Search results for 'factuality' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  6
    Bojan žalec (2004). Veber on Knowledge and Factuality. Acta Analytica 19 (33):241-263.
    The article deals with the development of the philosophy of France Veber, the pupil of Meinong and a main Slovene philosopher. One of the most important threads of Veber’s philosophy is the consideration of knowledge and factuality, which may be seen as a driving force of its development. Veber’s philosophical development is usually divided into three phases: the object theory phase, the phase when he created his philosophy of a person as a creature at the crossing of the natural (...)
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  2.  7
    Reinhardt Grossmann (1976). The Factuality of Facts. Grazer Philosophische Studien 2:85-103.
    It is argued that, while there is no such property as truth, there is a feature of factuality which certain states of affairs have and others lack. Since states of affairs can appear before the mind as having this feature when, in reality, they do not have it, a most difficult epistemological problem arises, namely, how to distinguish between a state of affairs which merely appears to have factuality and a state of affairs which really is factual. The (...)
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  3.  8
    Gregory Currie (1999). Is Factuality a Matter of Content? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):763-763.
    Dienes & Perner argue that there is a hierarchy of forms of implicit knowledge. One level of their hierarchy involves factuality, where it may be merely implicit that the state of affairs is supposed to be a real one rather than something imagined or fictional. I argue that the factual or fictional status of a thought or utterance cannot be a matter of concept, implicit or explicit.
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  4.  2
    Shaun Nichols & Claudia Uller (1999). Explicit Factuality and Comparative Evidence. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):776-777.
    We argue that Dienes & Perner's (D&P's) proposal needs to specify independent criteria when a subject explicitly represents factuality. This task is complicated by the fact that people typically “tacitly” believe that each of their beliefs is a fact. This problem does not arise for comparative evidence on monkeys, for they presumably lack the capacity to represent factuality explicitly. D&P suggest that explicit visual processing and declarative memory depend on explicit representations of factuality, whereas the analogous implicit (...)
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  5. Ron Wilburn (2008). Moral Knowledge and Moral Factuality. Ethic@ 7:69-85.
    For naturalistic and non-intuitionistic moral realists, moral knowledge is more problematic than ordinary and scientific factual knowledge. For without special faculties of moral discernment, how could we ever detect moral facts and properties? Physical facts and properties may be accessible to perceptual recognition. But how could moral facts and properties ever be similarly accessible? To address this challenge, we need a meta-ethical account that does two things. First, it must explain how the discernment of moralfacts and properties ultimately consists only (...)
     
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  6.  51
    Hilary Putnam (1989). Model Theory and the 'Factuality' of Semantics. In Alexander George (ed.), Reflections on Chomsky. Basil Blackwell 213--232.
  7.  5
    Kurt Weinke (1985). Kierkegaard's Chagrin. The Logic of Factuality in the “Philosophical Fragments”. Philosophy and History 18 (1):21-23.
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  8.  4
    Menachem Fisch (2005). Factuality Without Realism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):505-530.
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  9.  19
    Yitzhak Benbaji & Menachem Fisch (2005). Factuality Without Realism: Normativity and the Davidsonian Approach to Meaning. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):505-530.
  10.  6
    Nicolas J. Zaunbrecher (2012). Suspending Belief and Suspending Doubt: The Everyday and the Virtual in Practices of Factuality. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (4):519-537.
    From an ethnomethodological perspective, this article describes social actors’ everyday and virtual stances in terms of their practices of provisional doubt and belief for the purpose of fact-establishment. Facts are iterated, reinforced, elaborated, and transformed via phenomenal practices configuring relations of equipment, interpretation, and method organized as “other” than, but relevant to, the everyday. Such practices in scientific research involve forms of suspended belief; in other areas they can instead involve forms of suspended doubt. As an illuminating example of this (...)
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  11.  16
    Robert P. McArthur (1974). Factuality and Modality in the Future Tense. Noûs 8 (3):283-288.
  12. Manuel Aguirre (1976). Factuality and Modality. Universitaire Instelling Antwerpen, Departementen Ger & Rom, Afd. Linguis̈tiek.
