Search results for 'freewill' (try it on Scholar)

97 found
Order:
  1.  13
    Leslie Stevenson (2014). Kant on Freewill, Grace and Forgiveness. Diametros 39:125-139.
    How do our secular reflections on freewill relate to the theological tradition of human freedom and divine grace? I will pursue this question with reference to Kant, who represents a half-way house between Christianity and the atheism of other Enlightenment thinkers. But are those the only two alternatives? I suggest that Kant’s wrestling with the notion of divine grace can draw us all towards recognition of the ultimate mystery of human motivation and behaviour, and our need for (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Brent Silby (2012). The Ghostly Illusion of Freewill. Cafe Philosophy 4 (Jan/Feb 2012).
    During my childhood I was fascinated by videogames. One game that stands out in my memory is Pacman. It wasn’t the gameplay that interested me so much as the behavior of the ghosts. As you watch them roam around the maze, you get the feeling that they are intelligent. They seem to be making decisions about how best to catch Pacman. But how free are their decisions? One of the interesting things I noticed was that I could play exactly the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. S. McCall (2013). Freewill and Omniscience: A Reply to Garrett. Analysis 73 (3):488-488.
    Brian Garrett (Analysis (2012), 293–5) comments on McCall's paper (Analysis (2011), 501–6). McCall had claimed that since the truth of true empirical propositions supervenes on, and depends upon, empirical fact, what God knows and does not know also depends upon being, i.e. upon facts. Consequently God's foreknowing what I freely decide to do depends upon what I freely do. Garrett objects that the dependence of truth on being seems to play no essential role in McCall's argument. McCall replies that his (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  94
    J. Westphal (2012). The Logic of the Compatibility of God's Foreknowledge and Human Freewill. Analysis 72 (4):746-748.
    A central argument for the view that God's necessary omniscience [( Bgf p )] precludes freewill is unsound, because the necessity of the consequence is not the necessity of the consequent, and nor is Bgf true. God's belief in some particular proposition f about what I will do is not necessary, as I might do something that makes ~ f true. Fischer and Tognazzini claim that this counterargument argument assumes that I must freely do the something that makes f (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5. J. Westphal (2011). The Compatibility of Divine Foreknowledge and Freewill. Analysis 71 (2):246-252.
    On Friday God knew everything, including f, a proposition about what Jones would do on Monday; we can write the time-indexed proposition that on Friday God believed f as Bgf. If Jones does not do the thing that makes f true, then the resulting state of affairs will be ∼f. So on Monday, before a certain time – ‘ t time’ – Jones has it in his power to bring it about that ∼f. It seems to follow that on Monday (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  52
    John Sellars (2012). Stoics Against Stoics In Cudworth's A Treatise of Freewill. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (5):935-952.
    In his A Treatise of Freewill, Ralph Cudworth argues against Stoic determinism by drawing on what he takes to be other concepts found in Stoicism, notably the claim that some things are ?up to us? and that these things are the product of our choice. These concepts are central to the late Stoic Epictetus and it appears at first glance as if Cudworth is opposing late Stoic voluntarism against early Stoic determinism. This paper argues that in fact, despite his (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  18
    David Tribe (2012). On Freewill and Determinism. The Australian Humanist (106):7.
    Tribe, David In reviewing Bill Cooke's Wealth of Insights (2011) (AH, Autumn 2012), I said that the age-old debate on freewill versus determinism is 'a major issue for neurophysiology, philosophy, jurisprudence and criminology'. I could have added religion, but here the debate takes on a slightly different form of freewill versus predestination (worth considering later) and appears to have divided on peaceful sectarian lines.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  29
    Robert J. Valenza (2008). Possibility, Actuality, and Freewill. World Futures 64 (2):94 – 108.
    I describe recent developments of Conway and Kochen on the physical meaning of freewill and their theorem that the assertion of freewill for human beings, in their specific sense, implies the same for elementary particles. This description is given in simplified metaphorical terms that nonetheless address the key physical axioms and essential analytic content of their argument. I then give points of contact of our metaphor with the full technical analysis of the cited authors and conclude with some (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  16
    Pamela Huby (1967). The First Discovery of the Freewill Problem. Philosophy 42 (162):353 - 362.
