Search results for 'family resemblance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Massimo Pigliucci (2003). Species as Family Resemblance Concepts: The (Dis-)Solution of the Species Problem? BioEssays 25 (6):596-602.score: 90.0
    The so-called ‘‘species problem’’ has plagued evolution- ary biology since before Darwin’s publication of the aptly titled Origin of Species. Many biologists think the problem is just a matter of semantics; others complain that it will not be solved until we have more empirical data. Yet, we don’t seem to be able to escape discussing it and teaching seminars about it. In this paper, I briefly examine the main themes of the biological and philosophical liter- atures on the species problem, (...)
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  2. Sunil Vadera, Andres Rodriguez, Enrique Succar & Jia Wu (2008). Using Wittgenstein's Family Resemblance Principle to Learn Exemplars. Foundations of Science 13 (1):67-74.score: 90.0
    The introduction of the notion of family resemblance represented a major shift in Wittgenstein’s thoughts on the meaning of words, moving away from a belief that words were well defined, to a view that words denoted less well defined categories of meaning. This paper presents the use of the notion of family resemblance in the area of machine learning as an example of the benefits that can accrue from adopting the kind of paradigm shift taken by (...)
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  3. Neil Pickering (2013). Extending Disorder: Essentialism, Family Resemblance and Secondary Sense. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):185-195.score: 90.0
    It is commonly thought that mental disorder is a valid concept only in so far as it is an extension of or continuous with the concept of physical disorder. A valid extension has to meet two criteria: determination and coherence. Essentialists meet these criteria through necessary and sufficient conditions for being a disorder. Two Wittgensteinian alternatives to essentialism are considered and assessed against the two criteria. These are the family resemblance approach and the secondary sense approach. Where the (...)
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  4. Hans Sluga (2006). Family Resemblance. Grazer Philosophische Studien 71 (1):1-21.score: 60.0
    Wittgenstein's remarks about family resemblance in the Philosophical Investigations should not be construed as implying a comprehensive theory of universals. They possess, rather, a defensive function in his exposition. The remarks allow one, nevertheless, to draw certain general conclusions about how Wittgenstein thought about concepts. Reflection on the notion of family resemblance reveals that kinship and similarity considerations intersect in it in a problematic fashion.
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  5. Hanne Andersen (2000). Kuhn's Account of Family Resemblance: A Solution to the Problem of Wide-Open Texture. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 52 (3):313-337.score: 60.0
    It is a commonly raised argument against thefamily resemblance account of concepts that, on thisaccount, there is no limit to a concept's extension.An account of family resemblance which attempts toprovide a solution to this problem by including bothsimilarity among instances and dissimilarity tonon-instances has been developed by the philosopher ofscience Thomas Kuhn. Similar solutions have beenhinted at in the literature on family resemblanceconcepts, but the solution has never received adetailed investigation. I shall provide areconstruction of Kuhn's (...)
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  6. Gürol Irzık, Gurol Irzik & Robert Nola, A Family Resemblance Approach to the Nature of Science for Science Education.score: 60.0
    Although there is universal consensus both in the science education literature and in the science standards documents to the effect that students should learn not only the content of science but also its nature, there is little agreement about what that nature is. This led many science educators to adopt what is sometimes called “the consensus view” about the nature of science (NOS), whose goal is to teach students only those characteristics of science on which there is wide consensus. This (...)
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  7. Pawel Garbacz (2013). Artefacts and Family Resemblance. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):419-447.score: 60.0
    I develop in this paper a conception of artefacts based on L. Wittgenstein’s idea of family resemblance. My approach peruses the notion of frame, which was invented in cognitive psychology as an operationisable extension of this philosophical idea. Following the metaphor of life-cycle I show how this schematic notion of frame may be filled with the content relevant for artefacts if we consider them from the point of view of their histories. The resulting conception of artefacts provides a (...)
