Search results for 'first-person perspective' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Sydney Shoemaker (1996). The First-Person Perspective and Other Essays. Cambridge University Press.score: 558.0
    Sydney Shoemaker is one of the most influential philosophers currently writing on philosophy of mind and metaphysics. The essays in this collection deal with the way in which we know our own minds, and with the nature of those mental states of which we have our most direct conscious awareness. Professor Shoemaker opposes the 'inner sense' conception of introspective self-knowledge. He defends the view that perceptual and sensory states have non-representational features - 'qualia' - that determine what it is like (...)
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  2. N. Georgalis (2006). Representation and the First-Person Perspective. Synthese 150 (2):281-325.score: 543.0
    The orthodox view in the study of representation is that a strictly third-person objective methodology must be employed. The acceptance of this methodology is shown to be a fundamental and debilitating error. Toward this end I defend what I call.
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  3. Lynne Rudder Baker (2007). Naturalism and the First-Person Perspective. In Georg Gasser (ed.), How Successful is Naturalism? Publications of the Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. Ontos Verlag.score: 540.0
    The first-person perspective is a challenge to naturalism. Naturalistic theories are relentlessly third-personal. The first-person perspective is, well, first-personal; it is the perspective from which one thinks of oneself as oneself* without the aid of any third-person name, description, demonstrative or other referential device. The exercise of the capacity to think of oneself in this first-personal way is the necessary condition of all our self-knowledge, indeed of all our self-consciousness. As important as the first-person (...)
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  4. Thomas Metzinger (2004). The Subjectivity of Subjective Experience: A Representationalist Analysis of the First-Person Perspective. Networks:285--306.score: 540.0
    Before one can even begin to model consciousness and what exactly it means that it is a subjective phenomenon one needs a theory about what a first-person perspective really is. This theory has to be conceptually convincing, empirically plausible and, most of all, open to new developments. The chosen conceptual framework must be able to accommodate scientific progress. Its ba- sic assumptions have to be plastic as it were, so that new details and empirical data can continuously be (...)
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  5. Dilip Ninan (2009). Persistence and the First-Person Perspective. Philosophical Review 118 (4):425--464.score: 540.0
    When one considers one's own persistence over time from the first-person perspective, it seems as if facts about one's persistence are "further facts," over and above facts about physical and psychological continuity. But the idea that facts about one's persistence are further facts is objectionable on independent theoretical grounds: it conflicts with physicalism and requires us to posit hidden facts about our persistence. This essay shows how to resolve this conflict using the idea that imagining from the (...) point of view is a guide to centered possibility , a type of possibility analyzed in terms of centered worlds. CiteULike Connotea Del.icio.us Digg Reddit Technorati What's this? (shrink)
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  6. Lynne Rudder Baker (2008). “Tätigsein Und Die Erste-Person-Perspektive” (Agency and the First-Person Perspective). In Bruno Niederbacher & Edmund Runggaldier (eds.), Was Sind Menschliche Personen? Onto Verlag.score: 540.0
    It is no news that you and I are agents as well as persons. Agency and personhood are surely connected, but it is not obvious just how they are connected. I believe that being a person and being an agent are intimately linked by what I call a ‘first-person perspective’: All persons and all agents have first-person perspectives. Even so, the connection between personhood and agency is not altogether straightforward. There are different kinds of agents, and there (...)
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  7. Mark Rowlands (2008). From the Inside: Consciousness and the First-Person Perspective. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (3):281 – 297.score: 540.0
    To adopt a first-person perspective on consciousness is typically understood as a matter of inwardly engaging one's awareness in such a way as to make one's conscious states and their properties into objects of awareness. When awareness is thus inwardly engaged, experience functions as both act and object of awareness. As objects of awareness, an experience-token and its various properties are items of which a subject is aware. As an act of awareness, an experience-token is that in virtue (...)
