Search results for 'ethical skepticism' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Clayton Littlejohn (2011). Ethical Intuitionism and Moral Skepticism. In Jill Graper Hernandez (ed.), The New Intuitionism.score: 174.0
    In this paper, I defend a non-skeptical intuitionist approach to moral epistemology from recent criticisms. Starting with Sinnott-Armstrong's skeptical attacks, I argue that a familiar sort of skeptical argument rests on a problematic conception of the evidential grounds of our moral judgments. The success of his argument turns on whether we conceive of the evidential grounds of our moral judgments as consisting entirely of non-normative considerations. While we cannot avoid skepticism if we accept this conception of our evidential grounds, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Andrew Sepielli, An Argument for Ethical Skepticism.score: 150.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Paul Kurtz (1985). Moral Faith and Ethical Skepticism Reconsidered. Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (1):55-65.score: 150.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Thomas McClintock (1971). The Basic Varieties of Ethical Skepticism. Metaphilosophy 2 (1):29–43.score: 150.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Noah Lemos (2002). Ethical Skepticism. In Paul K. Moser (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Epistemology. Oxford University Press. 486.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Sean Valentine & Karen Page (2006). Nine to Five: Skepticism of Women's Employment and Ethical Reasoning. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 63 (1):53 - 61.score: 146.0
    Previous work suggests that gender attitudes are associated with different individual and organizational factors. At the same time, ethics research suggests that many of these same variables can influence ethical reasoning in companies. In this study, we sought to combine these streams of research to investigate whether individual skepticism of women’s employment is related to ethical reasoning in a gender-based ethical situation. The results of the hierarchical regression analysis indicated that skepticism of women’s employment was (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Fred Wilson (2003). David Hume, Treatise of Human Nature (1740): A Genial Skepticism, an Ethical Naturalism. In Jorge J. E. Gracia, Gregory M. Reichberg & Bernard N. Schumacher (eds.), The Classics of Western Philosophy: A Reader's Guide. Blackwell Pub.. 291--308.score: 120.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Fred K. Beard (2003). College Student Attitudes Toward Advertising's Ethical, Economic, and Social Consequences. Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):217-228.score: 86.0
    Little research has focused on college students'' attitudes toward advertising''s ethical, economic, and social consequences over the last two decades. Exploring and tracking the attitudes of college students toward advertising is important, however, for several reasons. College students represent an important segment of consumers for many marketers, negative attitudes toward advertising on the part of college students could lead to their support for restrictive regulation in the future, and there are potentially negative consequences concerning the effects of advertising that (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ronald Duska (2005). The Good Auditor – Skeptic or Wealth Accumulator? Ethical Lessons Learned From the Arthur Andersen Debacle. Journal of Business Ethics 57 (1):17 - 29.score: 80.0
    The paper begins with an example of the accounting treatment afforded an Indefeasible Rights Use (IRU) Swap by Global Crossing. The case presents a typical example of ways in which accounting firms contributed to the ethical scandals of the early 21st century. While the behavior of Arthur Andersen, the accounting company in the case, might have met the letter of the law, we argue that it violated the spirit of the law, which can be discovered by looking at (1) (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Helen L. Brown-Liburd, Jeffrey Cohen & Greg Trompeter (2013). Effects of Earnings Forecasts and Heightened Professional Skepticism on the Outcomes of Client–Auditor Negotiation. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):311-325.score: 80.0
    Ethics has been identified as an important factor that potentially affects auditors’ professional skepticism. For example, prior research finds that auditors who are more concerned with professional ethics exhibit greater professional skepticism. Further, the literature suggests that professional skepticism may lead the auditor to more vigilantly resist the client’s position in financial reporting disputes. These reporting disputes are generally resolved through negotiations between the auditor and client to arrive at the final reported amounts. To date, the role (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Owen Ware (2010). Kant, Skepticism, and Moral Sensibility. Dissertation, University of Torontoscore: 78.0
    In his early writings, Kant says that the solution to the puzzle of how morality can serve as a motivating force in human life is nothing less than the “philosophers’ stone.” In this dissertation I show that for years Kant searched for the philosophers’ stone in the concept of “respect” (Achtung), which he understood as the complex effect practical reason has on feeling. I sketch the history of that search in Chapters 1-2. In Chapter 3 I show that Kant’s analysis (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Stephen Maitzen (2006). The Impossibility of Local Skepticism. Philosophia 34 (4):453-464.score: 72.0
