Search results for 'feedback loop' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  14
    Etienne Farcot & Jean-Luc Gouzé (2009). Periodic Solutions of Piecewise Affine Gene Network Models with Non Uniform Decay Rates: The Case of a Negative Feedback Loop. Acta Biotheoretica 57 (4):429-455.
    This paper concerns periodic solutions of a class of equations that model gene regulatory networks. Unlike the vast majority of previous studies, it is not assumed that all decay rates are identical. To handle this more general situation, we rely on monotonicity properties of these systems. Under an alternative assumption, it is shown that a classical fixed point theorem for monotone, concave operators can be applied to these systems. The required assumption is expressed in geometrical terms as an alignment condition (...)
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  2.  59
    Evandro Agazzi (2008). Epistemology and the Social: A Feedback Loop. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 96 (1):19-31.
    A sociological study of science is not very recent and has never been seen as particularly problematic since science, and especially modern science, constitutes an impressive and extremely ramified "social system" of activities, institutions, relations and interferences with other social systems. Less favourable, however, has been the consideration of a more recent trend in the philosophy of science known as the "sociological" philosophy of science, whose most debatable point consists in directly challenging the traditional epistemology of science and, in particular, (...)
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  3.  3
    Marcel Kinsbourne (1995). Septohippocampal Comparator: Consciousness Generator or Attention Feedback Loop? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):687.
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  4.  1
    Stephen A. Sherblom (2015). A Moral Experience Feedback Loop: Modeling a System of Moral Self-Cultivation in Everyday Life. Journal of Moral Education 44 (3):364-381.
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  5.  2
    Todd D. Nelson (1995). The Control of Consciousness Via a Neuropsychological Feedback Loop. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):690.
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  6. Steven M. Picksley & David P. Lane (1993). What the Papers Say: The P53‐Mdm2 Autoregulatory Feedback Loop: A Paradigm for the Regulation of Growth Control by P53? Bioessays 15 (10):689-690.
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  7.  40
    Ravinder Jerath & Molly W. Crawford (2014). Neural Correlates of Visuospatial Consciousness in 3D Default Space: Insights From Contralateral Neglect Syndrome. Consciousness and Cognition 28:81-93.
    One of the most compelling questions still unanswered in neuroscience is how consciousness arises. In this article, we examine visual processing, the parietal lobe, and contralateral neglect syndrome as a window into consciousness and how the brain functions as the mind and we introduce a mechanism for the processing of visual information and its role in consciousness. We propose that consciousness arises from integration of information from throughout the body and brain by the thalamus and that the thalamus reimages visual (...)
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  8. Matt L. Drabek (2010). Interactive Classification and Practice in the Social Sciences. Poroi 6 (2):62-80.
    This paper examines the ways in which social scientific discourse and classification interact with the objects of social scientific investigation. I examine this interaction in the context of the traditional philosophical project of demarcating the social sciences from the natural sciences. I begin by reviewing Ian Hacking’s work on interactive classification and argue that there are additional forms of interaction that must be treated.
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  9.  8
    Sui Huang (2013). When Peers Are Not Peers and Don't Know It: The Dunning‐Kruger Effect and Self‐Fulfilling Prophecy in Peer‐Review. Bioessays 35 (5):414-416.
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  10.  15
    Anton Lethin (2005). Covert Agency with Proprioceptive Feedback. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (s 4-5):96-114.
    : Marcel says that the experience of ownership of actions is given in the specifications for action. He is referring not to a bodily movement but that which precedes it. Is the body involved or are all the changes in the brain? This paper examines the evidence for changes in the spinal cord and muscles that occur with motor imagery, simulation and preparation. There are changes in the alpha motoneurons and in the gamma motoneurons to the muscle spindles. These may (...)
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  11.  15
    Man‐Sun Kim, Jeong‐Rae Kim & Kwang‐Hyun Cho (2010). Dynamic Network Rewiring Determines Temporal Regulatory Functions in Drosophilamelanogaster Development Processes. Bioessays 32 (6):505-513.
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  12.  21
    Carlos Muñoz-Suárez & Felipe De Brigard (eds.) (forthcoming). Content and Consciousness Revisited. With Replies by Daniel Dennett. Springer.