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  8. Dan Zahavi (2007). Subjectivity and the First-Person Perspective. Southern Journal of Philosophy 45 (S1):66-84.score: 540.0
    Phenomenology and analytical philosophy share a number of common concerns, and it seems obvious that analytical philosophy can learn from phenomenology, just as phenomenology can profit from an exchange with analytical philosophy. But although I think it would be a pity to miss the opportunity for dialogue that is currently at hand, I will in the following voice some caveats. More specifically, I wish to discuss two issues that complicate what might otherwise seem like rather straightforward interaction. The first issue (...)
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  9. David Copp (2013). Four Epistemological Challenges to Ethical Naturalism: Naturalized Epistemology and the First-Person Perspective. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 30 (sup1):30-74.score: 540.0
    (2000). Four Epistemological Challenges to Ethical Naturalism: Naturalized Epistemology and the First-Person Perspective. Canadian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 30, Supplementary Volume 26: Moral Epistemology Naturalized, pp. 30-74.
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  10. John Haglund (forthcoming). The View From Somewhere - Investigations Pertaining to the Implications of the Impurity of the Third- and the First-Person-Perspective. Continental Philosophy Review.score: 537.0
    The old duality that eventually came to produce the mind/body-problem indicates the problem of transcendental subjectivity. The enduring significance of this problem shows itself in a provocation of any paradigm that has become too objectivistic, too naturalistic – even too idealistic in a certain sense – and too forgetful of its own departure from a perspective always presumed. Analytic philosophy bears a tendency towards such a ‘view from nowhere’ which denies a fundamental subjective connection. The rebuttal of this position (...)
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  11. Dan Zahavi (2005). Subjectivity and Selfhood: Investigating the First-Person Perspective. Cambridge MA: Bradford Book/MIT Press.score: 534.0
    The relationship of self, and self-awareness, and experience: exploring classical phenomenological analyses and their relevance to contemporary discussions in ...
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  12. Thomas Natsoulas (2001). On the Intrinsic Nature of States of Consciousness: Attempted Inroads From the First Person Perspective. Journal Of Mind And Behavior 22 (3):219-248.score: 534.0
     
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  13. Herman Cappelen & Josh Dever (2013). The Inessential Indexical: On the Philosophical Insignificance of Perspective and the First Person. Oxford University Press.score: 522.0
    Cappelen and Dever present a forceful challenge to the standard view that perspective, and in particular the perspective of the first person, is a philosophically deep aspect of the world. Their goal is not to show that we need to explain indexical and other perspectival phenomena in different ways, but to show that the entire topic is an illusion.
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  14. Thomas Metzinger (2000). The Subjectivity of Subjective Experience: A Representationist Analysis of the First-Person Perspective. In , Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press. 285--306.score: 492.0
    This is a brief and accessible English summary of the "Self-model Theory of Subjectivity" (SMT), which is only available as German book in this archive. It introduces two new theoretical entities, the "phenomenal self-model" (PSM) and the "phenomenal model of the intentionality-relation" PMIR. A representationalist analysis of the phenomenal first-person persepctive is offered. This is a revised version, including two pictures.
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  15. Maria van der Schaar (2011). The Cognitive Act and the First-Person Perspective: An Epistemology for Constructive Type Theory. [REVIEW] Synthese 180 (3):391-417.score: 492.0
    The notion of cognitive act is of importance for an epistemology that is apt for constructive type theory, and for epistemology in general. Instead of taking knowledge attributions as the primary use of the verb ‘to know’ that needs to be given an account of, and understanding a first-person knowledge claim as a special case of knowledge attribution, the account of knowledge that is given here understands first-person knowledge claims as the primary use of the verb ‘to know’. (...)
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  16. Maria van der Schaar (2011). The Cognitive Act and the First-Person Perspective: An Epistemology for Constructive Type Theory. Synthese 180 (3):391 - 417.score: 492.0
    The notion of cognitive act is of importance for an epistemology that is apt for constructive type theory, and for epistemology in general. Instead of taking knowledge attributions as the primary use of the verb 'to know' that needs to be given an account of, and understanding a first-person knowledge claim as a special case of knowledge attribution, the account of knowledge that is given here understands first-person knowledge claims as the primary use of the verb 'to know'. (...)
