Search results for 'evolutionary genetics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Massimo Pigliucci (2006). Genetic Variance–Covariance Matrices: A Critique of the Evolutionary Quantitative Genetics Research Program. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):1-23.score: 144.0
    This paper outlines a critique of the use of the genetic variance–covariance matrix (G), one of the central concepts in the modern study of natural selection and evolution. Specifically, I argue that for both conceptual and empirical reasons, studies of G cannot be used to elucidate so-called constraints on natural selection, nor can they be employed to detect or to measure past selection in natural populations – contrary to what assumed by most practicing biologists. I suggest that the search for (...)
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  2. Matthew C. Keller & Geoffrey Miller (2006). Resolving the Paradox of Common, Harmful, Heritable Mental Disorders: Which Evolutionary Genetic Models Work Best? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):385-404.score: 132.0
    Given that natural selection is so powerful at optimizing complex adaptations, why does it seem unable to eliminate genes (susceptibility alleles) that predispose to common, harmful, heritable mental disorders, such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorder? We assess three leading explanations for this apparent paradox from evolutionary genetic theory: (1) ancestral neutrality (susceptibility alleles were not harmful among ancestors), (2) balancing selection (susceptibility alleles sometimes increased fitness), and (3) polygenic mutation-selection balance (mental disorders reflect the inevitable mutational load on the (...)
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  3. Jonathan Bard (2010). A Systems Biology View of Evolutionary Genetics. Bioessays 32 (7):559-563.score: 102.0
  4. Massimo Pigliucci (2008). The Proper Role of Population Genetics in Modern Evolutionary Theory. Biological Theory 3 (4):316-324.score: 96.0
    Evolutionary biology is a field currently animated by much discussion concerning its conceptual foundations. On the one hand, we have supporters of a classical view of evolutionary theory, whose backbone is provided by population genetics and the so-called Modern Synthesis (MS). On the other hand, a number of researchers are calling for an Extended Synthe- sis (ES) that takes seriously both the limitations of the MS (such as its inability to incorporate developmental biology) and recent empirical and (...)
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  5. J. Cain (2002). Epistemic and Community Transition in American Evolutionary Studies: The 'Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology, and Systematics' (1942-1949). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (2):283-313.score: 96.0
    The Committee on Common Problems of Genetics, Paleontology, and Systematics (United States National Research Council) marks part of a critical transition in American evolutionary studies. Launched in 1942 to facilitate cross-training between genetics and paleontology, the Committee was also designed to amplify paleontologist voices in modern studies of evolutionary processes. During coincidental absences of founders George Gaylord Simpson and Theodosius Dobzhansky, an opportunistic Ernst Mayr moved into the project's leadership. Mayr used the opportunity for programmatic reforms (...)
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  6. John Beatty (1982). The Insights and Oversights of Molecular Genetics: The Place of the Evolutionary Perspective. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:341 - 355.score: 96.0
    A general case about the insights and oversights of molecular genetics is argued for by considering two specific cases: the first concerns the bearing of molecular genetics on Mendelian genetics, and the second concerns the bearing of molecular genetics on the replicability of the genetic material. As in the first case, it is argued that Mendel's law of segregation cannot be explained wholly in terms of molecular genetics--the law demands evolutionary scrutiny as well. In (...)
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  7. David Loye, Peter Saunders, Eric Chaisson, Rod Swenson & Michael Ghiselin (1991). Evolutionary Systems and Society, Vilmos Csanyi, Professor of Ethology and Behavior Genetics, Lorand Eotvos University, Budapest, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1989. 304 Pp. $49.50 (Cloth). [REVIEW] World Futures 30 (3):191-206.score: 96.0
    (1991). Evolutionary Systems and Society, Vilmos Csányi, Professor of Ethology and Behavior Genetics, Lorand Eotvos University, Budapest, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 1989. 304 pp. $49.50 (cloth). World Futures: Vol. 30, No. 3, pp. 191-206.