    According to global skepticism, we know nothing. According to local skepticism, we know nothing in some particular area or domain of discourse. Unlike their global counterparts, local skeptics think they can contain our invincible ignorance within limited bounds. I argue that they are mistaken. Local skepticism, particularly the kinds that most often get defended, cannot stay local: if there are domains whose truths we cannot know, then there must be claims outside those domains that we cannot know (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Paul Kurtz (2010). Exuberant Skepticism. Prometheus Books 59 John Glenn Drive.score: 72.0
    What is skepticism? -- Skepticism as selective doubt -- Scientific method and rational skepticism -- Skepticism and the new enlightenment -- The growth of antiscience -- Skepticism, science, and the paranormal -- Should skeptical inquiry be applied to religion? -- Skepticism and religion -- Are science and religion compatible? -- Skepticism and political inquiry -- Skepticism and ethical inquiry -- Moral faith and ethical skepticism reconsidered -- Skepticism and (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jay P. Mulki, Jorge Fernando Jaramillo & William B. Locander (2009). Critical Role of Leadership on Ethical Climate and Salesperson Behaviors. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):125 - 141.score: 68.0
    Leaders play a critical role in setting the tone for ethical climate in organizations. In recent years, there has been an increased skepticism about the role played by corporate executives in developing and implementing ethics in business practices. Sales and marketing practices of businesses, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry, have come under increased scrutiny. This study identifies a type of leadership style that can help firms develop an ethical climate. Responses from 333 salespeople working for a North (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. B. Schneewind (1991). Natural Law, Skepticism, and Methods of Ethics. Journal of the History of Ideas 52 (2):289-308.score: 66.0
    In the Foundations of the Metaphysics of Morals Kant presented a method for discovering what morality requires us to do in any situation and claimed that it is a method everyone can use. The method consists in testing one's maxim against the requirement stated in the formulations of the categorical imperative. There has been endless discussion of the adequacy of Kant's method in giving moral guidance, but there has been little effort to situate Kant's view of ethical method in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Roger Wilkinson & Gerard Fitzgerald (1997). Public Perceptions of Biological Control of Rabbits in New Zealand: Some Ethical and Practical Issues. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (3):273-282.score: 66.0
    Rabbits are a major vertebrate pest in New Zealand. An application has been made recently to import and release in New Zealand the biological control agent Rabbit Calicivirus Disease (RCD). In this paper we discuss the findings from a qualitative study and a national survey of New Zealanders' perceptions of rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), rabbit control, and RCD. New Zealanders' position on the introduction of RCD is complex, and includes concern for the rabbit as a sentient individual that deserves a humane (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Richard F. Kitchener (1991). The Ethical Foundations of Behavior Therapy. Ethics and Behavior 1 (4):221 – 238.score: 62.0
    In this article, I am concerned with the ethical foundations of behavior therapy, that is, with the normative ethics and the meta-ethics underlying behavior therapy. In particular, I am concerned with questions concerning the very possibility of providing an ethical justification for things done in the context of therapy. Because behavior therapists must be able to provide an ethical justification for various actions (if the need arises), certain meta-ethical views widely accepted by behavior therapists must be (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. William J. FitzPatrick (forthcoming). Debunking Evolutionary Debunking of Ethical Realism. Philosophical Studies:1-22.score: 60.0
    What implications, if any, does evolutionary biology have for metaethics? Many believe that our evolutionary background supports a deflationary metaethics, providing a basis at least for debunking ethical realism. Some arguments for this conclusion appeal to claims about the etiology of the mental capacities we employ in ethical judgment, while others appeal to the etiology of the content of our moral beliefs. In both cases the debunkers’ claim is that the causal roles played by evolutionary factors raise deep (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Fatimah Jackson (1998). Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.score: 60.0
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing the molecular taxonomic norm for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.) (2011). Ethical Naturalism: Current Debates. Cambridge University Press.score: 58.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; 1. Naturalism in moral philosophy Gilbert Harman; 2. Normativity and reasons: five arguments from Parfit against normative naturalism David Copp; 3. Naturalism: feel the width Roger Crisp; 4. On ethical naturalism and the philosophy of language Frank Jackson; 5. Metaethical pluralism: how both moral naturalism and moral skepticism may be permissible positions Richard Joyce; 6. Moral naturalism and categorical reasons Terence Cuneo; 7. Does analytical moral naturalism rest on a mistake? Susana Nuccetelli and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Brian Hutchinson (2001). G.E. Moore's Ethical Theory: Resistance and Reconciliation. Cambridge University Press.score: 58.0
