Search results for 'free market' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John T. Sanders (1977). The Free Market Model Versus Government: A Reply to Nozick. Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (1):35-44.score: 180.0
    In Anarchy, State and Utopia, Robert Nozick argues, first, that free-market anarchism is unstable -that it will inevitably lead back to the state; and, second, that without a certain "redistributive" proviso, the model is unjust. If either of these things is the case, the model defeats itself, for its justification purports to be that it provides a morally acceptable alternative to government (and therefore to the state). I argue, against Nozick's contention, that his "dominant protection agency" neither meets (...)
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  2. Tony Smith (1995). The Case Against Free Market Environmentalism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):126-144.score: 180.0
    Free market environmentalists believe that the extension of private property rights and market transactions is sufficient to address environmental difficulties. But there is no invisible hand operating in markets that ensures that environmentally sound practices will be employed just because property rights are in private hands. Also, liability laws and the court systems cannot be relied upon to force polluters to internalize the social costs of pollution. Third, market prices do not provide an objective measure of (...)
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  3. Jan Narveson (1995). The Case for Free Market Environmentalism. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):145-156.score: 180.0
    Environmental Ethics is the ethics of how we humans are to relate to each other about the environment we live in. The best way to adjust inevitable differences among us in this respect is by private property. Each person takes the best care of what he owns, and ownership entails the free market, which enables people to make mutually advantageous trades with those who might use it even better. Public regulation, by contrast, becomes management in the interests of (...)
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  4. Edward J. Romar (2009). Noble Markets: The Noble/Slave Ethic in Hayek's Free Market Capitalism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):57 - 66.score: 180.0
    Friedrich A. von Hayek influenced many areas of inquiry including economics, psychology and political theory. This article will offer one possible interpretation of the ethical foundation of Hayek’s political and social contributions to libertarianism and free market capitalism by analyzing several of his important non-economic publications, primarily The Road to Serfdom, The Fatal Conceit, The Constitution of Liberty and Law, Legislation and Liberty. While Hayek did not offer a particular ethical foundation for free market capitalism, he (...)
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  5. John Thrasher (forthcoming). Free Market Fairness. [REVIEW] Public Choice.score: 150.0
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  6. Laurence Ashworth & Clinton Free (2006). Marketing Dataveillance and Digital Privacy: Using Theories of Justice to Understand Consumers' Online Privacy Concerns. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 67 (2):107 - 123.score: 140.0
    Technology used in online marketing has advanced to a state where collection, enhancement and aggregation of information are instantaneous. This proliferation of customer information focused technology brings with it a host of issues surrounding customer privacy. This article makes two key contributions to the debate concerning digital privacy. First, we use theories of justice to help understand the way consumers conceive of, and react to, privacy concerns. Specifically, it is argued that an important component of consumers’ privacy concerns relates to (...)
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  7. Chris Crittenden (2000). Ecofeminism Meets Business: A Comparison of Ecofeminist, Corporate, and Free Market Ideologies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):51 - 63.score: 120.0
    This paper develops a psychological and ethical ecofeminist position and then compares ecofeminism to corporate and free market capitalism in terms of effects along four scales of well-being: democracy/human rights, environmental health, psychological health, and cruelty toward animals. Using aspects of symbolic interactionism and Antony Weston's self-validating reduction model, it is demonstrated that an ecofeminist belief system tends to promote moral and psychological health whereas the discussed forms of capitalistic thinking militate in the other direction. Ecofeminism is not, (...)
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  8. Uskali Mäki (1999). Science as a Free Market: A Reflexivity Test in an Economics of Economics. Perspectives on Science 7 (4):486-509.score: 120.0
    : One prominent aspect of recent developments in science studies has been the increasing employment of economic concepts and models in the depiction of science, including the notion of a free market for scientific ideas. This gives rise to the issue of the adequacy of the conceptual resources of economics for this purpose. This paper suggests an adequacy test by putting a version of free market economics to a self-referential scrutiny. The outcome is that either (...)
