Search results for 'feminist philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sharon Crasnow (2013). Feminist Philosophy of Science: Values and Objectivity. Philosophy Compass 8 (4):413-423.score: 246.0
    Feminist philosophy of science appears to present problems for the ideal of value-free science. These difficulties also challenge a traditional understanding of the objectivity of science. However, feminist philosophers of science have good reasons for desiring to retain some concept of objectivity. The present essay considers several recent and influential feminist approaches to the role of social and political values in science, with particular focus on feminist empiricism and feminist standpoint theory. The similarities and (...)
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  2. Sharon Crasnow (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Science: 'Standpoint' and Knowledge. [REVIEW] Science and Education 17 (10):1089-1110.score: 240.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has been criticized on several counts. On the one hand, it is claimed that it results in relativism of the worst sort since the political commitment to feminism is prima facie incompatible with scientific objectivity. On the other hand, when critics acknowledge that there may be some value in work that feminists have done, they comment that there is nothing particularly feminist about their accounts. I argue that both criticisms can be addressed through (...)
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  3. Erin C. Tarver (2013). The Dismissal of Feminist Philosophy and Hostility to Women in the Profession. APA Newsletter on Feminist Philosophy 12 (2):8-11.score: 240.0
  4. Pamela Sue Anderson & Beverley Clack (eds.) (2004). Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Critical Readings. Routledge.score: 234.0
    Feminist philosophy of religion as a subject of study has developed in recent years because of the identification and exposure of explicit sexism in much of the traditional philosophical thinking about religion. This struggle with a discipline shaped almost exclusively by men has led feminist philosophers to redress the problematic biases of gender, race, class and sexual orientation of the subject. Anderson and Clack bring together new and key writings on the core topics and approaches to this (...)
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  5. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 234.0
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie (...)
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  6. Ann Garry & Marilyn Pearsall (eds.) (1996). Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy, 2nd Ed. Routledge.score: 222.0
    This second edition of Women, Knowledge and Reality continues to exhibit the ways in which feminist philosophers enrich and challenge philosophy. Essays by twenty-five feminist philosophers, seventeen of them new to the second edition, address fundamental issues in philosophical and feminist methods, metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophies of science, language, religion and mind/body. This second edition expands the perspectives of women of color, of postmodernism and French feminism, and focuses on the most recent controversies in (...) theory and philosophy. The chapters are organized by traditional fields of philosophy, and include introductions which contrast the ideas of feminist thinkers with traditional philosophers. The collected essays illustrate both the depth and breadth of feminist critiques and the range of contemporary feminist theoretical perspectives. (shrink)
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  7. Linda Lemoncheck (1998). Loose Women, Lecherous Men: A Feminist Philosophy of Sex. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):369-373.score: 222.0
    Linda LeMoncheck introduces a new way of thinking and talking about women's sexual pleasures, preferences, and desires. Using the tools of contemporary analytic philosophy, she discusses methods for mediating the tensions among apparently irreconcilable feminist perspectives on women's sexuality and shows how a feminist epistemology and ethic can advance the dialogue in women's sexuality across a broad political spectrum. She argues that in order to capture the diversity and complexity of women's sexual experience, women's sexuality must be (...)
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  8. Sandra G. Harding & Merrill B. Hintikka (eds.) (2003). Discovering Reality: Feminist Perspectives on Epistemology, Metaphysics, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 204.0
    This collection of essays, first published two decades ago, presents central feminist critiques and analyses of natural and social sciences and their philosophies. Unfortunately, in spite of the brilliant body of research and scholarship in these fields in subsequent decades, the insights of these essays remain as timely now as they were then: philosophy and the sciences still presume kinds of social innocence to which they are not entitled. The essays focus on Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Hobbes, Rousseau, and (...)
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  9. Penelope Deutscher (1997). Yielding Gender: Feminism, Deconstruction, and the History of Philosophy. Routledge.score: 204.0
    Yielding Gender explores and reconsiders the tensions that deconstruction poses for feminist philosophy. Emphasizing the important role of deconstruction in revealing the ambiguity and unstable nature of gender, Penelope Deutscher asks the crucial question: does the very instability of gender mean that we can no longer talk of a man or a woman of reason in the history of philosophy? Using the work of Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida and Luce Irigaray, Deutscher explores this question by examining the (...)