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  17. Lynne Rudder Baker (1998). The First-Person Perspective: A Test for Naturalism. American Philosophical Quarterly 35 (4):327-348.score: 477.0
    Self-consciousness, many philosophers agree, is essential to being a person. There is not so much agreement, however, about how to understand what self-consciousness is. Philosophers in the field of cognitive science tend to write off self-consciousness as unproblematic. According to such philosophers, the real difficulty for the cognitive scientist is phenomenal consciousness--the fact that we (and other organisms) have states that feel a certain way. If we had a grip on phenomenal consciousness, they think, self-consciousness could be easily handled by (...)
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  18. Robert J. Howell (2013). Perception From the First‐Person Perspective. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2).score: 470.0
    This paper develops a view of the content of perceptual states that reflects the cognitive significance those states have for the subject. Perhaps the most important datum for such a theory is the intuition that experiences are ‘transparent’, an intuition promoted by philosophers as diverse as Sartre and Dretske. This paper distinguishes several different transparency theses, and considers which ones are truly supported by the phenomenological data. It is argued that the only thesis supported by the data is much weaker (...)
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  19. Karsten Stueber, Intentional Explanation, Psychological Laws, and the Irreducibility of the First Person Perspective.score: 459.0
    1. Introduction: Naturalism and Psychological Explanations To a large extent, contemporary philosophical debate takes place within a framework of naturalistic assumptions. From the perspective of the history of philosophy, naturalism is the legacy of positivism without its empiricist epistemology and empiricist conception of meaning and cognitive significance. Systematically, it is best to characterize naturalism as the philosophical articulation of the underlying presuppositions of a reductive scientific research program that was rather successful in the last few centuries and, equally important, (...)
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  20. C. Petitmengin (2011). Is the “Core Self” a Construct? Review of “Subjectivity and Selfhood: Investigating the First-Person Perspective” by Dan Zahavi. Constructivist Foundations 6 (2):270-274.score: 459.0
    Upshot: Is lived experience always the experience of a self? The central thesis of Dan Zahavi’s book is that there is a “minimal” or “core” self, according to which a quality of “self-givenness” is a constitutive feature of experience. The adoption of a dynamic phenomenological perspective leads us to call this thesis into question.
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  21. Sydney Shoemaker (1994). The First-Person Perspective. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 68 (2):7-22.score: 450.0
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  22. Charles Siewert (2008). Subjectivity and Selfhood: Investigating the First-Person Perspective. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 77 (3):840-843.score: 450.0
  23. Kai Vogeley & Gereon R. Fink (2003). Neural Correlates of the First-Person Perspective. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):38-42.score: 450.0
  24. Brian Loar (1995). Reference From the First Person Perspective. Philosophical Issues 6:53-72.score: 450.0
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  25. Kai Vogeley, M. May, A. Ritzl, P. Falkai, K. Zilles & Gereon R. Fink (2004). Neural Correlates of First-Person Perspective as One Constituent of Human Self-Consciousness. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 16 (5):817-827.score: 450.0
  26. B. Dainton (2008). Review: Dan Zahavi: Subjectivity and Selfhood: Investigating the First-Person Perspective. [REVIEW] Mind 117 (465):241-245.score: 450.0
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  27. Shaun Gallagher (2002). Complexities in the First-Person Perspective. Review of Self-Awareness and Alterity by Dan Zahavi. Research in Phenomenology 32 (1):238-248.score: 450.0
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  28. Karsten R. Stueber (1996). Indeterminacy and the First Person Perspective. In C. Martinez Vidal (ed.), Verdad: Logica, Representacion Y Mundo. Universidade de Santiago de Compostela.score: 450.0
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  29. Charles K. Fink (2012). The 'Scent' of a Self: Buddhism and the First-Person Perspective. Asian Philosophy 22 (3):289-306.score: 450.0
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  30. Michael Tye (2000). Shoemaker's the First-Person Perspective and Other Essays. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (2):461-464.score: 450.0
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  31. Mark Crimmins (1999). The First Person Perspective and Other Essays Sydney Shoemaker New York: Cambridge University Press, 1996, Xiii + 278 Pp., $59.95, $18.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 38 (02):453-.score: 450.0
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  32. Shaun Gallagher (2012). First-Person Perspective and Immunity to Error Through Misidentification. In Miguens & Preyer (eds.), Consciousness and Subjectivity. Ontos Verlag. 47--245.score: 450.0
  33. Naomi Eilan (1995). The First Person Perspective. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 95:51 - 66.score: 450.0
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  34. Max Velmans (1991). Consciousness From a First-Person Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):702-726.score: 450.0
    The sequence of topics in this reply roughly follows that of the target article. The latter focused largely on experimental studies of how consciousness relates to human information processing, tracing their relation from input through to output. The discussion of the implications of the findings both for cognitive psychology and philosophy of mind was relatively brief. The commentaries reverse this emphasis, and so, correspondingly, does the reply.
