Search results for 'experimental design' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Nat Hansen (2013). A Slugfest of Intuitions: Contextualism and Experimental Design. Synthese 190 (10):1771-1792.score: 240.0
    This paper considers ways that experimental design can affect judgments about informally presented context shifting experiments. Reasons are given to think that judgments about informal context shifting experiments are affected by an exclusive reliance on binary truth value judgments and by experimenter bias. Exclusive reliance on binary truth value judgments may produce experimental artifacts by obscuring important differences of degree between the phenomena being investigated. Experimenter bias is an effect generated when, for example, experimenters disclose (even unconsciously) (...)
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  2. George Kellas, Alfred A. Baumeister & Stephen J. Wilcox (1969). Interactive Effects of Preparatory Intervals, Stimulus Intensity, and Experimental Design on Reaction Time. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (2p1):311.score: 216.0
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  3. Walter Theodore Federer (1955). Experimental Design. New York, Macmillan.score: 210.0
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  4. A. E. Maxwell (1958). Experimental Design in Psychology and the Medical Sciences. New York, Wiley.score: 210.0
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  5. Jerome L. Myers (1972). Fundamentals of Experimental Design. Boston,Allyn and Bacon.score: 210.0
     
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  6. William Samuel Ray (1960). An Introduction to Experimental Design. New York, Macmillan.score: 210.0
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  7. Jan Sprenger (2009). Evidence and Experimental Design in Sequential Trials. Philosophy of Science 76 (5):637-649.score: 180.0
    To what extent does the design of statistical experiments, in particular sequential trials, affect their interpretation? Should postexperimental decisions depend on the observed data alone, or should they account for the used stopping rule? Bayesians and frequentists are apparently deadlocked in their controversy over these questions. To resolve the deadlock, I suggest a three‐part strategy that combines conceptual, methodological, and decision‐theoretic arguments. This approach maintains the pre‐experimental relevance of (...)
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  8. Andreas Ortmann & Michal Ostatnicky (2004). Proper Experimental Design and Implementation Are Necessary Conditions for a Balanced Social Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):352-353.score: 180.0
    We applaud the authors' basic message. We note that the negative research emphasis is not special solely to social psychology and judgment and decision-making. We argue that the proposed integration of null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) and Bayesian analysis is promising but will ultimately succeed only if more attention is paid to proper experimental design and implementation.
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  9. Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Christopher Meek, S. Fineberg & E. Slate, Prediction and Experimental Design with Graphical Causal Models.score: 180.0
    Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, Richard Scheines, Christopher Meek, S. Fineberg, E. Slate. Prediction and Experimental Design with Graphical Causal Models.
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  10. Shaun Gallagher (2003). Phenomenology and Experimental Design: Toward a Phenomenologically Enlightened Experimental Science. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):85-99.score: 162.0
  11. Herbert Gintis (2001). The Contribution of Game Theory to Experimental Design in the Behavioral Sciences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):411-412.score: 156.0
    Methodological practices differ between economics and psychology because economists use game theory as the basis for the design and interpretation of experiments, while psychologists do not. This methodological choice explains the “four key variables” stressed by Hert-wig and Ortmann. Game theory is currently the most rigorous basis for modeling strategic choice.
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  12. Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (2000). Ephestia: The Experimental Design of Alfred Kühn's Physiological Developmental Genetics. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 33 (3):535 - 576.score: 156.0
    Much of the early history of developmental and physiological genetics in Germany remains to be written. Together with Carl Correns and Richard Goldschmidt, Alfred Kühn occupies a special place in this history. Trained as a zoologist in Freiburg im Breisgau, he set out to integrate physiology, development and genetics in a particular experimental system based on the flour moth Ephestia kühniella Zeller. This paper is meant to reconstruct the crucial steps in the experimental pathway that led Kühn (...)
