Search results for 'ethical liberalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  93
    Richard Bellamy (1991). Between Economic and Ethical Liberalism: Benedetto Croce and the Dilemmas of Liberal Politics. History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):175-195.
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  2.  10
    Richard Flathman (2010). In and Out of the Ethical: The Realist Liberalism of Bernard Williams. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):77.
    In his later writings, the British philosopher Bernard Williams increasingly turned his attentions to issues concerning practical politics and in political theory. He advanced a moderately sceptical and realist liberalism that features distinctive views concerning the appropriate relations among moral, ethical and political theory, and concerning legitimacy, freedom and equality, and democracy. This article examines these and related features of his thinking and locates them in the context of currently influential formulations of liberalism.
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  3.  20
    Abel Garza (1990). Hegel's Critique of Liberalism and Natural Law: Reconstructing Ethical Life. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 9 (4):371 - 398.
    This essay considers the evolution of Hegel's political and legal theory with respect to the emergence of a classical liberal society and modern natural law. I argue that Hegel abandoned his early concerns which focused on a revival of the Greek polis and ethics over legality and refocused his efforts at reaching a modern form of ethical life predicated on the acceptance of classical liberal society and modern natural law. I try to argue that Hegel wanted to achieve a (...)
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  4.  2
    James Tully (2009). Ethical Pluralism and Classical Liberalism. In Tracy B. Strong & Richard Madsen (eds.), The Many and the One: Religious and Secular Perspectives on Ethical Pluralism in the Modern World. Princeton University Press 78-86.
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  5.  6
    Axel Honneth (1991). The Limits of Liberalism: On the Political-Ethical Discussion on Communitarianism. Thesis Eleven 28 (1):18-34.
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  6. A. Honneth (1991). The Limits of Liberalism, on the Political and Ethical Debate About Communitarianism. Philosophische Rundschau 38 (1-2):83-102.
     
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  7.  70
    Jason Brennan (2005). Choice and Excellence: A Defense of Millian Individualism. Social Theory and Practice 31 (4):483-498.
    Communitarians have argued against Millian individualism (ethical liberalism) by claiming that it leads to the compartmentalization of life, and thus inhibits virtue, that it causes alienation, and leads to what I call the problem of choice. Ethical liberals celebrate the free choice of a conception of the good life, but communitarians respond by posing a dilemma. Either the choice is made in reference to some given standard (a social or natural telos), in which case it is not (...)
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  8.  5
    George Crowder (2002). Liberalism and Value Pluralism. Continuum.
    This is the first book-length defence of <span class='Hi'>liberalism</span> on the basis of value pluralism, complementing and extending the work of Berlin and others.
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  9.  19
    John Skorupski (1999). Ethical Explorations. Oxford University Press.
    In these essays, John Skorupski develops a distinctive and systematic moral philosophy. He examines the central ethical concepts of reasons, the good, and morality, and applies the results to issues of culture and politics. Ethical Explorations firmly connects liberal politics to its ethical ideal, and links that ideal to modern morality and modern ideas of the good.
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  10. Horacio Spector (2007). Autonomy and Rights: The Moral Foundations of Liberalism. Oxford University Press.
    Horacio Spector provides an original and compelling moral justification of classical liberalism. Among the topics he discusses are the concepts of negative and positive freedom, the notion of a moral right, the link between positive freedom and personal autonomy, and the agent-relativity of moral reasons.
     
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  11.  20
    Tassos Michalopoulos, Michiel Korthals & Henk Hogeveen (2008). Trading “Ethical Preferences” in the Market: Outline of a Politically Liberal Framework for the Ethical Characterization of Foods. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (1):3-27.
    The absence of appropriate information about imperceptible and ethical food characteristics limits the opportunities for concerned consumer/citizens to take ethical issues into account during their inescapable food consumption. It also fuels trust crises between producers and consumers, hinders the optimal embedment of innovative technologies, “punishes” in the market ethical producers, and limits the opportunities for politically liberal democratic governance. This paper outlines a framework for the ethical characterization and subsequent optimization of foods (ECHO). The framework applies (...)