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  35. Stephen Kearns (forthcoming). Naturalism and the First Person Perspective By Lynne Rudder Baker. Analysis:anu074.score: 450.0
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  36. Martha Lang (forthcoming). Naturalism and the First-Person Perspective. Philosophical Psychology:1-4.score: 450.0
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  37. Gurpreet Rattan (2014). Disagreement and the First‐Person Perspective. Analytic Philosophy 55 (1):31-53.score: 450.0
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  38. Johannes Roessler, Review of The First-Person Perspective and Other Essays, by Shoemaker, S. [REVIEW]score: 450.0
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  39. H. Kockler, L. Scheef, R. Tepest, N. David, B. H. Bewernick, A. Newen, H. H. Schild, M. May & K. Vogeley (2010). Visuospatial Perspective Taking in a Dynamic Environment: Perceiving Moving Objects From a First-Person-Perspective Induces a Disposition to Act☆. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):690-701.score: 450.0
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  40. David H. Lund (1990). Disembodied Existence, Personal Identity, and the First Person Perspective. Idealistic Studies 20 (3):187-202.score: 450.0
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  41. K. Ramakrishna Rao (1993). Consciousness, Awareness and First-Person Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (2):407.score: 450.0
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  42. W. Schaeken & G. D'Ydewalle (1991). Isn't the First-Person Perspective a Bad Third-Person Perspective? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):692-693.score: 450.0
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  43. Søren Holm (2005). Justifying Patient Self-Management – Evidence Based Medicine or the Primacy of the First Person Perspective. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):159-164.score: 450.0
    Patient self-management programs have become increasingly popular and are now also receiving official endorsements. This paper analyses two possible types of positive justifications for promoting patient self-management: evidence-based and patient-centred justifications. It is argued that evidence-based justifications, although important politically are deficient and that the primary justification for patient self-management must be a patient-centred justification focusing on the patient’s privileged access to his or her own lived body.
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  44. Mark Crimmins (1999). The First Person Perspective and Other Essays. Dialogue 38 (2):453-455.score: 450.0
     
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  45. Jean-Marie Danion & Caroline Huron (2007). Can We Study Subjective Experiences Objectively? First-Person Perspective Approaches and Impaired Subjective States of Awareness in Schizophrenia? In Philip David Zelazo, Morris Moscovitch & Evan Thompson (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness. Cambridge.score: 450.0
     
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  46. James G. Edwards (1997). Sydney Shoemaker, The First Person Perspective and Other Essays Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 17 (4):283-285.score: 450.0
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  47. A. Giorgi (2006). Zahavi, D.(2005). Subjectivity and Selfhood: Investigating the First Person Perspective. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 37 (2):284.score: 450.0
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  48. Monica Meijsing (2006). The Development of the First-Person Perspective. A Gradualist Approach. Manuscrito 29 (2).score: 450.0
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  49. Matthias Stefan (2011). The Simple Theory of Personal Identity and the First-Person Perspective. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 118 (1):3-20.score: 450.0
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  50. D. Stoljar (1998). Shoemaker, S.-The First Person Perspective and Other Essays. Philosophical Books 39:105-108.score: 450.0
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