Search results for 'ethical skepticism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Clayton Littlejohn (2011). Ethical Intuitionism and Moral Skepticism. In Jill Graper Hernandez (ed.), The New Intuitionism.
    In this paper, I defend a non-skeptical intuitionist approach to moral epistemology from recent criticisms. Starting with Sinnott-Armstrong's skeptical attacks, I argue that a familiar sort of skeptical argument rests on a problematic conception of the evidential grounds of our moral judgments. The success of his argument turns on whether we conceive of the evidential grounds of our moral judgments as consisting entirely of non-normative considerations. While we cannot avoid skepticism if we accept this conception of our evidential grounds, (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Noah Lemos (2002). Ethical Skepticism. In Paul K. Moser (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Epistemology. Oxford University Press 486.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  28
    Paul Kurtz (1985). Moral Faith and Ethical Skepticism Reconsidered. Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (1):55-65.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  11
    Thomas McClintock (1971). The Basic Varieties of Ethical Skepticism. Metaphilosophy 2 (1):29–43.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  14
    Sean Valentine & Karen Page (2006). Nine to Five: Skepticism of Women's Employment and Ethical Reasoning. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):53 - 61.
    Previous work suggests that gender attitudes are associated with different individual and organizational factors. At the same time, ethics research suggests that many of these same variables can influence ethical reasoning in companies. In this study, we sought to combine these streams of research to investigate whether individual skepticism of women’s employment is related to ethical reasoning in a gender-based ethical situation. The results of the hierarchical regression analysis indicated that skepticism of women’s employment was (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6.  52
    William J. FitzPatrick (2014). Skepticism About Naturalizing Normativity: In Defense of Ethical Nonnaturalism. Res Philosophica 91 (4):559-588.
    There is perhaps no more widely shared conviction in contemporary metaethics, even among those who hold otherwise divergent views, than that practical normativity must be capable of being naturalized . My aim is to illuminate the central reasons for skepticism about this. While certain naturalizing projects are plausible for very limited purposes, it is unlikely that any can provide everything we might reasonably want from an account of goodness and badness, rightness and wrongness, and unqualified reasons for acting—at least (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  2
    Sean Valentine & Karen Page (2006). Nine to Five: Skepticism of Women’s Employment and Ethical Reasoning. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):53-61.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. William Irwin & Brian Williams (2010). An Ethical Defense of Global-Warming Skepticism. Reason Papers 32:7-27.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Fred Wilson (2003). David Hume, Treatise of Human Nature (1740): A Genial Skepticism, an Ethical Naturalism. In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub. 291--308.
  10.  61
    Fred K. Beard (2003). College Student Attitudes Toward Advertising's Ethical, Economic, and Social Consequences. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):217-228.
    Little research has focused on college students'' attitudes toward advertising''s ethical, economic, and social consequences over the last two decades. Exploring and tracking the attitudes of college students toward advertising is important, however, for several reasons. College students represent an important segment of consumers for many marketers, negative attitudes toward advertising on the part of college students could lead to their support for restrictive regulation in the future, and there are potentially negative consequences concerning the effects of advertising that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  11. Stephen Maitzen (2006). The Impossibility of Local Skepticism. Philosophia 34 (4):453-464.
    According to global skepticism, we know nothing. According to local skepticism, we know nothing in some particular area or domain of discourse. Unlike their global counterparts, local skeptics think they can contain our invincible ignorance within limited bounds. I argue that they are mistaken. Local skepticism, particularly the kinds that most often get defended, cannot stay local: if there are domains whose truths we cannot know, then there must be claims outside those domains that we cannot know (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  12. William J. FitzPatrick (2015). Debunking Evolutionary Debunking of Ethical Realism. Philosophical Studies 172 (4):883-904.
    What implications, if any, does evolutionary biology have for metaethics? Many believe that our evolutionary background supports a deflationary metaethics, providing a basis at least for debunking ethical realism. Some arguments for this conclusion appeal to claims about the etiology of the mental capacities we employ in ethical judgment, while others appeal to the etiology of the content of our moral beliefs. In both cases the debunkers’ claim is that the causal roles played by evolutionary factors raise deep (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  13. Paul Kurtz (2010). Exuberant Skepticism. Prometheus Books 59 John Glenn Drive.