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  10. Faye S. Routledge (2007). Exploring the Use of Feminist Philosophy Within Nursing Research to Enhance Post-Positivist Methodologies in the Study of Cardiovascular Health. Nursing Philosophy 8 (4):278-290.score: 204.0
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  11. Grace Jantzen (1999). Becoming Divine: Towards a Feminist Philosophy of Religion. Indiana University Press.score: 204.0
    'What canst thou say?' Finding a feminist voice As long as their situation is apprehended as natural, inevitable, ard inescapable, women's consciousness of ...
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  12. Alison Bailey (2010). On Intersectionality and the Whiteness of Feminist Philosophy. In George Yancy (ed.), THE CENTER MUST NOT HOLD: WHITE WOMEN PHILOSOPHERS ON THE WHITENESS OF PHILOSOPHY. Lexington Books.score: 198.0
    In this paper I explore some possible reasons why white feminists philosophers have failed to engage the radical work being done by non-Western women, U.S. women of color and scholars of color outside of the discipline. -/- Feminism and academic philosophy have had lots to say to one another. Yet part of what marks feminist philosophy as philosophy is our engagement with the intellectual traditions of the white forefathers. I’m not uncomfortable with these projects: Aristotle, Foucault, (...)
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  13. Monica Aufrecht (2011). The Context Distinction: Controversies Over Feminist Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):373-392.score: 198.0
    The “context of discovery” and “context of justification” distinction has been used by Noretta Koertge and Lynn Hankinson Nelson in debates over the legitimacy of feminist approaches to philosophy of science. Koertge uses the context distinction to focus the conversation by barring certain approaches. I contend this focus masks points of true disagreement about the nature of justification. Nonetheless, Koertge raises important questions that have been too quickly set aside by some. I conclude that the context distinction should (...)
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  14. Andrea Nye (2004). Feminism and Modern Philosophy: An Introduction. Routledge.score: 198.0
    The history of modern philosophy is a major topic in philosophy and is crucial to an understanding of the advent of feminist philosophy. Feminism and Modern Philosophy introduces fundamental topics in modern philosophy from a feminist perspective. It takes the student through the subject step by step by looking at the main thinkers most usually examined on a course in modern philosophy and by examining the role of gender in studying classic philosophical (...)
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  15. Elizabeth Gould (2011). Feminist Imperative(s) in Music and Education: Philosophy, Theory, or What Matters Most. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):130-147.score: 198.0
    A historically feminized profession, education in North America remains remarkably unaffected by feminism, with the notable exception of pedagogy and its impact on curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to describe characteristics of feminism that render it particularly useful and appropriate for developing potentialities in education and music education. As a set of flexible methodological tools informed by Gilles Deleuze's notions of philosophy and art, I argue feminism may contribute to education's becoming more efficacious, reflexive, and reflective of (...)
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  16. Elizabeth Potter (2006). Feminism and Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 198.0
    Feminist perspectives have been increasingly influential on philosophy of science. Feminism and Philosophy of Science is designed to introduce the newcomer to the central themes, issues and arguments of this burgeoning area of study. Elizabeth Potter engages in a rigorous and well-organized study that takes in the views of key feminist theorists - Nelson, Wylie, Anderson, Longino and Harding - whose arguments exemplify contemporary feminist philosophy of science. The book is divided into six chapters (...)
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  17. Janine Jones (2011). Maria Del Guadaloupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines, and Donna-Dale L. Marcano (Eds), Convergences: Black Feminism and Philosophy. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 19 (1):165-169.score: 198.0
    Review of Maria del Guadaloupe Davidson, Kathryn T. Gines, and Donna-Dale L. Marcano (eds), Convergences: Black Feminism and Philosophy (Albany: SUNY, 2010).
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  18. Judith A. Little (ed.) (2007). Feminist Philosophy and Science Fiction: Utopias and Dystopias. Prometheus Books.score: 198.0
     
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  19. G. A. Brandt (2004). Filosofskai͡a Antropologii͡a Feminizma: Priroda Zhenshchiny = Feminist Philosophy: Woman's Nature. Gumanitarnyĭ Universitet.score: 198.0
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  20. Genevieve Lloyd (ed.) (2002). Feminism and History of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 198.0
    This new collection of essays by leading feminist critics highlights the fresh perspectives that feminism can offer to the discussion of past philosophers. Rather than defining itself through opposition to a "male" philosophical tradition, feminist philosophy emerges not only as an exciting new contribution to the history of philosophy, but also as a source of cultural self-understanding in the present.