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  13. Sue V. Rosser (1989). Re-Visioning Clinical Research: Gender and the Ethics of Experimental Design. Hypatia 4 (2):125 - 139.score: 156.0
    Since modern medicine is based substantially in clinical medical research, the flaws and ethical problems that arise in this research as it is conceived and practiced in the United States are likely to be reflected to some extent in current medicine and its practice. This paper explores some of the ways in which clinical research has suffered from an androcentric focus in its choice and definition of problems studied, approaches and methods used in design and interpretation of experiments, and (...)
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  14. Alvin E. Roth (2001). Form and Function in Experimental Design. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):427-428.score: 156.0
    Standard practices in experimental economics arise for different reasons. The “no deception” rule comes from a cost-benefit tradeoff; other practices have to do with the uses to which economists put experiments. Because experiments are part of scientific conversations that mostly go on within disciplines, differences in standard practices between disciplines are likely to persist.
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  15. Francesco Guala (2009). Methodological Issues in Experimental Design and Interpretation. In Harold Kincaid & Don Ross (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics. Oxford University Press. 280--281.score: 150.0
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  16. Serena Cattaruzza (1999). Philosophical Theories and Experimental Design in Vittorio Benussi. Axiomathes 10 (1-3):11-29.score: 150.0
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  17. L. A. R. (1953). Book Review:Experimental Design in Psychological Research Allen L. Edwards. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 20 (4):345-.score: 150.0
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  18. S. F. Barker (1960). Book Review:Experimental Design in Psychology and the Medical Sciences A. E. Maxwell. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 27 (3):310-.score: 150.0
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  19. Daniel Algom, Dan Zakay, Ofer Monar & Eran Chajut (2009). Wheel Chairs and Arm Chairs: A Novel Experimental Design for the Emotional Stroop Effect. Cognition and Emotion 23 (8):1552-1564.score: 150.0
  20. C. L. Carlson (1986). Experimental Design a Must for Graduate Students. BioScience 36 (9):588-588.score: 150.0
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  21. John H. Flowers & Beccy Blair (1976). Verbal Interference with Visual Classification: Optimal Processing and Experimental Design. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (3):260-262.score: 150.0
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  22. Cooper B. Holmes & Stephen F. Davis (1979). Backward Conditioning: An Artifact of Experimental Design? Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 14 (6):431-432.score: 150.0
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  23. J. Maarten Schraagen (1993). How Experts Solve a Novel Problem in Experimental Design. Cognitive Science 17 (2):285-309.score: 150.0
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  24. Lisa M. Baker & Kevin Dunbar (1996). Constraints on the Experimental Design Process in Real-World Science. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 154--159.score: 150.0
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  25. C. J. Barnard (2011). Asking Questions in Biology: A Guide to Hypothesis Testing, Experimental Design and Presentation in Practical Work and Research Projects. Pearson.score: 150.0
  26. G. G. Gallup (1994). Self-Recognition: Research Strategies and Experimental Design. In S. T. Parker, R. Mitchell & M. L. Boccia (eds.), Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans: Developmental Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 150.0
     
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  27. Robert E. Haskell (2003). A Logico-Mathematic, Structural Methodology. Part II: Experimental Design and Epistemological Issues. Journal of Mind and Behavior 24 (3-4):401-422.score: 150.0
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  28. C. G. Mclaren, V. I. Bartolome, M. C. Carrasco, L. C. Quintana, M. I. B. Ferino, J. Z. Mojica, A. B. Olea, L. C. Paunlagui, C. G. Ramos & M. A. Ynalvez (forthcoming). Experimental Design and Data Analysis for Agricultural Research, Vol. 1, International Rice Research Institute, Los Banos. Laguna.score: 150.0
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  29. John A. Ross & Floyd G. Robinson (1987). The Use of Rule Structures in Teaching Experimental Design to Secondary‐School Students. Science Education 71 (4):571-589.score: 150.0
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  30. Jan Maarten Schraagen (1993). How Experts Solve a Novel Problem in Experimental Design. Cognitive Science 17 (2):285-309.score: 150.0
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  31. Donald Thomas Campbell (1966). Experimental and Quasi-Experimental Designs for Research. Chicago, R. Mcnally.score: 130.0
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  32. Walter G. Vincenti (2001). The Experimental Assessment of Engineering Theory As a Tool for Design. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 5 (3):124-130.score: 120.0
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  33. W. D. Hackmann (1979). The Relationship Between Concept and Instrument Design in Eighteenth-Century Experimental Science. Annals of Science 36 (3):205-224.score: 120.0
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  34. Alan Fask, Fred Englander & Zhaobo Wang (2014). Do Online Exams Facilitate Cheating? An Experiment Designed to Separate Possible Cheating From the Effect of the Online Test Taking Environment. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (2):101-112.score: 100.0
    Despite recent growth in distance education, there has been relatively little research on whether online examinations facilitate student cheating. The present paper utilizes an experimental design to assess the difference in student performance between students taking a traditional, proctored exam and those taking an online, unproctored exam. This difference in performance is examined in a manner which considers both the effect of the different physical test environments and the possible effect of a difference in the opportunity for students (...)