    What are the grounds for the distinction between the mental and the physical? What is it the relation between ascribing mental states to an organism and understanding its behavior? Are animals and complex systems vehicles of inner evolutionary environments? Is there a difference between personal and sub-personal level processes in the brain? Answers to these and other questions were developed in Daniel Dennett’s first book, Content and Consciousness (1969), where he sketched a unified theoretical framework for views that are now (...)
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  13. H. Snippe & J. H. van Hateren (2004). Dynamics of Nonlinear Feedback Control. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing 182-182.
    Feedback control in neural systems is ubiquitous. Here we study the mathematics of nonlinear feedback control. We compare models in which the input is multiplied by a dynamic gain (multiplicative control) with models in which the input is divided by a dynamic attenuation (divisive control). The gain signal (resp. the attenuation signal) is obtained through a concatenation of an instantaneous nonlinearity and a linear low-pass filter operating on the output of the feedback loop. For input steps, (...)
     
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  14.  4
    Karola Pitsch, Anna-Lisa Vollmer, Katharina J. Rohlfing, Jannik Fritsch & Britta Wrede (2014). Tutoring in Adult-Child Interaction: On the Loop of the Tutor’s Action Modification and the Recipient’s Gaze. [REVIEW] Interaction Studies 15 (1):55-98.
    Research of tutoring in parent-infant interaction has shown that tutors – when presenting some action – modify both their verbal and manual performance for the learner (‘motherese’, ‘motionese’). Investigating the sources and effects of the tutors’ action modifications, we suggest an interactional account of ‘motionese’. Using video-data from a semi-experimental study in which parents taught their 8- to 11-month old infants how to nest a set of differently sized cups, we found that the tutors’ action modifications (in particular: high arches) (...)
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  15.  51
    Warren Mansell (2011). Control of Perception Should Be Operationalized as a Fundamental Property of the Nervous System. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):257-261.
    This commentary proposes that “cognitive control” is neither componential nor emergent, but a fundamental feature of behavior. The term “control” requires an operational definition. This is best provided by the negative feedback loop that utilizes behavior to control perception; it does not control behavior per se. In order to model complex cognitive control, Perceptual Control Theory proposes that loops are organized into a dissociable hierarchical network (PCT; Powers, Clark, & McFarland, 1960; Powers, 1973a, 2008). In this way, behavior (...)
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  16.  28
    Peter Fleming & Stelios C. Zyglidopoulos (2008). The Escalation of Deception in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):837 - 850.
    Drawing on a number of recent high-profile cases of corporate corruption, we develop a process model that explains the escalation of deception in corrupt firms. If undetected, an initial lie can begin a process whereby the ease, severity and pervasiveness of deception increases overtime so that it eventually becomes an organization level phenomenon. We propose that organizational complexity has an amplifying effect. A␣feedback loop between organization level deception and each of the escalation stages positively reinforces the process. In (...)
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  17.  49
    Ben Jeffares (2010). The Co-Evolution of Tools and Minds: Cognition and Material Culture in the Hominin Lineage. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):503-520.
    The structuring of our environment to provide cues and reminders for ourselves is common: We leave notes on the fridge, we have a particular place for our keys where we deposit them, making them easy to find. We alter our world to streamline our cognitive tasks. But how did hominins gain this capacity? What pushed our ancestors to structure their physical environment in ways that buffered thinking and began the process of using the world cognitively? I argue that the capacity (...)
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  18.  12
    Simone van der Burg (2011). Taking the “Soft Impacts” of Technology Into Account: Broadening the Discourse in Research Practice. Social Epistemology 23 (3):301-316.
    Public funding institutions are able to influence what aspects researchers take into account when they consider the future impacts of their research. On the basis of a description of the evaluation systems that public research funding institutes in the Netherlands (STW and SenterNovem) use to estimate the quality of engineering science, this article shows that researchers are now predominantly required to reflect on the intellectual merit of their research and on the usability and marketability of the technology it contributes to. (...)
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  19.  21
    Anton Benz (2012). Errors in Pragmatics. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 21 (1):97-116.
    In this paper we are going to show that error coping strategies play an essential role in linguistic pragmatics. We study the effect of noisy speaker strategies within a framework of signalling games with feedback loop. We distinguish between cases in which errors occur in message selection and cases in which they occur in signal selection. The first type of errors affects the content of an utterance, and the second type its linguistic expression. The general communication model is (...)
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  20.  69
    Karen Jones (2012). The Politics of Intellectual Self-Trust. Social Epistemology 26 (2):237-251.