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  8. Douglas Huff (1981). Family Resemblances and Rule-Governed Behavior. Philosophical Investigations 4 (3):1-23.score: 51.0
  9. Jason Bridges (2010). Wittgenstein Vs Contextualism. In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 45.0
    A critique of attempts by Charles Travis and others to read contextualism back into Philosophical Investigations. The central interpretive claim is that this reading is not only unsupported; it gets Wittgenstein's intent, in the parts of the text at issue, precisely backwards. The focus of the chapter is on Wittgenstein's treatment of explanation, understanding, proper names, and family-resemblance concepts.
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  10. Nöel Carroll (2012). Art in an Expanded Field: Wittgenstein and Aesthetics. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 42 (42):14-31.score: 45.0
    This article reviews the various ways in which the later writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein have been employed to address the question “What is Art?”. These include the family resemblance model, the cluster concept model and the form of life model. The article defends a version of the form of life approach. Also, addressed the charge that it would have been more profitable had aestheticians explored what Wittgenstein actually said about art instead of trying to extrapolate from his writings (...)
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  11. Hjalmar Wennerberg (1967). The Concept of Family Resemblance in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy. Theoria 33 (2):107-132.score: 45.0
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  12. Michael A. Simon (1969). When is a Resemblance a Family Resemblance? Mind 78 (311):408-416.score: 45.0
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  13. Pamela M. Huby (1968). Family Resemblance. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (70):66-67.score: 45.0
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  14. Ardon Lyon (1968). Family Resemblance, Vagueness, and Change of Meaning. Theoria 34 (1):66-75.score: 45.0
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  15. Keith Campbell (1965). Family Resemblance Predicates. American Philosophical Quarterly 2 (3):238 - 244.score: 45.0
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  16. L. Pompa (1967). Family Resemblance. Philosophical Quarterly 17 (66):63-69.score: 45.0
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  17. J. E. Llewelyn (1968). Family Resemblance. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):344-346.score: 45.0
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  18. Richard D. Mohr (1977). Family Resemblance, Platonism, Universals. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):593 - 600.score: 45.0
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  19. L. Pompa (1968). Family Resemblance: A Reply. Philosophical Quarterly 18 (73):347-353.score: 45.0
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  20. D. S. Goldberg (2011). Eschewing Definitions of the Therapeutic Misconception: A Family Resemblance Analysis. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (3):296-320.score: 45.0
    Twenty-five years after the term "therapeutic misconception’ (TM) first entered the literature, most commentators agree that it remains widespread. However, the majority of scholarly attention has focused on the reasons why a patient cum human subject might confuse the goals of research with the goals of therapy. Although this paper addresses the social and cultural factors that seem to animate the TM among subjects, it also fills a niche in the literature by examining why investigators too might operate under a (...)
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  21. Sheldon M. Cohen (1973). Family Resemblance in the Thirteenth Century. Philosophy 48 (186):391 - 394.score: 45.0
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  22. Ralph Weber (forthcoming). Comparative Philosophy and the Tertium: Comparing What with What, and in What Respect? Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-21.score: 45.0
    Comparison is fundamental to the practice and subject-matter of philosophy, but has received scant attention by philosophers. This is even so in “comparative philosophy,” which literally distinguishes itself from other philosophy by being “comparative.” In this article, the need for a philosophy of comparison is suggested. What we compare with what, and in what respect it is done, poses a series of intriguing and intricate questions. In Part One, I offer a problematization of the tertium comparationis (the third of comparison) (...)
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  23. Hanne Andersen (2013). Conceptual Development and Dynamic Realism. Studia Philosophica Estonica 5 (2):133-151.score: 45.0
    This paper focuses on Thomas S. Kuhn's work on taxonomic concepts and how it relates to empirical work from the cognitive sciences on categorization and conceptual development. I shall first review the basic features of Kuhn's family resemblance account and compare to work from the cognitive sciences. I shall then show how Kuhn's account can be extended to cover the development of new taxonomies in science, and I shall illustrate by a detailed case study that Kuhn himself mentioned (...)