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  9. Mark Sagoff (1992). FreeMarket Versus Libertarian Environmentalism. Critical Review 6 (2-3):211-230.score: 120.0
    Libertarians favor a free market for intrinsic reasons: it embodies liberty, accountability, consent, cooperation, and other virtues. Additionally, if property rights against trespasses such as pollution are enforced and if public lands are transferred as private property to environmental groups, a free market may also protect the environment. In contrast, Terry Anderson and Donald Leal's Free Market Environmentalism favors a free market solely on instrumental grounds: markets allocate resources efficiently. The authors apparently (...)
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  10. Dennis Attick & Deron Boyles (2010). Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism: Educational Theory for a Free Market in Education. Education and Culture 26 (1):100-103.score: 120.0
    Jerry Kirkpatrick's Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism: Educational Theory for a Free Market in Education presents a provocative synthesis of the educational philosophies of Maria Montessori and John Dewey with the economic philosophies of Ayn Rand and Ludwig Von Mises. At the center of Kirkpatrick's thesis is his belief that public education be subject to a free-market model. Kirkpatrick holds that students can thrive in an educational system free from all forms of coercion, something he believes (...)
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  11. Lawrence Souder (2010). A Free-Market Model for Media Ethics: Adam Smith's Looking Glass. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 25 (1):53 – 64.score: 120.0
    This article points out the challenges to current models for media ethics that arise from the private ownership of public media, and it proposes a new model that integrates Adam Smith's free-market theory and his system of moral reasoning. The model creates moral obligations to maintain the integrity of a system for anyone who profits from it. This model renews an appeal for the contemporary notion of transparency and is built on an analogy between the system of the (...)
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  12. Herman E. Daly (1992). FreeMarket Environmentalism: Turning a Good Servant Into a Bad Master. Critical Review 6 (2-3):171-183.score: 120.0
    The virtue of internalizing environmental costs so that prices reflect full social opportunity costs at the margin, reaffirmed by Terry Anderson and Donald Leal, is unarguable. Beyond that, however, Anderson and Leal's Free Market Environmentalism neglects the classic works in the intellectual tradition to which it is supposed to be a contribution; is unconvincing and inconsistent in the functions it ascribes to the ?environmental entrepreneur?; conflates problems of distribution and scale with the problem of allocation; ignores international dimensions; (...)
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  13. John McMurtry (1997). The Contradictions of Free Market Doctrine: Is There a Solution? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (7):645-662.score: 120.0
    The article considers six standard arguments in favour of an unfettered free market: (1) the freedom to consume; (2) the freedom of the seller; (3) the freedom of the producer; (4) freedom from government interference; (5) lower costs; (6) promotion of democracy. It demonstrates that each of these arguments turns out to be incoherent on closer examination. The ground of this incoherence it is shown, is the market doctrine's systematic omission of non-business costs and benefits from its (...)
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  14. R. M. Sade (2008). Foundational Ethics of the Health Care System: The Moral and Practical Superiority of Free Market Reforms. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (5):461-497.score: 120.0
    Proposed solutions to the problems of this country's health care system range along a spectrum from central planning to free market. Central planners and free market advocates provide various ethical justifications for the policies they propose. The crucial flaw in the philosophical rationale of central planning is failure to distinguish between normative and metanormative principles, which leads to mistaken understanding of the nature of rights. Natural rights, based on the principle of noninterference, provide the link between (...)
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  15. Allan Walstad (2001). On Science as a Free Market. Perspectives on Science 9 (3):324-340.score: 120.0
    : The question of whether science may usefully be viewed as a market process has recently been addressed by Mäki (1999), who concludes that "either free-market economics is self-defeating, or else there must be two different concepts of free market, one for the ordinary economy, the other for science." Here I argue that such pessimism is unwarranted. Mäki proposes (see also Wible 1998) that the conduct of economic research itself be taken, self-reflexively, as a test (...)
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  16. Bill Richardson & Peter Curwen (1995). Do Free-Market Governments Create Crisis-Ridden Societies? Journal of Business Ethics 14 (7):551 - 560.score: 120.0
    The paper is concerned with the potential or actual impact that free-market governmental principles and policies might have, or might have had, in helping to create a more crisis-prone world. It is concerned with organizationally-induced crises where organizations and their environment interact to create disasters. The nature of the crisis-prone organization is discussed in the context of the relevant management literature. It is argued that the disastrous interaction of such an organization with its environment is promoted by a (...)