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  35. Alejandro Garcia-Rivera, Mark Graves & Carl Neumann (2009). Beauty in the Living World. Zygon 44 (2):243-263.score: 90.0
    Almost all admit that there is beauty in the natural world. Many suspect that such beauty is more than an adornment of nature. Few in our contemporary world suggest that this beauty is an empirical principle of the natural world itself and instead relegate beauty to the eye and mind of the beholder. Guided by theological and scientific insight, the authors propose that such exclusion is no longer tenable, at least in the data of modern biology and in our view (...)
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  36. Shaun Gallagher & Jesper B. Sorensen (2006). Experimenting with Phenomenology. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):119-134.score: 90.0
    We review the use of introspective and phenomenological methods in experimental settings. We distinguish different senses of introspection, and further distinguish phenomenological method from introspectionist approaches. Two ways of using phenomenology in experimental procedures are identified: first, the neurophenomenological method, proposed by Varela, involves the training of experimental subjects. This approach has been directly and productively incorporated into the protocol of experiments on perception. A second approach may have wider application and does not involve training experimental (...)
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  37. Nat Hansen (2014). Contrasting Cases. In James Beebe (ed.), Advances in Experimental Epistemology. Bloomsbury. 71-95.score: 90.0
    This paper concerns the philosophical significance of a choice about how to design the context shifting experiments used by contextualists and anti-intellectualists: Should contexts be judged jointly, with contrast, or separately, without contrast? Findings in experimental psychology suggest (1) that certain contextual features are more difficult to evaluate when considered separately, and there are reasons to think that one feature--stakes or importance--that interests contextualists and anti-intellectualists is such a difficult to evaluate attribute, and (2) that joint evaluation of (...)
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  38. Nancy S. Hall (2007). R. A. Fisher and His Advocacy of Randomization. Journal of the History of Biology 40 (2):295 - 325.score: 90.0
    The requirement of randomization in experimental design was first stated by R. A. Fisher, statistician and geneticist, in 1925 in his book Statistical Methods for Research Workers. Earlier designs were systematic and involved the judgment of the experimenter; this led to possible bias and inaccurate interpretation of the data. Fisher's dictum was that randomization eliminates bias and permits a valid test of significance. Randomization in experimenting had been used by Charles Sanders Peirce in 1885 but the practice was (...)
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  39. Michael Hampe & Silke Lang (eds.) (2009). The Design of Material, Organism, and Minds: Different Understandings of Design. Springer.score: 90.0
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  40. Charles Robert Hicks (1964). Fundamental Concepts in the Design of Experiments. New York, Holt, Rinehart and Winston.score: 90.0
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  41. Kan Chen Peng (1967). The Design and Analysis of Scientific Experiments. Reading, Mass.,Addison-Wesley Pub. Co..score: 90.0
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  42. Peregrine Schwartz-Shea (2011). Interpretive Research Design: Concepts and Processes. Routledge.score: 90.0
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  43. B. F. Skinner (1984). Methods and Theories in the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):511.score: 90.0
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  44. Nat Hansen (2012). On an Alleged Truth/Falsity Asymmetry in Context Shifting Experiments. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):530-545.score: 84.0
    Keith DeRose has argued that context shifting experiments should be designed in a specific way in order to accommodate what he calls a ‘truth/falsity asymmetry’. I explain and critique DeRose's reasons for proposing this modification to contextualist methodology, drawing on recent experimental studies of DeRose's bank cases as well as experimental findings about the verification of affirmative and negative statements. While DeRose's arguments for his particular modification to contextualist methodology fail, the lesson of his proposal is that there (...)