    Just as testimony is affected by unjust social relations, so too is intellectual self-trust. I defend an account of intellectual self-trust that explains both why it is properly thought of as trust and why it is directed at the self, and explore its relationship to social power. Intellectual self-trust is neither a matter of having dispositions to rely on one?s epistemic methods and mechanisms, nor having a set of beliefs about which ones are reliable. Instead, it is a stance that (...)
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  21.  47
    J. H. van Hateren, Consciousness Results When Communication Modifies the Form of Self-Estimated Fitness.
    The origin and development of consciousness is poorly understood. Although it is clearly a naturalistic phenomenon evolved through Darwinian evolution, explaining it in terms of physicochemical, neural, or symbolic mechanisms remains elusive. Here I propose that two steps had to be taken in its evolution. First, living systems evolved an intrinsic goal-directedness by internalizing Darwinian fitness as a self-estimated fitness. The self-estimated fitness participates in a feedback loop that effectively produces intrinsic meaning in the organism. Second, animals with (...)
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  22.  9
    Jean McGuire, Lois Wright Morton & Alicia D. Cast (2013). Reconstructing the Good Farmer Identity: Shifts in Farmer Identities and Farm Management Practices to Improve Water Quality. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 30 (1):57-69.
    All farmers have their own version of what it means to be a good farmer. For many US farmers a large portion of their identity is defined by the high input, high output production systems they manage to produce food, fiber or fuel. However, the unintended consequences of highly productivist systems are often increased soil erosion and the pollution of ground and surface water. A large number of farmers have conservationist identities within their good farmer identity, however their conservation goals (...)
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  23.  49
    Susan Hawthorne (2010). Embedding Values: How Science and Society Jointly Valence a Concept—the Case of ADHD. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (1):21-31.
    Many successful sciences both serve and shape human ends. Conversely, the societies in which these sciences are practiced support the research and provide interpretive context. These mutual influences may result in a positive feedback loop that reinforces constitutive and contextual values, embedding them in scientific concepts: the ADHD concept is a case in point. In an ongoing process, social considerations fuel investigational choices and contexts for evaluating data. Scientific study forwards the feedback loop through the influence (...)
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  24.  4
    Chia-Yi Liu (2016). Institutional Isomorphism and Food Fraud: A Longitudinal Study of the Mislabeling of Rice in Taiwan. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):607-630.
    A number of high-profile mislabeling incidents have led to many studies exploring the decision-making processes that firms make around performing illegal acts. However, it remains unclear why the proportion of firms conducting these acts constantly fluctuates and never disappears. Therefore, this study investigated this by carrying out a longitudinal analysis of food labeling in the Taiwanese rice industry. Drawing on the institutional isomorphism theory, it was found that the degree of mislabeling is negatively correlated with both the level of control (...)
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  25.  6
    J. H. van Hateren (2015). Intrinsic Estimates of Fitness Affect the Causal Structure of Evolutionary Change. Biology and Philosophy 30 (5):729-746.
    The causal structure of Darwinian evolution by natural selection is investigated. Its basic scheme is reproduction resulting from a feedback loop driven by internal and external causes. Causation internal to the loop connects genotype, development, phenotype, and fitness, with environmental constraints on the latter preventing runaway reproduction. External causes driving the core loop are environmental change and genetic change. This basic causal structure is complicated by modern additions such as control of mutation rate, niche construction, interactions (...)
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  26.  8
    D. Kimbrough Oller, Ulrike Griebel & Anne S. Warlaumont (2016). Vocal Development as a Guide to Modeling the Evolution of Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (2):382-392.
    Modeling of evolution and development of language has principally utilized mature units of spoken language, phonemes and words, as both targets and inputs. This approach cannot address the earliest phases of development because young infants are unable to produce such language features. We argue that units of early vocal development—protophones and their primitive illocutionary/perlocutionary forces—should be targeted in evolutionary modeling because they suggest likely units of hominin vocalization/communication shortly after the split from the chimpanzee/bonobo lineage, and because early development of (...)
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  27.  55
    Paul Davies (2010). The Nature of the Laws of Physics and Their Mysterious Bio-Friendliness. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 767--788.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * 1 The Universe Is Weirdly Fine-Tuned for Life * 2 The Cosmic Code * 3 The Concept of Laws * 4 Are the Laws Real? * 5 Does a Multiverse Explain the Goldilocks Enigma? * 6 Many Scientists Hate the Multiverse Idea * 7 Who Designed the Multiverse? * 8 If There Were a Unique Final Theory, God Would Be Redundant * 9 What Exists and What Doesn’t: Who or What Gets to Decide? * (...)
