Search results for 'ethical liberalism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jason Brennan (2005). Choice and Excellence: A Defense of Millian Individualism. Social Theory and Practice 31 (4):483-498.score: 90.0
    Communitarians have argued against Millian individualism (ethical liberalism) by claiming that it leads to the compartmentalization of life, and thus inhibits virtue, that it causes alienation, and leads to what I call the problem of choice. Ethical liberals celebrate the free choice of a conception of the good life, but communitarians respond by posing a dilemma. Either the choice is made in reference to some given standard (a social or natural telos), in which case it is not (...)
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  2. Richard Bellamy (1991). Between Economic and Ethical Liberalism: Benedetto Croce and the Dilemmas of Liberal Politics. History of the Human Sciences 4 (2):175-195.score: 90.0
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  3. Asma Abbas (2010). Liberalism and Human Suffering: Materialist Reflections on Politics, Ethics, and Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 84.0
    This book investigates the sources and implications of our encounters with suffering in contemporary politics and culture, exploring the forces that determine ...
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  4. Abel Garza (1990). Hegel's Critique of Liberalism and Natural Law: Reconstructing Ethical Life. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 9 (4):371 - 398.score: 78.0
    This essay considers the evolution of Hegel's political and legal theory with respect to the emergence of a classical liberal society and modern natural law. I argue that Hegel abandoned his early concerns which focused on a revival of the Greek polis and ethics over legality and refocused his efforts at reaching a modern form of ethical life predicated on the acceptance of classical liberal society and modern natural law. I try to argue that Hegel wanted to achieve a (...)
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  5. John Skorupski (1999). Ethical Explorations. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    In these essays, John Skorupski develops a distinctive and systematic moral philosophy. He examines the central ethical concepts of reasons, the good, and morality, and applies the results to issues of culture and politics. Ethical Explorations firmly connects liberal politics to its ethical ideal, and links that ideal to modern morality and modern ideas of the good.
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  6. Tassos Michalopoulos, Michiel Korthals & Henk Hogeveen (2008). Trading “Ethical Preferences” in the Market: Outline of a Politically Liberal Framework for the Ethical Characterization of Foods. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (1):3-27.score: 74.0
    The absence of appropriate information about imperceptible and ethical food characteristics limits the opportunities for concerned consumer/citizens to take ethical issues into account during their inescapable food consumption. It also fuels trust crises between producers and consumers, hinders the optimal embedment of innovative technologies, “punishes” in the market ethical producers, and limits the opportunities for politically liberal democratic governance. This paper outlines a framework for the ethical characterization and subsequent optimization of foods (ECHO). The framework applies (...)
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  7. Graham Mark Long (2004). Relativism and the Foundations of Liberalism. Imprint Academic.score: 72.0
    Moral relativism is often regarded as both fatally flawed and incompatible with liberalism. This book aims to show why such criticism is misconceived. First, it argues that relativism provides a plausible account of moral justification. Drawing on the contemporary relatavist and universalist analyses of thinkers such as Harman, Nagel and Habermas, it develops an alternative account of coherence relativism.
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  8. Karl Hostetler (1998). Towards a Perfectionist Response to Ethical Conflict. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (4):295-302.score: 72.0
    This paper argues for a pluralist perfectionist response to ethical conflict. This sets for states and their public schools the task of helping people adjudicate conflicts between ethical orientations and of promoting or discouraging particular conceptions of a good life. The aim of deliberation is mutual ethical recognition and growth, judged against a thick yet universally shared conception of human flourishing. The political justification of perfectionism is that it provides a better defense against repression and discrimination than (...)
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  9. Richard Flathman (2010). In and Out of the Ethical: The Realist Liberalism of Bernard Williams. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (1):77.score: 72.0
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  10. A. Honneth (1991). The Limits of Liberalism, on the Political and Ethical Debate About Communitarianism. Philosophische Rundschau 38 (1-2):83-102.score: 72.0
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  11. Axel Honneth (1991). The Limits of Liberalism: On the Political-Ethical Discussion on Communitarianism. Thesis Eleven 28 (1):18-34.score: 72.0
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  12. Lorraine Kasprisin (1996). Ideas of Self and Community: Ethical Implications for a Communitarian Conception of Moral Autonomy. Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (1-2):41-49.score: 66.0
  13. George Crowder (2002). Liberalism and Value Pluralism. Continuum.score: 66.0
  14. Horacio Spector (2007). Autonomy and Rights: The Moral Foundations of Liberalism. Oxford University Press.score: 66.0
  15. Seyla Benhabib (1992). Situating the Self: Gender, Community, and Postmodernism in Contemporary Ethics. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Situating the Self is a decisive intervention into debates concerning modernity, postmodernity, ehtics, and the self. It will be of interest to all concerned with critical theory or contemporary ethics.