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  24. Massimiliano Carrara, Pawel Garbacz & Pieter E. Vermaas (2011). If Engineering Function is a Family Resemblance Concept: Assessing Three Formalization Strategies. Applied Ontology 6 (2):141-163.score: 45.0
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  25. Michael Forster (2010). Wittgenstein on Family Resemblance Concepts. In Arif Ahmed (ed.), Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 45.0
     
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  26. John Halliday (2001). Reason, Education and Liberalism: Family Resemblance Within an Overlapping Consensus. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (3):225-234.score: 45.0
    This paper focuses on recent debates over the nature ofliberalism and its central feature of reason, both inside and outside ofeducational philosophy. Central ideas from Jonathan and Hirst contributeas do those from Rawls, Gadamer, Wittgenstein, Taylor, and Ackermantoward a less traditional contextualized and contingent view.
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  27. Paul Alfred Hazard (1975). A Problem with Wittgenstein's « Family Resemblance ». Laval Théologique Et Philosophique 31 (3):265.score: 45.0
  28. F. N. Milton & A. J. Wills (2008). The Influence of Perceptual Difficulty on Family Resemblance Sorting. In. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. 2273--2278.score: 45.0
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  29. David L. Miller (1972). The Meaning of Sameness or Family Resemblance in the Pragmatic Tradition. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 21:51-62.score: 45.0
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  30. B. Rundle (1983). Family Resemblance and Explanations of Meaning. Conceptus. Zeitschrift Fur Philosophie Salzburg 17 (40-41):53-63.score: 45.0
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  31. Marc Ereshefsky (2010). Darwin's Solution to the Species Problem. Synthese 175 (3):405 - 425.score: 30.0
    Biologists and philosophers that debate the existence of the species category fall into two camps. Some believe that the species category does not exist and the term 'species' should be eliminated from biology. Others believe that with new biological insights or the application of philosophical ideas, we can be confident that the species category exists. This paper offers a different approach to the species problem. We should be skeptical of the species category, but not skeptical of the existence of those (...)
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  32. Christopher Shields (2012). The Dialectic of Life. Synthese 185 (1):103-124.score: 30.0
    In the dialectic of debates about the extension of life, one witnesses a predictably repeating pattern: one side appeals to a motley of variegated criteria for something’s qualifying as a living system, only to find an opposite side taking issue with the individual necessity or collective sufficiency of the proposed criteria. Some of these criteria tend to cluster with one another, while others do not: metabolism, growth and reproduction; self-organization and homeostasis; an ability to decrease internal entropy by the appropriation (...)
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  33. T. Mooney, John Williams & Mark Nowacki (2011). Kovesi and the Formal and Material Elements of Concepts. Philosophia 39 (4):699-720.score: 30.0
    In his seminal work Moral Notions , Julius Kovesi presents a novel account of concept formation. At the heart of this account is a distinction between what he terms the material element and the formal element of concepts. This paper elucidates his distinction in detail and contrasts it with other distinctions such as form-matter, universal-particular, genus-difference, necessary-sufficient, and open texture-closed texture. We situate Kovesi’s distinction within his general philosophical method, outlining his views on concept formation in general and explain how (...)
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  34. Dale Jacquette (2012). Faith as a Mustard Seed. Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 17 (2):141-173.score: 30.0
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  35. Heather J. Gert (1995). Family Resemblances and Criteria. Synthese 105 (2):177-190.score: 28.0
    In §66 ofPhilosophical Investigations Wittgenstein looks for something common to various games and finds only an interconnecting network of resemblances. These are family resemblances. Sympathetic as well as unsympathetic readers have interpreted him as claiming that games form a family in virtue of these resemblances. This assumes Wittgenstein inverted the relation between being a member of a family and bearing family resemblances to others of that family. (The Churchills bear family resemblances to one another (...)