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  8. David M. Buss (2006). The Evolutionary Genetics of Personality: Does Mutation Load Signal Relationship Load? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):409-409.score: 92.0
    The mutation-selection hypothesis may extend to understanding normal personality variation. Traits such as emotional stability, agreeableness, and conscientiousness figure strongly in mate selection and show evidence of non-additive genetic variance. They are linked with reproductively relevant outcomes, including longevity, resource acquisition, and mating success. Evolved difference-detection adaptations may function to spurn individuals whose high mutation load signals a burdensome relationship load. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  9. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2006). Fisherian and Wrightian Perspectives in Evolutionary Genetics and Model-Mediated Imposition of Theoretical Assumptions. Journal of Theoretical Biology 240:218-232.score: 90.0
    I investigate how theoretical assumptions, pertinent to different perspectives and operative during the modeling process, are central in determining how nature is actually taken to be. I explore two different models by Michael Turelli and Steve Frank of the evolution of parasite-mediated cytoplasmic incompatility, guided, respectively, by Fisherian and Wrightian perspectives. Since the two models can be shown to be commensurable both with respect to mathematics and data, I argue that the differences between them in the (1) mathematical presentation of (...)
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  10. Massimo Pigliucci & Carl D. Schlichting (1997). On the Limits of Quantitative Genetics for the Study of Phenotypic Evolution. Acta Biotheoretica 45 (2):143-160.score: 90.0
    During the last two decades the role of quantitative genetics in evolutionary theory has expanded considerably. Quantitative genetic-based models addressing long term phenotypic evolution, evolution in multiple environments (phenotypic plasticity) and evolution of ontogenies (developmental trajectories) have been proposed. Yet, the mathematical foundations of quantitative genetics were laid with a very different set of problems in mind (mostly the prediction of short term responses to artificial selection), and at a time in which any details of the genetic (...)
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  11. Alan C. Love (2003). Evolutionary Morphology, Innovation, and the Synthesis of Evolutionary and Developmental Biology. Biology and Philosophy 18 (2):309-345.score: 90.0
    One foundational question in contemporarybiology is how to `rejoin evolution anddevelopment. The emerging research program(evolutionary developmental biology or`evo-devo) requires a meshing of disciplines,concepts, and explanations that have beendeveloped largely in independence over the pastcentury. In the attempt to comprehend thepresent separation between evolution anddevelopment much attention has been paid to thesplit between genetics and embryology in theearly part of the 20th century with itscodification in the exclusion of embryologyfrom the Modern Synthesis. This encourages acharacterization of evolutionary developmentalbiology (...)
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  12. Evan Charney (2012). Behavior Genetics and Postgenomics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 35 (5):331-358.score: 90.0
    The science of genetics is undergoing a paradigm shift. Recent discoveries, including the activity of retrotransposons, the extent of copy number variations, somatic and chromosomal mosaicism, and the nature of the epigenome as a regulator of DNA expressivity, are challenging a series of dogmas concerning the nature of the genome and the relationship between genotype and phenotype. According to three widely held dogmas, DNA is the unchanging template of heredity, is identical in all the cells and tissues of the (...)
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  13. Veena Rao & Vidyanand Nanjundiah (2011). J. B. S. Haldane, Ernst Mayr and the Beanbag Genetics Dispute. Journal of the History of Biology 44 (2):233 - 281.score: 90.0
    Starting from the early decades of the twentieth century, evolutionary biology began to acquire mathematical overtones. This took place via the development of a set of models in which the Darwinian picture of evolution was shown to be consistent with the laws of heredity discovered by Mendel. The models, which came to be elaborated over the years, define a field of study known as population genetics. Population genetics is generally looked upon as an essential component of modern (...)
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  14. Donald H. Feener (1990). Evolutionary Genetics of Eusocial Insects. Bioscience 40 (4):310-312.score: 90.0
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  15. Tim J. Crow (2012). Paul Broca and the Evolutionary Genetics of Cerebral Asymmetry. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:133-147.score: 90.0
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  16. Feener (1990). Evolutionary Genetics of Eusocial Insects The Genetics of Social Evolution Michael D. Breed Robert E. Page, Jr. Bioscience 40 (4):310-312.score: 90.0
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  17. Jonathan Cooke (2005). Book Review: Human Evolutionary Genetics: Origins, Peoples and Disease and Gene Genealogies, Variation and Evolution: A Primer in Coalescent Theory. [REVIEW] Bioessays 27 (9):978-980.score: 90.0
  18. Greg Gibson & Günter Wagner (2000). Canalization in Evolutionary Genetics: A Stabilizing Theory? Bioessays 22 (4):372-380.score: 90.0