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  12.  8
    Karl Hostetler (1998). Towards a Perfectionist Response to Ethical Conflict. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):295-302.
    This paper argues for a pluralist perfectionist response to ethical conflict. This sets for states and their public schools the task of helping people adjudicate conflicts between ethical orientations and of promoting or discouraging particular conceptions of a good life. The aim of deliberation is mutual ethical recognition and growth, judged against a thick yet universally shared conception of human flourishing. The political justification of perfectionism is that it provides a better defense against repression and discrimination than (...)
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  13.  27
    Graham Mark Long (2004). Relativism and the Foundations of Liberalism. Imprint Academic.
    Moral relativism is often regarded as both fatally flawed and incompatible with liberalism. This book aims to show why such criticism is misconceived. First, it argues that relativism provides a plausible account of moral justification. Drawing on the contemporary relatavist and universalist analyses of thinkers such as Harman, Nagel and Habermas, it develops an alternative account of coherence relativism.
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  14.  5
    Lorraine Kasprisin (1996). Ideas of Self and Community: Ethical Implications for a Communitarian Conception of Moral Autonomy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (1-2):41-49.
  15.  27
    Asma Abbas (2010). Liberalism and Human Suffering: Materialist Reflections on Politics, Ethics, and Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book investigates the sources and implications of our encounters with suffering in contemporary politics and culture, exploring the forces that determine ...
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  16. Enzo Rossi (2008). Liberal Democracy and the Challenge of Ethical Diversity. Human Affairs 18 (1):10-22.
    What do we talk about when we talk about ethical diversity as a challenge to the normative justifiability of liberal democracy? Many theorists claim that liberal democracy ought to be reformed or rejected for not being sufficiently ‘inclusive’ towards diversity; others argue that, on the contrary, liberalism is desirable because it accommodates (some level of) diversity. Moreover, it has been argued that concern for diversity should lead us to favour (say) neutralistic over perfectionist, universalistic over particularistic, participative over (...)
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  17.  49
    John Gray (2000). Mill's Liberalism and Liberalism's Posterity. Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):137-165.
    It is argued that the moral theory undergirding J.S. Mill''s argumentin On Liberty is a species of perfectionism rather than any kind of utilitarianism. The conception of human flourishing that itinvokes is one in which the goods of personal autonomy and individualityare central. If this conception is to be more than the expression ofa particular cultural ideal it needs the support of an empiricallyplausible view of human nature and a defensible interpretation ofhistory. Neither of these can be found in Mill. (...)
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  18.  17
    James Scott Johnston (2012). Schools as Ethical or Schools as Political? Habermas Between Dewey and Rawls. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (2):109-122.
    Education is oftentimes understood as a deeply ethical practice for the development of the person. Alternatively, education is construed as a state-enforced apparatus for inculcation of specific codes, conventions, beliefs, and norms about social and political practices. Though holding both of these beliefs about education is not necessarily mutually contradictory, a definite tension emerges when one attempts to articulate a cogent theory involving both. I will argue in this paper that Habermas’s theory of discourse ethics, when combined with his (...)
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  19.  5
    David Stevens (2014). Creating Greener Citizens: Political Liberalism and a Robust Environmental Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (5):545-562.
    Proponents of environmentalist views often urge the teaching of such views and the inculcation of ‘green’ values within the educational curriculum of schools as a key component of achieving their ends. It might seem that modern versions of political morality that refuse to take a stance on controversial questions—religious, ethical, philosophical—or eschew appeal to perfectionist doctrines, such as Rawlsian political liberalism, are beset by a particularly acute difficulty in this regard. To the extent that environmentalist views embody claims (...)
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  20.  3
    Mark Tunick (1998). Practices and Principles: Approaches to Ethical and Legal Judgment. Princeton University Press.
    Are there universally valid moral principles that dictate what's right regardless of what the consensus is within a particular society? Or are moral judgments culturally relative, ultimately dictated by conventions and practices which vary among societies? Practices and Principles takes up the debate between cultural relativists and universalists, and the related debate in political philosophy between communitarians and liberals, each of which has roots in an earlier debate between Kant and Hegel. Rejecting uncritical deference to social practice, I acknowledge the (...)