    This is the first comprehensive study of the ethics of G. E. Moore, the most important English-speaking ethicist of the twentieth century. Moore's ethical project, set out in his seminal text Principia Ethica, is to preserve common moral insight from skepticism and, in effect, persuade his readers to accept the objective character of goodness. Brian Hutchinson explores Moore's arguments in detail and in the process relates the ethical thought to Moore's anti-skeptical epistemology. Moore was, without perhaps fully (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Jennifer Alvidrez & Patricia A. Areán (2002). Psychosocial Treatment Research with Ethnic Minority Populations: Ethical Considerations in Conducting Clinical Trials. Ethics and Behavior 12 (1):103 – 116.score: 56.0
    Because of historical mistreatment of ethnic minorities by research and medical institutions, it is particularly important for researchers to be mindful of ethical issues that arise when conducting research with ethnic minority populations. In this article, we focus on the ethical issues related to the inclusion of ethnic minorities in clinical trials of psychosocial treatments. We highlight 2 factors, skepticism and mistrust by ethnic minorities about research and current inequities in the mental health care system, that researchers (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Slutsky (2001). Causally Inefficacious Moral Properties. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (4):595-610.score: 54.0
    In this paper, I motivate skepticism about the causal efficacy of moral properties in two ways. First, I highlight a tension that arises between two claims that moral realists may want to accept. The first claim is that physically indistinguishable things do not differ in any causally efficacious respect. The second claim is that physically indistinguishable things that differ in certain historical respects have different moral properties. The tension arises to the extent to which these different moral properties are (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Carla Bagnoli (2000). Moral Dilemmas and the Limits of Ethical Theory. LED.score: 54.0
    In this book, I consider whether the hypothesis of moral dilemmas undermines ethics' pretensions to objectivity. I argue against the view that moral dilemmas challenge the very possibility of ethical theory, as a practical and theoretical enterprise. By examining Kantian, Intuitionist and Utilitarian arguments about moral dilemmas, I show that no ethical theory is capable of avoiding them. I further argue that an adequate ethical theory should admit dilemmas. Dilemmas do not reveal a logical or normative flaw (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael Rubin, Synthetic Ethical Naturalism.score: 54.0
    This dissertation is a critique of synthetic ethical naturalism (SEN). SEN is a view in metaethics that comprises three key theses: first, there are moral properties and facts that are independent of the beliefs and attitudes of moral appraisers (moral realism); second, moral properties and facts are identical to (or constituted only by) natural properties and facts (ethical naturalism); and third, sentences used to assert identity or constitution relations between moral and natural properties are expressions of synthetic, a (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Olaf L. Mueller (2003). Can They Say What They Want? A Transcendental Argument Against Utilitarianism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):241-259.score: 54.0
    Let us imagine an ideal ethical agent, i.e., an agent who (i) holds a certain ethical theory, (ii) has all factual knowledge needed for determining which action among those open to her is right and which is wrong, according to her theory, and who (iii) is ideally motivated to really do whatever her ethical theory demands her to do. If we grant that the notions of omniscience and ideal motivation both make sense, we may ask: Could there (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Chris Fraser (2009). Skepticism and Value in the Zhuāngzi. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (4):439-457.score: 54.0
    The ethics of the Zhuāngzi is distinctive for its valorization of psychological qualities such as open-mindedness, adaptability, and tolerance. The paper discusses how these qualities and their consequences for morality and politics relate to the text’s views onskepticism and value. Chad Hansen has argued that Zhuangist ethical views are motivated by skepticism about our ability to know a privileged scheme of action-guiding distinctions, which in turn is grounded in a form of relativism about such distinctions. Against this, Icontend (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Arthur L. Caplan, Daniel Callahan & Janet Haas (1987). Ethical & Policy Issues in Rehabilitation Medicine. Hastings Center Report 17 (4):1-20.score: 54.0
    The field of medical rehabilitation is relatively new.... Until recently, the ethical problems of this new field were neglected. There seemed to be more pressing concerns as rehabilitation medicine struggled to establish itself, sometimes in the face of considerable skepticism or hostility. There also seemed no pressing moral questions of the kind and intensity to be encountered, say, in high-technology acute care medicine or genetic engineering.... Those in biomedical ethics could and did easily overlook the quiet, less obtrusive (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Jana Sawicki (2013). Queer Feminism: Cultivating Ethical Practices of Freedom. Foucault Studies 16:74-87.score: 54.0