     
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  21. Lilli Alanen & Charlotte Witt (eds.) (2004). Feminist Reflections on the History of Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers.score: 192.0
    Feminist work in the history of philosophy has come of age as an innovative field in the history of philosophy. This volume marks that accomplishment with original essays by leading feminist scholars who ask basic questions: What is distinctive of feminist work in the history of philosophy? Is there a method that is distinctive of feminist historical work? How can women philosophers be meaningfully included in the history of the discipline? Who counts as (...)
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  22. Alison Stone (2007). An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy. Polity.score: 192.0
    This is the first book to offer a systematic account of feminist philosophy as a distinctive field of philosophy. The book introduces key issues and debates in feminist philosophy including: the nature of sex, gender, and the body; the relation between gender, sexuality, and sexual difference; whether there is anything that all women have in common; and the nature of birth and its centrality to human existence. An Introduction to Feminist Philosophy shows how (...)
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  23. Emanuela Bianchi (ed.) (1999). Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? Northwestern University Press.score: 192.0
    Drawing attention to the vexed relationship between feminist theory and philosophy, Is Feminist Philosophy Philosophy? demonstrates the spectrum of significant work being done at this contested boundary. The volume offers clear statements by seventeen distinguished scholars as well as a full range of philosophical approaches; it also presents feminist philosophers in conversation both as feminists and as philosophers, making the book accessible to a wide audience. -/- Table of Contents -/- Opening plenary: Drucilla Cornell, (...)
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  24. Ann Garry (1995). A Minimally Decent Philosophical Method: Analytic Philosophy and Feminism. Hypatia 10 (3):7-30. [REVIEW] Hypatia 10 (3):7-30.score: 192.0
    This essay focuses on the extent to which the methods of analytic philosophy can be useful to feminist philosophers. I pose nine general questions feminist philosophers might ask to determine the suitability of a philosophical method. Examples include: Do its typical ways of formulating problems or issues encourage the inclusion of a wide variety of women's points of view? Are its central concepts gender-biased, not merely in their origin, but in very deep, continuing ways? Does it facilitate (...)
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  25. Janice Richardson (2011). The Changing Meaning of Privacy, Identity and Contemporary Feminist Philosophy. Minds and Machines 21 (4):517-532.score: 192.0
    This paper draws upon contemporary feminist philosophy in order to consider the changing meaning of privacy and its relationship to identity, both online and offline. For example, privacy is now viewed by European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) as a right, which when breached can harm us by undermining our ability to maintain social relations. I briefly outline the meaning of privacy in common law and under the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) in order to show the (...)
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  26. Janet A. Kourany (2010). Philosophy of Science After Feminism. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    A feminist primer for philosophers of science -- The legacy of twentieth century philosophy of science -- What feminist science studies can offer -- Challenges from every direction -- The prospects of twenty-first century philosophy of science.
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  27. Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.) (1984/1990). Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge.score: 192.0
    Since 1972, the journal Radical Philosophy has provided a forum for the discussion of radical and critical ideas in philosophy. This anthology reprints some of the best articles to have appeared in the journal during the past five years. It covers topics in social and moral philosophy which are central to current controversies on the left, focusing on theoretical issues raised by socialist, feminist, and environmental movements. The articles engage with contemporary issues in critical terms, and (...)
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  28. Julie K. Ward (ed.) (1996). Feminism and Ancient Philosophy. Routledge.score: 192.0
    An important volume connecting classical studies with feminism, Feminism and Ancient Philosophy provides an even-handed assessment of the ancient philosophers' discussions of women and explains which ancient views can be fruitful for feminist theorizing today. The papers in this anthology range from classical Greek philosophy through the Hellenistic period, with the predominance of essays focusing on topics such as the relation of reason and the emotions, the nature of emotions and desire, and related issues in moral psychology. (...)
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  29. Kimberly Hutchings (2003). Hegel and Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 192.0
    Hegel and Feminist Philosophy traces the legacy of Hegel in the work of thinkers such as de Beauvoir, Irigaray and Butler, and also in contemporary debates in ...
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  30. Dorothea Olkowski (ed.) (2000). Resistance, Flight, Creation: Feminist Enactments of French Philosophy. Cornell University Press.score: 192.0
    The collection also contains a comprehensive bibliography of feminist thinkers who are enacting French philosophy in English, German, and French.
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  31. Anita M. Superson & Sharon L. Crasnow (eds.) (2012). Out From the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    This collection showcases the work of 18 analytical feminists from a variety of traditional areas of philosophy. It highlights successful uses of concepts and approaches from traditional philosophy, and illustrates the contributions that feminist approaches have made and could make to the analysis of issues in key areas of traditional philosophy, while also demonstrating that traditional philosophy ignores feminist insights and feminist critiques of traditional philosophy at its own peril.