     
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  13. Frank B. Dilley (1970). The Factuality of So-Called Logical Disputes. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 51 (4):490.
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  14. Daniel Kalpokas (2007). Normatividad y facticidad: el doble aspecto del concepto de justificación. Respuesta a Penelas y Satne [Normativity and Factuality: The Double Aspect of the Concept of Justification. Reply to Penelas and Satne]. Dianoia 52 (58):125-142.
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  15. F. Modenato (1999). The Objective of Factuality According to Alexius Meinong. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 54 (3):437-464.
     
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  16.  5
    David E. Taylor (forthcoming). Quine on Matters of Fact. Synthese:1-32.
    The idea of there being “no fact of the matter” features centrally in Quine’s indeterminacy theses. Yet there has been little discussion of how exactly Quine understands this idea. In this paper I identify, develop and then critically evaluate Quine’s conception of NFM. In Sects. 3–4 I consider a handful of intuitive semantic and ontological conceptions of NFM and argue that none is workable from within Quine’s philosophy. I conclude that the failure of each of these proposals is due to (...)
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  17.  21
    Rodrigo Laera (ed.) (2011). Los desvíos de la razón: el lugar de la facticidad en la cadena de justificaciones. Miño y Dávila.
    Moviéndose con libertad entre distintas tradiciones filosóficas, ajeno a cualquier división escolar del pensamiento, el autor describe las formas que toma el simulacro en un recorrido de gran alcance, que abarca desde teoría de la referencia hasta la ontología existencial. "`Todo lo que es profundo ama la máscara´, escribió Nietzsche. En efecto, ¿qué es nuestra existencia, sino una inmensa mascarada? Vivimos como si entendiéramos lo que sucede a nuestro alrededor. Nos comportamos como si pudiéramos prever las consecuencias de nuestros actos. (...)
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  18. Kit Fine (2001). The Question of Realism. Philosophers' Imprint 1 (1):1-30.
    This paper distinguishes two kinds of realist issue -- the issue of whether the propositions of a given domain are factual and the issue of whether they are fundamental. It criticizes previous accounts of what these issues come to and suggests that they are to be understood in terms of a basic metaphysical concept of reality. This leaves open the question of how such issues are to be resolved; and it is argued that this may be done through consideration of (...)
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  19.  45
    Venanzio Raspa (2012). Is ‘Ought’ an Object? Meinong’s and Veber’s Answers. In T. Pirc (ed.), Object, Person, and Reality: An Introduction to France Veber. JSKD 53-65.
    Focusing mainly on Meinong’s "Über emotionale Präsentation" and Veber’s "Die Natur des Sollens", I examine their respective conceptions of ought. Meinong has not written a specific work on the ought, he deals with it as a part of his value theory. In "Über emotionale Präsentation" the ought is a property of being, which cannot be viewed as separated from a desiring subject. The ought is an ideal object of higher order; it concerns neither factuality nor non-factuality, but subfactuality, (...)
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  20. Neil Tennant (1997). The Taming of the True. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Taming of the True poses a broad challenge to the realist views of meaning and truth that have been prominent in recent philosophy. Neil Tennant starts with a careful critical survey of the realism debate, guiding the reader through its complexities; he then presents a sustained defence of the anti-realist view that every truth is knowable in principle, and that grasp of meaning must be able to be made manifest. Sceptical arguments for the indeterminacy or non-factuality of meaning (...)
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  21. Françoise Dastur (2000). Phenomenology of the Event: Waiting and Surprise. Hypatia 15 (4):178-189.
    How, asks Françoise Dastur, can philosophy account for the sudden happening and the factuality of the event? Dastur asks how phenomenology, in particular the work of Heidegger, Husserl, and Merleau-Ponty, may be interpreted as offering such an account. She argues that the "paradoxical capacity of expecting surprise is always in question in phenomenology," and for this reason, she concludes, "We should not oppose phenomenology and the thinking of the event. We should connect them; openness to phenomena must be identified (...)