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  21. Seyla Benhabib (1992). Situating the Self: Gender, Community, and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics. Routledge.
    Situating the Self is a decisive intervention into debates concerning modernity, postmodernity, ehtics, and the self. It will be of interest to all concerned with critical theory or contemporary ethics.
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  22. Demin Duan & Ryan Wines (2010). Introduction: In Search of a Lost Liberalism. Ethical Perspectives 17 (3):365-370.
    The theme of this issue of Ethical Perspectives is the French tradition in liberal thought, and the unique contribution that this tradition can make to debates in contemporary liberalism. It is inspired by a colloquium held at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven in December of 2008 entitled “In Search of a Lost Liberalism: Constant, Tocqueville, and the singularity of French Liberalism.” This colloquium was held in conjunction with the retirement of Leuven professor and former Dean of the (...)
     
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  23.  42
    Luara Ferracioli & Rosa Terlazzo (2014). Educating for Autonomy: Liberalism and Autonomy in the Capabilities Approach. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):443-455.
    Martha Nussbaum grounds her version of the capabilities approach in political liberalism. In this paper, we argue that the capabilities approach, insofar as it genuinely values the things that persons can actually do and be, must be grounded in a hybrid account of liberalism: in order to show respect for adults, its justification must be political; in order to show respect for children, however, its implementation must include a commitment to comprehensive autonomy, one that ensures that children develop (...)
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  24.  4
    Shruti Kapila (2007). Self, Spencer and Swaraj: Nationalist Thought and Critiques of Liberalism, 1890–1920. Modern Intellectual History 4 (1):109-127.
    In giving a historically specific account of the self in early twentieth-century India, this article poses questions about the historiography of nationalist thought within which the concept of the self has generally been embedded. It focuses on the ethical questions that moored nationalist thought and practice, and were premised on particular understandings of the self. The reappraisal of religion and the self in relation to contemporary evolutionary sociology is examined through the writings of a diverse set of radical nationalist (...)
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  25.  30
    Gordon Davis & Blain Neufeld (2007). Political Liberalism, Civic Education, and Educational Choice. Social Theory and Practice 33 (1):47-74.
    In this paper we argue that John Rawls’s account of political liberalism requires a conception of mutual respect that differs from the one advanced in A Theory of Justice. We formulate such a political liberal form of mutual respect, which we call ‘civic respect.’ We also maintain that core features of political liberalism – in particular, the ideas of ‘the burdens of judgment’ and ‘public reason’ – do not commit political liberalism to an ideal of personal autonomy, (...)
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  26.  92
    J. Gregory (2014). The Culture of Liberalism and the Virtue of 'Balance'. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (1):78-94.
    This article argues for a virtue-based account of the value and legitimacy of liberalism in increasingly multicultural societies. In contrast to the recent trend to seek consensus and stability through an overlapping ‘political’ consensus, this article argues for a more ‘comprehensive’ view of the attraction of liberalism in a culturally diverse world. This attraction resides in a particular view of the properly constituted ‘self’, able to appreciate and navigate a range of competing ethical demands, coming from a (...)
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  27.  10
    V. Tahmasebi (2010). Does Levinas Justify or Transcend Liberalism? Levinas on Human Liberation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (5):523-544.
    Can Levinas be of any use for a radical political project beyond the liberal horizon? By illustrating the irreconcilability of Levinas’ ethico-politics to liberal conception of the individual, its rational peace and economic arrangement, this article argues that there is a radical distance between Levinas’ thought and the western liberal tradition. Yet demonstrating this irreducibility by itself does not expose the underlying radical possibilities of Levinas’ ethics. This task is accomplished by providing a new reading of the ‘third’ in which (...)
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  28.  6
    Sam Binkley (2009). The Work of Neoliberal Governmentality: Temporality and Ethical Substance in the Tale of Two Dads. Foucault Studies 6:60-78.
    This paper considers debates around the neoliberal governmentality, and argues for the need to better theorize the specific ethical practices through which such programs of governmentality are carried out. Arguing that much theoretical and empirical work in this area is prone to a “top down” approach, in which governmentality is reduced to an imposing apparatus through which subjectivities are produced, it argues instead for the need to understand the self-production of subjectivities by considering the ethical practices that make (...)