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  45. Mark Blokpoel, Marlieke van Kesteren, Arjen Stolk, Pim Haselager, Ivan Toni & Iris Van Rooij (2012). Recipient Design in Human Communication: Simple Heuristics or Perspective Taking? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 84.0
    Humans have a remarkable capacity for tuning their communicative behaviors to different addressees, a phenomenon also known as recipient design. It remains unclear how this tuning of communicative behavior is implemented during live human interactions. Classical theories of communication postulate that recipient design involves perspective taking, i.e., the communicator selects her behavior based on her hypotheses about beliefs and knowledge of the recipient. More recently, researchers have argued that perspective taking is computationally too costly to be a plausible (...)
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  46. Catherine Legg (2010). Engineering Philosophy. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 2 (01):45-50.score: 72.0
    A commentary on a current paper by Aaron Sloman (“An alternative to working on machine consciousness"). Sloman argues that in order to make progress in AI, consciousness (and related unclear folk mental concepts), "should be replaced by more precise and varied architecture-based concepts better suited to specify what needs to be explained by scientific theories". This original vision of philosophical inquiry as mapping out 'design-spaces' for a contested concept seeks to achieve a holistic, synthetic understanding of what possibilities such (...)
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  47. Stefano Gualeni (2014). Augmented Ontologies or How to Philosophize with a Digital Hammer. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):177-199.score: 72.0
    Could a person ever transcend what it is like to be in the world as a human being? Could we ever know what it is like to be other creatures? Questions about the overcoming of a human perspective are not uncommon in the history of philosophy. In the last century, those very interrogatives were notably raised by American philosopher Thomas Nagel in the context of philosophy of mind. In his 1974 essay What is it Like to Be a Bat?, Nagel (...)
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  48. Christina Fang, Sari Carp & Zur Shapira (2011). Prior Divergence: Do Researchers and Participants Share the Same Prior Probability Distributions? Cognitive Science 35 (4):744-762.score: 72.0
    Do participants bring their own priors to an experiment? If so, do they share the same priors as the researchers who design the experiment? In this article, we examine the extent to which self-generated priors conform to experimenters’ expectations by explicitly asking participants to indicate their own priors in estimating the probability of a variety of events. We find in Study 1 that despite being instructed to follow a uniform distribution, participants appear to have used their own priors, which (...)
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  49. Christopher Mole & Sean D. Kelly (2006). On the Demonstration of Blindsight in Monkeys. Mind and Language 21 (4):475-483.score: 66.0
    The work of Alan Cowey and Petra Stoerig is often taken to have shown that, following lesions analogous to those that cause blindsight in humans, there is blindsight in monkeys. The present paper reveals a problem in Cowey and Stoerig's case for blindsight in monkeys. The problem is that Cowey and Stoerig's results would only provide good evidence for blindsight if there is no difference between their two experimental paradigms with regard to the sorts of stimuli that are likely (...)
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  50. Frederick Eberhardt (2008). A Sufficient Condition for Pooling Data. Synthese 163 (3):433 - 442.score: 66.0
    We consider the problems arising from using sequences of experiments to discover the causal structure among a set of variables, none of whom are known ahead of time to be an “outcome”. In particular, we present various approaches to resolve conflicts in the experimental results arising from sampling variability in the experiments. We provide a sufficient condition that allows for pooling of data from experiments with different joint distributions over the variables. Satisfaction of the condition allows for an independence (...)
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