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  36. Ben Tilghman (2008). Kaufman on Art, Family Resemblances, and Wittgenstein. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (1):86-88.score: 28.0
    Kaufman describes the current debate on the possibility of a definition of art between the theorists and the anti-theorist Wittgensteinians. The Wittgensteinian reliance on ‘family resemblances’ is a serious objection to theoretical definitions. Wittgenstein, however, is said to be unable to give a proper account of the ‘inner experience’ encountered in art. By way of response, it is urged that attention to Wittgenstein himself will show that there are misunderstandings of the idea of family resemblances and that Wittgenstein's (...)
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  37. Hanne Andersen (2001). Reference and Resemblance. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S50-.score: 24.0
    Many discussions between realists and non-realists have centered on the issue of reference, especially whether there is referential stability during theory change. In this paper, I shall summarize the debate, sketching the problems that remain within the two opposing positions, and show that both have ended on their own slippery slope, sliding away from their original position toward that of their opponents. In the search for a viable intermediate position, I shall then suggest an account of reference which, to a (...)
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  38. Jim Stone (1994). Games and Family Resemblances. Philosophical Investigations 17 (No. 2): 435-443.score: 21.0
    An account of the feature all games share in virtue of which they are games.
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  39. Maurice Mandelbaum (1965). Family Resemblances and Generalization Concerning the Arts. American Philosophical Quarterly 2 (3):219 - 228.score: 21.0
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  40. Marcello Frixione (2011). Art, the Brain, and Family Resemblances: Some Considerations on Neuroaesthetics. Philosophical Psychology 24 (5):699 - 715.score: 21.0
    The project of neuroaesthetics could be interpreted as an attempt to identify a ?neural essence? of art, i.e., a set of necessary and sufficient conditions formulated in the language of neuroscience, which define the concept art . Some proposals developed within this field can be read in this way. I shall argue that such attempts do not succeed in individuating a neural definition of art. Of course, the fact that the proposals available for defining art in neural terms do not (...)
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  41. Daniel A. Kaufman (2007). Family Resemblances, Relationalism, and the Meaning of 'Art'. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):280-297.score: 21.0
    Peter Kivy has maintained that the Wittgensteinian account of ‘art’ ‘is not a going concern’ and that ‘the traditional task of defining the work of art is back in fashion, with a vengeance’. This is true, in large part, because of the turn towards relational definitions of ‘art’ taken by philosophers in the 1960s; a move that is widely believed to have countered the Wittgensteinian charge that ‘art’ is an open concept and which gave rise to a ‘New Wave’ in (...)
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  42. Renford Bambrough (1960). Universals and Family Resemblances. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 61:207 - 222.score: 21.0
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  43. Nicholas Griffin (1974). Wittgenstein, Universals and Family Resemblances. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):635 - 651.score: 21.0
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  44. R. W. Beardsmore (1992). The Theory of Family Resemblances. Philosophical Investigations 15 (2):131-146.score: 21.0
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  45. Richard E. Grandy (1979). Universals or Family Resemblances? Midwest Studies in Philosophy 4 (1):11-17.score: 21.0
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  46. R. W. Beardsmore (1995). Art and Family Resemblances. Philosophical Investigations 18 (3):199-215.score: 21.0
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  47. Anthony Manser (1967). Games and Family Resemblances. Philosophy 42 (161):210 - 225.score: 21.0
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  48. Timothy Tessin (1996). Family Resemblances and the Unity of a Concept. Philosophical Investigations 19 (1):62-71.score: 21.0
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  49. James E. Bellaimey (1990). Family Resemblances and the Problem of the Under-Determination of Extension. Philosophical Investigations 13 (1):31-43.score: 21.0
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  50. Haig Khatchadourian (1969). Family Resemblances and the Classification of Works of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 28 (1):79-90.score: 21.0
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