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  29.  11
    Avner Offer (2012). Self-Interest, Sympathy and the Invisible Hand: From Adam Smith to Market Liberalism. Economic Thought.
    Adam Smith rejected Mandeville's invisible-hand doctrine of 'private vices, publick benefits'. In The Theory of Moral Sentiments his model of the 'impartial spectator' is driven not by sympathy for other people, but by their approbation. The innate capacity for sympathy makes approbation credible. Approbation needs to be authenticated, and in Smith's model authentication relies on innate virtue, which is not realistic. An alternative model of 'regard' makes use of signalling and is more pragmatic. Modern versions of the invisible hand in (...)
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  30.  24
    Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2006). Freedom-Costs of Canonical Individualism: Enforced Euthanasia Tolerance in Belgium and the Problem of European Liberalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4):333 – 362.
    Belgium's policy of not permitting Catholic hospitals to refuse euthanasia services rests on ethical presuppositions concerning the secular justification of political power which reveal the paradoxical character of European liberalism: In endorsing freedom as a value (rather than as a side constraint), liberalism prioritizes first-order intentions, thus discouraging lasting moral commitments and the authority of moral communities in supporting such commitments. The state itself is thus transformed into a moral community of its own. Alternative policies (such as (...)
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  31.  21
    Paul Saurette (2002). Kant's Culture of Humiliation: Politics and Ethical Cultivation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (1):59-90.
    This article seeks both to challenge common understandings of Kant's moral project and to use that reading to reconceptualize the aims of political theory. The paper argues that while Kant's moral work is widely praised or criticized for its formalism and its defense of the autonomous subject, an interpretation that takes seriously Kant's remarks about humiliation in the Critique of Practical Reason challenges both these commonplaces. An examination both of the practical role that humiliation plays in Kant's moral system and (...)
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  32.  3
    Christopher J. Insole (2004). Against Radical Orthodoxy: The Dangers of Overcoming Political Liberalism. Modern Theology 20 (2):213-241.
    The article considers the critique of political liberalism offered by the Radical Orthodoxy movement. The first part deals with the claim that the underlying framework for the “secular” human condition ‐which would include political liberalism‐ is ontological violence and ethical nihilism.The second part of the article deals with the charge that liberalism leads to a social atomism and individualism which can be overcome with the help of a participatory‐analogical theology. I consider the invocation to unity, participation (...)
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  33.  12
    Brenda Cohen (1983). Ethical Objectivity and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 12 (2):131-136.
    Abstract The view that links a subjectivist view in ethics to an open approach to moral education is challenged, as well as the converse view that an objectivist ethical view entails a conformist approach. An objectivist analysis involves recognizing the possibility of error or moral misjudgement, while a subjectivist analysis is consistent with strong conviction. It does not follow from the fact that there are different ideas about right and wrong that anyone should view them all impartially. And a (...)
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  34.  19
    D. Weinstein (1991). The Discourse of Freedom, Rights and Good in Nineteenth-Century English Liberalism. Utilitas 3 (2):245.
    For both its enthusiastic adherents as well as its more generous opponents, liberalism commands considerable ethical appeal but at a price. And that price is its lack of systematic integrity or coherence. The charm of its ethical appeal stems from the great values which it celebrates. But for many these very values seem fatally incommensurable, seem to be forever colliding with and thwarting one another. As Isaiah Berlin has never tired of reminding us, liberty and equality continue (...)
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  35.  4
    Paola Cavalieri (2004). Silent Parties: A Problem for Liberalism? Essays in Philosophy 5 (2):6.
    Liberalism is often under attack because of its alleged excessive "formalism". In the words of one of its main contemporary defenders, "the defining feature of liberalism is that it ascribes certain fundamental freedoms to each individual. In particular, it grants people a very wide freedom of choice in terms of how they lead their lives".1 In more continental language, this core idea has been summarized in the statement that what liberalism is all about is "the handling and (...)
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  36.  3
    Pavo Barišić (2010). Ethical Ideal of Democracy. On John Dewey's Philosophy of Democratic Education. Synthesis Philosophica 25 (1):37-56.