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  28.  2
    Martin W. Bauer & George Gaskell (2008). Social Representations Theory: A Progressive Research Programme for Social Psychology. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (4):335-353.
    The study “Psychoanalysis—its image and its public” intimates that common sense is increasingly informed by science. But common sense asserts its autonomy and, in turn, may affect the trajectory of science. This is a process that leads to many differentiations—in common sense, in scientific innovation and in political and regulatory structures. Bauer and Gaskell's toblerone model of triangles of mediation provided a distillation of their reading of “La Psychanalyse.” Here it was argued that representations are multi-modal phenomena necessitating the use (...)
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  29.  34
    Jonathan Lowell (2012). Managers and Moral Dissonance: Self Justification as a Big Threat to Ethical Management? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):17-25.
    This article discusses the implications of moral dissonance for managers, and how dissonance induced self justification can create an amplifying feedback loop and downward spiral of immoral behaviour. After addressing the nature of moral dissonance, including the difference between moral and hedonistic dissonance, the writer then focuses on dissonance reduction strategies available to managers such as rationalization, self affirmation, self justification, etc. It is noted that there is a considerable literature which views the organization as a potentially corrupting (...)
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  30.  61
    John Storrs Hall (2007). Self-Improving AI: An Analysis. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 17 (3):249-259.
    Self-improvement was one of the aspects of AI proposed for study in the 1956 Dartmouth conference. Turing proposed a “child machine” which could be taught in the human manner to attain adult human-level intelligence. In latter days, the contention that an AI system could be built to learn and improve itself indefinitely has acquired the label of the bootstrap fallacy. Attempts in AI to implement such a system have met with consistent failure for half a century. Technological optimists, however, have (...)
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  31.  15
    J. H. van Hateren (2015). The Natural Emergence of (Bio)Semiosic Phenomena. Biosemiotics 8 (3):403-419.
    Biological organisms appear to have agency, goals, and meaningful behaviour. One possibility is that this is mere appearance, where such properties are not real, but only ‘as if’ consequences of the physiological structure of organisms. Another possibility is that these properties are real, as emerging from the organism's structure and from how the organism interacts with its environment. Here I will discuss a recent theory showing that the latter position is most likely correct, and argue that the theory is largely (...)
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  32.  14
    Elana Gomel (2011). Science (Fiction) and Posthuman Ethics: Redefining the Human. The European Legacy 16 (3):339-354.
    The boundaries of the ethical have traditionally coincided with the boundaries of humanity. This, however, is no longer the case. Scientific developments, such as genetic engineering, stem-cell research, cloning, the Human Genome Project, new paleontological evidence, and the rise of neuropsychology call into question the very notion of human being and thus require a new conceptual map for ethical judgment. The contours of this map may be seen to emerge in works of science fiction (SF), which not only vividly dramatize (...)
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  33.  43
    Rodney M. J. Cotterill (1997). On the Mechanism of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (3):231-48.
    The master-module theory of consciousness is considered in the light of experimental evidence that has emerged since the model was first published. It is found that these new results tend to strengthen the original hypothesis. It is also argued that the master module is involved in generation of the schemata previously postulated to be associated with consciousness . The recent discovery of attention-related activity in the thalamic intralaminar nuclei is taken to indicate that these structures constitute an important part of (...)
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  34.  11
    Donna Vaughan (2011). The Importance of Capabilities in the Sustainability of Information and Communications Technology Programs: The Case of Remote Indigenous Australian Communities. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 13 (2):131-150.
    The use of the capability approach as an evaluative tool for Information and Communication Technology (ICT) policy and programs in developing countries, in particular at a grass-roots community level, is an emerging field of application. However, one of the difficulties with ICT for development (ICT4D) evaluations is in linking what is often no more than a resource, for example basic access, to actual outcomes, or means to end. This article argues that the capability approach provides a framework for evaluating the (...)
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  35.  11
    Larry R. Vandervert (2009). The Appearance of the Child Prodigy 10,000 Years Ago: An Evolutionary and Developmental Explanation. Journal of Mind and Behavior 30 (1):15.