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  22. Tim Maudlin (2004). Truth and Paradox: Solving the Riddles. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Truth and Paradox offers a comprehensive account of truth values and the norms governing claims about truth, based on a new approach to logic and semantics. Since the seminal work of Tarski in the mid-twentieth century, the Liar paradox and other related paradoxes have stood in the way of a precise philosophical account of truth. Tim Maudlin draws on analogies from mathematical physics to explicate the origin of classical truth-value gaps, and to provide an account of truth that avoids any (...)
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  23.  87
    Matthew McGrath (2005). No Objects, No Problem? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (4):457 – 486.
    One familiar form of argument for rejecting entities of a certain kind is that, by rejecting them, we avoid certain difficult problems associated with them. Such problem-avoidance arguments backfire if the problems cited survive the elimination of the rejected entities. In particular, we examine one way problems can survive: a question for the realist about which of a set of inconsistent statements is false may give way to an equally difficult question for the eliminativist about which of a set of (...)
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  24. Ariane Mildenberg (2008). Seeing Fine Substances Strangely. Studia Phaenomenologica 8:259-282.
    Gertrude Stein may be regarded as one of the most innovative and obscure modernist writers. At the core of Tender Buttons (1914), her most experimental work, lies a dialectical tension between meaning and non-meaning, order and disorder, the opacity of which some of the earliest critical studies of Stein described as both “an eloquent mistake” and “the ravings of a lunatic,” resisting interpretation. In this paper, I show that phenomenology offers an appropriate tool for opening up the much-discussed dialectic of (...)
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  25.  33
    Sami Pihlström (2010). Toward a Pragmatically Naturalist Metaphysics of the Fact-Value Entanglement. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:323-352.
    This paper examines the metaphysical status of the fact-value entanglement. According to Hilary Putnam, among others, this is a major theme in both classical and recent pragmatism, but its relevance obviously extends beyond pragmatism scholarship. The pragmatic naturalist must make sense of the entanglement thesis within a broadly non-reductively naturalist account of reality. Two rival options for such metaphysics are discussed: values may be claimed to emerge from facts (or normativity from factuality), or fact and value may be considered (...)
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  26.  62
    Barry Ward (2002). Humeanism Without Humean Supervenience: A Projectivist Account of Laws and Possibilities. Philosophical Studies 107 (3):191-208.
    Acceptance of Humean Supervenience and thereductive Humean analyses that entail it leadsto a litany of inadequately explained conflictswith our intuitions regarding laws andpossibilities. However, the non-reductiveHumeanism developed here, on which law claimsare understood as normative rather than factstating, can accommodate those intuitions. Rational constraints on such norms provide aset of consistency relations that ground asemantics formulated in terms offactual-normative worlds, solving theFrege-Geach problem of construing unassertedcontexts. This set of factual-normative worldsincludes exactly the intuitive sets ofnomologically possible worlds associated witheach possible (...)
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  27. David Macarthur (2007). Wittgenstein and Scepticism - Edited by Denis Mcmanus. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 48 (2):168-170.
    Wittgenstein has been likened to a Pyrrhonian sceptic, one who employs dialectical skills to avoid rather than defend doctrine, but it is his role in exposing and excavating the sands upon which modern scepticisms have been built that is the subject of this new volume of largely original essays. The first three chapters, by Crispin Wright, Akeel Bilgrami and Michael Williams find inspiration in On Certainty for singling out key moves in the initial set-up of external world scepticism; the next (...)
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  28. Lotte Dam & Helle Dam-Jensen (2010). Mood in Complementizer Phrases in Spanish: How to Assess the Semantics of Mood. Pragmatics and Cognition 18 (1):111-135.
    This article argues that language provides instructions for the interpretive work of the addressee. The result of this interpretive process is the establishment of linguistic meaning. On this assumption, the article aims at explaining how meaning is established on the basis of the category of mood in Spanish. It is often assumed that the meaning of mood in Spanish is explainable in terms of assertion vs. non-assertion. Contrary to this, we shall claim that assertion belongs to the level of subordination. (...)
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  29.  12
    Karl Karlander, The Normativity of Thought and Meaning.
