Search results for 'evo-devo' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Uwe Hoßfeld & Lennart Olsson (2003). The Road From Haeckel: The Jena Tradition in Evolutionary Morphology and the Origins of “Evo-Devo”. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):285-307.score: 156.0
    With Carl Gegenbaur and Ernst Haeckel, inspiredby Darwin and the cell theory, comparativeanatomy and embryology became established andflourished in Jena. This tradition wascontinued and developed further with new ideasand methods devised by some of Haeckelsstudents. This first period of innovative workin evolutionary morphology was followed byperiods of crisis and even a disintegration ofthe discipline in the early twentieth century.This stagnation was caused by a lack ofinterest among morphologists in Mendeliangenetics, and uncertainty about the mechanismsof evolution. Idealistic morphology was stillinfluental in (...)
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  2. Verónica S. Di Stilio (2011). Empowering Plant Evo‐Devo: Virus Induced Gene Silencing Validates New and Emerging Model Systems. Bioessays 33 (9):711-718.score: 150.0
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  3. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2013). Evo-Devo as a Trading Zone. In Alan Love (ed.), Conceptual Change in Biology: Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives on Evolution and Development. Springer Verlag, Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science.score: 120.0
    Evo-Devo exhibits a plurality of scientific “cultures” of practice and theory. When are the cultures acting—individually or collectively—in ways that actually move research forward, empirically, theoretically, and ethically? When do they become imperialistic, in the sense of excluding and subordinating other cultures? This chapter identifies six cultures – three /styles/ (mathematical modeling, mechanism, and history) and three /paradigms/ (adaptationism, structuralism, and cladism). The key assumptions standing behind, under, or within each of these cultures are explored. Characterizing the internal structure (...)
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  4. Paul Griffiths, Evo-Devo Meets the Mind: Toward a Developmental Evolutionary Psychology.score: 120.0
    _The emerging discipline of evolutionary developmental biology has opened up many new _ _lines of investigation into morphological evolution. Here I explore how two of the core _ _theoretical concepts in ‘evo-devo’ – modularity and homology – apply to evolutionary _ _psychology. I distinguish three sorts of module - developmental, functional and mental _ _modules and argue that mental modules need only be ‘virtual’ functional modules. _ _Evolutionary psychologists have argued that separate mental modules are solutions to _ _separate (...)
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  5. Lindsay R. Craig (2009). Defending Evo‐Devo: A Response to Hoekstra and Coyne. Philosophy of Science 76 (3):335-344.score: 120.0
    The study of evolutionary developmental biology (“evo‐devo”) has recently experienced a dramatic surge in popularity among researchers and theorists concerned with evolution. However, some biologists and philosophers remain skeptical of the claims of evo‐devo. This paper discusses and responds to the recent high profile criticisms of evo‐devo presented by biologists Hopi E. Hoekstra and Jerry A. Coyne. I argue that their objections are unconvincing. Indeed, empirical research supports the main tenets of evo‐devo, including the claim that morphological evolution is the (...)
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  6. Ingo Brigandt (2009). Accounting for Vertebrate Limbs: From Owen's Homology to Novelty in Evo-Devo. [REVIEW] Philosophy & Theory in Biology 1 (20130604):e004.score: 120.0
    This article reviews the recent reissuing of Richard Owen’s On the Nature of Limbs and its three novel, introductory essays. These essays make Owen’s 1849 text very accessible by discussing the historical context of his work and explaining how Owen’s ideas relate to his larger intellectual framework. In addition to the ways in which the essays point to Owen’s relevance for contemporary biology, I discuss how Owen’s unity of type theory and his homology claims about fins and limbs compare with (...)
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  7. Simon M. Reader (2006). Evo-Devo, Modularity, and Evolvability: Insights for Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):361-362.score: 120.0
    Evolutionary developmental biology (“evo-devo”) may provide insights and new methods for studies of cognition and cultural evolution. For example, I propose using cultural selection and individual learning to examine constraints on cultural evolution. Modularity, the idea that traits vary independently, can facilitate evolution (increase “evolvability”), because evolution can act on one trait without disrupting another. I explore links between cognitive modularity, evolutionary modularity, and cultural evolvability. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  8. Jeffrey H. Schwartz (2006). Decisions, Decisions: Why Thomas Hunt Morgan Was Not the "Father" of Evo-Devo. Philosophy of Science 73 (5):918-929.score: 120.0
    Although the construction of neo-Darwinism grew out of Thomas Hunt Morgan's melding of Darwinism and Mendelism, his evidence did not soley support a model of gradual change. To the contrary, he was confronted with observations that could have led him to a more "evo-devo" understanding of the emergence of novel features. Indeed, since Morgan was an embryologist before he became a fruit-fly geneticist, one would have predicted that the combination of these two lines of research would have resulted in (...)