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  16. Julia Simon (2001). Beyond Contractual Morality: Ethics, Law, and Literature in Eighteenth-Century France. University of Rochester Press.score: 60.0
    Beyond Contractual Morality looks at current debates over the meaning of liberalism by reexamining their roots in eighteenth-century texts, which demonstrate ...
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  17. John Gray (2000). Mill's Liberalism and Liberalism's Posterity. Journal of Ethics 4 (1-2):137-165.score: 56.0
    It is argued that the moral theory undergirding J.S. Mill''s argumentin On Liberty is a species of perfectionism rather than any kind of utilitarianism. The conception of human flourishing that itinvokes is one in which the goods of personal autonomy and individualityare central. If this conception is to be more than the expression ofa particular cultural ideal it needs the support of an empiricallyplausible view of human nature and a defensible interpretation ofhistory. Neither of these can be found in Mill. (...)
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  18. Enzo Rossi (2008). Liberal Democracy and the Challenge of Ethical Diversity. Human Affairs 18 (1):10-22.score: 54.0
    What do we talk about when we talk about ethical diversity as a challenge to the normative justifiability of liberal democracy? Many theorists claim that liberal democracy ought to be reformed or rejected for not being sufficiently ‘inclusive’ towards diversity; others argue that, on the contrary, liberalism is desirable because it accommodates (some level of) diversity. Moreover, it has been argued that concern for diversity should lead us to favour (say) neutralistic over perfectionist, universalistic over particularistic, participative over (...)
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  19. Jennifer A. Parks (2010). Care Ethics and the Global Practice of Commercial Surrogacy. Bioethics 24 (7):333-340.score: 54.0
    This essay will focus on the moral issues relating to surrogacy in the global context, and will critique the liberal arguments that have been offered in support of it. Liberal arguments hold sway concerning reproductive arrangements made between commissioning couples from wealthy nations and the surrogates from socioeconomically weak backgrounds that they hire to do their reproductive labor. My argument in this paper is motivated by a concern for controlling harms by putting the practice of globalized commercial surrogacy into the (...)
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  20. Agnes Heller (2000). The Complexity of Justice - a Challenge to the 21st Century. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (3):247-262.score: 54.0
    The author discusses two questions, the relation between liberalism and democracy, and the relation between ethics, morality and law. As to the first question, she argues that neither liberalism nor democracy are merely formal. Roughly spoken, it can be said that liberalism stands for negative liberties, whereas democracy stands for positive ones. She observes a non-contingent tension between the ethos of liberalism (personal freedom) and the ethos of democracy (equality; majority rule). It is the task of (...)
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  21. James Scott Johnston (2012). Schools as Ethical or Schools as Political? Habermas Between Dewey and Rawls. Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (2):109-122.score: 54.0
    Education is oftentimes understood as a deeply ethical practice for the development of the person. Alternatively, education is construed as a state-enforced apparatus for inculcation of specific codes, conventions, beliefs, and norms about social and political practices. Though holding both of these beliefs about education is not necessarily mutually contradictory, a definite tension emerges when one attempts to articulate a cogent theory involving both. I will argue in this paper that Habermas’s theory of discourse ethics, when combined with his (...)
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  22. Robert Brecher (1997). Getting What You Want?: A Critique of Liberal Morality. Routledge.score: 54.0
    Bob Brecher claims that it is wrong to think that morality is simply rooted in what people want. Brecher explains that in our consumerist society, we make the assumption that getting "what people want" is our natural goal, and that this goal is usually a good one. We see that whether it is a matter of pornography or getting married--if people want it, then that's that. But is this really a good thing? Getting What You Want offers a critique of (...)
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  23. David Stevens (2014). Creating Greener Citizens: Political Liberalism and a Robust Environmental Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 33 (5):545-562.score: 54.0
    Proponents of environmentalist views often urge the teaching of such views and the inculcation of ‘green’ values within the educational curriculum of schools as a key component of achieving their ends. It might seem that modern versions of political morality that refuse to take a stance on controversial questions—religious, ethical, philosophical—or eschew appeal to perfectionist doctrines, such as Rawlsian political liberalism, are beset by a particularly acute difficulty in this regard. To the extent that environmentalist views embody claims (...)