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  17. Frank van Dun, The Modern Business Corporation Versus the Free Market?score: 120.0
    Is the modern large publicly traded business corporation compatible with a truly free market? The question itself may seem strange, even silly. Corporations are primary actors in what the media refer to as ‘the market economy’. Also, when the media refer to ‘the market’, they as often as not mean the stock exchange, which is the place where the shares of large corporations are traded. Moreover, during the age of socialist ascendancy, many defenders of the (...) market have felt themselves moved to defend the corporation against socialist or ‘liberal’ attacks. Many genuine advocates of the free market even appear willing to make the stronger claim that a defence of the free market requires a defence of the corporation. In their view, defending the corporate form of business organisation is an essential part of the argument for the free market. Prima facie, there seems to be a strong case for saying that the large ‘publicly traded’ corporation is compatible with the requirements of the free market. Nevertheless, I believe classical liberals and libertarians have good reasons to question that view. First, what the media say is not always accurate even on the count of reporting facts, which supposedly is their core business. Conceptual analysis is not their forte. They do not have much consideration for the theoretical contexts from which terms such as ‘free market’ derive their significance or for the requirements of consistency in their use of such ‘theory laden’ terms. The stock exchange is a market of sorts, but it is not ‘the market’. In any case, the stock exchanges with which the media are familiar are not really free but rather heavily regulated markets. Second, socialist critiques of the corporation often were presented as critiques of free market capitalism and merited a vigorous response from the latter’s defenders.. (shrink)
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  18. Alistair MacLeod (2000). Human Dignity, Individual Liberty, And the Free Market Ideal. Social Philosophy Today 16:113-123.score: 120.0
    Taking for granted that there is a strong connection between respect far human dignity and endorsement of institutional arrangements that protect individual liberty, I ask whether this can be cited in support of a free market approach to the organization of the economy. The answer, it might seem, must be Yes. Prominent defenders of a free market system commonly assume that an important part of the rationale for the free market is that it protects (...)
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  19. Murat Civaner & Berna Arda (2008). Do Patients Have Responsibilities in a Free-Market System? A Personal Perspective. Nursing Ethics 15 (2):263-273.score: 120.0
    The current debate that surrounds the issue of patient rights and the transformation of health care, social insurance, and reimbursement systems has put the topic of patient responsibility on both the public and health care sectors' agenda. This climate of debate and transition provides an ideal time to rethink patient responsibilities, together with their underlying rationale, and to determine if they are properly represented when being called `patient' responsibilities. In this article we analyze the various types of patient responsibilities, identify (...)
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  20. Alvin I. Goldman & James C. Cox (1996). Speech, Truth, and the Free Market for Ideas. Legal Theory 2 (1):1-32.score: 120.0
    This article examines a thesis of interest to social epistemology and some articulations of First Amendment legal theory: that a free market in speech is an optimal institution for promoting true belief. Under our interpretation, the market-for-speech thesis claims that more total truth possession will be achieved if speech is regulated only by free market mechanisms; that is, both government regulation and private sector nonmarket regulation are held to have information-fostering properties that are inferior to (...)
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  21. Harvey S. James Jr (2006). Sustainable Agriculture and Free Market Economics: Finding Common Ground in Adam Smith. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):427-438.score: 120.0
    There are two competing approaches to sustainability in agriculture. One stresses a strict economic approach in which market forces should guide the activities of agricultural producers. The other advocates the need to balance economic with environmental and social objectives, even to the point of reducing profitability. The writings of the eighteenth century moral philosopher Adam Smith could bridge the debate. Smith certainly promoted profit-seeking, private property, and free market exchange consistent with the strict economic perspective. However, his (...)
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  22. Jonathan H. Adler (2012). Is the Common Law a Free-Market Solution to Pollution? Critical Review 24 (1):61-85.score: 120.0
    Whereas conventional analyses characterize environmental problems as examples of market failure, proponents of free-market environmentalism (FME) consider the problem to be a lack of markets and, in particular, a lack of enforceable and exchangeable property rights. Enforcing property rights alleviates disputes about, as well as the overuse of, most natural resources. FME diagnoses of pollution are much weaker, however. Most FME proponents suggest that common-law tort suits can adequately protect private property and ecological resources from pollution. Yet (...)