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  9. R. Allen Gardner (2005). Animal Cognition Meets Evo-Devo. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):699-700.score: 120.0
    Sound comparative psychology and modern evolutionary and developmental biology (often called evo-devo) emphasize powerful effects of developmental conditions on the expression of genetic endowment. Both demand that evolutionary theorists recognize these effects. Instead, Tomasello et al. compares studies of normal human children with studies of chimpanzees reared and maintained in cognitively deprived conditions, while ignoring studies of chimpanzees in cognitively appropriate environments.
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  10. Ron Amundson, Accounting For Vertebrate Limbs: From Owen's Homology To Novelty In Evo-Devo.score: 120.0
    This article reviews the recent reissuing of Richard Owen’s On the Nature of Limbs and its three novel, introductory essays. These essays make Owen’s 1849 text very accessible by discussing the historical context of his work and explaining how Owen’s ideas relate to his larger intellectual framework. In addition to the ways in which the essays point to Owen’s relevance for contemporary biology, I discuss how Owen’s unity of type theory and his homology claims about fins and limbs compare with (...)
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  11. Laura Nuño de la Rosa & Arantza Etxeberria, Pattern and Process in Evo-Devo: Descriptions and Explanations.score: 120.0
    In the evolutionary biology of the Modern Synthesis the study of patterns refers to how to identify and systematise order in lineages, looking for hierarchies or for branching/splitting events in the tree of life, whereas the resulting order is supposed to be due to underlying processes or mechanisms. But patterns and processes play distinct roles in evo-devo: four different views on the role of patterns and processes in descriptions and explanations of development and evolution: A) transformational; B) generative; C) (...)
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  12. Paula M. Mabee (2006). Integrating Evolution and Development: The Need for Bioinformatics in Evo-Devo. BioScience 56 (4):301-309.score: 120.0
    Abstract -/- This article is an overview of concepts relating to the integration of the genotype and phenotype. One of the major goals of evolutionary developmental biology, or evo-devo, is to understand the transformation of morphology in evolution. This goal can be accomplished by synthesizing the data pertaining to gene regulatory networks and making use of the increasingly comprehensive knowledge of phylogenetic relationships and associated phenotypes. I give several examples of recent success in connecting these different biological levels. These (...)
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  13. Marion Blute (2008). Is It Time for an Updated 'Eco-Evo-Devo'Definition of Evolution by Natural Selection? Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 2 (1):1.score: 96.0
    Abstract A lot of science has passed under the bridge since the classic definition of evolution as a change in gene frequencies in a population became common. Much knowledge has accumulated since then about evolution, heredity, ecology, development, phenotypic plasticity, niche construction and genetic drift. Building on Van Valen’s description of evolution as “the control of development by ecology,” it is suggested that the classic definition be replaced by a updated ‘eco‐evo-evo’ definition of evolution by natural selection which acknowledges this (...)
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  14. Massimo Pigliucci (2013). Between Holism and Reductionism: A Philosophical Primer on Emergence. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society.score: 90.0
    Ever since Darwin a great deal of the conceptual history of biology may be read as a struggle between two philosophical positions: reductionism and holism. On the one hand, we have the reductionist claim that evolution has to be understood in terms of changes at the fundamental causal level of the gene. As Richard Dawkins famously put it, organisms are just ‘lumbering robots’ in the service of their genetic masters. On the other hand, there is a long holistic tradition that (...)
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  15. Andrew Hamilton (2009). Toward a Mechanistic Evo Devo. In Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Form and Function in Developmental Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
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  16. Brett Calcott (2013). Why How and Why Aren't Enough: More Problems with Mayr's Proximate-Ultimate Distinction. Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):767-780.score: 90.0
    Like Laland et al., I think Mayr’s distinction is problematic, but I identify a further problem with it. I argue that Mayr’s distinction is a false dichotomy, and obscures an important question about evolutionary change. I show how this question, once revealed, sheds light on some debates in evo-devo that Laland et al.’s analysis cannot, and suggest that it provides a different view about how future integration between biological disciplines might proceed.