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  24. Mark Tunick (1998). Practices and Principles: Approaches to Ethical and Legal Judgment. Princeton University Press.score: 54.0
    Are there universally valid moral principles that dictate what's right regardless of what the consensus is within a particular society? Or are moral judgments culturally relative, ultimately dictated by conventions and practices which vary among societies? Practices and Principles takes up the debate between cultural relativists and universalists, and the related debate in political philosophy between communitarians and liberals, each of which has roots in an earlier debate between Kant and Hegel. Rejecting uncritical deference to social practice, I acknowledge the (...)
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  25. Eamonn Callan (1985). Moral Education in a Liberal Society. Journal of Moral Education 14 (1):9-22.score: 52.0
  26. Lubomira Radoilska (2009). Public Health Ethics and Liberalism. Public Health Ethics 2 (2):135-145.score: 50.0
    This paper defends a distinctly liberal approach to public health ethics and replies to possible objections. In particular, I look at a set of recent proposals aiming to revise and expand liberalism in light of public health's rationale and epidemiological findings. I argue that they fail to provide a sociologically informed version of liberalism. Instead, they rest on an implicit normative premise about the value of health, which I show to be invalid. I then make explicit the unobvious, (...)
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  27. Majid Yar (2003). Honneth and the Communitarians: Towards a Recognitive Critical Theory of Community. Res Publica 9 (2):101-125.score: 48.0
    This paper attempts to sketch a critical model of political community by drawing upon recent contributions to the theory of ‘recognition’, particularly in the work of Axel Honneth. The paper proceeds by, first, delineating key features shared by a range of positions associated with ‘communitarianism’, along with the limitations and problems incurred by these commitments. The second part of the paper attempts to mobilise Honneth’s theoretical work to develop a conception of community that shares a number of the basic premisesvis-á-vis (...)
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  28. Ludvig Beckman (2001). The Liberal State & the Politics of Virtue. Transaction Publishers.score: 48.0
    In this volume, schematically divided into two parts, Ludvig Beckman challenges the common view that support for the good life, the politics of virtue, is in ...
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  29. Nico Vorster (2010). An Ethical Critique Of Milton Friedman's Doctrine On Economics And Freedom. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (26):163-188.score: 48.0
    Milton Friedman was one of the most influential economists of the twentieth century. Many of the neo-liberal views that he advocated were adopted in the 1980’s by Western countries such as Britain and the United States. This essay focuses on Friedman’s views on politics, economics and freedom. The first section discusses his perspectives on the relation between capitalism and freedom, the nature of markets, his understanding of equality and of the social responsibility of business. The second section attempts to provide (...)
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  30. Jurgen Slembrouck (ed.) (2010). Onze Waarden?: Welke Toekomst Voor Het Humanisme? Upa, University Press Antwerp.score: 48.0
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  31. Dwight Furrow (2009). Reviving the Left: The Need to Restore Liberal Values in America. Prometheus.score: 48.0
    A work of popular philosophy that articulates a new way of understanding th moral foundations of liberalism in terms of an ethic of care and responsibility rather than social contract theory. Reviving the Left defends "rootstock liberalism", a cultural liberalism that develops the moral basis of society from the ground up, propagating relationships of social trust that provide the moral foundation of society. All intact human relationships depend on an ethical commitment that commands us to be (...)
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  32. Sirkku Hellsten (1997). In Defense of Moral Individualism. Philosophical Society of Finland.score: 48.0
  33. Jeremy Moon & Bruce Stone (eds.) (2002). Power and Freedom in Modern Politics. University of Western Australia Press.score: 48.0
  34. Sybol Cook Anderson (2009). Hegel's Theory of Recognition: From Oppression to Ethical Liberal Modernity. Continuum.score: 46.0
    Introduction: Redeeming recognition -- Oppression reconsidered -- Foundations of a liberal conception -- Toward a liberal conception of oppression -- Conclusion : A liberal conception of oppression -- Misrecognition as oppression -- Exploitation and disempowerment -- Cultural imperialism -- Marginalization -- Violence -- Conclusion: Misrecognition as oppression -- Overcoming oppression : the limits of toleration -- Contemporary differences : matters of toleration -- John Rawls : political liberalism -- Will Kymlicka : multicultural citizenship -- Conclusion: Accommodating differences : the (...)