    What is skepticism? -- Skepticism as selective doubt -- Scientific method and rational skepticism -- Skepticism and the new enlightenment -- The growth of antiscience -- Skepticism, science, and the paranormal -- Should skeptical inquiry be applied to religion? -- Skepticism and religion -- Are science and religion compatible? -- Skepticism and political inquiry -- Skepticism and ethical inquiry -- Moral faith and ethical skepticism reconsidered -- Skepticism and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  30
    Jay P. Mulki, Jorge Fernando Jaramillo & William B. Locander (2009). Critical Role of Leadership on Ethical Climate and Salesperson Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):125 - 141.
    Leaders play a critical role in setting the tone for ethical climate in organizations. In recent years, there has been an increased skepticism about the role played by corporate executives in developing and implementing ethics in business practices. Sales and marketing practices of businesses, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, have come under increased scrutiny. This study identifies a type of leadership style that can help firms develop an ethical climate. Responses from 333 salespeople working for a North (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  15. Ronald Duska (2005). The Good Auditor – Skeptic or Wealth Accumulator? Ethical Lessons Learned From the Arthur Andersen Debacle. Journal of Business Ethics 57 (1):17 - 29.
    The paper begins with an example of the accounting treatment afforded an Indefeasible Rights Use (IRU) Swap by Global Crossing. The case presents a typical example of ways in which accounting firms contributed to the ethical scandals of the early 21st century. While the behavior of Arthur Andersen, the accounting company in the case, might have met the letter of the law, we argue that it violated the spirit of the law, which can be discovered by looking at (1) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  16.  11
    Roger Wilkinson & Gerard Fitzgerald (1997). Public Perceptions of Biological Control of Rabbits in New Zealand: Some Ethical and Practical Issues. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):273-282.
    Rabbits are a major vertebrate pest in New Zealand. An application has been made recently to import and release in New Zealand the biological control agent Rabbit Calicivirus Disease. In this paper we discuss the findings from a qualitative study and a national survey of New Zealanders' perceptions of rabbits, rabbit control, and RCD. New Zealanders' position on the introduction of RCD is complex, and includes concern for the rabbit as a sentient individual that deserves a humane death if it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  4
    Helen L. Brown-Liburd, Jeffrey Cohen & Greg Trompeter (2013). Effects of Earnings Forecasts and Heightened Professional Skepticism on the Outcomes of Client–Auditor Negotiation. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):311-325.
    Ethics has been identified as an important factor that potentially affects auditors’ professional skepticism. For example, prior research finds that auditors who are more concerned with professional ethics exhibit greater professional skepticism. Further, the literature suggests that professional skepticism may lead the auditor to more vigilantly resist the client’s position in financial reporting disputes. These reporting disputes are generally resolved through negotiations between the auditor and client to arrive at the final reported amounts. To date, the role (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  65
    Owen Ware (2010). Kant, Skepticism, and Moral Sensibility. Dissertation, University of Toronto
    In his early writings, Kant says that the solution to the puzzle of how morality can serve as a motivating force in human life is nothing less than the “philosophers’ stone.” In this dissertation I show that for years Kant searched for the philosophers’ stone in the concept of “respect” (Achtung), which he understood as the complex effect practical reason has on feeling. I sketch the history of that search in Chapters 1-2. In Chapter 3 I show that Kant’s analysis (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  43
    Richard F. Kitchener (1991). The Ethical Foundations of Behavior Therapy. Ethics and Behavior 1 (4):221 – 238.
    In this article, I am concerned with the ethical foundations of behavior therapy, that is, with the normative ethics and the meta-ethics underlying behavior therapy. In particular, I am concerned with questions concerning the very possibility of providing an ethical justification for things done in the context of therapy. Because behavior therapists must be able to provide an ethical justification for various actions (if the need arises), certain meta-ethical views widely accepted by behavior therapists must be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Espen Hammer (2002). Stanley Cavell: Skepticism, Subjectivity, and the Ordinary. Polity.