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  17. Scott F. Gilbert (2003). Evo-Devo, Devo-Evo, and Devgen-Popgen. Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):347-352.score: 90.0
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  18. Michael Ruse (2005). Evo-Devo: A New Evolutionary Paradigm? Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 80 (56):8-.score: 90.0
  19. Alan C. Love (2005). Review of Ron Amundson, The Changing Role of the Embryo in Evolutionary Thought: Roots of Evo-Devo. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).score: 90.0
  20. Manfred D. Laubichler (2006). Does EvoDevo Equal Regulatory Evolution?: Endless Forms Most Beautiful: The New Science of Evo Devo and the Making of the Animal Kingdom Sean B. Carroll New York and London : Norton , 2005 (350 Pp; $25.95 Hbk; ISBN 0393060160); From DNA to Diversity: Molecular Genetics and the Evolution of Animal Design (2nd Ed.) Sean B. Carroll , Jennifer K. Grenier , Scott D. Weatherbee Malden, MA : Blackwell , 2004 (258 Pp; $49.95 Pbk; ISBN 1405119500). [REVIEW] Biological Theory 1 (1):102-103.score: 90.0
  21. Paula Mabee (2010). A Multifaceted View of Evo-Devo. Bioscience 60 (7):555-556.score: 90.0
  22. Ronald A. Jenner (2009). From Embryology to Evo-Devo: A History of Developmental Evolution (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (3):458-462.score: 90.0
  23. Bradford McCall (2012). The Changing Role of the Embryo in Evolutionary Thought: Roots of Evo-Devo. By Ron Amundson. Pp. Xiii, 280, Cambridge University Press, 2007, $26.99. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 53 (5):870-871.score: 90.0
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  24. Denis M. Walsh (2013). Mechanism, Emergence, and Miscibility: The Autonomy of Evo-Devo. In. In Philippe Huneman (ed.), Functions: Selection and Mechanisms. Springer. 43--65.score: 90.0
  25. Courtney Babbitt, Matt Giorgianni & Alivia Price (2002). Evo-Devo Comes Into Focus. Bioessays 24 (7):677-679.score: 90.0
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  26. Jessica A. Bolker (2008). From Embryology to Evo-Devo: A History of Developmental Evolution. Bioscience 58 (5):461.score: 90.0
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  27. Samuel M. Scheiner (2004). The Metamorphosis of Evo-Devo. Bioscience 54 (12):1150.score: 90.0
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  28. Wayne Getz (2003). Evo-Devo” and the Conundrum of Sympatric Speciation. Bioscience 53 (4):313.score: 90.0
  29. Erik L. Peterson (2011). The Excluded Philosophy of Evo-Devo? Revisiting CH Waddington's Failed Attempt to Embed Alfred North Whitehead's" Organicism" in Evolutionary Biology. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (3).score: 90.0
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  30. Sergi Balari Ravera & Guillermo José Lorenzo González (2010). La biología evo-devo, el crecimiento del cerebro y la evolución del lenguaje. Ludus Vitalis 18 (33):49-78.score: 90.0
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  31. M. Simon (2006). Evo-Devo, Modularity, and Evolvability: Insights for Cultural Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4).score: 90.0
  32. Manfred D. Laubichler (2009). Form and Function in Evo Devo: Historical and Conceptual Reflections. In Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Form and Function in Developmental Evolution. Cambridge University Press. 10.score: 90.0
  33. Ryuichi Matsuda (2004). The Metamorphosis of Evo-Devo. Bioscience 54 (12).score: 90.0
  34. Laura Nuño De La Rosa García & Arantza Etxeberria, Pattern and Process in Evo-Devo.score: 90.0
    In the Modern Synthesis the study of patterns refers to how to identify and systematize order in lineages (description), attributed to underlying processes or mechanisms (explanation). But patterns and processes play distinct roles in evodevo. In this paper we (1) distinguish three different views (the transformational, the morphogenetic and the process approach) according to the role they play in the description and explanation of development and evolution, and (2) relate this discussion to the issues of homology and variation.