    In recent years the normativity of thought and meaning has been the subject of an extensive debate. What is at issue is whether intentionality has normative features, and if so, whether that constitutes a problem for naturalistic attempts to account for intentional phenomena. The origin of the debate is Saul Kripke’s interpretation of Ludwig Wittgenstein’s later philosophy, published in Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language. Kripke claimed, on behalf of Wittgenstein, that dispositional accounts of linguistic meaning - accounts, i.e., which (...)
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  30.  8
    Gitte Meyer, Anna Paldam Folker, Rikke Bagger Jørgensen, Martin Krayer von Krauss, Peter Sandøe & Geir Tveit (2005). The Factualization of Uncertainty: Risk, Politics, and Genetically Modified Crops – a Case of Rape. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 22 (2):235-242.
    Mandatory risk assessment is intended to reassure concerned citizens and introduce reason into the heated European controversies on genetically modified crops and food. The authors, examining a case of risk assessment of genetically modified oilseed rape, claim that the new European legislation on risk assessment does nothing of the sort and is not likely to present an escape from the international deadlock on the use of genetic modification in agriculture and food production. The new legislation is likely to stimulate the (...)
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  31. Gregory M. Browne (2000). Necessary Factual Truth. Upa.
    In this book Gregory Browne rejects the views of David Hume and the Logical Positivists, and argues that there are necessary factual truths, which include a wide range of truths from many fields of knowledge. Browne argues for the necessity of Newton's Laws and truths about natural kinds, and for the factuality of definitional truths and truths of logic and mathematics. Browne synthesizes the work of Kripke, Putnam, Quine and others, but goes beyond the usual discussions of the meanings (...)
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  32.  42
    Patricia Marino (2006). What Should a Correspondence Theory Be and Do? Philosophical Studies 127 (3):415 - 457.
    Correspondence theories are frequently either too vaguely expressed – “true statements correspond to the way things are in the world,” or implausible – “true statements mirror raw, mind-independent reality.” I address this problem by developing features and roles that ought to characterize what I call ldquo;modest” correspondence theories. Of special importance is the role of correspondence in directing our responses to cases of suspected non-factuality; lack of straightforward correspondence shows the need for, and guides us in our choice of, (...)
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  33.  70
    Joseph J. Sartorelli (1991). McGinn on Content Scepticism and Kripke's Sceptical Argument. Analysis 51 (March):79-84.
    In Wittgenstein on Meaning, Colin McGinn argues that the skeptical argument that Kripke distills from Wittgenstein's rule-following considerations generates at most what might be called meaning skepticism (the non-factuality view of meaning), and not concept skepticism (the non-factuality view of concepts). If correct, this would mean the skeptical reasoning is far less significant than Kripke thinks. Others have seemed to agree with McGinn. I argue that McGinn is wrong here--that, in fact, Kripke's skeptical reasoning has a straightforward extension (...)
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  34.  2
    Mirjana Radojicic (2005). Non-Governmental Organizations and Politics of Interpretation of South-Slavic’s Recent Past. Filozofija I Društvo 27:109-125.
    In the text the author considers politics of interpretation of South-Slavic peoples' recent past, which was demonstrated by the most prominent activists of Serbian non-governmental organizations. By summarizing the interpretation in a few points, the author attempts to identify its key features: arrogance and extremism as a style, counter factuality as a strategy and anti-Serbian nationalism and racism as an ideological strongpoint. In the final section of the text, what is pleaded is a precise legal regulation of that delicate (...)
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  35.  40
    William T. Scott (1982). The Question of a Religious Reality: Commentary on the Polanyi Papers. Zygon 17 (1):83-87.
    . Two aspects of the problem of interpreting Michael Polanyi’s outlook on religion are discussed. First, various ways of relating to reality beyond the objective perception of factuality must be considered, including the shift from I-It to I-Thou relations, and the self-giving mode of surrender to a symbolized reality. Second, the active use of the imagination in perception involves a commitment that the image is of something real, transcending the person. I believe that Polanyi understands both religious rituals and (...)