    Stanley Cavell is a leading figure in American philosophy and one of the most exhilarating and wide-ranging intellectuals of our time. In this book Espen Hammer offers a lucid and thorough account of the development of Cavell's work, from his early writings on ordinary language philosophy and skepticism to his most recent contributions to film studies, literary theory, romanticism, ethics, and politics. The book traces the many lines of skepticism occurring in Cavell's work and shows how they amount (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  21. David Slutsky (2001). Causally Inefficacious Moral Properties. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):595-610.
    In this paper, I motivate skepticism about the causal efficacy of moral properties in two ways. First, I highlight a tension that arises between two claims that moral realists may want to accept. The first claim is that physically indistinguishable things do not differ in any causally efficacious respect. The second claim is that physically indistinguishable things that differ in certain historical respects have different moral properties. The tension arises to the extent to which these different moral properties are (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  34
    Chris Fraser (2009). Skepticism and Value in the Zhuāngzi. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):439-457.
    The ethics of the Zhuāngzi is distinctive for its valorization of psychological qualities such as open-mindedness, adaptability, and tolerance. The paper discusses how these qualities and their consequences for morality and politics relate to the text’s views onskepticism and value. Chad Hansen has argued that Zhuangist ethical views are motivated by skepticism about our ability to know a privileged scheme of action-guiding distinctions, which in turn is grounded in a form of relativism about such distinctions. Against this, Icontend (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23. Robert E. Allinson (2002). Space, Time and the Ethical Foundations. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    In Space, Time and the Ethical Foundations ideas about space and time are developed, unique to the history of philosophy, that match the new physics. A well grounded metaphysics is presented which offers a safe haven between stifling skepticism and wild imagination, and an original philosophical method is demonstrated which sharply demarcates philosophy from the empirical sciences.A new foundation is laid for ethics by grounding ethics on the author's psycho-biological deduction of the emotions that offers a progressive model (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24. Espen Hammer (2002). Stanley Cavell: Skepticism, Subjectivity, and the Ordinary. Polity.
    Stanley Cavell is a leading figure in American philosophy and one of the most exhilarating and wide-ranging intellectuals of our time. In this book Espen Hammer offers a lucid and thorough account of the development of Cavell's work, from his early writings on ordinary language philosophy and skepticism to his most recent contributions to film studies, literary theory, romanticism, ethics, and politics. The book traces the many lines of skepticism occurring in Cavell's work and shows how they amount (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  59
    Olaf L. Mueller (2003). Can They Say What They Want? A Transcendental Argument Against Utilitarianism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):241-259.
    Let us imagine an ideal ethical agent, i.e., an agent who (i) holds a certain ethical theory, (ii) has all factual knowledge needed for determining which action among those open to her is right and which is wrong, according to her theory, and who (iii) is ideally motivated to really do whatever her ethical theory demands her to do. If we grant that the notions of omniscience and ideal motivation both make sense, we may ask: Could there (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  43
    Michael Rubin, Synthetic Ethical Naturalism.
    This dissertation is a critique of synthetic ethical naturalism (SEN). SEN is a view in metaethics that comprises three key theses: first, there are moral properties and facts that are independent of the beliefs and attitudes of moral appraisers (moral realism); second, moral properties and facts are identical to (or constituted only by) natural properties and facts (ethical naturalism); and third, sentences used to assert identity or constitution relations between moral and natural properties are expressions of synthetic, a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  28
    Brian Hutchinson (2001). G.E. Moore's Ethical Theory: Resistance and Reconciliation. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of G. E. Moore, the most important English-speaking ethicist of the twentieth century. Moore's ethical project, set out in his seminal text Principia Ethica, is to preserve common moral insight from skepticism and, in effect, persuade his readers to accept the objective character of goodness. Brian Hutchinson explores Moore's arguments in detail and in the process relates the ethical thought to Moore's anti-skeptical epistemology. Moore was, without perhaps fully (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  28.  10
    Edwin E. Gantt (2001). Rationality, Irrationality, and the Ethical: On Saving Psychology From Nihilism. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):1-19.