    Historically there have been two main freewill problems, the problem of freedom versus predestination, which is mainly theological, and the problem of freedom versus determinism, which has exercised the minds of many of the great modern philosophers. The latter problem is seldom stated in full detail, for its elements are taken as so obvious that they do not need to be stated. The problem is seen as an attempt to reconcile the belief in human freedom, which is essential if (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Sarah Hutton (ed.) (1996). Ralph Cudworth: A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality: With a Treatise of Freewill. Cambridge University Press.
    Ralph Cudworth deserves recognition as one of the most important English seventeenth-century philosophers after Hobbes and Locke. In opposition to Hobbes, Cudworth proposes an innatist theory of knowledge which may be contrasted with the empirical position of his younger contemporary Locke, and in moral philosophy he anticipates the ethical rationalists of the eighteenth century. A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality is his most important work, and this volume makes it available, together with his shorter Treatise of Freewill, with (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Sarah Hutton (ed.) (2012). Ralph Cudworth: A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality: With a Treatise of Freewill. Cambridge University Press.
    Ralph Cudworth deserves recognition as one of the most important English seventeenth-century philosophers after Hobbes and Locke. In opposition to Hobbes, Cudworth proposes an innatist theory of knowledge which may be contrasted with the empirical position of his younger contemporary Locke, and in moral philosophy he anticipates the ethical rationalists of the eighteenth century. A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality is his most important work, and this volume makes it available, together with his shorter Treatise of Freewill, with (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  95
    Storrs McCall (2011). The Supervenience of Truth: Freewill and Omniscience. Analysis 71 (3):501-506.
  13. C. A. Campbell (1951). Is `Freewill' a Pseudo-Problem? Mind 60 (240):441-465.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  14. Ralph Cudworth & Sarah Hutton (1996). A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality with, a Treatise of Freewill. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  15.  77
    P. Nowell-Smith (1948). Freewill and Moral Responsibility. Mind 57 (225):45-61.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  16. R. L. Franklin (1983). Freewill, Determinism and the Sciences. Diogenes 31 (123):50-68.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  60
    Helen M. Smith (1936). Pre-Existence and Freewill. Analysis 3 (3):40 - 43.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  89
    Nicholas Beale (2009). Freewill, Free Process, and Love. Think 8 (23):115-124.
    Of all the philosophical challenges to theism in general and Christianity in particular, the one that Christians take most seriously is the Problem of Evil. It is clearly not logically contradictory to hold that there exists a Loving Ultimate Creator; and nevertheless there is a very substantial amount of evil and suffering in the world. But it is certainly problematic. Deeper scientific understandings of physics and evolution shed some light on this. It is also useful to reflect more deeply on (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  41
    D. M. MacKay (1961). Logical Indeterminacy and Freewill. Analysis 21 (4):82 - 83.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  21
    Jennifer Nagel (1998). Ralph Cudworth, A Treatise Concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality, With a Treatise of Freewill Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 18 (1):19-21.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  2
    Pamela M. Huby (1969). The Epicurean, Animals, and Freewill. Apeiron 3 (1).
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  2
    A. K. Stout (1940). Freewill. Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 18 (3):212-231.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  28
    C. J. F. Williams (1960). Logical Indeterminacy and Freewill. Analysis 21 (1):12 - 13.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  5
    J. B. V. (1977). Determination and Freewill. Anthony Collins' a Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty. Review of Metaphysics 30 (4):771-772.
  25.  3
    William Lyons & Anthony Kenny (1980). Freewill and Responsibility. Philosophical Quarterly 30 (119):183.