    The article elaborates on the essential characteristics and model of democratic education in Dewey’s works. It starts with the question: what is the meaning of Dewey’s concept of education regarding the contemporary deliberative democracy? Can his ethical ideal of humanity be applied as a philosophical basis for the evaluation and justification of democratic practices? Did Dewey undermine and destroy the foundations of liberalism, as suggested by Richard Rorty? Or does his reconstruction of philosophy actually bring liberalism back (...)
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  37.  1
    H. J. Mccloskey (1974). Liberalism: H. J. McCloskey. Philosophy 49 (187):13-32.
    Liberalism is commonly believed, especially by its exponents, to be opposed to interference by way of enforcing value judgments or concerning itself with the individual's morality. My concern is to show that this is not so and that liberalism is all the better for this. Many elements have contributed to liberal thought as we know it today, the major elements being the liberalism of which Locke is the most celebrated exponent, which is based upon a belief in (...)
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  38.  3
    Aryeh Botwinick (1998). Religion and Secularism in Liberalism. Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 1998 (113):79-104.
    Emmanuel Levinas has provided a hermeneutical key for reinterpreting the Western intellectual tradition. Certain recurring conundrums of Western philosophy led him to regard ethics above all other modes of inquiry and to emphasize infinity rather than totality. Yet, the primacy of the ethical cannot do what he wants it to do. To reinterpret the Western intellectual tradition, it is necessary to shift emphasis to the distinction between infinity and totality. This highlights the religious dimension of secularism, i.e., how modern (...)
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  39.  2
    S. S. Chakravarti (2009). Ethical Message of the Mahabharata in the Wake of the Global Financial Crisis. Journal of Human Values 15 (2):97-105.
    This article deals with the concept of greed as pertaining to Business Ethics in today’s world, considered part of the system of the study Ethics as such, in the backdrop of the recent happenings in the financial world in the USA, whose repercussions have been felt all over. The analysis draws inspiration from the words in the Mahabharata, both with a view to improving the existing theories in place in the West today, as well as having a handle on greed (...)
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  40.  5
    Zachary R. Calo (2008). “True Economic Liberalism” and the Development of American Catholic Social Thought, 1920-1940. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 5 (2):285-314.
    This paper considers the maturation of the American Catholic tradition of social and economic thought in the seminal period between 1920 and 1940, particularly as encapsulated in the work of John A. Ryan. While different social ethical models emerged in the American Church during this time, the dominant school of thought was the liberal tradition associated with Ryan. This tradition, which Ryan described as "true economic liberalism," forged American political liberalism and papal critiques of secular modernity into (...)
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  41.  2
    Richard Boyd (1997). Frank H. Knight and Ethical Pluralism. Critical Review 11 (4):519-536.
    For Frank Knight, the fact that we are free to engage in economic pursuits brings out what is both best and worst in human nature. The same competitive economy that liberates individuals to choose their own desired ends also provides them with socially undesirable wants and fosters habits potentially at odds with the demands of liberal democracy. Given Knight’s desire both to defend human liberty and his concession that liberty is likely to be abused, his version of liberalism must (...)
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  42.  35
    Sybol Cook Anderson (2009). Hegel's Theory of Recognition: From Oppression to Ethical Liberal Modernity. Continuum.
    Introduction: Redeeming recognition -- Oppression reconsidered -- Foundations of a liberal conception -- Toward a liberal conception of oppression -- Conclusion : A liberal conception of oppression -- Misrecognition as oppression -- Exploitation and disempowerment -- Cultural imperialism -- Marginalization -- Violence -- Conclusion: Misrecognition as oppression -- Overcoming oppression : the limits of toleration -- Contemporary differences : matters of toleration -- John Rawls : political liberalism -- Will Kymlicka : multicultural citizenship -- Conclusion: Accommodating differences : the (...)
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  43. Edward Barrett (2010). Persons and Liberal Democracy: The Ethical and Political Thought of Karol Wojtyla/John Paul Ii. Lexington Books.