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  35. R. C. Sekhar (2002). Ethical Choices in Business. Response Books.score: 46.0
    Praise for the First Edition: '... a unique and lively business ethics text... fresh and delightful... Sekhar's witty use of stories and cases will engage and enlighten business people in India and the rest of the world' - Joanne B Ciulla, The Journal of Business Ethics 'Richly international in scope and contributes to global concern' - Newsltter IIAS Leiden University 'This book makes an important contribution through its holisitc and balanced approach to the issue... Each chapter has a fair number (...)
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  36. Sudhir Chella Rajan (2007). Automobility, Liberalism, and the Ethics of Driving. Environmental Ethics 29 (1):77-90.score: 44.0
    Automobility, or the myriad institutions that foster car culture, has rarely if ever been put under the lens of liberal political theory, even though driving is one of the most common and widely accepted features of daily life in modern societies. When its implied promise of guaranteeing both freedom and equality is examined more closely, however, it appears that the ethical implications of driving may be darker than initially supposed. Automobility may indeed be in violation of both the Kantian (...)
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  37. Robert P. George (ed.) (1996). Natural Law, Liberalism, and Morality: Contemporary Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    This work brings together leading defenders of Natural Law and Liberalism for a series of frank and lively exchanges touching upon critical issues of contemporary moral and political theory. The book is an outstanding example of the fruitful engagement of traditions of thought about fundamental matters of ethics and justice.
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  38. Wim Dubbink & Luc van Liedekerke (2009). A Neo-Kantian Foundation of Corporate Social Responsibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (2):117 - 136.score: 42.0
    ‘Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is conceptualized in many ways. We argue that one cannot be indifferent about the issue of its conceptualization. In terms of methodology, our position is that any conceptual discussion must embed CSR in political theory. With regard to substance, we link up with the discussion on whether CSR must be defined on the basis of a tripartite or a quadripartite division of business responsibilities. We share A.B. Carroll’s intuition that a quadripartite division is called for as (...)
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  39. Corinna Delkeskamp-Hayes (2006). Freedom-Costs of Canonical Individualism: Enforced Euthanasia Tolerance in Belgium and the Problem of European Liberalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (4):333 – 362.score: 42.0
    Belgium's policy of not permitting Catholic hospitals to refuse euthanasia services rests on ethical presuppositions concerning the secular justification of political power which reveal the paradoxical character of European liberalism: In endorsing freedom as a value (rather than as a side constraint), liberalism prioritizes first-order intentions, thus discouraging lasting moral commitments and the authority of moral communities in supporting such commitments. The state itself is thus transformed into a moral community of its own. Alternative policies (such as (...)
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  40. Gordon Davis & Blain Neufeld (2007). Political Liberalism, Civic Education, and Educational Choice. Social Theory and Practice 33 (1):47-74.score: 42.0
    In this paper we argue that John Rawls’s account of political liberalism requires a conception of mutual respect that differs from the one advanced in A Theory of Justice. We formulate such a political liberal form of mutual respect, which we call ‘civic respect.’ We also maintain that core features of political liberalism – in particular, the ideas of ‘the burdens of judgment’ and ‘public reason’ – do not commit political liberalism to an ideal of personal autonomy, (...)
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  41. Luara Ferracioli & Rosa Terlazzo (2014). Educating for Autonomy: Liberalism and Autonomy in the Capabilities Approach. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):443-455.score: 42.0
    Martha Nussbaum grounds her version of the capabilities approach in political liberalism. In this paper, we argue that the capabilities approach, insofar as it genuinely values the things that persons can actually do and be, must be grounded in a hybrid account of liberalism: in order to show respect for adults, its justification must be political; in order to show respect for children, however, its implementation must include a commitment to comprehensive autonomy, one that ensures that children develop (...)
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  42. Paul Saurette (2002). Kant's Culture of Humiliation: Politics and Ethical Cultivation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (1):59-90.score: 42.0
    This article seeks both to challenge common understandings of Kant's moral project and to use that reading to reconceptualize the aims of political theory. The paper argues that while Kant's moral work is widely praised or criticized for its formalism and its defense of the autonomous subject, an interpretation that takes seriously Kant's remarks about humiliation in the Critique of Practical Reason challenges both these commonplaces. An examination both of the practical role that humiliation plays in Kant's moral system and (...)