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  23. T. Bielicki, A. Szklarska, S. Koziel & S. J. Ulijaszek (2005). Changing Patterns of Social Variation in Stature in Poland: Effects of Transition From a Command Economy to the Free-Market System? Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (4):427-434.score: 120.0
    The aim of this analysis was to examine the effects on stature in two nationally representative samples of Polish 19-year-old conscripts of maternal and paternal education level, and of degree of urbanization, before and after the economic transition of 1990. Data were from two national surveys of 19-year-old Polish conscripts: 27,236 in 1986 and 28,151 in 2001. In addition to taking height measurements, each subject was asked about the socioeconomic background of their families, including paternal and maternal education, and the (...)
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  24. John Tomasi (2012). Free Market Fairness. Princeton University Press.score: 120.0
    John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness treats both traditions with depth, nuance, and unremitting fair-mindedness, and then points us toward a synthesis. Social democrats and libertarians equally need to read this book.
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  25. Garett Jones (2000). “The Free Market” and the Asian Crisis. Critical Review 14 (1):47-56.score: 104.0
    Abstract The Asian financial crisis, which devastated many of the newly industrializing countries, is said to have demonstrated the inherent fragility of economies built upon laissez?faire principles. However, it appears that the major sources of disruption have come from policies that deviate from laissez faire, such as government?guaranteed bailouts and international monetary policy. That capitalist economies were afflicted by the crisis does not constitute an indictment of free markets.
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  26. Mark T. Nelson (1991). The Morality of a Free Market for Transplant Organs. Public Affairs Quarterly 5 (1):63-79.score: 102.0
    There is a world-wide shortage of kidneys for transplantation. Many people will have to endure lengthy and unpleasant dialysis treatments, or die before an organ becomes available. Given this chronic shortage, some doctors and health economists have proposed offering financial incentives to potential donors to increase the supply of transplantable organs. In this paper, I explore objections to the practice of buying and selling organs from the point of view 1) justice, 2) beneficence and 3) Commodification. Regarding objection to the (...)
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  27. Fred Block (2013). Think Tanks, Free Market Academics, and the Triumph of the Right. Theory and Society 42 (6):647-651.score: 102.0
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  28. Wim Dubbink (2004). The Fragile Structure of Free-Market Society. Business Ethics Quarterly 14 (1):23-46.score: 96.0
    In this article thinking on corporate social responsibility (CSR) is compared with the dominant political theory of the market: theneoclassical theory. The comparison shows that thinking on CSR fundamentally collides with that theory. For example, their respectivenormative views on man are incompatible, as are their respective views on the modus operandi of the market. Given that CSR is desirable it follows that a new political theory of the market is needed. This article suggests some initial steps toward (...)
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  29. Kurtz Paul (2004). The Free Market with a Human Face. Free Inquiry 24 (2):5.score: 96.0
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  30. G. M. A. Gronbacher (1996). Understanding Equality in Health Care: A Christian Free-Market Approach. Christian Bioethics 2 (3):293-308.score: 96.0
    This paper examines the arguments presented by the Roman Catholic Bishops in their 1993 Pastoral Resolution, Comprehensive Health Care Reform: Protecting Human Life, Promoting Human Dignity, Pursuing the Common Good, concerning health care reform. Focusing on the meaning of equality in health care and traditional Roman Catholic doctrine, it is argued that the Bishops fail to grasp the force of the differences among persons, the value of the market, and traditional scholastic arguments concerning obligatory and extraordinary health care. To (...)
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  31. Michael F. Reber, “Distributive Justice and Free Market Economics: A Eudaimonistic Perspective”.score: 90.0
    In today’s society, a peculiar understanding of distributive justice has developed which holds that “social justice must be distributed by the coercive force of government.” However, this is a perversion of the ideal of distributive justice. The perspective of distributive justice which should be considered is one with its roots [...].