    Occupying an eccentric position with respect to critical theories, Foucault prefigures a queer critical thought and practice. In this paper I make a case for the continuing importance of Foucault for rethinking feminism within the context of neoliberal governmentality despite continuing skepticism about the value of his ethical writings. I draw not only upon the work of Foucault, but also that of queer feminist Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Michael Philips (1994). Between Universalism and Skepticism: Ethics as Social Artifact. Oxford University Press.score: 52.0
    Philips defends a middle ground between the view that there is a set of standards binding on rational beings as such (universalism) and the view that differences in morals reduce ultimately to matters of taste (skepticism). He begins with a sustained critique of universalist moral theories and some familiar approaches to concrete moral questions that presuppose them (most appeals to intuitions, respect for person's moralities, and versions of contractarianism and wide reflective equilibrium). He goes on to criticize major recent (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Daniel Callcut (2006). The Value of Teaching Moral Skepticism. Teaching Philosophy 29 (3):223-235.score: 50.0
    This article argues that introductory ethics classes can unwittingly create or confirm skeptical views toward morality. Introductory courses frequently include critical discussion of skeptical positions such as moral relativism and psychological egoism as a way to head off this unintended outcome. But this method of forestalling skepticism can have a residual (and unintended) skeptical effect. The problem calls for deeper pedagogical-cum-philosophical engagement with the underlying sources of skepticism. The paper provides examples of how to do this and explains (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Larry S. Temkin (2005). Thinking About the Needy: A Reprise. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 8 (4):409 - 458.score: 50.0
    This article discusses Jan Narvesons Welfare and Wealth, Poverty and Justice in Todays World, and Is World Poverty a Moral Problem for the Wealthy? and their relation to my Thinking about the Needy, Justice, and International Organizations. Section 2 points out that Narvesons concerns differ from mine, so that often his claims and mine fail to engage each other. For example, his focus is on the poor, mine the needy, and while many poor are needy, and vice versa, our obligations (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Benjamin Vilhauer (2009). Free Will Skepticism and Personhood as a Desert Base. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):pp. 489-511.score: 48.0
    In contemporary free will theory, a significant number of philosophers are once again taking seriously the possibility that human beings do not have free will, and are therefore not morally responsible for their actions. Free will theorists commonly assume that giving up the belief that human beings are morally responsible implies giving up all our beliefs about desert. But the consequences of giving up the belief that we are morally responsible are not quite this dramatic. Giving up the belief that (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Owen Ware (2014). Skepticism in Kant's Groundwork. European Journal of Philosophy 21 (4).score: 48.0
    This paper offers a new interpretation of Kant's relationship with skepticism in the Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals. My position differs from commonly held views in the literature in two ways. On the one hand, I argue that Kant's relationship with skepticism is active and systematic (contrary to Hill, Wood, Rawls, Timmermann, and Allison). On the other hand, I argue that the kind of skepticism Kant is interested in does not speak to the philosophical tradition in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. George L. Kline (2011). Skepticism and Faith in Shestov's Early Critique of Rationalism. Studies in East European Thought 63 (1):15 - 29.score: 48.0
    Shestov's work can be summed up under six headings. Three are sharp contrasts, three are paradoxes. (1) First there is the contrast between Shestov the person, who was moderate, competent, and calm, and Shestov the thinker, who was extreme, incandescent, and impassioned. (2) Then there is the contrast between his critique of reason, his acceptance of irrationalism, and the means by which he attacks the former and defends the latter: namely, careful rational argument. Sometimes he argues like a lawyer (after (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Elisa Aaltola (2013). Skepticism, Empathy, and Animal Suffering. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):457-467.score: 44.0
    The suffering of nonhuman animals has become a noted factor in deciding public policy and legislative change. Yet, despite this growing concern, skepticism toward such suffering is still surprisingly common. This paper analyzes the merits of the skeptical approach, both in its moderate and extreme forms. In the first part it is claimed that the type of criterion for verification concerning the mental states of other animals posed by skepticism is overly (and, in the case of extreme (...), illogically) demanding. Resting on Wittgenstein and Husserl, it is argued that skepticism relies on a misguided epistemology and, thus, that key questions posed by it face the risk of absurdity. In the second part of the paper it is suggested that, instead of skepticism, empathy together with intersubjectivity be adopted. Edith Stein’s take on empathy, along with contemporary findings, are explored, and the claim is made that it is only via these two methods of understanding that the suffering of nonhuman animals can be perceived. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stanley Cavell (1979/1999). The Claim of Reason: Wittgenstein, Skepticism, Morality, and Tragedy. Oxford University Press.score: 44.0