    Notes that much debate in contemporary psychology has been centered on the nature and scope of rationality and rational discourse. This paper seeks to elucidate 2 philosophical approaches that have come to occupy a central position in this debate: modernism and postmodernism. It will be argued that, although proceeding from antithetical assumptions concerning the proper grounding for philosophical and psychological endeavor, both modernism and postmodernism ultimately fall prey to epistemological skepticism and moral nihilism. The work of the French phenomenologist (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  5
    Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel Callahan & Janet Haas (1987). Ethical & Policy Issues in Rehabilitation Medicine. Hastings Center Report 17 (4):1-20.
    The field of medical rehabilitation is relatively new.... Until recently, the ethical problems of this new field were neglected. There seemed to be more pressing concerns as rehabilitation medicine struggled to establish itself, sometimes in the face of considerable skepticism or hostility. There also seemed no pressing moral questions of the kind and intensity to be encountered, say, in high-technology acute care medicine or genetic engineering.... Those in biomedical ethics could and did easily overlook the quiet, less obtrusive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  27
    Jennifer Alvidrez & Patricia A. Areán (2002). Psychosocial Treatment Research with Ethnic Minority Populations: Ethical Considerations in Conducting Clinical Trials. Ethics and Behavior 12 (1):103 – 116.
    Because of historical mistreatment of ethnic minorities by research and medical institutions, it is particularly important for researchers to be mindful of ethical issues that arise when conducting research with ethnic minority populations. In this article, we focus on the ethical issues related to the inclusion of ethnic minorities in clinical trials of psychosocial treatments. We highlight 2 factors, skepticism and mistrust by ethnic minorities about research and current inequities in the mental health care system, that researchers (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  23
    Fatimah Jackson (1998). Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing the molecular taxonomic norm for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  4
    Jana Sawicki (2013). Queer Feminism: Cultivating Ethical Practices of Freedom. Foucault Studies 16:74-87.
    Occupying an eccentric position with respect to critical theories, Foucault prefigures a queer critical thought and practice. In this paper I make a case for the continuing importance of Foucault for rethinking feminism within the context of neoliberal governmentality despite continuing skepticism about the value of his ethical writings. I draw not only upon the work of Foucault, but also that of queer feminist Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  19
    Harald Thorsrud (2006). Cicero’s Academic Skepticism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    I distinguish two varieties of ancient skepticism on the basis of their competing attitudes towards reason. Pyrrhonian skeptics, according to Sextus Empiricus, not only doubt our ability to arrive at true beliefs, but also the value of doing so, whereas the Academics, as portrayed by Cicero, are committed to the view that true beliefs are as beneficial as they are difficult to acquire. Next, I examine Academic epistemology, focusing on one of Cicero's most important and problematic philosophical coinages---probabilitas . (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  1
    Curtis Carter, Skepticism and Moral Theory in Contemporary Philosophy.
    Skepticism is the one problem above all others which has commanded the attention of moral philosophers in our century. Sometimes the problem is taken up explicitly, in full but uneasy consciousness; at others times it is treated indirectly, as in the troubled reflections from which emerge such questions as "Can moral principles be proved?" or "Is there a single 'right' point of view for confronting moral questions?" or "Why should I be moral at all?" In either case, skepticism (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Carla Bagnoli (2000). Moral Dilemmas and the Limits of Ethical Theory. LED.
