Search results for 'four causes' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Boris Hennig (2009). The Four Causes. Journal of Philosophy 106 (3):137-160.score: 180.0
    I will argue that Aristotle’s fourfold division of four causes naturally arises from a combination of two distinctions (a) between things and changes, and (b) between that which potentially is something and what it potentially is. Within this scheme, what is usually called the “efficient cause” is something that potentially is a certain natural change, and the “final cause” is, at least in a basic sense, what the efficient cause potentially is. I will further argue that the essences (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Mohan Matthen (1989). The Four Causes in Aristotle's Embryology. Apeiron 22 (4):159 - 179.score: 150.0
  3. Rosamond Kent Sprague (1968). The Four Causes. The Monist 52 (2):298-300.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Newton P. Stallknecht (1934). Art and the Four Causes. Journal of Philosophy 31 (26):710-717.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Spencer E. Young (2012). Prohibition-Era Aristotelianism: Parisian Theologians and the Four Causes. Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 53:41 - 59.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. William Crews (1969). Four Causes of Reality. New York, Philosophical Library.score: 150.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Noone (1958). The Logical Foundations of the Four Causes. Modern Schoolman 35 (4):287-294.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. John B. Noone, (2012). The Logical Foundations of the Four Causes. Modern Schoolman 35 (4):287-294.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. J. Raymond Zimmer (2006). A Category-Based Diagram of the Scholastic Doctrine of Four Causes. Semiotics:18-25.score: 150.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Olivier Rieppel (1990). Structuralism, Functionalism, and the Four Aristotelian Causes. Journal of the History of Biology 23 (2):291 - 320.score: 120.0
  11. Nathan Spiegel (1975). The Significance of "Mimesis" in the Light of Aristotle's Doctrine of the Four Ontological Causes. Revue Belge de Philologie Et D'Histoire 53 (1):5-23.score: 120.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Rich Cameron (2003). The Ontology of Aristotle's Final Cause. Apeiron 35 (2):153-79.score: 76.0
    Modern philosophy is, for what appear to be good reasons, uniformly hostile to sui generis final causes. And motivated to develop philosophically and scientifically plausible interpretations, scholars have increasingly offered reductivist and eliminitivist accounts of Aristotle's teleological commitment. This trend in contemporary scholarship is misguided. We have strong grounds to believe Aristotle accepted unreduced sui generis teleology, and reductivist and eliminitivist accounts face insurmountable textual and philosophical difficulties. We offer Aristotelians cold comfort by replacing his apparent view with failed (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. David Ebrey (2014). Making Room for Matter: Material Causes in the Phaedo and the Physics. Apeiron 47 (2):245–265.score: 64.0
    It is often claimed that Socrates rejects material causes in the Phaedo because they are not rational or not teleological. In this paper I argue for a new account: Socrates ultimately rejects material causes because he is committed to each change having a single cause. Because each change has a single cause, this cause must, on its own, provide an adequate explanation for the change. Material causes cannot provide an adequate explanation on their own and so Socrates (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Timothy O'Connor (ed.) (1995). Agents, Causes, and Events: Essays on Indeterminism and Free Will. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Many philosophers are persuaded by familiar arguments that free will is incompatible with causal determinism. Yet, notoriously, past attempts to articulate how the right type of indeterminism might secure the capacity for autonomous action have generally been regarded as either demonstrably inadequate or irremediably obscure. This volume gathers together the most significant recent discussions concerning the prospects for devising a satisfactory indeterministic account of freedom of action. These essays give greater precision to traditional formulations of the problems associated with indeterministic (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Hans Paul Prümm (2009). Reducing Irrationality of Legal Methodology by Realistic Description of Interpretative Tools and Teaching the Causes of Irrationality in Legal Education. Jurisprudence 115 (1):199-219.score: 54.0
    Lawyers pretend as if the process of application of laws, as well as its outcome, could be an analytic-deductive derivation; especially law students learn that legal decision-making is primarily a logic process. But we know that application of laws depends on analytic-logical as well as on voluntaristic (wilful) elements. Exact relations between these components are unknown and will be unknown. At most German law schools students as the most important imperative tool learn the so called “Auslegung” through the use of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. J. Raymond Zimmer (2010). From Here to the Latin Age and Back Again: A Four-Cause Category-Based Exploration of Adrian J. Walker's Article on von Balthasar's Concept of “Love Alone”. Semiotica 2010 (179):315-328.score: 50.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Jonathan Lear, Technique and Final Cause in Psychoanalysis: Four Ways of Looking at One Moment.score: 42.0