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  32. Daniel Shapiro (1995). Why Rawlsian Liberals Should Support Free Market Capitalism. Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (1):58–85.score: 90.0
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  33. Dennis Attick Deron Boyles (2010). Montessori, Dewey, and Capitalism: Educational Theory for a Free Market in Education. Education and Culture 26 (1):pp. 100-103.score: 90.0
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  34. Andreas Hasman & Søren Holm (2005). Direct-to-Consumer Advertising: Should There Be a Free Market in Healthcare Information? Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 15 (01):42-49.score: 90.0
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  35. Elizabeth Anderson (2013). Book Review: Free Market Fairness. [REVIEW] Political Theory 41 (1):163-166.score: 90.0
  36. James F. Pontuso (2002). Transformation Politics: The Debate Between Václav Havel and Václav Klaus on the Free Market and Civil Society. Studies in East European Thought 54 (3):153-177.score: 90.0
  37. Mark J. Cherry (2006). Medical Innovation, Collapsing Goods, and the Moral Centrality of the Free-Market. Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):209-226.score: 90.0
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  38. Sedat Aybar & Costas Lapavitsas (2001). The Recent Turkish Crisis: Another Step Toward Free Market Authoritarianism. Historical Materialism 8 (1):297-308.score: 90.0
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  39. William P. Gunnar (2007). Understanding the Complexity of the U. S. Health Care System: Can Free Market Ideology Respond to a Current Challenge? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 51 (1):149-154.score: 90.0
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  40. Uskali Maki (1999). Science as a Free Market: A Reflexivity Test in an Economics of Economics. Perspectives on Science 7 (4):486-509.score: 90.0
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  41. Stefan Scheingraber, Ben O'Brien, Andreas Machens & Andreas Hirner (2004). Change Remains – Paradigm Shifts in Modern Surgery. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):195-200.score: 90.0
    This article aims to describe underlying principles of paradigm shifts in clinical medicine by means of analysis of typical examples. Retrospectively, profound shifts of ruling paradigms can be shown in diverse fields such as outcome research, in the redefining of patient's and doctor's autonomies, in the challenges presented by consumer medicine and the free market economy. This has provoked controversy between doctors, patients and the community. The judgement on whether recent shifts in paradigms in medicine have improved the (...)
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  42. D. R. Cooley (2004). Transgenic Organisms and the Failure of a Free Market Argument. Business Ethics 13 (4):354-371.score: 90.0
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  43. Jan Narveson (2012). Book Reviews Tomasi , John . Free Market Fairness . Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012. Pp. Xxvii+348. $35.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 123 (1):188-192.score: 90.0
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  44. Douglas B. Rogers (2010). Free Market Madness: Why Human Nature is at Odds with Economics—and Why It Matters. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (4):575-579.score: 90.0
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  45. Walter E. Block (2011). Organ Transplant: Using the Free Market Solves the Problem. Journal of Clinical Research and Bioethics 2 (3).score: 90.0
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  46. Dr Jack Russell Weinstein, Is the Free Market Dead?score: 90.0
    The occasion of this talk was a panel discussion ending the conference on “Radical Politics” sponsored by The University of North Dakota’s chapter to Students for a Democratic Society. Many of the members are self-described Marxists and Anarchists. It is they whom I address here.
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  47. Fred Eidlin (2005). Popper's Social‐Democratic Politics and FreeMarket Liberalism. Critical Review 17 (1-2):25-48.score: 90.0
    Abstract Holding unlimited economic freedom to be nearly as dangerous as physical violence, Karl Popper advocated ?piecemeanl? economic intervention by the state. Jeremy Shearmur's recent book on Popper contends that as the philosopher aged, his views grew closer to classical liberalism than those expressed in The Open Society?consistently with what Shearmur sees as the logic of Popper's arguments. But Popper's philosophy, while recognizing that any project aimed at bringing about social change must be immensely complex and fraught with difficulty, retains (...)
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  48. William E. Scheuerman (1999). Free Market Anti-Formalism: The Case of Richard Posner. Ratio Juris 12 (1):80-95.score: 90.0
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  49. George Selgin (1994). Are Banking Crises FreeMarket Phenomena? Critical Review 8 (4):591-608.score: 90.0
    The conventional view of banking crises sees them as an inherent problem of fractional?reserve banking systems. According to this view, government regulation in the form of an alert central bank (acting as a ?lender of last resort"), or deposit insurance, or both is needed to keep isolated bank failures from generating systemwide panic. But this view does not mesh with historical experience, which points to government regulation itself as the most likely cause of banking crises.
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  50. Jane S. Shaw (1994). Real People Prefer FreeMarket Environmentalism: Reply to Friedman. Critical Review 8 (3):475-482.score: 90.0
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