    This reissue of an American philosophical classic includes a new preface by Cavell, in which he discusses the work's reception and influence. The work fosters a fascinating relationship between philosophy and literature both by augmenting his philosophical discussions with examples from literature and by applying philosophical theories to literary texts. Cavell also succeeds in drawing some very important parallels between the British analytic tradition and the continental tradition, by comparing skepticism as understood in Descartes, Hume, and Kant with philosophy (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Curtis L. Carter (1973). Skepticism and Moral Principles. [Evanston, Ill.,New University Press.score: 44.0
  39. Abraham Graber (2012). Medusa's Gaze Reflected: A Darwinian Dilemma for Anti-Realist Theories of Value. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (5):589-601.score: 42.0
    Abstract Street has argued that the meta-ethical realist is faced with a dilemma. Either evolutionary forces have had a distorting influenced on our ability to track moral properties or evolutionary forces influenced our beliefs in the direction of tracking moral properties. Street argues that if the realist accepts the first horn of the dilemma, the realist must accept implausible skepticism regarding moral beliefs. If the realist accepts the second horn of the dilemma, the realist owes an explanation of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Basil Smith (2001). Mark Timmons, Morality Without Foundations: A Defense of Ethical Contextualism. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 35 (2):269-273.score: 42.0
    In Morality Without Foundations, Mark Timmons argues that moral judgments (e.g. “cruelty is wrong”) have what he calls “evaluative assertoric content,” and so, are true or false. However, I argue that, even if correct, this argument renders moral truth or falsity mysterious.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. C. J. Fraser (1998). Paul Kjellberg and Philip J. Ivanhoe, Eds., Essays on Skepticism, Relativism, and Ethics in the “Zhuangzi”:Essays on Skepticism, Relativism, and Ethics in the “Zhuangzi.”. [REVIEW] Ethics 108 (4):799-802.score: 42.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Stanley G. Clarke (1990). Book Review:Skepticism in Ethics. Panayot Butchvarov. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (4):890-.score: 42.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. John Mizzoni (1998). Evolutionary Ethics: A Crack in the Foundation of Ethics? Theoretical Ethics.score: 42.0
    Michael Ruse has argued that evolutionary ethics discredits the objectivity and foundations of ethics. Ruse must employ dubitable assumptions, however, to reach his conclusion. We can trace these assumptions to G. E. Moore. Also, part of Ruse’s case against the foundations of ethics can support the objectivity and foundations of ethics. Cooperative activity geared toward human flourishing helps point the way to a naturalistic moral realism and not exclusively to ethical skepticism as Ruse supposes.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. T. Settle (2000). Farm Animals' Challenge to Ecological Thinking Skepticism About the Prospects for an Inclusive Ethics of Health. Ethics and the Environment 5 (2):243-251.score: 42.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Panayot Butchvarov (1990). [Book Review] Skepticism in Ethics. [REVIEW] Ethics 100.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Richard L. Kirby (1985). Medical Skepticism of Legal Ethics. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 13 (5):245-245.score: 42.0
  47. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2007). Animal Minds, Cognitive Ethology, and Ethics. Journal of Ethics 11 (3):299-317.score: 40.0
    Our goal in this paper is to provide enough of an account of the origins of cognitive ethology and the controversy surrounding it to help ethicists to gauge for themselves how to balance skepticism and credulity about animal minds when communicating with scientists. We believe that ethicists’ arguments would benefit from better understanding of the historical roots of ongoing controversies. It is not appropriate to treat some widely reported results in animal cognition as if their interpretations are a matter (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Eric Sean Nelson (2008). Questioning Dao: Skepticism, Mysticism, and Ethics in the Zhuangzi. International Journal of the Asian Philosophical Association 1:5-19.score: 40.0
  49. Elijah Millgram (2007). Applied Ethics, Moral Skepticism, and Reasons with Expiration Dates. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (5):pp. 263-280.score: 40.0
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Hsiu-Chen Chang (1998). Essays on Skepticism, Relativism, and Ethics in the Zhuangzi. Edited by Paul Kjellberg and Philip J. Ivanhoe. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1996. Pp.Xx +240. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (2):269-271.score: 40.0
1 — 50 / 1000