    Feldman and Goldsmith sought an evolutionary explanation of the child prodigy phenomenon. Following in this vein, a theory involving the evolution and development of the collaboration of working memory and the cognitive functions of the cerebellum is presented with commentary on Edmunds and Noel’s report on a child’s literary precocity. It is argued that the evolution of working memory and the cerebellum within the increasing rule-governed complexity of culture may have produced the child prodigy within agricultural villages as early as (...)
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  36.  53
    George Ainslie & John Monterosso (2005). Why Not Emotions as Motivated Behaviors? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):194-195.
    Lewis's dynamic systems approach is a refreshing change from the reflexology of most neuroscience, but it could go a step further: It could include the expected rewardingness of an emotion in the recursive feedback loop that determines whether the emotion will occur. Two possible objections to such a model are discussed: that emotions are not deliberate, and that negative emotions should lose out as instrumental choices.
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  37.  11
    Jason Pridmore (2010). Reflexive Marketing: The Cultural Circuit of Loyalty Programs. [REVIEW] Identity in the Information Society 3 (3):565-581.
    The amount of personal data now collected through contemporary marketing practices is indicative of the shifting landscape of contemporary capitalism. Loyalty programs can be seen as one exemplar of this, using the ‘add-ons’ of ‘points’ and ‘miles’ to entice consumers into divulging a range of personal information. These consumers are subject to surveillance practices that have digitally identified them as significant in the eyes of a corporation, yet they are also part of a feedback loop subject to ongoing (...)
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  38.  9
    Alex Englander (2013). Herder's 'Expressivist' Metaphysics and the Origins of German Idealism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (5):902 - 924.
    Charles Taylor's influential exposition of Hegel made the doctrine of expressivism of central importance and identified Herder as its exemplary historical advocate. The breadth and generality of Taylor's use of ?expressivism? have led the concept into some disrepute, but a more precise formulation of the doctrine as a theory of meaning can both demonstrate what is worthwhile and accurate in Taylor's account, and allow us a useful point of entry into Herder's multifaceted philosophy. A reconstruction of Herder's overall philosophical position, (...)
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  39.  18
    Warren S. Brown (1997). Mac Kay's View of Conscious Agents in Dialogue: Speculations on the Embodiment of Soul. Philosophical Psychology 10 (4):497 – 505.
    Donald MacKay's description of the embodiment of an efficacious conscious mind is reviewed as a version of non-reductive physicalism. Particular focus is given to MacKay's analysis of the emergence of consciousness in the capacity for self-evaluation which results from informational feedback regarding the results of action. Unique to MacKay's posthumously published Gifford Lectures is his analysis of agents in dialog as a particular form of an environmental feedback loop. His analysis of dialog is reviewed and expanded to (...)
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  40.  4
    Douglas Walton & Ralph Johnson (2011). Introduction: Special Issue on Charles Hamblin. Informal Logic 31 (4).
    It is unfortunate that Hamblin’s contributions do not get him the credit he deserves for his remarkable achievements. Although his contributions to philosophy are well enough recognized, and his early contributions to computing have been acknowledged, it seems strange that his work has not been widely enough recognized for the interdisciplinary effect it has had. There has been a feedback loop whereby his theories on formal dialogue systems and imperatives were taken up in argumentation, applied in computing, and (...)
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  41.  7
    William H. Calvin, Email || Home Page || Publication List.
    Plan-ahead becomes necessary for those movements which are over-and-done in less time than it takes for the feedback loop to operate. Natural selection for one of the ballistic movements (hammering, clubbing, and throwing) could evolve a plan-ahead serial buffer for hand-arm commands that would benefit the other ballistic movements as well. This same circuitry may also sequence other muscles (children learning handwriting often screw up their faces and tongues) and so novel oral-facial sequences may also benefit (as might (...)
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  42.  2
    Paul Schuurman (2012). Fénelon on Luxury, War and Trade in the Telemachus. History of European Ideas 38 (2):179-199.
    Summary In his novel The Adventures of Telemachus, François de la Mothe-Fénelon (1651?1715) presents a utopian society, Boetica, in which the role of luxury, war and trade is extremely limited. In unreformed Salentum, on the other hand, Fénelon shows the opposite image, one in which the three elements reinforce each other in a fatal feedback-loop. I analyse the relationship between luxury, war and trade in the Telemachus and I sketch the background to Fénelon's views, with special attention to (...)