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  19. David Houle (2011). Elements of Evolutionary Genetics. Bioscience 61 (5):409-411.score: 90.0
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  20. Thomas F. Turner (2007). Evolutionary Genetics: Concepts and Case Studies. Bioscience 57 (4):375-376.score: 90.0
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  21. Michael Wade, Evolutionary Genetics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 90.0
  22. Jianzhi Zhang (2010). Evolutionary Genetics: Progress and Challenges. In M. A. Bell, D. J. Futuyma, W. F. Eanes & J. S. Levinton (eds.), Evolution Since Darwin: The First 150 Years. Sinauer. 87--118.score: 90.0
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  23. David Houled (2011). Serious Evolutionary Genetics. Bioscience 61 (5):409-411.score: 90.0
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  24. David Houled (2011). Serious Evolutionary GeneticsElements of Evolutionary Genetics. Brian Charlesworth and Deborah Charlesworth . Roberts and Company, 2010. 768 Pp., Illus. $68.00 (ISBN 9780981519425 Cloth). [REVIEW] Bioscience 61 (5):409-411.score: 90.0
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  25. Robert E. Kohier (1991). Drosophila and Evolutionary Genetics: The Moral Economy of Scientific Practice. History of Science 29:335-375.score: 90.0
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  26. J. L. Mountain (2001). Human Evolutionary Genetics. In N. J. Smelser & B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. 6984--91.score: 90.0
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  27. Ellen L. Simms (forthcoming). The Evolutionary Genetics of Plant-Pathogen Systems. Bioscience.score: 90.0
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  28. Thomas F. Turner (2007). The Evolution of Evolutionary Genetics. Bioscience 57 (4):375-376.score: 90.0
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  29. S. Schmitt (1999). [The work of Richard Goldschmidt: an attempt at a synthesis of genetics, developmental biology, and evolutionary theory surrounding the concept of homeosis]. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 53 (3-4):381-399.score: 84.0
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  30. Stephen L. Zegura (1997). Color Categories and Biology: Considerations From Molecular Genetics, Neurobiology, and Evolutionary Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):211-212.score: 78.0
    Evidence from molecular genetics bolsters the claim that color is not a perceptuolinguistic and behavioral universal. Neurobiology continues to fill in many details about the flow of color information from photon reception to central processing in the brain. Humans have the most acute color vision in the biosphere because of natural selection and adaptation, not coincidence.
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  31. Joe Cain (2002). Co-Opting Colleagues: Appropriating Dobzhansky's 1936 Lectures at Columbia. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 35 (2):207 - 219.score: 78.0
    This paper clarifies the chronology surrounding the population geneticist Theodosius Dobzhansky's 1937 book, "Genetics and the Origin of Species." Most historians assume (a) Dobzhansky's book began as a series of 'Jesup lectures,' sponsored by the Department of Zoology at Columbia University in 1936, and (b) before these lectures were given, Dobzhansky knew he would produce a volume for the Columbia Biological Series (CBS). Archival evidence forces a rejection of both assumptions. Dobzhansky's 1936 Columbia lectures were not Jesup lectures. The (...)
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  32. Kevin N. Laland, John Odling-Smee & Marcus W. Feldman (2000). Niche Construction, Biological Evolution, and Cultural Change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):131-146.score: 72.0
    We propose a conceptual model that maps the causal pathways relating biological evolution to cultural change. It builds on conventional evolutionary theory by placing emphasis on the capacity of organisms to modify sources of natural selection in their environment (niche construction) and by broadening the evolutionary dynamic to incorporate ontogenetic and cultural processes. In this model, phenotypes have a much more active role in evolution than generally conceived. This sheds light on hominid evolution, on the evolution of culture, (...)
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  33. Peter Gildenhuys (2013). Classical Population Genetics and the Semantic Approach to Scientific Theories. Synthese 190 (2):273-291.score: 72.0
    In what follows, I argue that the semantic approach to scientific theories fails as a means to present the Wright—Fisher formalism (WFF) of population genetics. I offer an account of what population geneticist understand insofar as they understand the WFF, a variation on Lloyd's view that population genetics can be understood as a family of models of mid-level generality.
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  34. Peter Gildenhuys (2011). Righteous Modeling: The Competence of Classical Population Genetics. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 26 (6):813-835.score: 72.0
    In a recent article, “Wayward Modeling: Population Genetics and Natural Selection,” Bruce Glymour claims that population genetics is burdened by serious predictive and explanatory inadequacies and that the theory itself is to blame. Because Glymour overlooks a variety of formal modeling techniques in population genetics, his arguments do not quite undermine a major scientific theory. However, his arguments are extremely valuable as they provide definitive proof that those who would deploy classical population genetics over natural systems (...)