    In this book, I consider whether the hypothesis of moral dilemmas undermines ethics' pretensions to objectivity. I argue against the view that moral dilemmas challenge the very possibility of ethical theory, as a practical and theoretical enterprise. By examining Kantian, Intuitionist and Utilitarian arguments about moral dilemmas, I show that no ethical theory is capable of avoiding them. I further argue that an adequate ethical theory should admit dilemmas. Dilemmas do not reveal a logical or normative flaw (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  91
    Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.) (2011). Ethical Naturalism: Current Debates. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Naturalism in moral philosophy Gilbert Harman; 2. Normativity and reasons: five arguments from Parfit against normative naturalism David Copp; 3. Naturalism: feel the width Roger Crisp; 4. On ethical naturalism and the philosophy of language Frank Jackson; 5. Metaethical pluralism: how both moral naturalism and moral skepticism may be permissible positions Richard Joyce; 6. Moral naturalism and categorical reasons Terence Cuneo; 7. Does analytical moral naturalism rest on a mistake? Susana Nuccetelli and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  91
    Benjamin Vilhauer (2009). Free Will Skepticism and Personhood as a Desert Base. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):pp. 489-511.
    In contemporary free will theory, a significant number of philosophers are once again taking seriously the possibility that human beings do not have free will, and are therefore not morally responsible for their actions. Free will theorists commonly assume that giving up the belief that human beings are morally responsible implies giving up all our beliefs about desert. But the consequences of giving up the belief that we are morally responsible are not quite this dramatic. Giving up the belief that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  38.  11
    George L. Kline (2011). Skepticism and Faith in Shestov's Early Critique of Rationalism. Studies in East European Thought 63 (1):15 - 29.
    Shestov's work can be summed up under six headings. Three are sharp contrasts, three are paradoxes. (1) First there is the contrast between Shestov the person, who was moderate, competent, and calm, and Shestov the thinker, who was extreme, incandescent, and impassioned. (2) Then there is the contrast between his critique of reason, his acceptance of irrationalism, and the means by which he attacks the former and defends the latter: namely, careful rational argument. Sometimes he argues like a lawyer (after (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  71
    Abraham Graber (2012). Medusa's Gaze Reflected: A Darwinian Dilemma for Anti-Realist Theories of Value. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (5):589-601.
    Abstract Street has argued that the meta-ethical realist is faced with a dilemma. Either evolutionary forces have had a distorting influenced on our ability to track moral properties or evolutionary forces influenced our beliefs in the direction of tracking moral properties. Street argues that if the realist accepts the first horn of the dilemma, the realist must accept implausible skepticism regarding moral beliefs. If the realist accepts the second horn of the dilemma, the realist owes an explanation of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  63
    Basil Smith (2001). Mark Timmons, Morality Without Foundations: A Defense of Ethical Contextualism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (2):269-273.
    In Morality Without Foundations, Mark Timmons argues that moral judgments (e.g. “cruelty is wrong”) have what he calls “evaluative assertoric content,” and so, are true or false. However, I argue that, even if correct, this argument renders moral truth or falsity mysterious.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Ben Mijuskovic (2005). Ethical Principles, Criteria, and the Meaning of Life. Journal of Thought 40 (4).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  54
    Julie Pirsch, Shruti Gupta & Stacy Landreth Grau (2007). A Framework for Understanding Corporate Social Responsibility Programs as a Continuum: An Exploratory Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (2):125 - 140.
    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) programs are increasingly popular corporate marketing strategies. This paper argues that CSR programs can fall along a continuum between two endpoints: Institutionalized programs and Promotional programs. This classification is based on an exploratory study examining the variance of four responses from the consumer stakeholder group toward these two categories of CSR. Institutionalized CSR programs are argued to be most effective at increasing customer loyalty, enhancing attitude toward the company, and decreasing consumer skepticism. Promotional CSR programs (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  43. Denis Robinson (2010). Reflections on Moral Disagreement, Relativism, and Skepticism About Rules. Philosophical Topics 38 (2):131-156.
    Part I of this paper discusses some uses of arguments from radical moral disagreement — in particular, as directed against absolutist cognitivism — and surveys some semantic issues thus made salient. It may be argued that parties to such a disagreement cannot be using the relevant moral claims with exactly the same absolutist cognitive content. That challenges the absolutist element of absolutist cognitivism, which, combined with the intractable nature of radical moral disagreement, in turn challenges the viability of a purely (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Daniel Callcut (2009). Mill, Sentimentalism and the Problem of Moral Authority. Utilitas 21 (1):22-35.