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  32. Alison Bailey & Chris Cuomo (2008). The Feminist Philosophy Reader. McGraw Hill.score: 192.0
    The most comprehensive anthology of feminist philosophy available, this first edition reader brings together over 55 of the most influential and time-tested works to have been published in the field of feminist philosophy. Featuring perspectives from across the philosophical spectrum, and from an array of different cultural vantage points, it displays the incredible range, diversity, and depth of feminist writing on fundamental issues, from the early second wave to the present.
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  33. Linda Alcoff & Eva Feder Kittay (eds.) (2007). The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 192.0
    The Blackwell Guide to Feminist Philosophy is a definitive introduction to the field, consisting of 15 newly-contributed essays that apply philosophical methods and approaches to feminist concerns. Offers a key view of the project of centering women’s experience. Includes topics such as feminism and pragmatism, lesbian philosophy, feminist epistemology, and women in the history of philosophy.
     
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  34. Herta Nagl-Docekal (2004). Feminist Philosophy. Westview Press.score: 192.0
    Are we in a post-feminist era? Has the term, feminist, grown out of its resisted stance? What from today's standpoint is an appropriate concept of feminist philosophy? And is it not the case that all people thinking democratically must share its central concern? In Feminist Philosophy , internationally acclaimed philosopher Herta Nagl-Docekal discusses and critiques the theories of today. Her study ranges across philosophical anthropology, aesthetics, philosophy of science, the critique of reason, political (...)
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  35. Susan Mendus (2000). Feminism and Emotion: Readings in Moral and Political Philosophy. St. Martin's Press.score: 192.0
    This book combines the insights of enlightenment thinking and feminist theory to explore the significance of love in modern philosophy. The author argues for the importance of emotion in general, and love in particular, to moral and political philosophy, pointing out that some of the central philosophers of the enlightment were committed to a moralized conception of love. However, she believes that feminism's insights arise not from its attribution of special and distinctive qualities to women, but from (...)
     
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  36. Jennifer Saul, Feminist Philosophy of Language. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 186.0
    Much of feminist philosophy of language so far can be described as critical—critical either of language itself or of philosophy of language, and calling for change on the basis of these criticisms. Those making these criticisms suggest that the changes are needed for the sake of feminist goals — either to better allow for feminist work to be done or, more frequently, to bring an end to certain key ways that women are disadvantaged. In this (...)
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  37. A. W. Eaton (2008). Feminist Philosophy of Art. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):873-893.score: 186.0
    This article outlines the issues addressed by feminist philosophy of art, critically surveys major developments in the field, and concludes by considering directions in which the field is moving.
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  38. Sarah S. Richardson (2009). The Left Vienna Circle, Part 2. The Left Vienna Circle, Disciplinary History, and Feminist Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 40 (2):167-174.score: 186.0
    This paper analyzes the claim that the Left Vienna Circle (LVC) offers a theoretical and historical precedent for a politically engaged philosophy of science today. I describe the model for a political philosophy of science advanced by LVC historians. They offer this model as a moderate, properly philosophical approach to political philosophy of science that is rooted in the analytic tradition. This disciplinary-historical framing leads to weaknesses in LVC scholars' conception of the history of the LVC and (...)
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  39. Lena Halldenius (2009). Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (2):453-456.score: 186.0
    "The introduction of Historical Dictionary of Feminist Philosophy provides a useful overview of the subject, while the chronology runs the gamut from ancient Greek to contemporary feminist philosophers. Dictionary entries cover both the central figures and ideas from the historical tradition of philosophy, as well as ideas and theories from contemporary feminist philosophy, such as epistemology and topics like abortion and sexuality. In addition to including entries on Aristotle, Plato, Descartes, Kant, Wollstonecraft, Beauvoir, and (...)
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  40. Elizabeth Potter (1994). Methodological Norms in Traditional and Feminist Philosophy of Science. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1994:101 - 108.score: 186.0
    I argue against the assumption that the influence of non-cognitive values must lead to bad science and against the methodological norm that seems to some philosophers to follow from it, viz. that a good philosophy of science should analyze the morally and politically neutral production of good science. Against these, I argue for the assumption that non-cognitive values are compatible with good science and for the metaphilosophical norm that a good philosophy of science should allow us to see (...)