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  35. Andrew L. Hamilton (2009). Toward a Mechanistic Evo Devo. In Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Form and Function in Developmental Evolution. Cambridge University Press. 213.score: 90.0
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  36. Anne Buchanan (2010). Quirks of Human Anatomy: An Evo‐Devo Look at the Human Body. Bioessays 32 (6):537-538.score: 90.0
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  37. Jean S. Deutsch (2001). Evo/Devo Coming to Age: The First Textbook. Bioessays 23 (8):757-758.score: 90.0
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  38. Charles T. Driscoll, Hortense Michaud-Lalanne, Mario Lalanne & David Pimentel (2003). 2.“Evo-Devo” and the Conundrum of Sympatric Speciation “Evo-Devo” and the Conundrum of Sympatric Speciation (Pp. 313-314). [REVIEW] Bioscience 53 (4).score: 90.0
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  39. Walter Fontana (2002). Modelling 'Evo‐Devo' with RNA. Bioessays 24 (12):1164-1177.score: 90.0
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  40. Jason Scott Robert (2008). Evo-devo. In Michael Ruse (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
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  41. Jonathan Cooke (1992). Nato‐Limbo‐Devo‐Evo. Developmental Patterning of the Vertebrate Limb (Nato Asi Series A: Life Sciences Vol. 205) (1991). Edited by J. Richard Hinchcliffe. Juan M. Hurle and Dennis Summerbell. Plenum Publishing Co., New York and London. $115 in Usa/Canada, $138 Outside, $82.65 Uk. Pp. XI+452. Isbn 0‐306‐43927‐1. [REVIEW] Bioessays 14 (11):793-793.score: 72.0
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  42. Anton Reiner & Mario F. Wullimann (2004). The Gain in the Brain is Plain When Evo Meets Devo. Bioessays 26 (9):1026-1030.score: 72.0
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  43. Rachael L. Brown (2013). Learning, Evolvability and Exploratory Behaviour: Extending the Evolutionary Reach of Learning. Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):933-955.score: 60.0
    Traditional accounts of the role of learning in evolution have concentrated upon its capacity as a source of fitness to individuals. In this paper I use a case study from invasive species biology—the role of conditioned taste aversion in mitigating the impact of cane toads on the native species of Northern Australia—to highlight a role for learning beyond this—as a source of evolvability to populations. This has two benefits. First, it highlights an otherwise under-appreciated role for learning in evolution that (...)
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  44. Massimo Pigliucci (2003). The New Evolutionary Synthesis: Around the Corner, or Impossible Chimaera? [REVIEW] Quarterly Review of Biology 78 (4):449-453.score: 60.0
    In the fall of 1990 I had just began my doc- toral studies at the University of Connecticut. Freshly arrived from Italy, I came to the United States to work with Carl Schlichting on something to do with phenotypic plastic- ity. I spent most of that semester discussing with other graduate students what I thought was a momentous paper by Mary Jane West- Eberhard (1989) in the Annual Review of Ecol- ogy and Systematics. That paper, entitled Phe- notypic Plasticity and (...)
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  45. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee, William Hoppitt & Tobias Uller (2013). More on How and Why: Cause and Effect in Biology Revisited. Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):719-745.score: 60.0
    In 1961, Ernst Mayr published a highly influential article on the nature of causation in biology, in which he distinguished between proximate and ultimate causes. Mayr argued that proximate causes (e.g. physiological factors) and ultimate causes (e.g. natural selection) addressed distinct ‘how’ and ‘why’ questions and were not competing alternatives. That distinction retains explanatory value today. However, the adoption of Mayr’s heuristic led to the widespread belief that ontogenetic processes are irrelevant to evolutionary questions, a belief that has (1) hindered (...)
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  46. Ehud Lamm (2009). Conceptual and Methodological Biases in Network Models. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 1178:291-304.score: 60.0
    Many natural and biological phenomena can be depicted as networks. Theoretical and empirical analyses of networks have become prevalent. I discuss theoretical biases involved in the delineation of biological networks. The network perspective is shown to dissolve the distinction between regulatory architecture and regulatory state, consistent with the theoretical impossibility of distinguishing a priori between “program” and “data”. The evolutionary significance of the dynamics of trans-generational and inter-organism regulatory networks is explored and implications are presented for understanding the evolution of (...)
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  47. Massimo Pigliucci (2004). Beyond the Gene, Almost. [REVIEW] BioScience 54 (6):591-592.score: 60.0
    Review of a book on going beyond the gene in the study of developmental and evolutionary biology.
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  48. Massimo Pigliucci (1997). Butterflies in the Spotlight. BioEssays 19 (4):285-286.score: 60.0
    Commentary on research on butterflies' eyespots as a model in evolutionary developmental biology.
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  49. John O. Reiss, Ann C. Burke, Charles Archer, Miquel de Renzi, Hernán Dopazo, Arantza Etxeberría, Emily A. Gale, J. Richard Hinchliffe, Laura Nuño de la Rosa, Chris S. Rose, Diego Rasskin-Gutman & Gerd B. Müller (2008). Pere Alberch: Originator of EvoDevo. Biological Theory 3 (4):351-356.score: 60.0
    In September 2008, 10 years after the untimely death of Pere Alberch (1954–1998), the 20th Altenberg Workshop in Theoretical Biology gathered a group of Pere’s students, col- laborators, and colleagues (Figure 1) to celebrate his contribu- tions to the origins of EvoDevo. Hosted by the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI) outside Vienna, the group met for two days of discussion. The meeting was organized in tandem with a congress held in May 2008 at the Cavanilles Institute (...)
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