    Mill’s aim in chapter 3 of Utilitarianism is to show that his revisionary moral theory can preserve the kind of authority typically and traditionally associated with moral demands. One of his main targets is the idea that if people come to believe that morality is rooted in human sentiment then they will feel less bound by moral obligation. Chapter 3 emphasizes two claims: (1) The main motivation to ethical action comes from feelings and not from beliefs and (2) (...) feelings are highly malleable. I provide a critical examination of Mill’s use of these claims to support his argument that Utilitarianism can preserve morality’s authority. I show how the two claims, intended to form a significant rebuttal to the worry about Utilitarianism, can in fact be combined to raise powerful skeptical concerns. I explain how Mill evades the skepticism, and why contemporary philosophers who lack Millian optimism about human nature find it harder to avoid the skeptical outcome. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  3
    David Macarthur (2016). Living Our Skepticism of Others Through Film: Remarks In Light of Cavell. Substance 45 (3):120-136.
    In Stanley Cavell’s ethical universe, no concept is of more moment than that of acknowledgement. In Cavell’s view, the question of acknowledgement is not a matter of choice but is at issue whenever we confront, or are confronted by, others. To acknowledge is to admit or confess or reveal to someone, typically another, those things about oneself and one’s relations to the world and others that one, being human, cannot fail to know – except that “nothing is more human (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  26
    Alex Friedman (2009). Intransitive Ethics. Journal of Moral Philosophy 6 (3):277-297.
    This article addresses the question of whether the relation of moral preference is transitive. I argue, following Larry Temkin and Stuart Rachels, that any ethical theory complex enough to be even minimally plausible allows us to generate intransitive sets of preferences. Even act utilitarianism cannot avoid this predicament unless we accept its least plausible version. We must reevaluate the assumption that an ethical theory must be transitive in order to be rational. This problem amounts to a foundational crisis (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47.  76
    Seth Baum, Jacob Haqq-Misra & Chris Karmosky (2012). Climate Change: Evidence of Human Causes and Arguments for Emissions Reduction. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (2):393-410.
    In a recent editorial, Raymond Spier expresses skepticism over claims that climate change is driven by human actions and that humanity should act to avoid climate change. This paper responds to this skepticism as part of a broader review of the science and ethics of climate change. While much remains uncertain about the climate, research indicates that observed temperature increases are human-driven. Although opinions vary regarding what should be done, prominent arguments against action are based on dubious factual (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  44
    Larry S. Temkin (2005). Thinking About the Needy: A Reprise. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 8 (4):409 - 458.
    This article discusses Jan Narvesons Welfare and Wealth, Poverty and Justice in Todays World, and Is World Poverty a Moral Problem for the Wealthy? and their relation to my Thinking about the Needy, Justice, and International Organizations. Section 2 points out that Narvesons concerns differ from mine, so that often his claims and mine fail to engage each other. For example, his focus is on the poor, mine the needy, and while many poor are needy, and vice versa, our obligations (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  41
    Arnon Keren (2011). Disagreement, Democracy, and the Goals of Science: Is a Normative Philosophy of Science Possible, If Ethical Inquiry Is Not? Philosophy 86 (04):525-544.
    W.V.Quine and Philip Kitcher have both developed naturalistic approaches to the philosophy of science which are partially based on a skeptical view about the possibility of rational inquiry into certain questions of value. Nonetheless, both Quine and Kitcher do not wish to give up on the normative dimension of the philosophy of science. I argue that Kitcher's recent argument against the specification of the goal of science in terms of truth raises a problem for Quine's account of the normative dimensions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  9
    J. B. Schneewind (1991). Natural Law, Skepticism, and Methods of Ethics. Journal of the History of Ideas 52 (2):289-308.
    In the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals Kant presented a method for discovering what morality requires us to do in any situation and claimed that it is a method everyone can use. The method consists in testing one's maxim against the requirement stated in the formulations of the categorical imperative. There has been endless discussion of the adequacy of Kant's method in giving moral guidance, but there has been little effort to situate Kant's view of ethical method in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 1000