    This reissue was first published in 1978. Anthony Kenny, one of the most distinguished philosophers in England, explores the notion of responsibility and the precise place of the mental element in criminal actions. Bringing the insights of recent philosophy of mind to bear on contemporary developments in criminal law, he writes with the general reader in mind, no specialist training in philosophy being necessary to appreciate his argument. Kenny shows that abstract distinctions drawn by analytic philosophers are relevant to decisions (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  6
    J. C. A. Gaskin (1979). Determinism and Freewill: Anthony Collins' "A Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty". Journal of the History of Philosophy 17 (3):348-349.
  27.  17
    Aaron Sloman, Four Concepts of Freewill: Two of Them Incoherent.
    The discussion below could be extended by pointing out that there is a fifth notion of freedom which refers to what you are free to do within a context of a game, a system of laws, a moral regime etc. This notion of freedom is close to the notion of permission. It is worth noting that the law may forbid something without enforcing that proscription. So many people constantly do what they are not free to do in this sense.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  12
    Michael Langford (2011). Consciousness, Freewill and Language. Philosophy Now 87:10-12.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  2
    R. L. Franklin (1970). Freewill and Determinism: A Study of Rival Conceptions of Man. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 21 (2):215-216.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    Graham Nerlich (1972). FRANKLIN, R. L. Freewill and Determinism. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 50:76.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  6
    R. A. Duff (1980). Freewill and Responsibility. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 21 (1):52-54.
  32.  12
    Antony Flew (2003). Human Freewill & Divine Predestination. Philosophy Now 40:27-29.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  14
    W. F. R. Hardie (1968). Aristotle and the Freewill Problem. Philosophy 43 (165):274 - 278.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  10
    John Kleinig (1969). Freewill and Determinism. Philosophical Studies 18:260-262.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  15
    R. L. Franklin (1961). Dissolving the Problem of Freewill. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):111 – 124.
  36.  2
    Lee C. Rice (1970). Freewill and Determinism. By R. L. Franklin. Modern Schoolman 47 (3):356-357.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  9
    Pamela M. Huby (1969). The Epicureans, Animals, and Freewill. Apeiron 3 (1):17 - 19.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  3
    Antony Flew (1969). Freewill and Determinism. Philosophical Books 10 (3):5-7.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  8
    John Kilcullen, Appendix: Arnauld on Freewill and Necessity.
    According to Arnauld, if we cannot help acting in some way, that is either (1) because external forces or obstacles leave no alternative, or (2) because we cannot help wanting to act that way; and that may be (2a) because we have absolutely no power to want anything else, or (2b) because the power we have is quite insufficient to overcome the inclination to act that way. This gives three kinds of necessity, corresponding to (1), (2a) and (2b).[.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  6
    Lawrence C. Becker (1980). Book Review:Freewill and Responsibility. Anthony Kenny. [REVIEW] Ethics 90 (2):313-.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  6
    Barry G. Allen (1982). Freewill and Responsibility Anthony Kenny London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1978. Pp. 101 + Index. $15.75. [REVIEW] Dialogue 21 (2):369-374.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  2
    C. K. Grant (1952). Freewill: A Reply to Professor Campbell. Mind 61 (243):381 - 385.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  3
    Gary Elkins (1992). The Non-Reality of Freewill. Philosophical Studies 33:347-348.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  5
    C. K. Grant (1952). Freewill: A Reply to Professor Campbell. Mind 61 (243):381-385.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  3
    A. R. Lacey (1958). Freewill and Responsibility. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 58:15-32.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  4
    A. K. Stout (1940). Freewill. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 18 (December):212-231.
  47.  3
    Roger Gallie (2006). James Harris , Of Liberty and Necessity: The Freewill Debate in Eighteenth-Century British Philosophy, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2005. Xvi + 264pp. ISBN 0-19-926860-. [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 4 (1):86-88.
  48. Robin Attfield (1980). JAMES O'HIGGINS : Determinism and Freewill: Anthony Collins' A Philosophical Inquiry Concerning Human Liberty. [REVIEW] Studia Leibnitiana 12:287.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. E. K. Braybrooke (1980). KENNY, A., "Freewill and Responsibility". [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58:408.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Herbert Wildon Carr (1928). The Freewill Problem. London, E. Benn Limited.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 97