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  35. Gilberto Corbellini (2004). Genetic Risk, Medical Education, Public Understanding of Genetics, and Evolutionary Medicine: The Challenges of Genetic Counselling for Complex Disorders. Topoi 23 (2):187-193.score: 72.0
  36. David L. Hull (2001). Michael Ruse and His Fifteen Years of Booknotes – for Better or for Worse. Biology and Philosophy 16 (3):423-435.score: 72.0
    In this paper I trace Michael Ruse's Booknotes from the first volumeof Biology and Philosophy in 1986 to the present. I deal withboth the style and the content of these booknotes. Ruse paid specialattention to authors outside of the traditional English axis as wellas to feminist writers. He complained that too much attention wasbeing paid to certain topics (e.g., evolutionary ethics, evolutionaryepistemology, the species problem and reduction) while other, moreimportant topics were all but ignored (e.g., natural selection,population genetics, (...)
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  37. Marianne Sommer (2008). History in the Gene: Negotiations Between Molecular and Organismal Anthropology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (3):473 - 528.score: 72.0
    In the advertising discourse of human genetic database projects, of genetic ancestry tracing companies, and in popular books on anthropological genetics, what I refer to as the anthropological gene and genome appear as documents of human history, by far surpassing the written record and oral history in scope and accuracy as archives of our past. How did macromolecules become "documents of human evolutionary history"? Historically, molecular anthropology, a term introduced by Emile Zuckerkandl in 1962 to characterize the study (...)
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  38. Bert Theunissen (2014). Practical Animal Breeding as the Key to an Integrated View of Genetics, Eugenics and Evolutionary Theory: Arend L. Hagedoorn (1885–1953). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 46:55-64.score: 72.0
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  39. Philip Batterham, Andrew G. Davies, Anne Y. Game & John A. McKenzie (1996). Asymmetry - Where Evolutionary and Developmental Genetics Meet. Bioessays 18 (10):841-845.score: 72.0
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  40. Peter J. Bryant (1971). Genetics of Evolution Genetics of the Evolutionary Process T. Dobzhansky. Bioscience 21 (16):879-879.score: 72.0
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  41. David J. Depew (2013). The Rhetoric of Evolutionary Theory. Biological Theory 7 (4):380-389.score: 72.0
    I argue that Darwinian evolutionary theory has a rhetorical dimension and that rhetorical criticism plays a role in how evolutionary science acquires knowledge. I define what I mean by rhetoric by considering Darwin’s Origin. I use the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis to show how rhetoric conceived as situated and addressed argumentation enters into evolutionary theorizing. Finally, I argue that rhetorical criticism helps judge the success, limits, and failures of these theories.
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  42. Christopher H. Haufler (2002). Homospory 2002: An Odyssey of Progress in Pteridophyte Genetics and Evolutionary Biology. Bioscience 52 (12):1081.score: 72.0
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  43. B. J. Williams (1981). Evolutionary Biology of Human Populations Current Developments in Anthropological Genetics, Vol. 1: Theory and Methods James H. Mielke Michael H. Crawford. [REVIEW] Bioscience 31 (7):531-531.score: 72.0
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  44. Francisco J. Ayala (1981). Integrating Population Genetics/Ecology Theory of Population Genetics and Evolutionary Ecology: An Introduction Jonathan Roughgarden. Bioscience 31 (1):69-69.score: 72.0
  45. Rinaldo C. Bertossa (2005). Evolution of Behaviour: Bridging the Gap Between Evolutionary and Developmental Genetics. Bioessays 27 (12):1303-1304.score: 72.0
  46. G. Ainsworth Harrison (1972). Genetics of the Evolutionary Process. By Theodosius Dobzhansky. Pp. 505. (Columbia University Press, New York and London, 1970). Price £4.95. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 4 (1):137-140.score: 72.0
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  47. Christopher H. Haufler (2002). Homospory 2002: An Odyssey of Progress in Pteridophyte Genetics and Evolutionary Biology Ferns and Other Homosporous Vascular Plants Have Highly Polyploid Chromosome Numbers, but They Express Traits Following Diploid Models and, Although Capable of Extreme Inbreeding, Are Predominantly Outcrossing. Bioscience 52 (12):1081-1093.score: 72.0
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  48. Daniel Pérusse (1992). Attachment: A View From Evolutionary Biology and Behavior Genetics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (3):521-522.score: 72.0
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  49. Günter Theißen (2000). Evolutionary Developmental Genetics of Floral Symmetry: The Revealing Power of Linnaeus' Monstrous Flower. Bioessays 22 (3):209.score: 72.0
  50. M. J. Wade (forthcoming). Evolutionary and Ecological Genetics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 72.0
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