    This paper argues that if one considers just a single clinical moment there may be no principled way to choose among different approaches to psychoanalytic technique. One must in addition take into account what Aristotle called the final cause of psychoanalysis, which this paper argues is freedom. However, freedom is itself an open-ended concept with many aspects that need to be explored and developed from a psychoanalytic perspective. This paper considers one analytic moment from the perspectives of the techniques of (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Alfred J. Freddoso (1991). God's General Concurrence with Secondary Causes: Why Conservation is Not Enough. Philosophical Perspectives 5:553-585.score: 36.0
    After an exposition of some key concepts in scholastic ontology, this paper examines four arguments presented by Francisco Suarez for the thesis, commonly held by Christian Aristotelians, that God's causal contribution to effects occurring in the ordinary course of nature goes beyond His merely conserving created substances along with their active and passive causal powers. The postulation of a further causal contribution, known as God's general concurrence (or general concourse), can be viewed as an attempt to accommodate an element (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Willy Apollon (1993). Four Seasons in Femininity Orfour Men in a Woman's Life. Topoi 12 (2):101-115.score: 36.0
    The feminine complaint that Alex's passion echoes, raising it to a level rarely attained, is not limited to the pursuit of sexual jouissance . Nor can it be reduced to an aversion on the part of women to a morality of the signifier, as maintained by a certain reading of Freud. Very precisely, the persistent note in feminine restlessness is a certain relationship of the subject to the insufficiency of the signifier, which the quest for love registers. The fact that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jon M. Shepard, Michael Betz & Lenahan O'Connell (1997). The Proactive Corporation: Its Nature and Causes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (10):1001-1010.score: 36.0
    We argue that the stakeholder perspective on corporate social responsibility is in the process of being enlarged. Due to the process of institutional isomorphism, corporations are increasingly adopting organizational features designed to promote proactivity over mere reactivity in their stakeholder relationships. We identify two sources of pressure promoting the emergence of the proactive corporation -- stakeholder activism and the recognition of the social embeddedness of the economy. The final section describes four organizational design dimensions being installed by the more (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Kent Johnson (2014). Realism and Uncertainty of Unobservable Common Causes in Factor Analysis. Noûs 48 (3).score: 36.0
    Famously, scientific theories are underdetermined by their evidence. This occurs in the factor analytic model (FA), which is often used to connect concrete data (e.g. test scores) to hypothetical notions (e.g. intelligence). After introducing FA, three general topics are addressed. (i) Underdetermination: the precise reasons why FA is underdetermined illuminates various claims about underdetermination, abduction, and theoretical terms. (ii) Uncertainties: FA helps distinguish at least four kinds of uncertainties. The prevailing practice, often encoded in statistical software, is to ignore (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. des Chene, Suárez on Propinquity and the Efficient Cause.score: 34.0
    In the Principles, Descartes declares that of the four Aristotelian causes, he will retain only one: the efficient. Though some natural philosophers argued on behalf of the final cause, and others held that form could be rehabilitated, the efficient cause was in fact the only one of the four to flourish in the new philosophy. Descartes’ claim would lead one to believe that he preserved the efficient cause—that here, at least, we find continuity. But it is reasonable (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. H. S. Faust (2013). A Cause Without an Effect? Primary Prevention and Causation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (5):239-558.score: 34.0
    Clinical primary prevention eliminates or preempts either a susceptibility or risk (synergistically a cause) in order to avoid a specific harm. Philosophically, primary prevention gets caught in the metaphysical controversy of the “hard questions” of whether it is possible to “cause not” both through a positive action (preventive act causes no harm) or no action (avoiding something causes no harm). I examine my previously proposed four-step definition of the process of prevention, discuss its limitations in light of (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Massimo Pigliucci (2003). From Molecules to Phenotypes? The Promise and Limits of Integrative Biology. Basic and Applied Ecology 4:297-306.score: 30.0