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  36.  4
    R. Bakker (1974). Augustinus en het moderne denken. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 36 (3):442 - 465.
    In this article we have tried to draw some connections between the philosophy of St Augustine and the phenomenology of Husserl and Heidegger. The occasion for our choosing this subject was the fact that on the next 13th November 1620 years have elapsed since Augustine's day of birth. The way Augustine approached the basic questions of human existence is closely related to contemporary phenomenological thought. This we will illustrate with the help of some notions as „memory” and „time”. Modern thought (...)
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  37.  26
    Bruce R. Reichenbach (1975). The Cosmological Argument and the Causal Principle. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (3):185 - 190.
    I reply to Houston Craighead, who presents two arguments against my version of the cosmological argument. First, he argues that my arguments in defense of the causal principle in terms of the existence being accidental to an essence is fallacious because it begs the question. I respond that the objection itself is circular, and that it invokes the questionable contention that what is conceivable is possible. Against my contention that the causal principle might be intuitively known, I reply to his (...)
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  38.  10
    John Grumley (1999). A Utopian Dialectic of Needs? Heller's Theory of Radical Needs. Thesis Eleven 59 (1):53-72.
    The concept of `radical needs' has been a constant element in Heller's social philosophy over the last 25 years despite the fact that her own perspective moved progressively away from Marxian philosophical anthropology towards the position that she now characterizes as reflective post-modernism. This article charts this theoretical journey with a close examination of her articulation of the concept of radical needs in various phases of her work. Beginning with an attempt to rescue Marxism from the clutches of objectivism and (...)
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  39.  10
    Susan Goldin-Meadow & Martha Wagner Alibali (1999). Does the Hand Reflect Implicit Knowledge? Yes and No. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):766-767.
    Gesture does not have a fixed position in the Dienes & Perner framework. Its status depends on the way knowledge is expressed. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be fully implicit (neither factuality nor predication is explicit) if the goal is simply to move a pointing hand to a target. Knowledge reflected in gesture can be explicit (both factuality and predication are explicit) if the goal is to indicate an object. However, gesture is not restricted to these two extreme (...)
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  40.  1
    Hayden White (1986). Historical Pluralism. Critical Inquiry 12 (3):480-493.
    It is as if [W. J. T.] Mitchell, who in his stance as a literary theorist is willing to admit of a plurality of equally legitimate critical modes, were unwilling to extend this pluralism to the consideration of history itself. By this I do not mean that he would be unwilling to view the history of criticism as a cacophony or polyphony of contending critical positions, as a never=ending circle of critical viewpoints, with no one of them being able finally (...)
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  41.  21
    Mikael Janvid (2010). Empirical Indefeasibility and Nonfactuality. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):183-197.
    Hartry Field has recently presented an original and interesting approach to the a priori. Its main theses are, first, that certain rules are empirically indefeasible and, second, that the reasonableness of these rules are not based on any factual property. After an introduction, Field’s approach is presented in section II. Section III examines his claims concerning empirical indefeasibility. It will be argued that his general argument for empirical indefeasibility fails along with the particular examples of rules he gives. Alternative ways (...)
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  42.  10
    Martin Kurthen & Detlef B. Linke (1995). The Ontology of Aspectual Shape. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (3):612-614.
    Searle (1990) argues that unconscious intrinsic intentional states must be accessible to consciousness because (1) all intrinsic intentional states have aspectual shape, the of which cannot be explained in a third-person (e.g., neurophysiological) vocabulary, and (2) ontologically, unconscious mental states are neurophysiological processes. This argument confuses three senses of namely, factuality, individuative properties, and phenomenological presence.
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  43.  7
    J. Burton (2008). Machines Making Gods: Philip K. Dick, Henri Bergson and Saint Paul. Theory, Culture and Society 25 (7-8):262-284.
    This article addresses shared themes in the writing of Saint Paul and the work of the science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. Much recent philosophical interest in Saint Paul focuses on his contemporary significance as a radical political thinker, following Jacob Taubes' influential late work, The Political Theology of Paul. Assessments of Paul's writing in this context highlight the various ways in which he uses fictionalizing, for example in setting up the tension between the present world and a messianic future, (...)