    Moving from an historical analysis of the Catholic Church's gradual endorsement of liberal democracy to an explication of the ethical and political thought of Karol Wojtyla/John Paul II, Persons and Liberal Democracy concisely explains the relatively recent shift in the Church's political theory and, in the process, defends what could be deemed a non-statist form of welfare liberalism. This book offers a systematic account of John Paul's philosophical and theological ethics and their relationship to the key elements of (...)
     
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  44.  14
    Robert Brecher (1997). Getting What You Want?: A Critique of Liberal Morality. Routledge.
    Bob Brecher claims that it is wrong to think that morality is simply rooted in what people want. Brecher explains that in our consumerist society, we make the assumption that getting "what people want" is our natural goal, and that this goal is usually a good one. We see that whether it is a matter of pornography or getting married--if people want it, then that's that. But is this really a good thing? Getting What You Want offers a critique of (...)
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  45. Andrew Jason Cohen (1997). The Communitarian Critique of Liberalism's Individualism. Dissertation, Georgetown University
    The recent debate between liberals and their communitarian critics has reached a false plateau, with liberals conceding more than they should. After explicating the central communitarian thesis, the four ways that thesis could be understood, and the corresponding four senses of "independence," I argue that communitarians are right that liberalism requires a view of the self as 'unencumbered,' but I defend that view as superior to the alternatives. This allows me to defend true moral impartiality and universality as well (...)
     
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  46. George Crowder (2004). Isaiah Berlin: Liberty, Pluralism and Liberalism. Polity.
    Isaiah Berlin was one of the leading political thinkers of the twentieth century, and his work continues to attract admiration and debate. In Isaiah Berlin: Liberty, Pluralism and Liberalism, George Crowder provides both an accessible introduction to Berlin's ideas and an original contribution to political theory. Berlin's range of interests and learning was vast but united by a single overarching project: the uncovering of the conceptual roots of twentieth-century totalitarianism. He traces these through three levels of analysis: the distortion (...)
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  47. George Crowder (2004). Isaiah Berlin: Liberty, Pluralism and Liberalism. Polity.
    Isaiah Berlin was one of the leading political thinkers of the twentieth century, and his work continues to attract admiration and debate. In Isaiah Berlin: Liberty, Pluralism and Liberalism, George Crowder provides both an accessible introduction to Berlin's ideas and an original contribution to political theory. Berlin's range of interests and learning was vast but united by a single overarching project: the uncovering of the conceptual roots of twentieth-century totalitarianism. He traces these through three levels of analysis: the distortion (...)
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  48. Mark D. Gismondi (2010). Ethics, Liberalism and Realism in International Relations. Routledge.
    This book explores the complex issue of international ethics in the two dominant schools of thought in international relations; Liberalism and Realism. Both theories suffer from an inability to integrate the ethical and pragmatic dimensions of foreign policy. Liberal policy makers often suffer from moral blindness and a tendency toward coercion in the international arena, whilst realists tend to be epistemic sceptics, incorporating Nietzsche’s thought, directly or indirectly, into their theories. Mark Gismondi seeks to resolve the issues in (...)
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  49. David W. Loy (2003). From Greek Polis to Modern State: Hegel's Critique of Ancient Greek Ethical Life. Dissertation, Saint Louis University
    Hegel's relationship to the Greek ideal of his day is well known: early in his career he saw the Greeks as an alternative to modernity, but by 1805 he had retreated from the Greek ideal, although he still admired the Greeks. Despite agreement that the Greeks played a central role in Hegel's thought, only a few commentators have offered an interpretation of Hegel's account of Greek ethical life. This dissertation presents just such an interpretation. ;I begin by situating Hegel's (...)
     
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  50. Margaret Moore (1993). Foundations of Liberalism. Oxford University Press Uk.
    This book is an original critique of contemporary liberal theories of justice, focusing on the problem of how to relate the personal point of view of the individual to the impartial perspective of justice. Margaret Moore's examination of prominent contemporary arguments for liberal justice reveals that individualist theories are subject to two serious difficulties: the motivation problem and the integrity problem. Individualists cannot explain why the individual should be motivated to act in accordance with the dictates of liberal justice, andDSrelated (...)
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