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  43. Jonathan Trejo-Mathys (ed.) (2013). Social Acceleration: A New Theory of Modernity. Cup.
    Hartmut Rosa advances an account of the temporal structure of society from the perspective of critical theory. He identifies three categories of change in the tempo of modern social life: technological acceleration, evident in transportation, communication, and production; the acceleration of social change, reflected in cultural knowledge, social institutions, and personal relationships; and acceleration in the pace of life, which happens despite the expectation that technological change should increase an individual's free time. According to Rosa, both the structural and cultural (...)
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  44. Jonathan Trejo-Mathys (ed.) (2015). Social Acceleration: A New Theory of Modernity. Cup.
    Hartmut Rosa advances an account of the temporal structure of society from the perspective of critical theory. He identifies three categories of change in the tempo of modern social life: technological acceleration, evident in transportation, communication, and production; the acceleration of social change, reflected in cultural knowledge, social institutions, and personal relationships; and acceleration in the pace of life, which happens despite the expectation that technological change should increase an individual's free time. According to Rosa, both the structural and cultural (...)
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  45. Rick Grush (2004). The Emulation Theory of Representation: Motor Control, Imagery, and Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (3):377-396.
    The emulation theory of representation is developed and explored as a framework that can revealingly synthesize a wide variety of representational functions of the brain. The framework is based on constructs from control theory (forward models) and signal processing (Kalman filters). The idea is that in addition to simply engaging with the body and environment, the brain constructs neural circuits that act as models of the body and environment. During overt sensorimotor engagement, these models are driven by efference copies in (...)
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  46.  37
    Joshua Norton, Loop Quantum Ontology: Spin-Networks and Spacetime.
    The ontological issues at stake given the theory of loop quantum gravity include the status of spacetime, the nature and reality of spin-networks, the relationship of classical spacetime to issues of causation and the status of the abstract-concrete distinction. I this paper I argue that, while spacetime seems to disappear, the spirit of substantival spacetime lives on under certain interpretations of the theory. Moreover, in order for there to be physical spin-networks, and not merely mathematical artifacts, I argue that (...)
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  47.  28
    Dennis Norris, James M. McQueen & Anne Cutler (2000). Merging Information in Speech Recognition: Feedback is Never Necessary. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):299-325.
    Top-down feedback does not benefit speech recognition; on the contrary, it can hinder it. No experimental data imply that feedback loops are required for speech recognition. Feedback is accordingly unnecessary and spoken word recognition is modular. To defend this thesis, we analyse lexical involvement in phonemic decision making. TRACE (McClelland & Elman 1986), a model with feedback from the lexicon to prelexical processes, is unable to account for all the available data on phonemic decision making. The (...)
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  48. Alex Hankey (2014). Complexity Biology-Based Information Structures Can Explain Subjectivity, Objective Reduction of Wave Packets, and Non-Computability. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 10 (1):237-250.
    Background: how mind functions is subject to continuing scientific discussion. A simplistic approach says that, since no convincing way has been found to model subjective experience, mind cannot exist. A second holds that, since mind cannot be described by classical physics, it must be described by quantum physics. Another perspective concerns mind's hypothesized ability to interact with the world of quanta: it should be responsible for reduction of quantum wave packets; physics producing 'Objective Reduction' is postulated to form the basis (...)
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  49. R. H. Phaf & G. Wolters (1997). A Constructivist and Connectionist View on Conscious and Nonconscious Processes. Philosophical Psychology 10 (3):287-307.
    Recent experimental findings reveal dissociations of conscious and nonconscious performance in many fields of psychological research, suggesting that conscious and nonconscious effects result from qualitatively different processes. A connectionist view of these processes is put forward in which consciousness is the consequence of construction processes taking place in three types of working memory in a specific type of recurrent neural network. The recurrences arise by feeding back output to the input of a central (representational) network. They are assumed to be (...)
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  50. Rick Grush (2003). In Defense of Some "Cartesian" Assumption Concerning the Brain and its Operation. Biology and Philosophy 18 (1):53-92.
    I argue against a growing radical trend in current theoretical cognitive science that moves from the premises of embedded cognition, embodied cognition, dynamical systems theory and/or situated robotics to conclusions either to the effect that the mind is not in the brain or that cognition does not require representation, or both. I unearth the considerations at the foundation of this view: Haugeland's bandwidth-component argument to the effect that the brain is not a component in cognitive activity, and arguments inspired by (...)
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