    Is integrative biology a good idea, or even possible? There has been much interest lately in the unifica- tion of biology and the integration of traditionally separate disciplines such as molecular and develop- mental biology on one hand, and ecology and evolutionary biology on the other. In this paper I ask if and under what circumstances such integration of efforts actually makes sense. I develop by example an analogy with Aristotle’s famous fourcauses” that one can investigate concerning (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Andrea Falcon, Aristotle on Causality. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    Each Aristotelian science consists in the causal investigation of a specific department of reality. If successful, such an investigation results in causal knowledge; that is, knowledge of the relevant or appropriate causes. The emphasis on the concept of cause explains why Aristotle developed a theory of causality which is commonly known as the doctrine of the four causes. For Aristotle, a firm grasp of what a cause is, and how many kinds of causes there are, is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Nathanael Stein (2011). Aristotle's Causal Pluralism. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (2):121-147.score: 30.0
    Central to Aristotle's metaphysics and epistemology is the claim that ‘ aitia ’ – ‘cause’ – is “said in many ways”, i.e., multivocal. Though the importance of the four causes in Aristotle's system cannot be overstated, the nature of his pluralism about aitiai has not been addressed. It is not at all obvious how these modes of causation are related to one another, or why they all deserve a common term. Nor is it clear, in particular, whether the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. David Ebrey, Aristotle's Motivation for Matter.score: 30.0
    Aristotle’s Motivation for Matter Why does Aristotle make matter so central to his account of the natural world, making it a principle of nature and one of the four causes? Although there is considerable interest in how Aristotle conceives of matter, scholars rarely investigate why he thinks of it as fundamental to the natural world. Some simply ask why Aristotle thinks there must be matter (without asking how this fits into his account of the natural world). Other interpreters (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. William H. Capitan (1966). Part X of Hume's "Dialogues&Quot;. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (1):82 - 85.score: 30.0
    In hume's dialogues, Part x, Philo presents the trilemma attributed to epicurus: "is God willing but unable to prevent evil? able but unwilling? both willing and able? whence, Then is evil?" some critics say philo is trying to disprove god's existence. Some say he is not. I say he grants God exists as the first cause in order to show natural religion is impossible. For natural religion must establish god's benevolence, But it cannot combat "moderate scepticism" to establish any moral (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Michael Knoll & Rolf Dick (2013). Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.score: 30.0
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been given much research (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Kenneth C. Clatterbaugh (1999). The Causation Debate in Modern Philosophy, 1637-1739. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The Causation Debate in Modern Philosophy examines the debate that began as modern science separated itself from natural philosophy in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The book specifically explores the two dominant approaches to causation as a metaphysical problem and as a scientific problem. As philosophy and science turned from the ideas of Aristotle that dominated western thought throughout the renaissance, one of the most pressing intellectual problems was how to replace Aristotelian science with its doctine of the four (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Michael S. Moore (2012). Four Friendly Critics: A Response. Legal Theory 18 (4):491-542.score: 30.0
    In this reply, I seek to summarize fairly the criticisms advanced by each of my four critics, Jonathan Schaffer, Gideon Yaffe, John Gardner, and Carolina Sartorio. That there is so little overlap either in the aspects of the book on which they focus or in the arguments they advance about those issues has forced me to reply to each of them separately. Schaffer focuses much of his criticisms on my view that absences cannot serve as causal relata and argues (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Michael Knoll & Rolf van Dick (2013). Do I Hear the Whistle…? A First Attempt to Measure Four Forms of Employee Silence and Their Correlates. Journal of Business Ethics 113 (2):349-362.score: 30.0
    Silence in organizations refers to a state in which employees refrain from calling attention to issues at work such as illegal or immoral practices or developments that violate personal, moral, or legal standards. While Morrison and Milliken (Acad Manag Rev 25:706–725, 2000) discussed how organizational silence as a top-down organizational level phenomenon can cause employees to remain silent, a bottom-up perspective—that is, how employee motives contribute to the occurrence and maintenance of silence in organizations—has not yet been given much research (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Gabriela Rossi (2011). El Azar Segun Aristoteles: Estructuras de la Causalidad Accidental En Los Procesos Naturales y En la Accion. Academia Verlag.score: 30.0