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  41. Maria Cimitile (2008). The Use of Bloom's Taxonomy in Feminist Philosophy. Teaching Philosophy 31 (4):297-310.score: 186.0
    Overcoming our disciplinary aversion to assessment mechanisms allows more possibilities for students to achieve fundamental philosophical skills. My essay discusses the use of Bloom’s taxonomy in a Feminist Philosophy course with detailed examples that demonstrate its efficacy as a learning and assessment tool that is particularly suited to philosophy, as well as how critical philosophy in general, and feminist philosophy in particular, is an ideal subject to help students gain critical thinking skills.
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  42. Matthew Drabek (2012). Philosophy of Science After Feminism. By Janet Kourany. (Oxford UP, 2010. Pp. Ix. + 149. Price US$99.00.). Philosophical Quarterly 62 (248):631-633.score: 180.0
  43. Kristen Intemann, L. E. E. S., Kristin Mccartney, Shireen Roshanravan & Alexa Schriempf (2010). What Lies Ahead: Envisioning New Futures for Feminist Philosophy. Hypatia 25 (4):927-934.score: 180.0
    Thanks in large part to the record of scholarship fostered by Hypatia, feminist philosophers are now positioned not just as critics of the canon, but as innovators advancing uniquely feminist perspectives for theorizing about the world. As relatively junior feminist scholars, the five of us were called upon to provide some reflections on emerging trends in feminist philosophy and to comment on its future. Despite the fact that we come from diverse subfields and philosophical traditions, (...)
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  44. Sarah S. Richardson (2010). Feminist Philosophy of Science: History, Contributions, and Challenges. Synthese 177 (3):337 - 362.score: 180.0
    Feminist philosophy of science has led to improvements in the practices and products of scientific knowledge-making, and in this way it exemplifies socially relevant philosophy of science. It has also yielded important insights and original research questions for philosophy. Feminist scholarship on science thus presents a worthy thought-model for considering how we might build a more socially relevant philosophy of science—the question posed by the editors of this special issue. In this analysis of the (...)
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  45. Nancy Bauer (2001). Simone de Beauvoir, Philosophy, and Feminism. Columbia University Press.score: 180.0
    " Nancy Bauer begins her book by asking: "Then what kind of a problem does being a woman pose?
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  46. Ann Ferguson (1994). Twenty Years of Feminist Philosophy. Hypatia 9 (3):197 - 215.score: 180.0
    This paper provides an overview of twenty years of feminist philosophy in Northamerica. The professionalization of feminist theory that has occurred through the mainstreaming of feminist philosophy creates a danger of a gap between theory and practice that creates the danger of co-optation. Three stages of feminist philosophizing are outlined, including the radical critique, gender difference and difference/post-modernist stages. The last stage, it is argued, leads to an conceptual impasse about feminist strategies for (...)
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  47. Sharon Crasnow & Anita Superson (eds.) (2012). Out of the Shadows: Analytic Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. Oxford.score: 180.0
    light at the street level,1 bringing the streets out from the shadows. The effects of social progress are often even more significant than the effects of vertical progress, since social progress can be tradition-changing at various levels, bringing ...
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  48. Margaret A. Crouch (1991). Feminist Philosophy and the Genetic Fallacy. Hypatia 6 (2):104 - 117.score: 180.0
    Feminist philosophy seems to conflict with traditional philosophical methodology. For example, some uses of the concept of gender by feminist philosophers seem to commit the genetic fallacy. I argue that use of the concept of gender need not commit the genetic fallacy, but that the concept of gender is problematic on other grounds.
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  49. Margaret Urban Walker (1996). Some Thoughts on Feminists, Philosophy, and Feminist Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):222-225.score: 180.0
    This brief comment was a contribution to a 1995 Symposium on Feminism and Philosophy in the 1990s held at the Pacific Division Meeting of the APA in conjunction with the Society for Philosophy and Public Affairs. I suggest the usefulness of paying attention to the differences among philosophers who are women; philosophers who are feminists; philosophers who do feminist philosophy; and philosophers who want to express their feminism in their roles as philosophers. Keeping these differences in (...)
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  50. Kathryn Pyne Addelson (1994). Feminist Philosophy and the Women's Movement. Hypatia 9 (3):216 - 224.score: 180.0
    Feminist philosophy is now an established subdiscipline, but it began as an effort to transform the profession. Academics and activists worked together to make the new courses, and feminist theory was tested in the streets. As time passed, the "second wave" receded, but core elements of feminist theory were preserved in the academy. How can feminist philosophers today continue the early efforts of changing profession and the society, hand in hand with women outside the academy.
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