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  44.  19
    P. Hulsen (1998). Back to Basics: A Theory of the Emergence of Institutional Facts. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 17 (3):271-299.
    In order to account for the mode of existence of social rules and norms, the author develops a theory of the emergence of institutional facts. Just as other kinds of institutional fact, rules and norms are meanings. Therefore, insight into the emergence of social rules and norms can be achieved by studying the recognition and the communication of meanings. Following accounts of meaning and factuality, institutional facts are characterized as unquestionable shared typifications. It is argued that, in becoming an (...)
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  45.  4
    Bernard Williams (1991). Subjectivism and Toleration. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 30:197-208.
    Bertrand Russell said more than once that he was uncomfortable about a conflict, as he saw it, between two things: the strength of the conviction with which he held his ethical beliefs, and the philosophical opinions that he had about the status of those ethical beliefs—opinions which were non-cognitivist, and in some sense subjectivist. Russell felt that, in some way, if he did not think that his ethical beliefs were objective, he had no right to hold them so passionately. This (...)
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  46.  10
    Philip David Zelazo & Douglas Frye (1999). Consciousness and Control: The Argument From Developmental Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):788-789.
    Limitations of Dienes & Perner's (D&P's) theory are traced to the assumption that the higher-order thought (HOT) theory of consciousness is true. D&P claim that 18-month-old children are capable of explicitly representing factuality, from which it follows (on D&P's theory) that they are capable of explicitly representing content, attitude, and self. D&P then attempt to explain 3-year-olds' failures on tests of voluntary control such as the dimensional change card sort by suggesting that at this age children cannot represent content (...)
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  47.  9
    Mioara Mugur-Schächter (2002). Objectivity and Descriptional Relativities. Foundations of Science 7 (1-2):73-180.
    A general representation of the processesof conceptualization, founded upon adescriptional mould drawn from fundamentalquantum mechanics, is outlined. The approach iscalled the method of relativizedconceptualization. This stresses that therepresentation is not researched as a ``neutralstatement of facts'' but, from the start on, asa method subjected to definitedescriptional aims, namely an a prioriexclusion of the emergence of false problems orparadoxes and of any gliding into relativism.The method is characterized by an explicit andsystematic relativization of each descriptionalstep, to all the descriptional elementsinvolved in (...)
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  48.  1
    Venanzio Raspa (2012). Sollen: il dover essere è un oggetto?: le riposte di Meinong e Veber. Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia Del Diritto 89 (2):239-262.
    Focusing mainly on Meinong’s "Über emotionale Präsentation" and Veber’s "Die Natur des Sollens", I examine their respective conceptions of ought. Meinong has not written a specific work on the ought, he deals with it as a part of his value theory. In "Über emotionale Präsentation" the ought is a property of being, which cannot be viewed as separated from a desiring subject. The ought is an ideal object of higher order; it concerns neither factuality nor non-factuality, but subfactuality, (...)
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  49.  9
    Baudouin Dupret (2011). Adjudication in Action: An Ethnomethodology of Law, Morality and Justice. Ashgate.
    Law and morality : constructs and models -- The morality of cognition : the normativity of ordinary reasoning -- Law in action : a praxeological approach to law and justice -- Law in context : legal activity and the institutional context -- Procedural constraint : sequentiality, routine, and formal correctness -- Legal relevance : the production of factuality and legality -- From law in the books to law in action : egyptian criminal law between doctrine, case law, (...)
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  50. Alexander García Düttmann (2007). Philosophy of Exaggeration. Continuum.
    Splendour and misery of exaggeration : an introduction -- Thinking as gesture : exaggeration and philosophy -- Trust me : exaggeration and enlightenment -- Odd moves : exaggeration and irony -- The violence of destruction : exaggeration and infinity -- ? and ? end? : exaggeration and politics -- Being guilty : exaggeration and factuality -- Flight simulator : exaggeration and trauma -- The obvious : exaggeration and self-evidence -- Blow job : exaggeration and institution -- Old opera : (...)
     
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