    This work is the first monograph devoted to the interpretation of Aristotle’s theory of chance in Physics II 4-6 and its implications and projections in other treatises, including an original and comprehensive account of the Aristotelian conception of chance, of accidental causality in the realm of nature, and of accidental causality in the realm of human action. One of the main interpretative issues around Aristotle’s discussion of chance is its relation to the four causes and to teleology. In (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Peter R. Killeen (2001). Doing Versus Knowing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1063-1064.score: 30.0
    Aristotle's four causes frame Webb's question. Comprehension requires specification of trigger, function, mechanism, and representation. Robots are real models of function. Physical, biological, and epigenetic constraints delimit the hypothesis space for candidate mechanisms. Robots constitute a simplified system more susceptible to formal representation than the target system. They thus constitute an important tool in a constructivist development of scientific knowledge.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ronald Y. Nakasone (1993). Suffering and Healing: An Interpretation of the Buddhist Doctrine of the Four Noble Truths. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 14 (2):81-87.score: 30.0
    The Buddha's method of spiritual release is crystallized in the Four Noble Truths. The Four Truths profile the condition of an individual's life. It explains the cause of suffering, the means through which an individual residing in a transient world can extract oneself from samsara and propel oneself into an abiding spiritual reality or nirvana. This four stage method parallels the principles of diagnosis, etiology, recovery or health, and therapeutics, which are employed by physicians in their clinical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Peter Kreeft (2005). Socratic Logic. St. Augustine's Press.score: 30.0
    What good is logic? -- Seventeen ways this book is different -- The two logics -- All of logic in two pages : an overview -- The three acts of the mind -- I. The first act of the mind : understanding -- Understanding : the thing that distinguishes man from both beast and computer -- Concepts, terms and words -- The problem of universals -- The comprehension and extension of terms -- II. Terms -- Classifying terms -- Categories -- (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. António Manuel Martins (2009). A causalidade em Pedro da Fonseca. Veritas 54 (3).score: 30.0
    In this paper we intend to present briefly the way Fonseca deals with the doctrine of causation in his Commentaries on the Metaphysics of Aristotle. We shall begin with the presentation of the map of the disputations on causation in that work (I), then will refer to the position of Fonseca on the definition of cause (II), the relation between cause and principle (III) and, finally, his defense of the Aristotelian four causes (IV).
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David Roochnik (2002). An Introduction to Greek Philosophy. Teaching Co..score: 30.0
    lecture 1. A dialectical approach to Greek philosophy -- lecture 2. From myth to philosophy, Hesiod and Thales -- lecture 3. The Milesians and the quest for being -- lecture 4. The great intrusion, Heraclitus -- lecture 5. Parmenides, the champion of being -- lecture 6. Reconciling Heraclitus and Parmenides -- lecture 7. The Sophists, Protagoras, the first "humanist" -- lecture 8. Socrates -- lecture 9. An introduction to Plato's Dialogues -- lecture 10. Plato versus the Sophists, I -- lecture (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John A. Vella (2008). Aristotle: A Guide for the Perplexed. Continuum.score: 30.0
    Science (episteme) -- Division of the sciences according to aims and objects -- Demonstration (apodeixis) -- The axioms of the sciences -- Being or substance (ousia) -- Being before aristotle -- Being in the categories -- The science of being: first philosophy -- Being in metaphysics zeta -- Nature (physis) -- Principles of change -- The four causes or explanations (aitiai) -- Defense of teleology -- Soul (psyche) -- Soul as substance, form and actuality -- What the student (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Toby Handfield (2009). The Metaphysics of Dispositions and Causes. In , Dispositions and Causes. Clarendon Press. 1--30.score: 27.0
    This article gives a general overview of recent metaphysical work on dispositional properties and causal relations. It serves as an introduction to the edited volume, Dispositions and Causes.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2001). August Weismann on Germ-Plasm Variation. Journal of the History of Biology 34 (3):517-555.score: 24.0
    August Weismann is famous for having argued against the inheritance of acquired characters. However, an analysis of his work indicates that Weismann always held that changes in external conditions, acting during development, were the necessary causes of variation in the hereditary material. For much of his career he held that acquired germ-plasm variation was inherited. An irony, which is in tension with much of the standard twentieth-century history of biology, thus exists – Weismann was not a Weismannian. I distinguish (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Roger Crisp (1987). Persuasive Advertising, Autonomy, and the Creation of Desire. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (5):413 - 418.score: 24.0