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  43. Michael Parker (ed.) (1999). Ethics and Community in the Health Care Professions. Routledge.score: 42.0
    This volume explores the focus of interest in community and the emerging theoretical opposition between communitarianism and liberalism, including the practical, theoretical and ethical issues that relate to community in the healthcare professions.
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  44. Sohail H. Hashmi & Steven Lee (eds.) (2004). Ethics and Weapons of Mass Destruction: Religious and Secular Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 42.0
    This volume offers a unique perspective on the discussion of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) by broadening the terms of the debate to include secular as well as religious investigations not normally considered. Its contributed essays feature a structured dialogue between representatives of the following ethical traditions-- Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, feminism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, liberalism, natural law, pacifism, and realism--who address identical moral issues in order to create a dialogue both within and across traditions.
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  45. V. Tahmasebi (2010). Does Levinas Justify or Transcend Liberalism? Levinas on Human Liberation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (5):523-544.score: 42.0
    Can Levinas be of any use for a radical political project beyond the liberal horizon? By illustrating the irreconcilability of Levinas’ ethico-politics to liberal conception of the individual, its rational peace and economic arrangement, this article argues that there is a radical distance between Levinas’ thought and the western liberal tradition. Yet demonstrating this irreducibility by itself does not expose the underlying radical possibilities of Levinas’ ethics. This task is accomplished by providing a new reading of the ‘third’ in which (...)
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  46. Brenda Cohen (1983). Ethical Objectivity and Moral Education. Journal of Moral Education 12 (2):131-136.score: 42.0
    Abstract The view that links a subjectivist view in ethics to an open approach to moral education is challenged, as well as the converse view that an objectivist ethical view entails a conformist approach. An objectivist analysis involves recognizing the possibility of error or moral misjudgement, while a subjectivist analysis is consistent with strong conviction. It does not follow from the fact that there are different ideas about right and wrong that anyone should view them all impartially. And a (...)
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  47. James Gregory (2013). The Culture of Liberalism and the Virtue of 'Balance'. European Journal of Political Theory 13 (1):1474885112473718.score: 42.0
    This article argues for a virtue-based account of the value and legitimacy of liberalism in increasingly multicultural societies. In contrast to the recent trend to seek consensus and stability through an overlapping ‘political’ consensus, this article argues for a more ‘comprehensive’ view of the attraction of liberalism in a culturally diverse world. This attraction resides in a particular view of the properly constituted ‘self’, able to appreciate and navigate a range of competing ethical demands, coming from a (...)
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  48. Zachary R. Calo (2008). “True Economic Liberalism” and the Development of American Catholic Social Thought, 1920-1940. Journal of Catholic Social Thought 5 (2):285-314.score: 42.0
    This paper considers the maturation of the American Catholic tradition of social and economic thought in the seminal period between 1920 and 1940, particularly as encapsulated in the work of John A. Ryan. While different social ethical models emerged in the American Church during this time, the dominant school of thought was the liberal tradition associated with Ryan. This tradition, which Ryan described as "true economic liberalism," forged American political liberalism and papal critiques of secular modernity into (...)
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  49. Joshua L. Daniel (2013). Robust Liberalism: H. Richard Niebuhr and the Ethics of American Public Life by Timothy A. Beach-Verhey (Review). American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (2):189-192.score: 42.0
    Those most intimate with the works of H. Richard Niebuhr, who return to them time after time for theological and ethical sustenance, know that they exemplify a more interesting thinker than his brother, Reinhold. Of course, Reinhold was and remains the more public figure, read seriously in his time by politicians and theologians, celebrated by our current president, and enjoying renewed scholarly interest resulting in new editions of out-of-print works and a number of critical studies. Meanwhile, H. Richard continues (...)
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  50. Aryeh Botwinick (1998). Religion and Secularism in Liberalism. Telos 1998 (113):79-104.score: 42.0
    Emmanuel Levinas has provided a hermeneutical key for reinterpreting the Western intellectual tradition. Certain recurring conundrums of Western philosophy led him to regard ethics above all other modes of inquiry and to emphasize infinity rather than totality. Yet, the primacy of the ethical cannot do what he wants it to do. To reinterpret the Western intellectual tradition, it is necessary to shift emphasis to the distinction between infinity and totality. This highlights the religious dimension of secularism, i.e., how modern (...)
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