or epistemological dilemmas of ethics pose a challenge to contemporary ethics in the form of questions like "Is ethics (...)
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  47. Timothy P. Jackson (1999). Naturalism, Formalism, and Supernaturalism: Moral Epistemology and Comparative Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (3):477 - 506.score: 48.0
    If the much discussed fragmentation of the West means that we can seldom hold constructive moral conversations with our near neighbors, why imagine that comparative ethics is feasible as a critical enterprise with a coherent method? How, more specifically, do we understand the relative merits of naturalism, formalism, and supernaturalism as ethical orientations? The author addresses these questions first by examining the meaning of the quoted terms, then by criticizing the inordinate optimism of most naturalisms and formalisms. The article (...)
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  48. Kevin Meeker (2013). Ethics and Epistemology in Hume. The European Legacy 18 (4):457-466.score: 48.0
    This essay addresses the relationship between Hume?s moral theory and his epistemological project. More specifically, it focuses on one particular aspect of the relationship between Hume?s moral theory and his general scepticism with regard to reason. Several philosophers, such as David Owen and Annette Baier, have suggested that Hume?s moral theory provides significant support for his appeal to reason/reasoning. To uncover some of the main obstacles that any future attempts to rest Humean reason on ethics will probably face, this essay (...)
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  49. J. B. Tubbs (1996). Moral Epistemology in Richard McCormick's Ethics. Christian Bioethics 2 (1):114-126.score: 48.0
    In response to Michael Allsopp's essay ‘Deontic and epistemic authority in Roman Catholic ethics: The case of Richard McCormick’ it is argued that a carefully nuanced analysis reveals further epistemological implications of “reason informed by faith.” Three areas of McCormick's ethical analyses are considered which respond to basic questions about our moral knowledge, being and choosing 1) How do our value commitments arise? 2) From what perspective do we appreciate and interpret our value commitments?; 3) How do our value (...)
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  50. Michael R. DePaul & Linda Zagzebski (eds.) (2003). Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.score: 46.0
    The idea of a virtue has traditionally been important in ethics, but only recently has gained attention as an idea that can explain how we ought to form beliefs as well as how we ought to act. Moral philosophers and epistemologists have different approaches to the idea of intellectual virtue; here, Michael DePaul and Linda Zagzebski bring work from both fields together for the first time to address all of the important issues. It will be required reading for anyone working (...)
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