    It is argued that persuasive advertising overrides the autonomy of consumers, in that it manipulates them without their knowledge and for no good reason. Such advertising causes desires in such a way that a necessary condition of autonomy — the possibility of decision — is removed. Four notions central to autonomous action are discussed — autonomous desire, rational desire and choice, free choice, and control or manipulation — following the strategy of Robert Arrington in a recent paper in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. David Kirsh (2000). A Few Thoughts on Cognitive Overload. Intellectica 1 (30):19-51.score: 24.0
    This article addresses three main questions: What causes cognitive overload in the workplace? What analytical framework should be used to understand how agents interact with their work environments? How can environments be restructured to improve the cognitive workflow of agents? Four primary causes of overload are identified: too much tasking and interruption, and inadequate workplace infrastructure to help reduce the need for planning, monitoring, reminding, reclassifying information, etc… The first step in reducing the cognitive impact of these (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Susanne Bobzien (2014). Choice and Moral Responsibility in Nicomachean Ethics Iii 1-5. In R. Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to the Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press. 81-109.score: 24.0
    ABSTRACT: This paper serves two purposes: (i) it can be used by students as an introduction to chapters 1-5 of book iii of the NE; (ii) it suggests an answer to the unresolved question what overall objective this section of the NE has. The paper focuses primarily on Aristotle’s theory of what makes us responsible for our actions and character. After some preliminary observations about praise, blame and responsibility (Section 2), it sets out in detail how all the key notions (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Roger Crisp (2007). Ethics Without Reasons? Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (1):40-49.score: 24.0
    This paper is a discussion of Jonathan Dancy's book Ethics Without Principles (2004). Holism about reasons is distinguished into a weak version, which allows for invariant reasons, and a strong, which doesn't. Four problems with Dancy's arguments for strong holism are identified. (1) A plausible particularism based on it will be close to generalism. (2) Dancy rests his case on common-sense morality, without justifying it. (3) His examples are of non-ultimate reasons. (4) There are certain universal principles it is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Brandon Carey (2010). Overdetermination And The Exclusion Problem. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (2):251 - 262.score: 24.0
    The exclusion problem is held to show that mental and physical events are identical by claiming that the denial of this identity is incompatible with the causal completeness of physics and the occurrence of mental causation. The problem relies for its motivation on the claim that overdetermination of physical effects by mental and physical causes is objectionable for a variety of reasons. In this paper, I consider four different definitions of ?overdetermination? and argue that, on each, overdetermination in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jeremy Butterfield (2011). Emergence, Reduction and Supervenience: A Varied Landscape. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (6):920-959.score: 24.0
    This is one of two papers about emergence, reduction and supervenience. It expounds these notions and analyses the general relations between them. The companion paper analyses the situation in physics, especially limiting relations between physical theories.I shall take emergence as behaviour that is novel and robust relative to some comparison class. I shall take reduction as deduction using appropriate auxiliary definitions. And I shall take supervenience as a weakening of reduction, viz. to allow infinitely long definitions.The overall claim of this (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Richard Arneson (2005). Joel Feinberg and the Justification of Hard Paternalism. Legal Theory 11 (3):259-284.score: 24.0
    Joel Feinberg was a brilliant philosopher whose work in social and moral philosophy is a legacy of excellent, even stunning achievement. Perhaps his most memorable achievement is his four-volume treatise on The Moral Limits of the Criminal Law, and perhaps the most striking jewel in this crowning achievement is his passionate and deeply insightful treatment of paternalism.1 Feinberg opposes Legal Paternalism, the doctrine that “it is always a good reason in support of a [criminal law] prohibition that it is (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Michael Esfeld (2007). Mental Causation and the Metaphysics of Causation. Erkenntnis 67 (2):207 - 220.score: 24.0
    The paper argues for four claims: (1) The problem of mental causation and the argument for its solution in terms of the identity of mental with physical causes are independent of the theory of causation one favours. (2) If one considers our experience of agency as described by folk psychology to be veridical, one is committed to an anti-Humean metaphysics of causation in terms of powers that establish necessary connections. The same goes for functional properties in general. (3) (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000